FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Virginia Military Institute

Virginia Military Institute

Seal of VMI Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Motto Consilio et Animis
By wisdom and courage (Latin)
Established 1839
Type Public military college
Endowment $315 million
Superintendent J.H. Binford Peay III
Faculty 145
Students 1,377[1]
Location Lexington, Virginia, U.S.
Campus Rural, 134 acres (54.22 ha)
Colors Red, White, and Yellow                  
Nickname Keydets
Mascot Moe the Kangaroo
Athletics NCAA Division I, Big South Conference
Affiliations Association of American Colleges, Association of Virginia Colleges
Website www.vmi.edu

The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States.[2] In keeping with its founding principles, and unlike any other state military college in the country, all students at VMI are military cadets pursuing undergraduate degrees. VMI offers cadets a spartan, physically demanding environment combined with strict military discipline. VMI cadets pursue bachelor's degrees in 14 disciplines in the fields of engineering, science, and the liberal arts. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A military academy is a military educational institution. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Superintendent may refer to: Superintendent (education), an education executive or administrator Superintendent (police), a police rank Superintendent (United States Air Force), a United States Air Force position In buildings, a manager, a maintenance or repair person, a custodian or janitor. ... James Henry Binford Binnie Peay III (born May 10, 1940, in Richmond, Virginia) is a retired four-star general from the United States Army and is currently the 14th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... A hectare (symbol ha) is a metric unit of surface area, equal to 100 ares (the name is a contraction of the SI prefix hecto + are). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... A yellow Tulip. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Big South Conference is a College Athletic Conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I-AA in football and Division I in all other sports; it was founded in 1983. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... A military academy is a military educational institution. ...


VMI has been called the "West Point of the South."[3] However, as members of the VMI community are quick to point out, it differs from the federal service academies. For example, all VMI cadets must participate in Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) but they have the flexibility to accept a commission in any of the four U.S. military branches or to pursue civilian endeavors upon graduation. VMI firmly adheres to the "Citizen Soldier" concept. “USMA” redirects here. ... ROTC links here. ...


VMI's Mission Statement:

It is the mission of the Virginia Military Institute to produce educated and honorable men and women, prepared for the varied work of civil life, imbued with love of learning, confident in the functions and attitudes of leadership, possessing a high sense of public service, advocates of the American Democracy and free enterprise system, and ready as citizen-soldiers to defend their country in time of national peril.

Contents

History

Early history

On November 11, 1839, the Virginia Military Institute was founded on the site of the Lexington state arsenal, and the first Cadets relieved personnel on duty. Under Major General Francis Henney Smith, superintendent, and Colonel Claudius Crozet, president of the Board of Visitors, the Corps was imbued with the discipline and the spirit for which it is famous. The first cadet to march a sentinel post was Private John Strange in 1839. Since Strange's posting nearly 200 years ago, there have been sentinels posted at VMI 24 hours a day, seven days a week, during the school year. is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about armaments factories. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Francis Henney Smith (1812 - Lexington, VA March 21, 1890). ... In education, a superintendent is an individual that has executive oversight and administration rights, usually within an educational entity or organization. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Benoit Claudius Crozet (December 31, 1789-January 29, 1864) was an educator and civil engineer. ... A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... For other uses, see Discipline (disambiguation). ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ...


The Class of 1842 graduated 16 cadets into the ranks of the first alumni. Living conditions were poor until 1850 when the cornerstone of the new barracks was laid. In 1851, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson became a member of the faculty and professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy. Under then-Major Jackson and Major William Gilham, VMI infantry and artillery units were present at the execution by hanging of John Brown at Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1859. An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Natural philosophy or the philosophy of nature, known in Latin as philosophia naturalis, is a term applied to the objective study of nature and the physical universe that was regnant before the development of modern science. ... William Gilham (January 13, 1818-November 16, 1872) was an American soldier, teacher, chemist, and author. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... John Brown, ca. ... See also Charleston, West Virginia or Charlestown Charles Town is a city in Jefferson County, West Virginia USA. The population was 2,907 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ...


Civil War period

The Institute played a valuable part in the training of the Southern armies as well as participating in actual battle. VMI cadets were called into active military service on 14 different occasions during the American Civil War and many cadets, under the leadership of General Stonewall Jackson, were sent to Camp Lee, at Richmond, to train recruits. VMI alumni were regarded the best officers of the South and several distinguished themselves in the Union forces as well. Generally, a battle is an instance of combat in warfare between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Fifteen graduates rose to the rank of general in the Confederate Army.[4] At the Battle of Chancellorsville, Stonewall Jackson was reported to say, "The Institute will be heard from today," commenting on the leadership provided by VMI alumni during the battle. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Joseph Hooker Robert E. Lee Stonewall Jackson† Strength 133,868 60,892 Casualties 17,197 (1,606 killed, 9,672 wounded, 5,919 missing)[1] 12,764 (1,665 killed, 9,081 wounded, 2,018 missing)[1] The Battle of...


