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Encyclopedia > Virginia
Commonwealth of Virginia
Flag of Virginia State seal of Virginia
Flag of Virginia Seal of Virginia
Nickname(s): Old Dominion, Mother of Presidents
Motto(s): Sic semper tyrannis
Official language(s) English
Spoken language(s) English 94.3%, Spanish 5.8%
Demonym Virginian
Capital Richmond
Largest city Virginia Beach
Largest metro area Northern Virginia
Area  Ranked 35th in the US
 - Total 42,774 sq mi
(110,785 km²)
 - Width 200 miles (320 km)
 - Length 430 miles (690 km)
 - % water 7.4
 - Latitude 36° 32′ N to 39° 28′ N
 - Longitude 75° 15′ W to 83° 41′ W
Population  Ranked 12th in the US
 - Total 7,078,515
 - Density 178.8/sq mi 
69.03/km² (14th in the US)
 - Median income  $53,275 (10th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mount Rogers[1]
5,729 ft  (1,747 m)
 - Mean 950 ft  (290 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  June 25, 1788 (10th)
Governor Timothy M. Kaine (D)
Lieutenant Governor Bill Bolling (R)
U.S. Senators John Warner (R)
Jim Webb (D)
Congressional Delegation 8 Rep. and 3 Dem. (list)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations VA US-VA
Website www.virginia.gov

The Commonwealth of Virginia (pronounced /vɚˈdʒɪnjə/) is an American state on the Atlantic Coast of the Southern United States. Virginia is the 12th-most populous state in the U.S. with over 7.7 million residents, and the 35th-largest in area.[2] It is named after Queen Elizabeth I of England, who, never having married, was known as the 'Virgin Queen'. The state is also known as the "The Old Dominion" and sometimes "Mother of Presidents", because it is the birthplace of eight U.S. presidents. Look up Virginia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Virginia. ... Flag of Virginia Image:Vaflag. ... In May of 1776 the colony of Virginia declared its independence from England. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Great Seal of Virginia with the state motto. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_VA.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Virginia ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Mount Rogers is the highest point in the state of Virginia, USA, with a summit elevation of 5729 feet (1746 meters) above mean sea level. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Timothy Michael Tim Kaine (born February 26, 1958) is an American politician and the current Governor of Virginia. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Bill Bolling is the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972 to 1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since January 2, 1979. ... For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Virginia to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


The roots of modern Virginia trace back to the founding of the Virginia Colony in 1607 by the Virginia Company of London. It was the first permanent New World English colony and became one of the thirteen colonies that would take part in the American Revolution. Slavery played a large role in Virginia's early economy and politics, and the state seceded and subsequently became the heart of the Confederacy in the American Civil War. A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The capital of the commonwealth is Richmond, while Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. Although traditionally conservative and historically part of the Southern United States, modern Virginia is a politically competitive state with both conservative and liberal areas.[3] Virginia's government is ranked with the highest efficiency grade in the nation.[4] This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Part of the Virginia Beach oceanfront resort strip. ... Fairfax County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The politics of Virginia reflect a commonwealth in transition from a largely rural, conservative state to an increasingly diverse and cosmopolitan state with growing suburban areas that increasingly vote Democratic. ...


Virginia has an economy with several important industries, including the federal government in Northern Virginia and military bases in Hampton Roads, as well as agricultural areas. The Historic Triangle includes Jamestown, Yorktown and the living museum of Colonial Williamsburg, the most popular tourist destination in the state.[5] The growth of the technology sector has made computer chips the state's leading export, with the industry based on the strength of Virginia's public schools and universities, some of which are at the top of national rankings.[6] Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... This article reads like an advertisement. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbor. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... A living museum is a type of museum that recreates to the fullest extent conditions of a culture, natural environment or historical period. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... An integrated circuit (IC) is a thin chip consisting of at least two interconnected semiconductor devices, mainly transistors, as well as passive components like resistors. ... See Virginia state entry. ...

Contents

Geography

See also: List of counties in Virginia and List of county seats in Virginia.
Map of Virginia's major cities and roads
Map of Virginia's major cities and roads

Virginia has an area of 42,774 square miles (110,784 km²) making it the thirty-fifth largest state.[7] Virginia is bordered by Maryland and the District of Columbia to the north and east; by Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; by North Carolina and Tennessee to the south; by Kentucky to the west and by West Virginia to the north and west. Due to a peculiarity of Virginia's original charter, its boundary with Maryland does not extend past the low-water mark of the southern shore of the Potomac River, meaning Maryland and the District of Columbia contain the whole width of the river rather than splitting it between them and Virginia.[8] The Commonwealth of Virginia is divided into 95 counties and 39 independent cities, which are considered county-equivalents for census puposes. ... List of Virginia county seats: County seats in italics are independent cities that are legally separate from their surrounding county. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... ... The Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ...


Geology and terrain

Topographic map of Virginia counties
Topographic map of Virginia counties

The Chesapeake Bay divides the commonwealth with Virginia's Eastern Shore as a separate exclave. Many of Virginia's rivers flow into the Chesapeake.[9] The Virginia seismic zone has not had a history of regular activity. Earthquakes are rarely above 4.5 on the Richter magnitude scale because Virginia is located centrally on the North American Plate. The largest earthquake, at 5.9 magnitude, came in 1897 in Blacksburg.[10] Besides coal, resources such as slate, kyanite, and sand and gravel are mined with an annual value over $2 billion.[11] Geographically and geologically, Virginia is divided into five regions from east to west: The Eastern Shore of Virginia is on the Atlantic Coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... This is a list of rivers in the U.S. state of Virginia, as listed in The Hornbook of Virginia History (1994 edition). ... The Virginia seismic zone is located in the US State of Virginia. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ... Blacksburgs location within Virgina Virginias location within the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Montgomery Founded 1798 Government  - Mayor Ron Rordam Area  - Town  19. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Slate (disambiguation). ... Kyanite, whose name derives from the Greek, kyanos, meaning blue, is a typically blue silicate mineral, commonly found in aluminium-rich metamorphic pegmatites and/or sedimentary rock. ...

The Tidewater region of Virginia is the southeastern portion of the Commonwealth of Virginia, centered on Hampton Roads. ... A coastal plain is an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast and separated from the interior by other features. ... The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlain by limestone. ... Igneous rocks (etymology from Latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in hilly areas at the base of a mountain range. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... The Southwest Mountains of Virginia are a range parallel to and geologically associated with the Blue Ridge Mountains about 30 miles (50 km) to the west. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... Mount Rogers is the highest point in the state of Virginia, USA, with a summit elevation of 5729 feet (1746 meters) above mean sea level. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... The Ridge-and-valley Appalachians are a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. ... Massanutten Mountain is a mountain range that runs down the center of the Shenandoah Valley from approximately Frederick County, Virginia in the North, to its highest peak in Rockingham County, Virginia in the South. ... The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. ... Carbonate rocks are a class of sedimentary rocks composed primarily of carbonate minerals. ... The Appalachian Plateau is the western part of the Appalachian mountain system, stretching from New York to Alabama. ... Map of the Allegheny plateau. ... In geomorphology, a drainage system is the pattern formed by the streams, rivers, and lakes in a particular watershed. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...

Climate

Main article: Climate of Virginia
The Blue Ridge Mountains have a humid continental climate.
The Blue Ridge Mountains have a humid continental climate.

Most of the state east of the Blue Ridge Mountains, plus the southern part of the Shenandoah Valley, has a humid subtropical climate. In the mountainous areas west of the Blue Ridge, the climate becomes humid continental.[14] The moderating influence of the ocean from the east, powered by the Gulf Stream, also creates the potential for hurricanes near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, making the coastal area vulnerable. Although Hurricane Gaston in 2004 inundated Richmond, it is rare for a major hurricane to threaten Virginia.[15] This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,440 × 1,080 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,440 × 1,080 pixels, file size: 1. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season officially started June 1, 2004, and lasted until November 30, 2004. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Thunderstorms are an occasional concern, with the state averaging from 35-45 days of thunderstorm activity annually. The area of most frequent occurrence is in the west.[16] The state averages more than 85 tornadoes per year, though most are F2 and lower on the Fujita scale.[17] Cold air masses arriving over the mountains, especially in winter, can lead to significant snowfalls, such as the Blizzard of 1996. The interaction of these elements with the state's topography creates micro-climates in the Shenandoah Valley, the mountainous southwest, and the coastal plains that are distinct.[18] In recent years the expansion of the southern suburbs of Washington into Northern Virginia, has created an urban heat island due to the increased energy output of more densely used areas.[19] In 2005, seventeen of the ninety-five counties received failing grades for air quality, with Fairfax County having the worst in the state.[20] A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... F-scale redirects here. ... The Blizzard of 1996 was a noreaster that paralyzed the U.S. East Coast with up to four feet (1. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Tokyo, a case of Urban Heat Island. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ...


Flora and fauna

Deer at Tanner Ridge Overlook in Shenandoah National Park
Deer at Tanner Ridge Overlook in Shenandoah National Park

Virginia is sixty-five percent covered by forests.[21] In some mountainous areas of the state, pine predominates and there is also the occasional naturally growing prickly pear cactus. Lower altitudes are more likely to have small but dense stands of moisture-loving hemlocks and mosses in abundance. Other commonly found plants include oak, hickory, chestnut, maple, tulip poplar, mountain laurel, milkweed, daisies, and many species of ferns. Gypsy moth infestations beginning in the early 1990s have eroded the dominance of the oak forests.[22] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Blue Ridge region of Virginia. ... Species Many, see text Opuntia is a genus in the cactus family Cactaceae. ... Subfamilies Cactoideae Maihuenioideae Opuntioideae Pereskioideae See also taxonomy of the Cactaceae A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is any member of the succulent plant family Cactaceae, native to the Americas. ... Binomial name Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. ... For other uses, see Moss (disambiguation). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... Species See text Comparison of Carya nuts Ripe hickory nuts ready to fall, Andrews, SC Hickory is a tree of the genus Carya, including 17-19 species of deciduous trees with pinnately compound leaves and large nuts. ... Species Castanea alnifolia - Bush Chinkapin* Castanea crenata - Japanese Chestnut Castanea dentata - American Chestnut Castanea henryi - Henrys Chestnut Castanea mollissima - Chinese Chestnut Castanea ozarkensis - Ozark Chinkapin Castanea pumila - Allegheny Chinkapin Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut Castanea seguinii - Seguins Chestnut * treated as a synonym of by many authors Chestnut is a... For other uses, see Maple (disambiguation). ... Species Liriodendron chinense (Hemsl. ... Binominal name Kalmia latifolia L. Mountain-laurel is the common name of Kalmia latifolia a flowering shrub of the family Ericaceae Found in the eastern USA, this is a poisonous broad-leaved (3-12 cm long, 1-4 cm wide) evergreen shrub, between 3-9 m tall. ... Botany Asclepias, the milkweeds, is a genus of herbaceous perennial, dicotyledonous plants in the family Asclepiadaceae that contains over 140 known species. ... Look up daisy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the group of pteridophyte plants. ... Binomial name Lymantria dispar Linnaeus, 1758 The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is a moth in the family Lymantriidae of Eurasian origin. ...


Mammals include Whitetailed deer, black bear, bobcat, raccoon, skunk, opossum, groundhog, gray fox, and eastern cottontail rabbit.[23] Though unsubstantiated, there have been some reported sightings of mountain lion in areas of the state.[24] Birds include barred owls, Carolina chickadees, Red-tailed Hawks, and wild turkeys. The Peregrine Falcon was reintroduced into Shenandoah National Park in the mid-1990s.[25] Freshwater fish include brook trout, longnose and blacknose dance, and the bluehead chub.[26] The Chesapeake Bay is home to many species, including blue crabs, clams, oysters, and rockfish, also known as striped bass.[27] This article is about the ruminent animal. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... For the river, see Raccoon River. ... Polecat redirects here. ... Genera Several; see text Didelphimorphia is the order of common opossums of the Western Hemisphere. ... For other uses see groundhog (disambiguation) and woodchuck (disambiguation) Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The groundhog (Marmota monax), also known as the woodchuck, land beaver, bunnydog, or whistlepig, is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots. ... For other uses, see Gray Fox (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... Binomial name Barton, 1799 The Barred Owl, Strix varia, is a large typical owl. ... Binomial name Poecile carolinensis (Audubon, 1834) The Carolina Chickadee, Parus carolinensis or Poecile carolinensis, is a small songbird. ... Binomial name (Gmelin, 1788) Synonyms Buteo borealis Buteo broealis (lapsus) The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a medium-sized bird of prey, one of three species colloquially known in the United States as the chickenhawk. ... Binomial name Tunstall, 1771 Global range Yellow: Breeding summer visitor Green: Breeding resident Blue: Winter visitor Light blue: Passage visitor Subspecies 17-19, see text Synonyms Falco atriceps Hume Falco kreyenborgi Kleinschmidt, 1929 Falco pelegrinoides madens Ripley & Watson, 1963 Rhynchodon peregrinus (Tunstall, 1771) and see text The Peregrine Falcon (Falco... This article is about the species of fish. ... This article is about Callinectes sapidus. ... For other uses, see Clam (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ... Rockfish may refer to one of the following fishes: Striped bass, a member of the Moronidae family (temperate basses). ... Binomial name Morone saxatilis (Walbaum, 1792) The striped bass Morone saxatilis is a member of the temperate bass family native to North America but widely introduced elsewhere. ...


Virginia has many National Park Service units, including one national park, the Shenandoah National Park. Shenandoah was established in 1935 and encompasses the scenic Skyline Drive. Almost forty percent of the park's area (79,579 acres/322 km²) has been designated as Wilderness and is protected as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Other parks in Virginia, such as Great Falls Park and Prince William Forest Park are included in the many areas in the National Park System. Additionally, there are thirty-four Virginia state parks, run by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Virginia Department of Forestry.[28] The Chesapeake Bay, while not a national park, is protected by both state and federal legislation, and the jointly run Chesapeake Bay Program which conducts restoration on the bay and its watershed. The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge is protected by both Virginia and North Carolina. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... This article is about national parks. ... Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Blue Ridge region of Virginia. ... Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Piedmont region of Virginia. ... For other uses, see Wilderness (disambiguation). ... The National Wilderness Preservation System protects federally managed land areas that are of a pristine condition. ... Great Falls Park is a small National Parks Service (NPS) site in Virginia, United States. ... Quantico Creek The North Fork of Quantico Creek, from the North Valley trail Map of Prince William Forest Park Prince William Forest Park was established as Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area in 1936 and is located in eastern Prince William County, Virginia. ... The following is a list of all areas managed by the United States National Park Service within Virginia: Appalachian National Scenic Trail Appomattox Court House National Historical Park in Appomattox Assateague Island National Seashore near Chincoteague Blue Ridge Parkway Booker T. Washington National Monument at Hardy Cedar Creek and Belle... This is a list of state parks in Virginia, containing state parks and other related state-managed lands and facilities in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The Chesapeake Bay Program is the regional partnership that directs and conducts the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. ... The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge was created in 1974 to help protect and preserve a portion of the Great Dismal Swamp, a marshy region on the Coastal Plain of southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina between Norfolk, Virginia, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


History

Main article: History of Virginia
A 19th century depiction of Pocahontas, of the Powhatan tribe, an ancestor of many of the First Families of Virginia
A 19th century depiction of Pocahontas, of the Powhatan tribe, an ancestor of many of the First Families of Virginia

Jamestown 2007 marked Virginia's quadricentennial year, celebrating four hundred years since the establishment of the Jamestown Colony. Over the centuries Virginia has been at the front of warfare from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the Cold War and the War on Terrorism. The far-reaching social changes of the mid- to late-20th century were expressed by broad-based celebrations marking contributions of three cultures to the state: Native American, European and African.[29] The recorded History of Virginia began with settlement of the geographic region now known as the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States thousands of years ago by Native Americans. ... Download high resolution version (403x608, 55 KB)Public domain image from http://www. ... Download high resolution version (403x608, 55 KB)Public domain image from http://www. ... A 1616 engraving of Pocahontas by Simone van de Passe. ... This article is about the Algonquian tribe. ... First Families of Virginia is a hereditary society composed of individuals who have proved their descent from one of the original Virginia colonists from England who primarily settled at Jamestown and along the James River and other navigable waters in the Virginia Colony during the 17th century. ... The Virginia state quarter commerates Jamestons quadricentennial. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ...


Colony

Main article: Colony of Virginia

At the time of the English colonization of Virginia, Native American people were living in what now is Virginia. Native American tribes in Virginia included the Cherokee, Chesepian, Chickahominy, Mattaponi, Meherrin, Monacan, Nansemond, Nottoway, Pamunkey, Powhatan, Rappahannock, Saponi and others.[30] The natives are often divided into three groups, based to a large extent upon language differences. The largest group are known as the Algonquian who numbered over 10,000, most of whom were united in the Powhatan Confederacy led by Chief Powhatan. The other groups are the Iroquoian, numbering 2,500, and the Siouan.[31] A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, circa 1908. ... This page details the status of Native American tribes living in the US state of Virginia. ... This page contains special characters. ... Chesepian were Native American (American Indian) inhabitants of the area now know as South Hampton Roads in Virginia during the Woodland Period and later prior to the arrival of the English settlers in 1607. ... The Chickahominy are a tribe of Native Americans who primarily live in Charles City and New Kent counties in the Greater Richmond-Petersburg area in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... William Bradby dressed in Mattaponi regalia. ... The Meherrin Tribe is one of eight state-recognized tribes of Native Americans in North Carolina and received formal state recognition in 1986. ... The Monacan are an Indian tribe in Virginia, located in Amherst County, Virginia near Lynchburg, Virginia. ... A Nansemond family from Norfolk County, VA at the beginning of the 20th century. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Pamunkey Native American tribe has been in existence since pre-Columbian times. ... This article is about the Algonquian tribe. ... The Rappahannock are a tribe of Native Americans. ... Language(s) Tutelo-Saponi (extinct), English Religion(s) Indigenous Religion, Christianity Related ethnic groups Tutelo, Occaneechi, Monacan, Manahoac, possibly Saura, other eastern Siouan tribes Saponi, also spelled Sappony is the name of one of the eastern Siouan tribes, related to the Tutelo, Occaneechi, Monacan, Manahoac and other eastern Siouan peoples... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Chief Powhatan (detail of map published by John Smith (1612) Chief Powhatan (c. ... The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... Siouan is a family of related Native American languages in North America. ...


In 1583, Queen Elizabeth I of England granted Sir Walter Raleigh a charter to explore and plant a colony north of Florida.[32] In 1584, Sir Walter Raleigh explored the Atlantic coast of North America. Raleigh, or possibly the Queen herself, named the area "Virginia" after Queen Elizabeth, known as the "Virgin Queen" because she never married.[33] The name eventually applied to the whole coast from South Carolina to Maine, and included Bermuda. The London Virginia Company was incorporated as a joint stock company by the proprietary Charter of 1606, which granted land rights to this area.[34] The Company financed the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Jamestown, named for King James I, was founded on May 13, 1607 by Captains Christopher Newport and John Smith.[35] In 1609 many colonists died during the "starving time" after the loss of the Third Supply's flagship, the Sea Venture.[36] Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a woman monarch possessing and exercising all of the monarchal powers of a king, in contrast with a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, and in and of her... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... This article is about the sixteenth-century explorer. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the sixteenth-century explorer. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... A joint stock company (JSC) is a type of business partnership in which the capital is formed by the individual contributions of a group of shareholders. ... The Charter of 1606 was the document under which the London Company sent out its first settlers to Virginia. ... Because land is a limited resource and property rights include the right to exclude others, land rights are a form of monopoly. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Sketch of Jamestown c. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Christopher Newport (c. ... Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ... The Third Supply was the first truly successful wave of colonization, in the first British settlement in the Americas; Jamestown, Virginia. ... The coat of arms of Bermuda features a representation of the wreck of the Sea Venture The Sea Venture was a 17th-century English sailing ship, the wrecking of which in Bermuda is widely thought to have been the inspiration for Shakespeares The Tempest. ...


The House of Burgesses was established in 1619 as the colony's elected governance.[37] In 1619, twenty enslaved Africans are bought from a Dutch ship coming ashore at Jamestown, but henceforth treated as indentured servants. From 1620, indentured servants also arrive from Europe, especially from Ireland, Scotland, England and Germany. Indentured servitude gradually transforms to racial slavery, but surely before 1640. In 1683 Virginia introduced the headright system, leading to many more indentured servants being brought from Europe. In this system, settlers received fifty acres for each colonist they transported to the colony.[38] The capital was moved in 1698 to Williamsburg, where the College of William and Mary had been founded in 1693.[39] Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. The House of Burgesses was the first elected legislative assembly in the New World established in the Colony of Virginia in 1619. ... An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... The headright system was used in Jamestown , established in 1618, as an attempt to solve labor shortages due to the advent of the tobacco economy, which required large plots of land with many workers. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...