On May 15, 1864, VMI cadets fought as an independent unit at the Battle of New Market.[5] VMI is the only military college or military academy in the nation that holds this distinction and is therefore the only school authorized to "fix bayonets" during parades. The cadets age who fought that day ranged from 14 to 22, though through the years claims of cadets as young as 12 fighting have been made. [28] General John C. Breckinridge, the commanding Southern general, held the cadets in reserve and did not use them until Union troops broke through the Confederate lines. Upon seeing the tide of battle turning in favor of the Union forces, Breckinridge stated, "Put the boys in...and may God forgive me for the order." With that order, history was made and the cadet corps from VMI charged into battle. Because of the heroic and unprecedented actions of the VMI cadets, the Union troops were defeated and Confederate troops under General Breckinridge held the Shenandoah Valley. In the end, VMI suffered fifty-two casualties with ten cadets killed in action and forty-two wounded. Six of the ten fallen cadets are buried on VMI grounds behind the statue, "Virginia Mourning Her Dead" by sculptor Moses Ezekiel, a VMI graduate who was also injured in the Battle of New Market. Worldwide, students at only two other military schools have ever fought as a unit in war: École polytechnique in France under Napoleon and Chapultepec in Mexico. is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Battle of New Market was a battle fought on May 15, 1864, in Virginia during Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. ... The US Marine Corps OKC-3S bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle or similar weapon. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Moses Jacob Ezekiel (October 28, 1844, Richmond, Virginia - March 27, 1917, Italy) was a U.S. sculptor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chapultepec Park with Polanco at the right, as seen from Torre Mayor observation deck. ...


The Institute was shelled and burned on June 12, 1864, by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter, as part of the Valley Campaigns of 1864. The destruction was almost complete and the Institute had to temporarily hold classes at the Alms house in Richmond, Virginia. In April 1865, Richmond was evacuated due to the impending fall of Petersburg and the VMI Corps of Cadets was disbanded. is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... David Hunter David Hunter (July 21, 1802 – February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Eastern Theater operations in 1864 The Valley Campaigns of 1864 were American Civil War operations and battles that took place in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia from May to October, 1864. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


The Lexington campus reopened for classes on October 17, 1865.[6] It is said that Confederate General Jubal A. Early burned the town of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in retaliation for the shelling of VMI. is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... Chambersburg is a borough in Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Following the war, Matthew Fontaine Maury, the pioneering oceanographer known as the "Pathfinder of the Seas", accepted a teaching position at VMI, holding the physics chair. Matthew Fontaine Maury Matthew Fontaine Maury (January 14, 1806 – February 1, 1873), USN - American astronomer, astrophysicist, historian, oceanographer, meteorologist, cartographer, author, geologist, educator. ... Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology and marine science is the study of the earths oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


World War I and II

During World War II, VMI participated in the War Department's Army Specialized Training Program from 1943 to 1946. The program provided training in engineering and related subjects to enlisted men at colleges across the United States. Over 2,100 ASTP members studied at VMI during the war. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... In military service, an enlisted rank is generally any rating below that of a commissioned officer. ...


Superintendents

Since 1839, the Virginia Military Institute has had fourteen superintendents. Francis H. Smith was the first and the longest serving, filling the position for 50 years.

  1. Francis H. Smith (1839-1889)
  2. Scott Shipp (1890-1907)
  3. Edward W. Nichols (1907-1924)
  4. William H. Cocke (1924-1929)
  5. John A. Lejeune (1929-1937) Also a Commandant of the Marine Corps
  6. Charles E. Kilbourne (1937-1946) Medal of Honor recipient and the first American to hold all three of the Nation's highest military decorations simultaneously
  7. Richard J. Marshall (1946-1952)
  8. William H. Milton, Jr. (1952-1960)
  9. George R. E. Shell (1960-1971)
  10. Richard L. Irby (1971-1981)
  11. Sam S. Walker (1981-1988)
  12. John W. Knapp (1989-1995)
  13. Josiah Bunting III (1995-2002)
  14. J.H. Binford Peay III (2003-present)

Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was born at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, on 10 January 1867. ... Charles E. Kilbourne was an officer in the United States Army who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Philippine-American War. ... Sam Sims Walker is a retired United States Army four star general who served as Commander, Allied Land Forces South East Europe (COMLANDSOUTHEAST) from 1977 to 1978. ... Josiah Bunting III Lieutenant General Josiah Bunting III (Ret. ... James Henry Binford Binnie Peay III (born May 10, 1940, in Richmond, Virginia) is a retired four-star general from the United States Army and is currently the 14th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute. ...

Campus

Virginia Military Institute Campus

The VMI campus covers 134 acres, 12 of which are designated as a National Historic District. The campus is referred to as the "Post." Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


All cadets are housed on campus in a large five-story building, called the "barracks." The Old Barracks, which has been designated a National Historic Landmark, stands on the site of the old arsenal. The new wing of the barracks ("New Barracks") was completed in 1949. The two wings surround two quadrangles connected by a sally port. All rooms open onto porch-like stoops facing one of the quadrangles. A third barracks wing is under construction on the site of the former visitor's center. The four arched entries into the barracks are named for George Washington, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, George Marshall and Jonathan Daniels. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... An example of a Sally port, here is the main entrance to Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Stonewall Jackson For the 1960s country music artist, see Stonewall Jackson (musician); for the submarine, see USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN-634). ... For other persons named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Myrick Daniels (March 20, 1939 - August 20, 1965) was an Episcopal seminarian, martyred in 1965 for his part in the American civil rights movement. ...