1851 painting of Patrick Henry's speech before the House of Burgesses on the Virginia Resolves against the Stamp Act of 1765
1851 painting of Patrick Henry's speech before the House of Burgesses on the Virginia Resolves against the Stamp Act of 1765

The House of Burgesses was temporarily dissolved in 1769 by the Royal governor Lord Botetourt, after Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee led speeches on the distresses of the British taxation without representation. In 1773, Henry and Lee formed a committee of correspondence, and in 1774 Virginia sent delegates to the Continental Congress.[40] On May 15, 1776, the Virginia Convention declared independence from the British Empire.[41] Shortly after, the Virginia Convention adopted the Virginia Declaration of Rights written by George Mason, a document that influenced the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights.[42] Then on June 29, 1776, the convention enacted a constitution, drafted by Thomas Jefferson, that formally declared Virginia as an independent commonwealth.[43] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x750, 116 KB) [edit] Summary From: http://cgfa. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x750, 116 KB) [edit] Summary From: http://cgfa. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. The House of Burgesses was the first elected legislative assembly in the New World established in the Colony of Virginia in 1619. ... Patrick Henrys speech on the Virginia Resolves (an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel) The Virginia Resolves were a series of resolutions passed by the Virginia General Assembly in response to the Stamp Act of 1765. ... The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. ... Norborne Berkeley, 4th Baron Botetourt (1718 – October 15, 1770) was governor of the Virginia Colony from 1768 to 1770. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... No taxation without representation was a slogan in the period 1763–1776 that summarized a primary grievance of the American colonists in the thirteen American colonies. ... For other uses, see Committee of correspondence (disambiguation). ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The Virginia Conventions were a series of five political meetings in the state of Virginia in response to British colonial rule. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Virginia Declaration of Rights is a declaration by the Virginia Convention of Delegates of rights of individuals and a call for independence from Britain. ... For other persons named George Mason, see George Mason (disambiguation). ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... The United States Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


During the American Revolutionary War, the capital was moved to Richmond at the urging of Governor Thomas Jefferson, fearing Williamsburg's location made it vulnerable to British attack.[44] In 1781, the combined action of Continental and French land and naval forces trapped the British on the Yorktown peninsula, where troops under George Washington and French Comte de Rochambeau defeated British General Cornwallis in the Battle of Yorktown. The British surrender on October 19, 1781 so shifted British public opinion that it led to the end of major hostilities and secured the independence of the colonies.[45] This article is about military actions only. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807), French soldier, was born at Vendôme (Loir-et-Cher). ... Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis (December 31, 1738-October 5, 1805) was a British general and colonial governor. ... Combatants Britain Colonial America France Commanders Charles Cornwallis George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Strength 7,500 8,845 Americans 7,800 French Casualties 156 killed 326 wounded 7,018 captured Americans: 20 killed, 56 wounded French: 52 killed, 134 wounded The Battle of Yorktown (1781) was a victory by a... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Statehood

Virginians were instrumental in writing the United States Constitution. James Madison drafted the Virginia Plan in 1787 and the Bill of Rights in 1789. Virginia ratified the Constitution on June 25, 1788. The three-fifths compromise ensured that Virginia initially had the largest bloc in the House of Representatives, which with the Virginia dynasty of presidents gave the commonwealth national importance. In 1790, both Virginia and Maryland ceded territory to form the new District of Columbia, though in 1847 the Virginian area was retroceded.[36] Virginia is sometimes called "Mother of States" because of its role in being carved into several mid-western states.[46] Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... The Virginia Plan (also known as the Randolph Plan, after its sponsor, or Large-State Plan) was a proposal by Virginia delegates, drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. ... The Virginia ratifying convention was held in 1788 to ratify the Constitution. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The three-fifths compromise was a compromise between Southern and Northern states reached during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 in which three-fifths of the population of slaves would be counted for enumeration purposes regarding both the distribution of taxes and the apportionment of the members of the United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Virginia dynasty is a term sometimes used to describe the fact that four of the first five Presidents of the United States were from Virginia. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

Richmond was the capital of the Confederate States of America.
Richmond was the capital of the Confederate States of America.

Nat Turner's slave rebellion in 1831 and John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859 showed deep social discontent over the issue of slavery in Virginia and its role in the plantation economy. Besides agriculture, slave labor was also increasingly used in mining, shipbuilding and other industries.[47] By 1860, almost half a million people, roughly thirty-one percent of the total population of Virginia, were enslaved.[48] Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Nat Turners Rebellion (also known as the Southampton Insurrection) was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia during August 1831. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish slavery. ... Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 1865. ... A plantation economy is an economy which is based on agricultural mass production, usually of a few staple products grown on large farms called plantations. ...


Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861 after Abraham Lincoln called for a response to the Confederate States of America (CSA) attack on Fort Sumter. Virginia turned over its military and ratified the CSA constitution in June 1861. The CSA then moved its capitol to Richmond. In 1863 forty-eight counties in the northwest of the state separated from Virginia to form the State of West Virginia. Virginia in the American Civil War saw more battles fought than anywhere else, including the Battles of Bull Run, the Seven Days Battles, the Battle of Chancellorsville, and the concluding Battle of Appomattox Courthouse. After the capture of Richmond, the confederate capitol was moved to Danville, Virginia. With the work of the Committee of Nine during post-war Reconstruction, Virginia formally rejoined the union on January 26, 1870, and adopted a constitution which provided for Negro suffrage, a system of free public schools, and guarantee of civil and political rights.[49] is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Virginia began a convention about secession on February 13, 1861 after six states seceded to form the Confederate States of America on February 4. ... Two conflicts during the American Civil War were known as Battle of Bull Run or Battle of Manassas: First Battle of Bull Run Second Battle of Bull Run This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac; 105,445 Army of Northern Virginia; 90,500 Casualties 1,734 killed 8,062 wounded 6,053 missing/captured 3,286 killed 15,009 wounded 946 missing/captured Peninsula... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Joseph Hooker Robert E. Lee Stonewall Jackson† Strength 133,868 60,892 Casualties and losses 17,197 (1,606 killed, 9,672 wounded, 5,919 missing)[2] 12,764 (1,665 killed, 9,081 wounded, 2,018 missing)[2] The Battle of Chancellorsville... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert Edward Lee # Strength Army of the Potomac, Army of the James Army of Northern Virginia Casualties and losses 164[1] ~500 killed and wounded[1] 27,805 surrendered and paroled The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse (April 9, 1865) was... Nickname: River City, City of Churches Motto: A World Class Organization Country United States State Virginia County Independent City  - Mayor R. Wayne Williams, Jr. ... The Committee of Nine was a group of state leaders in Virginia, following the American Civil War, who engineered the political machinery so that the Old Dominion might be readmitted into the Union. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The issue of voting rights in the United States has been contentious over the countrys history. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ...

Oliver Hill oversees the swearing in of the first African American member of the Trial Bureau of the Department of Justice

However during the culmination of the Jim Crow era, legislators rewrote the Constitution of Virginia to include a poll tax and other measures on voter registration that effectively disfranchised African Americans, leading to underfunding for segregated schools and services, and lack of representation in legal positions.[50] From 1900 to 1904, estimated black voting in Presidential elections dropped to zero.[51] African Americans still created vibrant communities and made progress. The first black students attended the University of Virginia School of Law in 1950, and Virginia Tech in 1953.[52] Despite the determination of Brown v. Board of Education, Virginia declared in 1958 that desegregated schools would not receive state funding, under the policy of "massive resistance" spearheaded by Senator Harry F. Byrd.[53] In 1959 Prince Edward County closed their schools rather than integrate them.[54] Oliver White Hill (May 1, 1907 – August 5, 2007) was a civil rights attorney from Richmond, Virginia. ... Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building, Washington, D.C. For animal rights group, see Justice Department (JD) The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... The Virginia Constitutional Convention, 1830, by George Catlin The Constitution of Virginia is the document that defines and limits the powers of the state government and the basic rights of the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... The Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution, adopted in 1870 in response to the American Civil War, prevented any state from denying the right to vote to any citizen on account of his race. ... The University of Virginia School of Law was founded in Charlottesville in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson as one of the original subjects taught at his academical village, the University of Virginia. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Massive Resistance was a policy declared by U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd, Sr. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. ... Prince Edward County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation...


The subsequent lawsuit to open the schools, Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County, was won by Richmond natives Spottswood Robinson and Oliver Hill, leading to the slow integration of Virginia's schools.[53] In addition, the Civil Rights Movement gained many participants in the 1960s and achieved the moral force to gain national legislation for protection of suffrage and civil rights for African Americans. In 1971, state legislators rewrote the constitution, after goals such as legal integration and the repeal of Jim Crow laws had been achieved. On January 13, 1990, Douglas Wilder was elected Governor of Virginia and became the first African American to achieve that office since Reconstruction. Davis v. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Spottswood William Robinson III (July 26, 1916 – November 2, 1998) was the first African-American to be appointed the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Oliver White Hill (May 1, 1907 – August 5, 2007) was a civil rights attorney from Richmond, Virginia. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ...


In 1926, Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, rector of Williamsburg's Bruton Parish Church, began restoration of colonial era buildings in the historic district with financial backing of John D. Rockefeller Jr. resulting in Colonial Williamsburg.[5] World War II and the Cold War led to massive expansion of government programs in the areas near Washington. Northern Virginia was targeted in the September 11, 2001 attacks because of the Pentagon site, where one hundred eighty-five people died. Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Cities and towns

Virginia population density map

Virginia is divided into independent cities and counties, which function in the same manner. According to the US Census Bureau, independent cities are considered county-equivalent.[55] As of 2006, thirty-nine of the forty-two independent cities in the United States are in Virginia. Incorporated towns are recognized as part of the 95 counties in Virginia, but are not independent. There are also hundreds of other unincorporated communities in Virginia. Virginia does not have any further political subdivisions, such as villages or townships. The political subdivisions of Virginia are the areas into which the U.S. state of Virginia is divided for political and administrative purposes. ... Image File history File links Virginia_population_map. ... Image File history File links Virginia_population_map. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A county-equivalent in the United States is a term used by the federal government to describe one of the two following state subdivisions: A unit of local government in certain states which is comparable to a county as found in most states. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... This is a complete list of towns in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. ... The Commonwealth of Virginia is divided into 95 counties and 40 independent cities. ... This is a list of important population centers in the Commonwealth of Virginia that are not incorporated as independent cities or towns as of 2005. ...

Richmond skyline from the Manchester Bridge
Richmond skyline from the Manchester Bridge

Virginia has eleven Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Northern Virginia, Hampton Roads, and Richmond-Petersburg are the three most populated metropolitan areas of the state. Richmond is the capital of Virginia, and the Richmond metropolitan area has a population of over 1.2 million people.[56] Virginia Beach is the most populous city in the commonwealth, with Norfolk and Chesapeake second and third, respectively. Norfolk forms the urban core of this metropolitan area, which is home to over 1.7 million people and the world's largest naval base.[57] Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA)s as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget as of June 2003 a List of U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget as of June, 2003. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Founded 1963 Government  - Mayor Dalton S. Edge Area  - City  350. ...


Although it is not incorporated as a city, Fairfax County is the most populous locality in Virginia, with over one million residents.[58] Fairfax has a major urban business and shopping center in Tysons Corner, Virginia's largest office market.[59] Neighboring Loudoun County, with the county seat at Leesburg, is the fastest-growing county in the United States.[60] Arlington County, the smallest self-governing county in the United States by land area, is an urban community organized as a county.[61] Roanoke, with a population of 292,983, is the largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in western Virginia.[62][63] Suffolk, which includes a portion of the Great Dismal Swamp, is the largest city geographically.[64] Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ... Tysons Corner is an unincorporated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia, near Washington, D.C., and adjacent to McLean, Virginia. ... Loudoun County (pronounced LOUD-un; IPA: ) is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States, and is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. ... Leesburg is a historic town and is the county seat of Loudoun County, Virginia, United States of America. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor Nelson Harris Area  - City  43 sq mi (111. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Founded 1742 Government  - Mayor Linda T. Johnson Area  - City  429. ... The Great Dismal Swamp is located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 691,737
1800 807,557 16.7%
1810 877,683 8.7%
1820 938,261 6.9%
1830 1,044,054 11.3%
1840 1,025,227 -1.8%
1850 1,119,348 9.2%
1860 1,219,630 9.0%
1870 1,225,163 0.5%
1880 1,512,565 23.5%
1890 1,655,980 9.5%
1900 1,854,184 12.0%
1910 2,061,612 11.2%
1920 2,309,187 12.0%
1930 2,421,851 4.9%
1940 2,677,773 10.6%
1950 3,318,680 23.9%
1960 3,966,949 19.5%
1970 4,648,494 17.2%
1980 5,346,818 15.0%
1990 6,187,358 15.7%
2000 7,078,515 14.4%

As of 2006, Virginia had an estimated population of 7,642,884, which is an increase of 78,557, or one percent, from the prior year and an increase of 563,854, or eight percent, since the year 2000. This includes an increase from net migration of 276,292 people into the commonwealth. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 151,748 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 124,544 people.[65] The center of population of Virginia is located in Goochland County.[66] The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1727 Seat Goochland Area  - Total  - Water 751 km² (290 mi²) 14 km² (6 mi²) 1. ...