Next to the Barracks are offices and meeting areas for VMI clubs and organizations, the cadet visitors center and lounge, a snack bar, and a Barnes & Noble-operated bookstore. A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...


Currently, VMI's campus is busy with construction due to the "Vision 2039" program. Under this capital campaign, VMI's alumni and supporters raised over $275 million over three years. The Barracks are being expanded to house 1,500 cadets, all academic buildings are being renovated and modernized, and VMI is spending an additional $200 million to build the VMI Center for Leadership and Ethics. The new Leadership Center will be used by VMI cadets, Washington and Lee University students, and other students throughout the country and abroad to develop leadership abilities combined with a focus on integrity and honor to benefit tomorrow's world. The Center will also be home to VMI's Distinguished Speaker Series and its Leadership Symposiums. The funding will also support "study abroad" programs including joint ventures with Oxford and Cambridge Universities in England and many other universities. Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


Academic programs

VMI's academic programs are grouped into four areas: Engineering, Liberal Arts, Science, and Leadership. Within those departments, it offers 14 major and 22 minor areas of study.[7]


The Engineering department has concentrations in three areas: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.[8] The current Chief of Engineers of the Army Corps of Engineers, Lieutenant General Carl A. Strock, is a VMI Engineering graduate, as was his predecessor, Robert B. Flowers.[9] United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ... Lieutenant General Carl A. Strock, was born in Georgia and grew up in an Army Family. ... Lieutenant General Robert B. Flowers Lieutenant General Robert B. Flowers was born in Pennsylvania and resided in several areas of the world as his family moved during his fathers military career. ...


The majority of classes are taught by full-time professors, 96 percent of whom hold Ph.D.s.[10] The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Within four months of graduation, on average, 97 percent of VMI graduates are serving in the military, employed, or admitted to graduate or professional schools.[11]


VMI has graduated more Rhodes Scholars than all the other state military colleges in the United States combined, graduating ten Rhodes Scholars since 1921.[12][13][14][15][16][17] In 2007, VMI had two Rhodes Scholarship finalists and one Marshall Scholarship finalist.[18] Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ...


Rankings

Academic

In 2007, VMI tied for first place in the U.S. News and World Report rankings of the 22 public liberal arts colleges in the United States.[19] This marks the sixth year in a row that VMI has held this honor. Compared to the top 100 U.S. liberal arts colleges, public and private, it ranked 86th out of 104 (including ties).[20] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...


Also in 2007, US News ranked VMI's Civil Engineering program ninth, and its overall Engineering program 31st in the United States among colleges offering up to a master's degree.[21]


VMI was the only state military college in the country named a "College of Distinction" in 2007 by Student Horizons, Inc.[22]


Kiplinger's magazine, in its ranking of the "Best Values in Public Colleges" for 2006, made mention of the Virginia Military Institute as a "great value", although the military nature of its program excluded it from consideration as a traditional four-year college in the rankings.[23] Kiplingers magazine cover Kiplingers Personal Finance is a magazine that has been continuously published, on a monthly basis, from 1947 to the present day. ...


Alumni giving

VMI is known for the financial support of its alumni — in a 1999 study by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, VMI's $290 million endowment was the largest per-student endowment of any public undergraduate college in the United States.[24] The following are lists of American institutions of higher education by endowment. ...


Students

Of the 1251 students enrolled in 2005, 66 were African-American, 39 were Asian, 34 were Hispanic and 71 were women. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ...


The first Jewish cadet, Moses Jacob Ezekiel, graduated in 1866. While at VMI, Ezekiel fought with the VMI cadets at the Battle of New Market. He became a sculptor and his works are on display at VMI. For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Moses Jacob Ezekiel (October 28, 1844, Richmond, Virginia - March 27, 1917, Italy) was a U.S. sculptor. ... The Battle of New Market was a battle fought on May 15, 1864, in Virginia during Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. ...


One of the first Asian cadets was Sun Li-jen, the Chinese National Revolutionary Army general, who graduated in 1927. General Sun Li-jen Sun Li-jen (Traditional Chinese: 孫立人; Hanyu Pinyin: SÅ«n Lìrén) (November 19, 1899–November 19, 1990) was a Kuomintang general, best known for his leadership in the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Chinese Civil War. ... The National Revolutionary Army (NRA) (Chinese: 國民革命軍; pinyin: guo2 min2 ge2 ming4 jun1) was the national army of the Republic of China. ...


The first African-American cadets were admitted in 1968. The first African-American regimental commander was Derren McDew, class of 1982. McDew is currently a U.S. Air Force brigadier general and vice-commander of the Eighteenth Air Force at Scott Air Force Base. “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The insignia of the Eighteenth Air Force Eighteenth Air Force is a Numbered Air Force in Air Mobility Command (AMC). ... Scott Air Force Base (Scott AFB) (IATA: BLV, ICAO: KBLV) is an base of the United States Air Force in St. ...


It is unknown when the first Muslim cadet graduated from VMI, but in 1985 Iranian expatriate Rex Ziai graduated. Before the Iranian Revolution, under Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi,several Persian cadets attended and graduated from VMI. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Iranian Revolution (also known as the Islamic Revolution,[1][2][3][4][5][6] Persian: انقلاب اسلامی, Enghelābe Eslāmi) was the revolution that transformed Iran from a monarchy under Shah Mohammad Reza... “Shah of Iran” redirects here. ... Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran (Persian: ) (October 26, 1919, Tehran – July 27, 1980, Cairo), styled His Imperial Majesty, and holding the imperial titles of Shahanshah (King of Kings), and Aryamehr (Light of the Aryans), was the monarch of Iran from September 16, 1941 until the Iranian Revolution on February...


VMI has traditionally enrolled cadets from the armed forces of Thailand and the Republic of China (Taiwan). Graduates have gone on to pursue graduate degrees after VMI at prestigious universities throughout the United States before returning to their countries to continue their military service. Several graduates reached general and flag officer ranks. The Royal Thai Military (กองทัพไทย) is the name of the military of Thailand. ... The Republic of China (commonly known as Taiwan) maintains a large military establishment, which accounted for 16. ...


During the 1990s, many other nations were represented in the Corps of Cadets, including Bangladesh, Finland, Botswana, Germany, Kenya, South Korea, and Japan. Michael Lokale of Kenya was chosen as VMI's tenth Rhodes Scholar in 2003. Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


Admission of women

VMI was the last U.S. military college to admit women. VMI excluded women from the Corps of Cadets until 1997. In 1990, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a discrimination lawsuit against VMI for its all-male admissions policy. Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ...


While the court challenge was pending, a state-sponsored Virginia Women's Institute for Leadership (VWIL) was opened at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia, as a parallel program for women. The VWIL continued, even after VMI's admission of women.[25] The Virginia Womens Institute for Leadership (or VWIL) is a womens military college based at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia. ... Mary Baldwin College is a private independent comprehensive four-year liberal arts womens college in Staunton, Virginia. ... West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton (IPA: or STAN-tehn or STANT-en) is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. ...


After VMI won its case in U.S. District Court, the case went through several appeals until June 26, 1996, when the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 7-1 decision in United States v. Virginia, found that it was unconstitutional for a school supported by public funds to exclude women. (Justice Clarence Thomas did not vote because his son was attending VMI at the time.) Following the ruling, VMI contemplated going private to exempt itself from the 14th Amendment, and thus avoid the ruling. However, Assistant Secretary of Defense Frederick F.Y. Pang warned the school that the Department of Defense would withdraw ROTC programs from the school if privatization took place. As a result of this action by Pang, Congress passed a resolution on November 18, 1997, prohibiting the Department of Defense from withdrawing or diminishing any ROTC program at one of the six senior military colleges, including VMI. This escape clause provided by Congress came after the VMI Board of Visitors had already voted 8-7 to admit women and the decision was not revisited. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Holding State of Virginias exclusion of women from the Virginia Military Institute violated Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... ROTC links here. ... In the United States, a Senior Military College is one of six colleges that offer military Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) programs and are recognized under 10 USC 2111a. ...


In August 1997, VMI enrolled its first female cadets, 30 women who would be held to the same strict physical courses and technical training as the male cadets.[26] VMI believes firmly in "one corps, one standard" and, unlike any other state military college, VMI has not adopted overt "gender-normed" physical training standards. Female Rats are required to maintain a short haircut of approximately four inches or less and are forbidden to wear makeup or jewelry. Look up Female in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... Jewelry (the American spelling; spelled jewellery in Commonwealth English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ...


Student life

Both academically and physically, daily life at VMI is highly demanding. VMI is an extremely traditional and old-fashioned military college. Today, as nearly 200 years ago, cadets at VMI sleep on cots for their entire cadetship. Additionally, telephones, televisions, posters, and civilian clothes are never allowed in cadets' rooms. VMI cadets wear uniforms every day and eat their meals together in a mess hall. In many ways, life at VMI today is little changed from life at VMI in 1839.


Potential students must be between 16 to 22 years of age. They must be unmarried, physically fit for enrollment in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and be graduates of an accredited secondary school or have completed an approved homeschool curriculum. New cadets at VMI have an average SAT score of nearly 1200 and an average high school GPA of 3.39.[27] ROTC links here. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


Eligibility is not restricted to Virginia residents, although it is more difficult to gain an appointment as a non-resident, as VMI has a goal that no more than 45 percent of cadets come from outside Virginia.[28] VMI has graduated students from across the U.S. and from many other countries. Virginia residents receive a discount in tuition, as is common at most state-sponsored schools. Tuition for the 2005-2006 school year is approximately $15,000 for Virginia residents and $28,000 for all others. These fees can be misleading, because VMI's endowment enables VMI to meet a substantial amount of a cadets's financial need before the cadet needs loans. Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ...