English was passed as the commonwealth's official language by statutes in 1981 and 1996, and by law in 2006, though the status is not mandated by the Constitution of Virginia.[67] English is the only language spoken by 6,201,784 (86.9%) Virginians, though it is spoken very well by an additional 536,508 (7.5%) for a total of 94.3% of the commonwealth which speaks English. Spanish has the most speakers of other languages, with 412,416 (5.8%). 240,332 (3.4%) speak Asian and Pacific Islander languages, including Vietnamese and Filipino.[68] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Virginia Constitutional Convention, 1830, by George Catlin The Constitution of Virginia is the document that defines and limits the powers of the state government and the basic rights of the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Ethnicity

The five largest reported ancestry groups in Virginia are: African (19.6%), German (11.7%), unspecified American (11.4%), English (11.1%), and Irish (9.8%).[69] 20.8% of Virginians are African-American, most of whom are descendants of enslaved Africans who worked its tobacco, cotton, and hemp plantations. Initially, they were imported from west central Africa, primarily Angola. During the eighteenth century, however, half were derived from various ethnicities located in the Niger Delta region of modern day Nigeria.[70] The twentieth century Great Migration of blacks from the rural South to the North reduced Virginia's black population; however, in the past forty years there has been a reverse migration of blacks returning to Virginia and the rest of the South.[65] Kinship and descent is one of the major concepts of cultural anthropology. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... By county. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... The Niger Delta, the delta of the Niger River in Nigeria, is a densely populated region sometimes called the Oil Rivers because it was once a major producer of palm oil. ... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses. ...


Two-thirds of Virginians are Non-Hispanic White. The western mountains have many settlements founded by Scots-Irish immigrants before the Revolution. [71] There are also sizable numbers of people of German descent in the northwestern mountains and Shenandoah Valley. People of English heritage settled throughout the state during the colonial period, and others of British heritage have migrated there through the decades for work.[72] Because of more recent immigration in the late 20th century and early 21st century, there are rapidly growing populations of Hispanics, particularly Central Americans, and Asians in Northern Virginia. The Hispanic population of the state tripled from 1990 to 2006, with two-thirds of Hispanics living in Northern Virginia.[73] As of 2007, 6.6% of Virginians are Hispanic, 5.5% are Asian, and 1% are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.[65] Northern Virginia has the largest Vietnamese population on the East Coast, with slightly more than 99,000 Vietnamese residents, whose major wave of immigration followed the Vietnam War.[74] The Hampton Roads area also has a large Filipino population, in part related to their tradition of service with the Navy.[75] For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... USN redirects here. ...

Demographics of Virginia (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 75.70% 20.54% 0.76% 4.32% 0.15%
2000 (Hispanic only) 4.17% 0.42% 0.09% 0.07% 0.02%
2005 (total population) 74.94% 20.65% 0.74% 5.20% 0.16%
2005 (Hispanic only) 5.44% 0.46% 0.10% 0.09% 0.03%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 5.84% 7.49% 4.61% 28.64% 17.09%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 3.87% 7.27% 2.22% 28.47% 15.73%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 39.60% 18.30% 22.10% 38.58% 24.16%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

Top Ancestries by County

Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...

Religion

Religious affiliation[76]
Christian: 76% Baptist: 30%
Protestant: 49% Methodist: 7%
Roman Catholic: 14% Lutheran: 2%
Other Christian: 13% Presbyterian: 3%
Judaism: 1% Episcopal: 3%
Islam: 1% Pentecostal: 2%
Other religions: 4% Congregational: 1%
Non-religious: 12% Other/general: 2%

Virginia is predominantly Protestant; Baptists are the largest single group with thirty percent of the population.[77] Roman Catholics, are the second-largest group, and also the third fastest growing. Baptist denominational groups in Virginia include the Baptist General Association of Virginia, with about 1,400 member churches, which supports both the Southern Baptist Convention and the moderate Cooperative Baptist Fellowship; and the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia with over 500 affiliated churches, which supports the Southern Baptist Convention.[78][79] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Presbyterianism is a family of Christian denominations within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... In continuous service since its founding in 1823, the Baptist General Association of Virginia (BGAV) is an umbrella organization of churches that supports and assists them in their various ministries and missions. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc. ... The Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia (SBC of Virginia, or SBCV) is a fellowship of 511 conservative Southern Baptist churches in Virginia and in surrounding areas. ...


While a small population in terms of the state overall, Jewish people have been long part of its history. Encouraged by the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the first congregation began in Richmond in 1789, building the first synagogue in 1791.[80] Early Jewish immigrants to Virginia were Sephardic, linked to trans-Atlantic trading networks. In the 19th and 20th centuries, they were joined by new groups of Ashkenazi Jews from Germany, and later Russia, Poland and eastern Europe.[81][82] For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. ... American Jews, or Jewish Americans, are Jews who are American citizens or resident aliens. ... Language(s) Hebrew, Ladino, Judæo-Portuguese, Catalanic, Shuadit, local languages Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions, Arabs, Spaniards, Portuguese. ... Language(s) Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, English Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Sephardi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, and other Jewish ethnic divisions Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (Standard Hebrew: sing. ...

Christ Church in Alexandria was frequented by George Washington and Robert E. Lee
Christ Church in Alexandria was frequented by George Washington and Robert E. Lee

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arlington includes most of Northern Virginia's Catholic churches, while the Diocese of Richmond covers the rest. The Virginia Synod is responsible for the churches of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, Southern Virginia, and Southwestern Virginia support the various Episcopal churches. In November 2006, fifteen conservative Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Virginia voted to split from the diocese and the larger Anglican Communion church over the issue of sexuality and the ordination of openly gay clergy and bishops. Virginia law allows parishioners to determine their church's affiliation. The resulting property law case is a test for Episcopal churches nationwide, as the diocese claims the church properties of those congregations that want to secede.[83] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Francis Xavier Dilorenzo is the current Bishop of Richmond. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Episcopal Diocese of Virginia is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America encompassing 38 counties in the northern and central parts of the state of Virginia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ...


About fifty percent of those practicing non-Christian faiths come from India. Others may include Vietnamese Americans and others of Asian descent. Together, those who practice Buddhism and Hinduism form the fastest growing group, and largest of the "Other Religions" group, accounting for one percent of the population. Islam, the second fastest growing religious group, accounts for 0.99% of the population.[84] Non-denominational megachurches in the state include McLean Bible Church and Immanuel Bible Church. Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The interior of Rev. ... McLean Bible Church is a non-denominational, evangelical Christian megachurch located in McLean, Virginia, a suburb of Washington, D.C. The head pastor is Lon Solomon, a Jewish convert to Christianity, who joined the church as its fourth pastor in 1980. ... Immanuel Bible Church is a non-denominational Bible church located in Springfield, Virginia, about 2 miles outside of the Capital Beltway and 10 miles outside of [[Washington, DC]. Founded in 1964 as a Baptist church, the congregation met at Lee High School until a suitable structure was established. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Virginia
Tourism is an important sector in Virginia Beach's economy
Tourism is an important sector in Virginia Beach's economy

Virginia's economy is well balanced with diverse sources of income. In 2006, Forbes Magazine named Virginia the best state in the nation for business.[85] As of the 2000 census, Virginia had the highest number of counties and independent cities, fifteen, in the top one-hundred wealthiest jurisdictions in the United States based upon median income. In addition, Virginia tied with Colorado as having the most counties, ten, in the top one-hundred based on per capita income.[86] As of 2007, seven Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the Richmond area.[87] Virginia has seventeen total Fortune 500 companies, making it rank tenth nationwide. Additionally, ten Fortune 1000 companies are in Northern Virginia, with a total of twenty-nine in the state.[88] The Economy of Virginia is well balanced with diverse sources of income. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 782 KB) The Virginia Beach oceanfront, boardwalk, and hotels as seen from the Fishing Pier. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 782 KB) The Virginia Beach oceanfront, boardwalk, and hotels as seen from the Fishing Pier. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... There are 3,142 counties in the United States. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ...


In Southside Virginia from the Hampton Roads area to Richmond and down to Lee County, the economy is based on military installations, and cattle, tobacco and peanut farming. About twenty percent of Virginian jobs are in agriculture, with 47,000 farms, averaging 181 acres (0.28 sq mi/0.73 km²).[12] Tomatoes surpassed soy as the most profitable crop in Virginia in 2006, with peanuts and hay as other agricultural products.[89] Oysters are an important part of the Chesapeake Bay economy, but declining populations due to disease, pollution, and overfishing have diminished catches.[90] Wineries and vineyards in the Northern Neck and along the Blue Ridge Mountains also have begun to generate income and attract tourists.[91] Southside is the colloquial name given to a broad swath of southeastern and/or south-central Virginia. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Lee County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... This article is about the legume. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... For other uses, see Hay (disambiguation). ... The name oyster is used for a number of different groups of mollusks which grow for the most part in marine or brackish water. ... The Northern Neck is the northernmost of three peninsulas on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, USA. This peninsula is bounded by the Potomac River on the north and the Rappahannock River on the south. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ...

The Pentagon, headquarters of the US Department of Defense in Arlington, is the largest office building on earth.
The Pentagon, headquarters of the US Department of Defense in Arlington, is the largest office building on earth.

Northern Virginia, once considered the state's dairy capital, now hosts software, communication technology, and consulting companies. Loudoun and Fairfax counties in Northern Virginia have the highest and second highest median household income, respectively, of all counties in the United States as of 2006.[92] Virginia has the highest concentration of technology workers of any state.[93] One-third of Virginia's jobs are in the service sector.[7] Computer chips became the state's highest-grossing export in 2006, surpassing its traditional top exports of coal and tobacco, combined.[6] The Dulles Technology Corridor near Dulles International Airport has a high concentration of Internet, communications and software engineering firms.[94] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2734x1726, 963 KB) The Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, looking northeast with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2734x1726, 963 KB) The Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, looking northeast with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... The know-how that goes into a given medium. ... For other uses, see Consultant (disambiguation). ... Loudoun County (pronounced LOUD-un; IPA: ) is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States, and is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Located in Northern Virginia near Washington Dulles International Airport, the Dulles Technology Corridor, dubbed the Netplex in 1993 by Fortune magazine are the vital electronic pathways that carry more than half of all traffic on the Internet. ... Aerial photo Washington Dulles International Airport (IATA airport code IAD, ICAO airport code KIAD) serves the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ...