Ratline

The new cadet, known as a "Rat", walks a prescribed line in barracks while in an exaggerated, painful form of attention known as "straining". The Rat experience, called the Ratline, is intended to instill pride, discipline, brotherhood, and a sense of honor in the students. A Rat faces many physical and mental challenges and must memorize rules, school songs, and facts about the school and its history. The Ratline is among the toughest and most grueling initiation programs in the country. It is best described as a longer version of the Marine Corps boot camp combined with rigorous academics. A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


After having their heads shaved bald (or cut very short for female cadets), the Rats undergo their first week in a long year of intense military and physical training. The initial week is a crash course in everything VMI: how to wear every uniform, how to march, how to clean a rifle, etc. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Once the first week is complete, life continues to get tougher as Rats await the arrival of the returning students, the "Old Corps". Each Rat is paired with a first classman (senior) who serves as a mentor for the rest of the first year. This pairing is integral to cadet life at VMI. The first classman is called a "Dyke", reference to an older phrase "to dyke out", or to get into a uniform. This arose from a pair of cadets helping each other get into the full parade dress uniform, which includes white pants or ducks, a full dress coatee, belt and leather cartridge box, a military dress shako, and several large web belts, or "cross dykes", that are extremely difficult to don alone, along with a school-issued M-14 rifle. Cadet officers and noncommissioned officers have the privilege of bearing a sash and sabre, while the Institute's regimental band carries instruments for parades and formal functions. For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... A Shako of a French Navy uniform of the 19th century. ...


During the freshman year, Rats continue to undergo training from the most highly skilled cadets at VMI, known as "the Cadre". The Cadre enforces all rules as the Rats live a life of "sweat parties", early morning runs, late night runs, and countless push-ups. It is hoped they will learn to think under pressure and focus on a team approach to solving challenges.


The Ratline experience culminates in a "Breakout" event during the second semester where the Rats are formally welcomed to the VMI community. After break out, rats are officially fourth class students and no longer have to strain in the barracks or eat "square meals" at attention. Many versions of the Breakout ceremony have been conducted. In the 1950s, Rats from each company would be packed into a corner room in the barracks and brawl their way out through the upperclassmen. From the late 1960s through the early 1980s, the Rats had to fight their way up to the fourth level of the barracks through three other classes of cadets determined not to let them get to the top. The stoops would often be slick with motor oil, packed with snow, glazed with ice, greased, or continuously hosed with water. The barracks stairs and rails were not able to take the abuse, so the Corps moved the breakout to a muddy hill where Rats attempt to climb to the top by crawling on their stomachs while the upper classes block them or drag them back down. As of 2004 though, the Rats no longer breakout in the mud but instead participate in a grueling day of physical activity testing both physical endurance and team work.[29]


Traditions

In addition to the Ratline, VMI has other traditions that are emblematic of the school and its history including the new cadet oath ceremony, the pagentry of close-order marching, and the nightly playing of "Taps". Taps (Butterfields Lullaby), sometimes known by the lyrics of its second verse, Day is Done, is a famous musical piece, played in the U.S. military during flag ceremonies and funerals, generally on bugle or trumpet. ...


An event second only to graduation in importance is the "Ring Figure" dance held every November. During their junior year, cadets receive class rings at a ring presentation ceremony followed by a formal dance.[30] The rings, which are quite large, are often referred to as "nuggets of gold". Most cadets get two rings, a formal ring and a combat ring; some choose to have the combat ring for everyday wear, and the formal for special occasions.[citation needed] Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ... A class ring (also known as a graduate, or grad, ring) is a ring worn by students and alumni to commemorate their graduation, generally for a high school, college, or university. ...


Every year, VMI honors its fallen cadets with a New Market Day parade and ceremony. During this ceremony, roll is called for cadets who "died on the Field of Honor" and wreaths are placed on the graves of those who died during the Battle of New Market.


The requirement that all first-year cadets eat in the mess hall was the basis for a lawsuit in 2002 when two cadets sued VMI over the prayer said before dinner. The non-denominational prayer had been a daily fixture since the 1950s.[31][32][33] In 2002, the Fourth Circuit ruled the prayer, during an event with mandatory attendance, at a state-funded school, violated the U.S. Constitution. When the Supreme Court declined to review the school's appeal in April 2004, the prayer tradition was stopped.[34] Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Honor System

VMI is known for its strict Honor System. Under the VMI Honor Code, "a cadet does not lie, cheat, steal, nor tolerate those who do." [35] There is only one punishment for violating the Honor Code: immediate expulsion in the form of a "drumming out" ceremony.


Clubs and activities

VMI currently offers over 50 school-sponsored clubs and organizations, including recreational activities, military organizations, musical and performance groups, religious organizations and service groups.[36][37]


There are also several unofficial organizations in which cadets and alumni participate, including the Southern Triad Fraternity Organization (which consists of Sigma Nu and Alpha Tau Omega), another fraternity (founded at neighboring Washington and Lee University), the People's Republic of Old Barracks (PROB), and the New Barracks Liberation Front (NBLF) [38] ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ...


Military service

The Virginia Military Institute offers ROTC programs for all four U.S. military branches.[39] While four years of ROTC is a requirement for all cadets, accepting a commission in the armed forces is optional. The VMI Board of Visitors has set a goal of having 70 percent of VMI cadets take a commission by 2015. The VMI class of 2006 achieved a 50 percent commissioning rate.[citation needed] The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ...


VMI has graduated 265 General and Flag Officers, more than any other state military college in the United States, including the first five-star General of the Army, George Marshall.[40] Six graduates have received the Medal of Honor, the highest award of the U.S. military.[41] This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Flag Officer is a naval officer of a high rank entitling him to fly a personal flag, especially on his flagship. ... For other persons named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...


Athletics

VMI fields 15 teams on the NCAA Division I level (FCS, formerly I-AA, for football). Varsity sports include baseball, basketball, men's and women's cross-country, football, lacrosse, men's and women's rifle, men and women's soccer, swimming, men's and women's indoor and outdoor track, wrestling, and Rugby. VMI is a member of the Big South, the Southern (for wrestling), and the Metro Atlantic Athletic (for men's lacrosse) conferences. The VMI team name is the Keydets, possibly a Southern style slang for the word "cadets". Image File history File links Vmi. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Big South Conference is a College Athletic Conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I-AA in football and Division I in all other sports; it was founded in 1983. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ... The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC, pronounced mack) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ...


Perhaps the most famous athletic story in VMI history was the two-year run of the 1976 and 1977 basketball teams. The 1976 squad advanced within one game of the Final Four before bowing to undefeated Rutgers in the East Regional Final, and in 1977 VMI finished with 26 wins and just four losses, still a school record, and reached the "Sweet 16" round of the NCAA tournament. Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... The impact of Athletics at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University) is associated chiefly to its heritage as the Birthplace of College Football—hosting the first ever intercollegiate football game on 6 November 1869 in which Rutgers defeated a team from the College of... The 1976 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The 1977 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the National Champion of Mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


VMI has the third-smallest enrollment of any FCS football college, after Presbyterian and Wofford.[42] Approximately one-third of the Corps of Cadets plays on at least one of VMI's intercollegiate athletic teams, making it one of the most active athletic programs in the country. Of the VMI athletes who complete their eligibility, 92 percent receive their VMI diplomas.[43] Presbyterian College is a liberal arts college in Clinton, South Carolina, USA. Presbyterian College, or PC, is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA. Presbyterian College has around 1300 students and runs on an endowment of around $75 million. ... Wofford College is a small liberal arts college located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. ...


Notable graduates

A new graduate looks at his diploma.

VMI's alumni include a Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Nobel Prize winners, Pulitzer Prize winners, Rhodes Scholars, Medal of Honor recipients, U.S. Senators and Representatives, college and university presidents, and many business leaders. Some examples: Image File history File links Graduate_looking_at_his_diploma. ... Image File history File links Graduate_looking_at_his_diploma. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...