Many of Northern Virginia's well-educated population work directly for Federal agencies. Many others work for government contractors, including defense and security contractors.[95] Well-known government agencies headquartered in Northern Virginia include the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense, as well as the National Science Foundation, the United States Geological Survey and the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The Hampton Roads area has the largest concentration of military bases and facilities of any metropolitan area in the world. The largest of the bases is Naval Station Norfolk.[57] The state is second to Alaska in per capita defense spending.[96] CIA redirects here. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... PTO headquarters in Alexandria The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... The Seven Cities of Hampton Roads are 7 independent cities located in the Hampton Roads region of southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... , NS Norfolk logo Naval Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Virginia, is a base of the United States Navy, supporting naval forces operating in the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Indian Ocean. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ...


Virginia collects personal income tax in five income brackets, ranging from 3.0% to 5.75%. The sales and use tax rate is 5%. The tax rate on food is 2.5%. There is an additional 1% local tax, for a total of a 5% combined sales tax on most Virginia purchases and a combined tax rate of 2.5% on food.[97] Virginia's property tax is set and collected at the local government level and varies throughout the commonwealth. Real estate is taxed at the local level based on one-hundred percent of fair market value. Tangible personal property also is taxed at the local level and is based on a percentage or percentages of original cost.[98] Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...


Culture

Map of nine Virginia cultural regions
Map of nine Virginia cultural regions
Colonial Virginian culture and style is reenacted in Williamsburg.
Colonial Virginian culture and style is reenacted in Williamsburg.

Virginia's historic culture was popularized and spread across America and the South by Washington, Jefferson, and Lee, and their homes represent Virginia as the birthplace of America and of the South.[99] Modern Virginia culture is a subculture in the wider culture of the Southern United States, though it shows elements of the North as well as the South. Although the Piedmont dialect is one of the most famous with its strong influence on Southern American English, a more homogenized American English is favored in Northern and urban areas.[100] The Tidewater dialect is also a distinct local accent.[101] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 500 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 500 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Historic Southern United States. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. ... Piedmont, Virginia is a part of the greater Piedmont region which stretches from the falls of the Potomac, Rappahannock, and James Rivers to the Blue Ridge Mountains. ... Southern American English is a group of dialects of the English language spoken throughout the Southern region of the United States, from Southern and Eastern Maryland, West Virginia and Kentucky to the Gulf Coast, and from the Atlantic coast to throughout most of Texas. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... The Tidewater region of Virginia is a term used to refer to the southeastern portion of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Besides the general cuisine of the Southern United States, Virginia maintains its own particular traditions. Virginia wine is made in made in many parts of the state.[91] Smithfield ham, sometimes called Virginia ham, is a type of country ham which is protected by state law, and can only be produced in the town of Smithfield.[102] Virginia furniture and architecture are typical of American colonial architecture. Thomas Jefferson and many of the states early leaders favored the Neoclassical architecture style, leading to its use for important state buildings. The Pennsylvania Dutch and their style can also be found in parts of the state.[72] The cuisine of the Southern United States is defined as the regional culinary form of states generally south of the Mason-Dixon Line westerly to the state of Texas. ... Virginia wine refers to wine made from grapes grown in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Smithfield ham or country ham is a variety of cured ham from the United States, associated with the Southern United States and Smithfield, Virginia in particular. ... A geographical indication (sometimes abbreviated to GI) is a name or sign used on certain products or which corresponds to a specific geographical location or origin (eg. ... Smithfield is a town located in Isle of Wight County, in the South Hampton Roads region of Virginia in the United States. ... From the colonial era to today, Virginia furniture has a long tradition. ... Colonial house and street. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... The Pennsylvania Dutch (perhaps more strictly Pennsylvania Deitsch or Pennsylvanian German) are the descendants of German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania prior to 1800. ...


Fine and performing arts

See also: Music of Virginia.
The Meadow Pavilion is one of the theaters at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts.
The Meadow Pavilion is one of the theaters at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts.

The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities works to improve commonwealth's civic, cultural, and intellectual life.[103] The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is a state-funded museum with the largest collection of Fabergé eggs outside of Russia.[104] The Chrysler Museum of Art is home to many pieces, stemming from the Chrysler family collection, including the final sculpture of Gian Lorenzo Bernini.[105] Other museums include the popular Science Museum of Virginia, the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum, the Frontier Culture Museum, and the Mariners' Museum. Besides these sites, many open air museums and battlefields are located in the state, such as Colonial Williamsburg, Richmond National Battlefield, and Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Virginias musical contribution to American culture has been diverse, and includes Piedmont blues musicians and later rock and roll bands, many centered at such college towns as Blacksburg, Charlottesville (home of Dave Matthews Band) and Richmond. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution‎ (4,386 × 2,920 pixels, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution‎ (4,386 × 2,920 pixels, file size: 6. ... Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center situated in a setting of rolling hills and woods located on 117 acres (47. ... The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) aims to develop the civic, cultural, and intellectual life of the Commonwealth of Virginia by creating learning opportunities for all Virginians. ... The Virginia Museum of Fine arts, or ‘’’VMFA’’’ is an art museum in Richmond, Virginia. ... The Moscow Kremlin egg, 1906 A Fabergé egg is any one of sixty eight [1] jewelled eggs made by Peter Carl Fabergé and his assistants for the Russian Tsars and private collectors between 1885 and 1917. ... The Chrysler Museum of Art was originally founded in 1939 in Norfolk, Virginia as the Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences. ... Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini; December 7, 1598 – November 28, 1680) was a pre-eminent Baroque sculptor and architect of 17th century Rome. ... The Science Museum of Virginia is a science museum located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Entrance to the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Aerial view of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center is the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum (NASM)s annex at Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia. ... National Air and Space Museum exterior The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution is a museum in Washington, D.C., United States, and is the most popular of the Smithsonian museums. ... The Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia, also referred to as the Frontier Culture Museum, and formerly known as the Museum of American Frontier Culture, is a living history museum based in Staunton, Virginia. ... The Mariners Museum is located in Newport News, Virginia. ... The old town (Den gamle by) — an open air museum in the town of Aarhus, Denmark An open air museum is a distinct type of museum exhibiting its collections out-of-doors. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Richmond National Battlefield Park is a unit of the National Park Service in and around Richmond, Virginia. ... A cannon on Maryes Heights at the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is a unit of the National Park Service in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and elsewhere in Spotsylvania County, commemorating four major battles in the American Civil War. ...


Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is located in Vienna and is the only national park intended for use as a performing arts center. Wolf Trap hosts the Wolf Trap Opera Company, which produces an opera festival every summer. The Harrison Opera House in Norfolk is home to the official Virginia Opera. The Virginia Symphony Orchestra is based in Hampton Roads. The American Shakespeare Center is located in Staunton, and home to resident and touring theater troupes. Other notable theaters include the Ferguson Center for the Arts, the Barter Theatre, and the Landmark Theater. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center situated in a setting of rolling hills and woods located on 117 acres (47. ... Vienna is a town in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... The Wolf Trap Opera Company produces a summer opera festival as part of the program of the Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, Virginia It was established in 1971, and has developed into one of Americas outstanding resident ensemble programs for young opera singers. ... The Edythe C. and Stanley L. Harrison Opera House is the official home of Virginia Opera in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... Virginia Opera is led by its Artistic Director, Peter Mark, who has been with the company since its first major performances in 1975. ... The Virginia Symphony Orchestra is a regional orchestra in Hampton Roads, Virginia, founded in 1920. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Blackfriars Playhouse is the worlds only replica of the Blackfriars Theatre. ... West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton (IPA: or STAN-tehn or STANT-en) is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. ... The Ferguson Center For The Performing Arts is a new theater and concert hall on the campus of Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia. ... Barter Theatre Barter Theatre, located in Abingdon, Virginia, opened on June 10, 1933. ... Landmark Theater, Richmond, VA. The Landmark Theater in Richmond, VA is a theater at the southwest corner of Monroe Park. ...


Besides native music, like Piedmont blues, bluegrass, and the traditional "mountain music" of Appalachia, Virginia has also launched many internationally successful popular music acts. Hip hop acts like Missy Elliott, Timbaland, The Neptunes, Chris Brown, and Clipse hail from the commonwealth. As does Singer-songwriter Jason Mraz, and jam bands like the Pat McGee Band and Dave Matthews Band, who continue their strong charitable connection to Charlottesville, Virginia.[106] Influential stage-rock group GWAR also began at Virginia Commonwealth University. Major performance venues in the state include The Birchmere, Nissan Pavilion, the Patriot Center, and the Verizon Wireless Virginia Beach Amphitheater. The Piedmont blues is a type of blues music characterized by a unique fingerpicking method on the guitar in which a regular, alternating-thumb bass pattern supports a melody using treble strings. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Areas included within the Appalachian Regional Commissions charter. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Missy Elliott (born Melissa Arnette Elliott July 1, 1971 in Portsmouth, Virginia), is a five-time Grammy Award-winning American rapper, singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... Timothy Z. Mosley, who works under the performing name Timbaland (born March 10, 1971), is a Grammy Award-winning American record producer, composer, rapper, and singer. ... The Neptunes is the name for the record production duo consisting of Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo, who created the sound for some very successful Hip Hop, R&B and Pop artists in the late-90s and 2000s. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Clipse is a Virginia based (via The Bronx) hip hop duo. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Jason Thomas Mraz (born June 23, 1977) is an American singer-songwriter, born and raised in Mechanicsville, Virginia, a suburb of Richmond. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... The Pat McGee Band is a rock band from Richmond, Virginia. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer-songwriter and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... GWAR is a satirical heavy metal musical group formed in 1985. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... The Birchmere is a well-known, intimate concert hall in Alexandria, Virginia, known for showcasing quality performers in the jazz, country, and folk genres. ... Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge or Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, VA, is an outdoor live performance amphitheatre with a 25,000 fan capacity, the largest in the Washington Metropolitan area. ... Patriot Center is a 10,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Fairfax, Virginia, on the campus of George Mason University. ... The Verizon Wireless Virginia Beach Amphitheater is a 20,000 seat outdoor concert venue located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. ...


Festivals

The annual Celebrate Fairfax! festival attracts more than 70,000 visitors.
The annual Celebrate Fairfax! festival attracts more than 70,000 visitors.