Richard Thomas Walker Duke, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... Reuben Lindsay Walker (May 29, 1827 – June 7, 1890) was a Confederate general who served in the artillery during the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... William Mahone (December 1, 1826 – October 8, 1895), of Southampton County, Virginia, was a civil engineer, teacher, soldier, railroad executive, and a member of the Virginia General Assembly and U.S. Congress. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Robert E. Rodes Robert Emmett Rodes ( March 29, 1829 – September 19, 1864) was a railroad civil engineer and a promising young Confederate general in the American Civil War, killed in battle in the Shenandoah Valley. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Battle of Opequon, also known as the Third Battle of Winchester, was a decisive victory for the Union army during the Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... Benjamin Franklin Ficklin (1827-1871) was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, Class of 1849. ... Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. ... James Henry Lane, CSA James Henry Lane (July 28, 1833 – September 21, 1907) was a university professor and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Map of Picketts Charge, July 3, 1863. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Brigadier General (sometimes known as a one-star general from the United States insignia) is the lowest rank of general officer in some countries, usually ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... A Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army famous for the ransom of Hagerstown, Maryland and the razing of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. ... Brigadier General (sometimes known as a one-star general from the United States insignia) is the lowest rank of general officer in some countries, usually ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... Lt. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... // This article is about the Confederate general. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Authorship redirects here. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... Charles E. Kilbourne was an officer in the United States Army who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Philippine-American War. ... Henry G. Shirley (died July 16, 1941) was Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Highways. ... The Virginia Department of Transportation, or VDOT, is the government agency responsible for building, maintaining and operating Virginias roads, bridges and tunnels. ... For other persons named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). ... General of the Army is historically the second most senior rank in the United States Army, equivalent to a Field Marshal in other militaries. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for ensuring readiness of the Army. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Map of Cold-War era Europe and the Near East showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... Major General William Peterkin Upshur (1881-1943) was the recipient of his nations highest military decoration — the Medal of Honor — for his actions in 1915 during the Haitan Campaign. ... John Dunbrack Ewing, Sr. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonard Townsend Gerow (July 13, 1888 - October 12, 1972) was born in Petersburg, Virginia. ... Richard Jacqueline Marshall (June 16, 1895 - August 3, 1973) was a Major General in the US Army. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... General Randolph McCall Pate (February 11, 1898–July 31, 1961) was the twenty-first Commandant of the United States Marine Corps from 1956 to 1959. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... Giles H. Miller was born in his parents home in Lynchburg, Virginia, while Theodore Roosevelt was serving his first term as President of the United States. ... The George C. Marshall Foundation, located in Lexington, Virginia, is a library, archive, and museum dedicated to honor the memory and work of George Catlett Marshall. ... Frank McCarthy (1912 - 1986) graduated from the Virginia Military Institute, Class of 1933. ... Robert Lee Bobby Thomason (March 26, 1928) was an American football player. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... Billy James Guin, Sr. ... : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Edward R. Schowalter, Jr. ... Fred Willard (born September 18, 1939) is an American comedian and character actor, known for his improvisational comedy skills. ... Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is the current head coach of the United States Military Academy football team. ... “USMA” redirects here. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ... “Chargers” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jonathan Myrick Daniels (March 20, 1939 - August 20, 1965) was an Episcopal seminarian, martyred for his part in the American civil rights movement. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ... James Henry Binford Binnie Peay III (born May 10, 1940, in Richmond, Virginia) is a retired four-star general from the United States Army and is currently the 14th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute. ... (Redirected from 101st Airborne) Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 101st Airborne Division, the Screaming Eagles. ... The United States Central Command (CENTCOM) is a theater-level Unified Combatant Command unit of the U.S. armed forces, established in 1983 under the operational control of the U.S. Secretary of Defense. ... W. Patrick Lang Walter Patrick Pat Lang, Jr. ... General John P. Jumper General John P. Jumper is a United States Air Force officer who served as Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force from September 6, 2001 to September 2, 2005. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... The Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force (CSAF) serves as the senior uniformed United States Air Force officer responsible for the organization, training, and equipage of more than 700,000 active-duty, National Guard, Reserve, and civilian forces serving in the United States and overseas. ... Lieutenant General Robert B. Flowers Lieutenant General Robert B. Flowers was born in Pennsylvania and resided in several areas of the world as his family moved during his fathers military career. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ... Lieutenant General Carl A. Strock, was born in Georgia and grew up in an Army Family. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ... Thunderbirds Squadron ensign The USAF Thunderbirds perform an echelon pass. ... Colonel James Hickey (second from right) on the night of Operation Red Dawn Colonel James Hickey, US Army earned notoriety because of his leadership during Operation Red Dawn which netted Saddam Hussein. ... Combatants United States Saddam Hussein Operation Red Dawn was a military operation conducted by the United States Armed Forces on December 13, 2003 in the small town of ad-Dawr in Iraq, near Tikrit. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ...

Trivia

  • James A. Walker was expelled in 1852 just before his graduation for "disobedience" in Stonewall Jackson's classroom. Cadet Walker had challenged Jackson to a duel over a perceived insult. VMI granted him an honorary degree in 1872 in recognition of his Civil War service, where he rose to the rank of brigadier general.[44]
  • Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas, was an instructor at VMI.
  • John Mercer Brooke, inventor of the Brooke Rifled Gun and worked on building the CSS Virginia ironclad. The Maury-Brooke Hall at VMI is named after him.
  • Although VMI prohibited cadet membership in fraternal organizations in 1885, VMI cadets were instrumental in starting several fraternities.
    • Alpha Tau Omega fraternity was founded by VMI cadets Otis Allen Glazebrook, Alfred Marshall, and Erskine Mayo Ross at Richmond, Virginia on September 11, 1865 while the school was closed for reconstruction. After the re-opening, Kappa Sigma Kappa fraternity was founded by cadets on September 28, 1867, and Sigma Nu fraternity was founded by cadets on January 1, 1869.[45]
    • VMI cadets formed the second chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity.[46] In a special arrangement, graduating cadets may be nominated by Kappa Alpha Order alumni and inducted into the fraternity, becoming part of Kappa Alpha Order's Beta Commission (a commission as opposed to an active chapter). This occurs following graduation, and the newly-initiated VMI alumni are accepted as brothers of the fraternity. [47]
    • Alpha Tau Omega, Sigma Nu, and Kappa Alpha Order form the Lexington Triad of Fraternities.
  • The New Mexico Military Institute is the nation's oldest state-supported co-educational college preparatory military high school and junior college, founded in 1891 in Roswell, New Mexico. It was inspired by VMI.[citation needed]
  • Richard E. Byrd, the U.S. Navy rear admiral and polar explorer, studied at VMI for two years, from 1904 to 1906.[48]
  • The Cadet, the institute's student newspaper, has been run independently by cadets since 1907.
  • Lewis Burwell "Chesty" Puller resigned from VMI after his freshman year to enlist as a Private in the United States Marine Corps in August 1918. He retired as a Lieutenant General as the most decorated Marine in U.S. history.
  • George Patton, like his father and grandfather who were both VMI graduates, studied at VMI. After leaving VMI, Patton graduated from West Point.
  • Major General John A. Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was Superintendent of VMI from 1929 to 1937.
  • Ronald Reagan starred in the film, "Brother Rat", which was filmed at VMI. Originally a Broadway hit, the play was written by John Monks Jr. and Fred F. Finklehoffe, both 1932 graduates of VMI.[49]
  • Steven J. McAuliffe, a federal judge in New Hampshire, VMI class of 1971, was the husband of Christa McAuliffe, the teacher who died in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. She had his VMI ring with her on the shuttle. All VMI graduates are given a new ring if their original is ever lost or stolen.
  • Southern Military Institute is a proposed all-male, private military college. The initiative is led by a 1977 VMI graduate to protest the 1996 court decision allowing women to enroll.[50]