Many counties and localities host county fairs and festivals. The Virginia State Fair is held at the Richmond International Raceway every September. Fairfax County sponsors Celebrate Fairfax! the second weekend after Memorial Day.[107] In Virginia Beach, the end of September brings the Neptune Festival, celebrating the city, the waterfront, and regional artists.[108] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 587 pixelsFull resolution‎ (814 × 597 pixels, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Celebrate Fairfax took this picture. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 587 pixelsFull resolution‎ (814 × 597 pixels, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Celebrate Fairfax took this picture. ... Fireworks over the Fairfax County Government Center The Celebrate Fairfax! Festival is an annual community-wide celebration that is held during the second weekend after Memorial Day at the Fairfax County Government Center in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... For other uses of the word fair see Fair (disambiguation) Fair is the name for the gathering together of people to display or trade produce or other goods, to parade or display animals and often to enjoy associated carnival or fairground entertainment. ... Carnival rides at the fair The Virginia State Fair is held annually at the end of September, at the former State Fairgrounds (now known as The Richmond International Raceway Complex) located in eastern Henrico County, just outside of the City of Richmond, VA. Competitive weight pumpkins at the State Fair... Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ... Part of the Virginia Beach oceanfront resort strip. ... Prize winning sandcastle at the 2007 Neptune Festival The Neptune Festival in Virginia Beach, Virginia was created by Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce President and RK Chevrolet (also known as RK Auto) founder Richard Kline (businessman) in 1973 to celebrate the unique heritage of Virginia Beach[1]. Since that time...


On the Eastern Shore island of Chincoteague the annual Pony Swim & Auction of feral Chincoteague ponies at the end of July is a unique local tradition expanded into a week-long carnival.[109] The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival is a six-day festival held annually in Winchester that includes parades and bluegrass concerts. From 2005 to 2007, Richmond was host of the National Folk Festival. The Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival is held over four days in May in Reston.[110] The Eastern Shore of Virginia is on the Atlantic Coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Chincoteague (IPA: ) is a town in Accomack County, Virginia, United States. ... A feral horse (an American mustang) in Wyoming A feral animal or plant is one that has escaped from domestication and returned, partly or wholly, to its wild state. ... The Chincoteague pony is a hardy breed between the size of a horse and a pony. ... The Shenandoah Apple Blossom festival is known for its many guest celebrities. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1802 Government  - Mayor Elizabeth Minor Area  - City  9. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The National Folk Festival in the United States (known also as the National) was first presented in St. ... A view of the Reston Town Center Reston is an internationally known planned community whose goal was to revolutionize post-World War II concepts of land use and residential/corporate development in American suburbia. ...


Two important film festivals, the Virginia Film Festival and the VCU French Film Festival, are held annually in Charlottesville and Richmond, respectively. Annual fan conventions in the commonwealth include Anime USA, the national anime convention held in Crystal City, Anime Mid-Atlantic held in various cities, Magfest music and gaming festival, and RavenCon science fiction convention in Richmond. A film festival is the presentation or showcasing of films in one or more movie theaters or screening venues. ... The Virginia Film Festival is a program of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, held usually in late October/ early November. ... Poster advertisement for the 1998 VCU French Film Festival The VCU French Film Festival, an annual festival created by Dr. Peter Kirkpatrick at Virginia Commonwealth University in 1993, is the largest festival of French film in the United States. ... A fan convention, or con, is an event in which the fans of a particular TV show, comic book, or actor, or an entire style of entertainment such as science fiction or anime, gather together to meet famous personalities (and each other) face-to-face. ... Anime USA (AUSA) is a fan convention for anime, manga and Japanese culture enthusiasts. ... Animé redirects here. ... Satellite image of the interlocking highrises of Crystal City. ... Anime Mid-Atlantic is a Japanese animation and cultural festival. ... Originally known as the Mid-Atlantic Gaming Festival, Magfest (Music And Gaming FESTival) is an annual Virginia convention that celebrates video games and the corresponding culture that they create. ... RavenCon is a science fiction convention held in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The first-ever RavenCon was held on April 21-23, 2006, with the next scheduled for April 20-22, 2007. ... Science fiction conventions are gatherings of the community of fans (called science fiction fandom) of various forms of speculative fiction including science fiction and fantasy. ...


Media

Office of the local Abingdon Virginian newspaper
Office of the local Abingdon Virginian newspaper

The Hampton Roads area is the forty-second largest media market in the United States as ranked by Nielsen Media Research, and the Richmond-Petersburg area is sixtieth and Roanoke-Lynchburg is sixty-eighth.[111] There are twenty-one television stations in Virginia, representing each major U.S. network, part of forty-two stations which serve Virginia viewers.[112] About 352 radio stations broadcast in Virginia. The nationally available Public Broadcasting Service, abbreviated as PBS, is headquartered in Arlington. The locally focused Commonwealth Public Broadcasting Corporation, a non-profit corporation which owns public TV and radio stations, has offices around the state.[113] Motto: Honor Pro Antiquis, Fides Pro Futuris Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Washington Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Lois Humphreys Area  - City  8. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor Nelson Harris Area  - City  43 sq mi (111. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the state of Virginia. ... This is a list of radio stations in Virginia, in the United States of America: // News / talk WINA, Charlottesville, 1070 kHz AM WSVA, Harrisonburg, 550 kHz AM WREL, Lexington, 1450kHz AM WLNI, Lynchburg, 105. ... PBS redirects here. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... It has been suggested that MHz Networks be merged into this article or section. ...


Major newspapers in the commonwealth include The Virginian-Pilot, based in Norfolk, the Richmond Times-Dispatch, and The Roanoke Times. The Times-Dispatch has a daily subscription of 186,441, slightly more than the Pilot at 183,024, fiftieth and fifty-second in the nation respectively, while the Roanoke Times has about 97,000 daily subscribers.[114][115] Several Washington, D.C. papers are based in Northern Virginia, such as The Washington Examiner and The Politico. The nation's widest circulated paper, USA Today, is headquartered in McLean. The Arlington based Freedom Forum is an organization dedicated to free press and journalistic free speech.[116] Besides traditional forms of media, Virginia is home to telecommunication companies such as Sprint Nextel and XO Communications. The Dulles Technology Corridor contains the "pathways that carry more than half of all traffic on the Internet."[94] The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... The Roanoke Times is the main newspaper in Roanoke, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... The Washington Examiner is a free daily newspaper published in Alexandria, Virginia, and distributed around Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and their suburbs. ... The Politico is a Washington, D.C.-based political journalism organization that distributes its content via television, the internet, newspaper, and radio. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Boundaries of the McLean CDP as of 2003. ... The Freedom Forum, based in Arlington, Virginia, is a nonpartisan foundation dedicated to free press, free speech and free spirit for all people. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the US. With 55 million subscribers, Sprint Nextel operates the third largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States (based on total wireless customers), behind AT&T and Verizon Wireless. ... XO Holdings, Inc. ... Located in Northern Virginia near Washington Dulles International Airport, the Dulles Technology Corridor, dubbed the Netplex in 1993 by Fortune magazine are the vital electronic pathways that carry more than half of all traffic on the Internet. ...


Education

The University of Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The University of Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Public K-12 schools in Virginia are generally operated by the counties and cities, and not by the state. Virginia's educational system consistently ranks in the top ten states on the U.S. Department of Education's National Assessment of Educational Progress, with Virginia students outperforming the average in all subject areas and grade levels tested.[117] The 2008 Quality Counts report ranked Virginia's K-12 education fifth best in the country.[118] All school divisions must adhere to educational standards set forth by the Virginia Department of Education, which maintains an assessment and accreditation regime known as the Standards of Learning to ensure accountability.[119] As of 2004, Virginia has a 79.3% graduation rate, which is the twelfth highest in the nation.[120] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... The Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building[1]) , ED headquarters in Washington, DC A construction project to repair and update the building facade at the Department of Education Headquarters building in 2002 resulted in the installation of structures at all of the entrances to protect employees and visitors from... The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the Nations Report Card, is the only nationally representative and continuing assessment of what Americas students know and can do in various subject areas. ... Education Week is a magazine in the United States Of America. ... Standards of Learning or (SOL) is a program of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


There are a total of 1,863 local and regional schools in the commonwealth, including three charter schools, and an additional 104 alternative and special education centers in 134 school divisions.[121] Besides the general public schools in Virginia, there are Governor's Schools and selective magnet schools. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, a public school which requires an application, is ranked as the best public high school in the nation.[122] The Governor's Schools are a collection of more than forty regional selective magnet high schools and summer programs intended for gifted students.[123] The Virginia Council for Private Education oversees the regulation of private schools. Charter schools are publicly funded elementary or secondary schools in the United States that have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each schools... This is a complete list of school divisions in the state of Virginia. ... The Governors Schools are a collection of regional magnet high schools and summer programs in the Commonwealth of Virginia intended for gifted students. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJHSST, TJ, Jefferson) is a public secondary magnet school in Alexandria, Virginia. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ...


Individual Virginia public high schools are often well rated, with public Langley High School ranked thirty-seventh best public high school in the nation according to U.S. News & World Report, and H-B Woodlawn in Arlington twelfth according to The Washington Post Challenge Index.[122][124] Northern Virginia schools also pay the test fees for students to take Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams, and Alexandria and Arlington Counties lead the nation in college course tests.[125] // This is a list of high schools in the state of Virginia. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... H-B Woodlawn Program The H-B Woodlawn Program, commonly referred to as H-B, is an alternative all-county public school located in Arlington County, Virginia, United States based on the liberal educational movements of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1749 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - Total 15. ...


Two of the U.S. top ten public universities are located in Virginia, according to the U.S. News and World Report annual college rankings. The University of Virginia is ranked number two and the College of William and Mary, the second-oldest college in America, is ranked sixth.[126] James Madison University has been the number one public master's level university in The South since 1993.[127] Virginia is also home to the Virginia Military Institute, the oldest state military college in the U.S. and a top public liberal arts college.[128] Virginia Commonwealth University is the largest university in Virginia with over 30,000 students, followed closely by George Mason University.[129] Virginia Tech and Virginia State University are the land-grant universities of the state. The state also operates twenty-three community colleges on forty campuses serving over 240,000 students.[130] See Virginia state entry. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... JMU redirects here. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... A military academy (American English), or service academy (British English) is an educational institution which prepares candidates for service in the military (officer corps of the Army), naval service or air force or provides education in a service environment, the exact definition depending on the country. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... George Mason University, also known as GMU or simply Mason, is a large public university in the United States. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... Virginia State University is an historically black university located in Ettrick, Virginia (near Petersburg, in the Richmond area), and was founded on March 6, 1882. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... A community college is a type of educational institution. ...


Health

Bon Secours St. Mary's Hospital in Richmond
Bon Secours St. Mary's Hospital in Richmond

Unlike their nation-leading education system, Virginia has a mixed health record. Virginia falls twenty-third highest among United States in both percentage of residents who exercise, seventy-eight percent, and in the rate of pre-mature deaths, 855.6 per 100,000.[131][132] Though Virginia is ranked as the twenty-first overall healthiest state, it has the fifth highest immunization coverage in the nation according to the United Health Foundation's Health Rankings 2006.[133] As of 2002, Virginia had a 23.7% obesity rate in adults, and thirty percent of Virginia's ten to seventeen year olds were overweight or obese, which is the twenty-fifth lowest percent in the country.[134] As of 2005, only 86.4% of Virginians have health insurance.[135] The term health insurance is generally used to describe a form of insurance that pays for medical expenses. ...