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... James Alexander Walker (August 27, 1832 – October 21, 1901) was a Virginia lawyer, politician, and Confederate general during the American Civil War, later serving as a United States Congressman for two terms. ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Matthew Fontaine Maury Matthew Fontaine Maury (January 14, 1806 – February 1, 1873), USN - American astronomer, astrophysicist, historian, oceanographer, meteorologist, cartographer, author, geologist, educator. ... John Mercer Brooke (18 December 1826–14 December 1906) was an American sailor, engineer, scientist, and educator who resigned his U.S. Navy commission in 1861 to join the Confederate Navy in the American Civil War. ... CSS Virginia was an ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War (built using the remains of the scuttled USS Merrimack). ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... New Mexico Military Institute is located in Roswell, New Mexico. ... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was a pioneering American polar explorer and famous aviator. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Lieutenant General Lewis Chesty Burwell Puller (June 26, 1898 – October 11, 1971) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps and was the most decorated Marine in history. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... General George Smith Patton Jr. ... Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was born at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, on 10 January 1867. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan, (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Brother Rat is a 1938 film starring Ronald Reagan, Eddie Albert, and Jane Wyman. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Steven J. McAuliffe (born 1948, Cambridge, Massachusetts) is an American attorney and judge, currently Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The iconic image of Space Shuttle Challengers smoke plume after its breakup 73 seconds after launch. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

References

Military of the United States Portal
  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4] VMI Archives
  5. ^ [5] VMI Museum
  6. ^ [6] VMI Archives
  7. ^ VMI web site
  8. ^ VMI web site
  9. ^ VMI web site
  10. ^ VMI web site
  11. ^ VMI web site
  12. ^ Listing of VMI Rhodes Scholars on VMI website
  13. ^ Texas A&M Rhodes Scholars
  14. ^ Virginia Tech Rhodes Scholars
  15. ^ Norwich Rhodes Scholars
  16. ^ Citadel Rhodes Scholars
  17. ^ North Georgia Rhodes Scholars
  18. ^ VMI web site
  19. ^ [7]
  20. ^ U.S. News Rankings for 2007
  21. ^ [8] VMI web site
  22. ^ Student Horizons Colleges of Distinction web site
  23. ^ Lankford, Kimberly (2006). Best Values in Public Colleges. Kiplinger's.
  24. ^ [9]
  25. ^ Cabe, Crista (1 March 2005). "MBC Celebrates VWIL's 10th Anniversary March 18, 2004". Mary Baldwin College web site.
  26. ^ [10]
  27. ^ [11]
  28. ^ [12]
  29. ^ http://new.vmi.edu/show.asp?durki=8137&site=11&return=91
  30. ^ [13] VMI Web site
  31. ^ http://wid.ap.org/documents/scotus/040426bunting.pdf
  32. ^ [14]
  33. ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04118/307182.stm
  34. ^ [15]
  35. ^ [16]
  36. ^ http://new.vmi.edu/Show.asp?durki=710
  37. ^ http://new.vmi.edu/Show.asp?durki=716
  38. ^ http://www.geocities.com/nblf2004/NBLF.html
  39. ^ [17]
  40. ^ [18] VMI web site
  41. ^ [19]
  42. ^ [20]
  43. ^ VMI Athletic History - A Brief Look (9 August 2002). VMI web site.
  44. ^ [21]
  45. ^ [22]
  46. ^ [23]
  47. ^ [24]
  48. ^ [25]
  49. ^ [26]
  50. ^ [27]

Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Virginia Military Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4141 words)
VMI is the only military college in the nation that holds this distinction and is therefore the only school authorized to "fix bayonets" during parades.
The Institute was shelled and burned on June 12, 1864, by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter, as part of the Valley Campaigns of 1864.
Southern Military Institute is an all-male, private military college proposed by a 1977 VMI graduate to protest the 1997 court decision allowing women to enroll.
Talk:Virginia Military Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2713 words)
I am familiar with the assertion by a number of military school students that their ring is the heaviest, and that it is a competition each year to see who has it, and who doesn't, but I have never seen any valid citations.
Please see the Virginia Military Institute case of the Mediation Cabal if you are involved in the dispute involving the citation of the size of the Virginia Military Institute's ring sizes or the Dabney Coleman hazing allegations.
Claims that an institution "places highly" in rankings are just as vague as claims that it is "prestigious" and "excellent," and are more dishonest in that they seem to cite an authoritative source.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m