There are eighty-six hospitals in Virginia listed with the United States Department of Health and Human Services.[136] Notable examples include Inova Fairfax Hospital, the largest hospital in the Washington Metropolitan Area, and the Medical College of Virginia (MCV), the medical school of Virginia Commonwealth University, which is home to the nation's oldest organ transplant program. The University of Virginia Medical Center, part of the University of Virginia Health System, which according to U.S.News & World Report has the eight ranked endocrinology specialty in the nation, and the best in the South.[137] Sentara Norfolk General Hospital, part of the Hampton Roads based Sentara Health System, is also nationally ranked, and was the site of the first successful in-vitro fertilization birth.[138][139] List of hospitals in Virginia (U.S. state), sorted by hospital name. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... Inova Fairfax Hospital is the largest hospital in the Washington D.C. area. ... It has been suggested that National Capital Region (United States) be merged into this article or section. ... The Medical College of Virginia was the name of the medical school that merged with the Richmond Professional Institute to form Virginia Commonwealth University. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine from Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1933 as United States News, which in 1948 merged with World Report. ... Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Sentara Healthcare is a not-for-reportable-profit health care organization whose mission is to provide innovative services to treat illness and disease and to promote the improvement of personal health. ... In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a technique in which egg cells are fertilized outside the mothers body in cases where conception is difficult or impossible through normal intercourse. ...


Transportation

Virginia is home to many shortline railroads such as the Buckingham Branch Railroad.
Virginia is home to many shortline railroads such as the Buckingham Branch Railroad.

As of 2007, the Virginia state government owns and operates 84.6% of roads in the state, instead of the local city or county authority.[140] 57,884 miles (93,155 km) of the total 68,429 miles (110,126 km) are run by the Virginia Department of Transportation, making it the third largest state highway system in the United States.[141] Virginia's road system is ranked as the eighteenth best in the nation.[142] While the Washington Metropolitan Area has the second worst traffic in the nation, Virginia as a whole has the twenty-first lowest congestion.[143] With low disbursements for both roads and bridges, and a low road fatality rate, Virginia has a good system with a tight budget.[144] The average commute time is 22.2 minutes.[145] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 376 KB) Photo by William Grimes in Dillwyn, Virginia, USA File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 376 KB) Photo by William Grimes in Dillwyn, Virginia, USA File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A short line is an independent railroad company that operates over a relatively short distance. ... Buckingham Branch Railroad (AAR reporting marks BB) is a Class III short-line railroad operating over 200 miles (322 km) of historic and strategic trackage in Central Virginia. ... The Virginia Department of Transportation, or VDOT, is the government agency responsible for building, maintaining and operating Virginias roads, bridges and tunnels. ...


Virginia has five major airports: Washington Dulles International, Washington Reagan National, Richmond International, Norfolk International and Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport.[146] Seventy-one airports serve the state's aviation needs.[147] Virginia has Amtrak passenger rail service along several corridors, and Virginia Railway Express maintains two commuter lines into Washington, D.C. from Fredericksburg and Manassas. The Washington Metro rapid transit system currently serves Northern Virginia as far west as Fairfax County, although expansion plans call for Metro to reach Dulles Airport in Loudoun County by 2015.[148] The Virginia Department of Transportation operates several free ferries throughout Virginia, the most notable being the Jamestown-Scotland ferry which crosses the James River in Surry County.[149] , FAA Airport Diagram Washington Dulles International Airport (IATA: IAD, ICAO: KIAD, FAA LID: IAD) is a public airport located 25 miles (40 km) west of the central business district of Washington, D.C., in Loudoun County and Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... , Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (IATA: DCA, ICAO: KDCA, FAA LID: DCA) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) south of the central business district of Washington, D.C., in Arlington County, Virginia, United States. ... Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC) is a public airport located in Sandston, Virginia, an unincorporated community within Henrico County which is about 5 miles (8 km) east of Richmond. ... Destinations with direct service from Norfolk Norfolk International Airport (IATA: ORF, ICAO: KORF, FAA LID: ORF) is a public airport located in Norfolk, Virginia, United States. ... Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (IATA: PHF, ICAO: KPHF) is an airport located 9 mi (14 km) northwest of Newport News, Virginia, and serves the entire Hampton Roads metropolitan area along with Norfolk International Airport in Norfolk. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The Virginia Railway Express (VRE) is a commuter railroad service that connects the Northern Virginia area with Washington, DC. The VRE operates on two lines, the Fredericksburg line, which starts from Fredericksburg, Virginia and the Manassas line, which starts from Broad Run Airport in Bristow, Virginia. ... Fredericksburg is the name of some places in the United States of America: Fredericksburg, Indiana Fredericksburg, Iowa Fredericksburg, Ohio Fredericksburg, Pennsylvania Fredericksburg, Texas Fredericksburg, Virginia, the site of the Battle of Fredericksburg Categories: ... Manassas is an independent city located in the state of Virginia. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... The future Silver Line will be an extension of the Washington Metro subway system consisting of 29 subway stations from Route 772 in Loudoun County to Stadium-Armory in Washington, D.C. The line will have stations in Loudoun, Fairfax, and Arlington counties in Virginia, and the District of Columbia. ... Surry County is a county located in the South Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...


Law and government

The Virginia State Capitol building, designed by Thomas Jefferson and begun by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785, recently underwent massive renovations.
The Virginia State Capitol building, designed by Thomas Jefferson and begun by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785, recently underwent massive renovations.

In colonial Virginia, free men elected the lower house of the legislature, called the House of Burgesses, which together with the Governor's Council, made the "General Assembly." Founded in 1619, the Virginia General Assembly is still in existence as the oldest legislature in the Western Hemisphere.[37] The modern government is ranked with an "A-", the highest grade in the nation, by the Pew Center on the States, an honor it shares with two others.[4] The Virginia State Capitol building, designed by Thomas Jefferson, recently underwent massive renovations. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 262 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 262 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. The House of Burgesses was the first elected legislative assembly in the New World established in the Colony of Virginia in 1619. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Virginia functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia, the commonwealth's seventh constitution, which provides for fewer elected officials than the previous constitution, with a strong legislature and a unified judicial system. Modeled on the federal structure, the government is divided in three branches: legislative, executive, and judicial. The legislative branch is the General Assembly, a bicameral body whose 140 members write the laws for the commonwealth. It is stronger than the executive, as incumbent governors cannot run for re-election, and the General Assembly selects judges and justices.[150] The current governor is Tim Kaine. Other members of the executive branch include the Lieutenant Governor and the Attorney General. The judicial branch consists of the Supreme Court of Virginia, the Virginia Court of Appeals, the General District Courts and the Circuit Courts.[151] The Virginia Constitutional Convention, 1830, by George Catlin The Constitution of Virginia is the document that defines and limits the powers of the state government and the basic rights of the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Separation of powers is a term coined by French political Enlightenment thinker Baron de Montesquieu[1][2], is a model for the governance of democratic states. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... This is a list of Governors of Virginia since Virginia became a U.S. state following the American Revolutionary War. ... Timothy Michael Tim Kaine (born February 26, 1958) is an American politician and the current Governor of Virginia. ... The Lieutenant Governor is a constitutional officer of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The Attorney General of Virginia is an executive office in the Government of Virginia. ... The Supreme Court of Virginia is one of the oldest continuous judicial bodies in the United States. ... the court of appeals has appellate jurisdiction on cases from circuit court ... A General District Court is the court most Virginians have contact with. ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ...


The Code of Virginia is the statutory law, and consists of the codified legislation of the General Assembly. The Virginia State Police are the largest law enforcement agency in Virginia, and the Virginia Capitol Police are the oldest police department in the United States.[152] The Virginia National Guard consists of 7,500 soldiers in the Virginia Army National Guard and 1,200 airmen in the Virginia Air National Guard.[153] In 2004, Virginia had the fifteenth lowest rate of violent crime per capita in the United States, but also had the fifth most race related hate crimes.[154] The "total crime risk" is twenty-nine percent under the national average.[145] Since the 1982 resumption of capital punishment in Virginia, ninety-eight people have been executed, second most in the nation.[155] Title page to the Code of 1819, formally titled The Revised Code of the Laws of Virginia The Code of Virginia is the statutory law of the U.S. state of Virginia, and consists of the codified legislation of the Virginia General Assembly. ... Statutory law is written law (as opposed to oral or customary law) set down by a legislature or other governing authority such as the executive branch of government in response to a perceived need to clarify the functioning of government, improve civil order, answer a public need, to codify existing... Virginia State Police is a state agency, established in 1919, that acts as the state police force for the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... . ... The Virginia Capitol Police is Americas oldest police department. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The Virginia National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Capital punishment is legal in the U.S. commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Virginia
Governor Tim Kaine with U.S. Senator John Warner and former Senator and Governor George Allen, and current Representative Thelma Drake
Governor Tim Kaine with U.S. Senator John Warner and former Senator and Governor George Allen, and current Representative Thelma Drake

Virginia's politics reflect a commonwealth in shift from a largely rural, politically Southern and conservative racially divided single-party state.[156] African Americans were effectively disfranchised until after passage of civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s, which was one of the catalysts for their early 20th century Great Migration to northern cities.[157] Enfranchisement and immigration of other groups, especially Hispanics, have placed growing importance on minority voting.[158] Politically moderate urban and growing suburban areas, including Northern Virginia, are the Democratic base.[159] Rural Virginia moved to support the Republican Party in response to their "southern strategy."[160] Portions of Southwest Virginia influenced by unionized coal mines, college towns such as Charlottesville and Blacksburg, and southeastern counties in the Black Belt Region have remained more likely to vote Democratic.[161][162] The politics of Virginia reflect a commonwealth in transition from a largely rural, conservative state to an increasingly diverse and cosmopolitan state with growing suburban areas that increasingly vote Democratic. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Timothy Michael Tim Kaine (born February 26, 1958) is an American politician and the current Governor of Virginia. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972 to 1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since January 2, 1979. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former Republican United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. ... Thelma Drake Thelma D. Drake (born November 20, 1949) is an American politician and a member of the Republican party from the state of Virginia. ... Politics of the Southern United States (or Southern politics) refers to the political landscape of the Southern United States. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... A single-party state or one-party system or single-party system is a type of party system government in which a single political party forms the government and no other parties are permitted to run candidates for election. ... Disfranchisement or disenfranchisement is the revocation of, or failure to grant, the right of suffrage (the right to vote) to a person or group of people. ... was when erikson martinez was rich ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... Southwest Virginia at its greatest geographical definition Southwest Virginia is a mountainous region of Virginia in the westernmost part of the commonwealth. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... Blacksburg is the name of some places in the United States of America: Blacksburg, South Carolina Blacksburg, Virginia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Black Belt Region in the U.S. refers to the social and demographic crescent of 623 southern counties that contain a higher than average percentages of African American residents. ...

2006 Senate election majority results by county, with GOP in red and Democratic Party in blue. The Democratic Party won with 49.6% of the vote.

While Virginia's Governor is a Democrat, the Lieutenant Governor is a Republican, and Republican Robert McDonnell became Attorney General by 360 votes following a legally mandated recount of ballots for that race in 2005.[163] In the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, Fairfax County and other Northern Virginia counties voted for the Democrat for the first time in forty years.[164] In the 2007 state elections, the Democrats regained control of the State Senate, and narrowed the Republican majority in the House of Delegates to eight votes.[165] Virginia is classified as a "swing state" for future presidential elections.[3] The Virginia Senate election of 2006 was held on November 7, 2006. ... The Democratic Party of Virginia is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Virginia. ... Republican Party of Virginia is based in Richmond in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Bob McDonnell Robert F. McDonnell (born June 15, 1954 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania),a Republican, is the Attorney General of Virginia. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Fairfax County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Virginias 2007 state elections will be held on November 6, 2007. ... Historic Partisan Makeup of the Virginia State Senate The Senate of Virginia is the upper house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... The Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... For the film of the same name, see Swing State (film). ...


The election of Democrat Jim Webb as one of Virginia's two U.S. Senators in the 2006 Virginia Senate election demonstrated disaffection with incumbent administration's performance.[166] John Warner, a Republican, has long held Virginia's other seat in the U.S. Senate, but he has announced his intention not to seek reelection in 2008.[167] Both of Virginia's Senators are former Secretaries of the Navy. Of state's eleven seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, Republicans hold eight and Democrats hold three. For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb (disambiguation). ... The Virginia Senate election of 2006 was held on November 7, 2006. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972 to 1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since January 2, 1979. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... This is an incomplete list of United States Representatives from Virginia since 1787 Sources House of Representatives List of Members Category: ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Sports

See also: List of professional sports teams in Virginia.
The Virginia Tech Hokies football team has the fourth longest bowl game streak in the country.
The Virginia Tech Hokies football team has the fourth longest bowl game streak in the country.

Virginia is by far the most populous U.S. state without a major professional sports league franchise.[168] The reasons for this include the lack of any dominant city or market within the state and the proximity of teams in Washington, D.C. which has franchises in all four major sports.[169] Virginia is home to many minor league clubs, especially in baseball and soccer, and the Washington Redskins have Redskins Park, their headquarters and training facility, in Ashburn, Virginia.[170] Virginia has many professional caliber golf courses including the Greg Norman course at Lansdowne Resort and Upper Cascades, Kingsmill Resort, home of the Michelob ULTRA Open. The following is a List of professional sports teams in Virginia. ... Head coach Frank Beamer 20th year, 156–81–2 Home stadium Lane Stadium Capacity 66,233 - Grass Conference ACC - Coastal First year 1892 Athletic director Jim Weaver Website HokieSports. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, originally named D.C. Stadium, is the largest sports venue in the city and has been home to at least 10 professional football, baseball, and soccer teams. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Ashburn, Virginia is an unincorporated area located in Loudoun County, Virginia, 30 miles west of Washington, D.C., and is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... Personal Information Birth February 10, 1955 ) Mount Isa, Queensland Nationality  Australia Wife Laura (married 1981, divorced 2007) Children Morgan Leigh, and Gregory Residence Hobe Sound, Florida Career Turned Pro 1974 Current Tour PGA Tour Professional wins 87 (PGA Tour: 20, European Tour: 14, PGA Tour of Australasia: 33, Other: 22... The MIchelob ULTRA Open at Kingsmill is an annual golf tournament, originating in 2003, for professional female golfers which takes place every May on the LPGA Tour. ...


The Washington Nationals and Baltimore Orioles also have followings due to their proximity to the state, and both are broadcast in the state on MASN.[171] When the New York Mets ended their long affiliation with the Norfolk Tides in 2007, the Orioles adopted the minor league club.[172] Other regional teams include the Cincinnati Reds and the Atlanta Braves, whose top farm team, the Richmond Braves, is located in the capital. Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Washington Nationals (2005–present) Montreal Expos (1969-2004) Other nicknames The Nats Ballpark Nationals Ballpark (2008–present) RFK Stadium 2005-2007 Hiram Bithorn Stadium[3] (San Juan) (2003-2004) Olympic Stadium (Montreal) (1977... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Mid-Atlantic Sports Network (MASN) is a joint network that broadcasts both Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals games in the Washington/Baltimore area. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... League International League Division South Division Year founded 1961 Major League affiliation Baltimore Orioles Home ballpark Harbor Park Previous home ballparks Met Park City Norfolk, Virginia Current uniform colors blue, powder blue, navy blue, black, red Previous uniform colors Logo design The wordmark Tides in navy blue with powder blue... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Class-Level Triple-A (1966-Present) Minor League affiliations International League South Division Major League affiliations Atlanta Braves (1966-Present) Name Richmond Braves (1966-Present) Ballpark The Diamond (1985-Present) Parker Field (1966-1985) Minor League titles League titles 1978, 1986, 1989, 1994, 2007 Division titles Owner(s)/Operated by...


Virginia is home to two NASCAR tracks currently on the Sprint Cup schedule, Martinsville Speedway and Richmond International Raceway. Norfolk born Rex White won the NASCAR Grand National in 1962 and 1963. Current Virginia drivers in the series include brothers Jeff Burton and Ward Burton, Ricky Rudd, Denny Hamlin, and Elliot Sadler.[173] Former Cup tracks include South Boston Speedway, Langley Speedway, Southside Speedway, and Old Dominion Speedway. Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The Sprint Cup is a Group 1 United Kingdom flat racing horse race for those horses aged three years and above run over a distance of 6 furlongs at Haydock Park during September. ... Martinsville Speedway is an International Speedway Corporation owned NASCAR stock car racing track located in Martinsville, Virginia. ... Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... Rex White is a former NASCAR champion. ... Jeffrey Brian Burton (born June 29, 1967 in South Boston, Virginia) also sometimes referred to as JB is a NASCAR Nextel Cup Series driver. ... Ward Burton (born October 25, 1961) is an American NASCAR auto racer. ... Ricky Rudd in 2005, courtesy of the U.S. Air Force Ricky Rudd racing at the Chevy Rock and Roll 400 at Richmond International Raceway. ... James Dennis Hamlin, Jr. ... Elliott Sadler (left) talking with teammate Dale Jarrett. ... South Boston Speedway or SoBo is a race track located in South Boston, Virginia, approximately sixty miles east of another area familiar to most NASCAR fans, Martinsville. ... Langley Speedway is a race track located in Hampton, Virginia, in the United States. ... Southside Speedway (affectionately dubbed The Toughest Short Track in the South) is a short track used for stock car auto racing located just South of Richmond, Virginia in Chesterfield County. ... Old Dominion Speedway (ODS) is a 3/8 mile (0. ...


Virginia does not allow state appropriated funds to be used for either operational or capital expenses for intercollegiate athletics.[174] Despite this, both the University of Virginia Cavaliers and Virginia Tech Hokies have been able to field competitive teams in the Atlantic Coast Conference and maintain modern facilities. Both regularly have attendance of 60,000 at home football games.[175][176] Virginia has several other universities that compete in Division I of the NCAA, particularly in the Colonial Athletic Association. Three historically black schools compete in the Division II Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and two others compete in Division I MEAC. Several smaller schools compete in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference and the USA South Athletic Conference of NCAA Division III. The NCAA currently holds its Division III championships in football, men's basketball, volleyball and softball in Salem.[177] The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... Virginia Tech sponsors 18 sports and competes at the NCAA Division I level. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Old Dominion Athletic Conference is an NCAA Division III athletic conference. ... The USA South Athletic Conference (formerly the Dixie Conference and the Dixie Intercollegiate Athletic Conference) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member schools are located in North Carolina and Virginia. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The logo for the 2006 Division III National Championship game. ... Salem is an independent city located in Virginia, bordered by the city of Roanoke and Roanoke County. ...


State symbols

Main article: List of Virginia state symbols
The Virginia welcome sign on State Route 32 employs the state bird, the cardinal, and the state tree and flower, the dogwood.

The state nickname is the oldest symbol, though it has never been made official by law. Virginia was given the title, "Dominion", by King Charles II of England at the time of The Restoration, because it had remained loyal to the crown during the English Civil War, and the present moniker, "Old Dominion" is a reference to that title.[178] The other nickname, "Mother of Presidents," is also historic, as eight Virginians have served as President of the United States, including four of the first five: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Zachary Taylor, and Woodrow Wilson. Additionally, Virginian Sam Houston served as president of the Republic of Texas. This is a list of state symbols of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 306 KB) Summary Photo by William Grimes Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 306 KB) Summary Photo by William Grimes Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... State Route 32 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia, located in the eastern part of the state. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... Subgenera Cornus Benthamidia Swida The Dogwoods comprise a group of 30-50 species of deciduous woody plants (shrubs and trees) in the family Cornaceae, divided into one to nine genera or subgenera (depending on botanical interpretation). ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Sam Houston, see Sam Houston (disambiguation). ... For the latter day independence movement surrounding Texas, see Republic of Texas (group). ...


Virginia is the only state to have the same plant for state flower and state tree.[179] The majority of the symbols were made official in the late 20th century, though the state motto and seal have been official since Virginia declared its independence.[180] Virginia currently has no state song, as the now state song emeritus, "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny", was retired in 1997.[181] Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Carry Me Back to Old Virginny, written by James A. Bland (1854 – 1911), an Negro minstrel who wrote over 700 folk songs. ...

The genus Corynorhinus consists of the lump-nosed bats, or American long-eared bats. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... This is a list of offical state ships as designated by each states legislature. ... The Cheapeake Bay deadrise is a type of work boat used in the Chesapeake Bay. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The Virginia Reel is an American folk dance that dates from the 17th century. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This article is about the species of fish. ... In a number of countries, plants have been chosen as symbols to represent specific geographic areas. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Cornus florida L. The flowering dogwood (Cornus florida or Benthamidia florida) is a showy small tree native to eastern and southeastern North America. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... Binomial name Chesapecten jeffersonius (Say, 1824) Chesapecten jeffersonius is the state fossil of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilio glaucus, is a large (12 cm wingspan) swallowtail butterfly. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Great Seal of Virginia with the state motto. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... This is a list of official state shells:[1] References ^ List of all state shells http://www. ... Binomial name Crassostrea virginica Gmelin, 1791 The Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a species of oyster that is found on the eastern seaboard of North America. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Virginia is for Lovers balloon. ... This is a list of official U.S. state tartans: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ...

See also

Virginia Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Historic houses in Virginia is a link page for any stately home or historic house in Virginia. ... This is a list of notable people who were born in the U.S. state of Virginia, were raised or lived in Virginia, or for whom Virginia is a significant part of their identity. ... Lost counties, cities and towns of Virginia are those which formerly existed in the English Colony of Virginia or the Commonwealth of Virginia after it became a state. ... Scouting in Virginia has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ...

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  116. ^ "Journalist deaths in Iraq compare to those of WW2", Reuters, The New Zealand Herald, May 31, 2006. Retrieved on 2008-03-24. 
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  118. ^ Quality Counts 2008 (PDF). Education Week (January 9, 2008). Retrieved on 2008-01-09.
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  121. ^ Local and Regional Schools and Centers. Virginia Department of Education (November 19, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-30.
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  139. ^ Szabo, Liz. "America's first 'test-tube baby'", USA Today, May 12, 2004. Retrieved on 2008-02-06. 
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is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Radford University is a medium-size public, state-funded university in the City of Radford, in Southwestern Virginia, founded in 1910 as a womens college and coeducational since 1972. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roanoke Times is the main newspaper in Roanoke, Virginia. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chesapeake Bay Program is the regional partnership that directs and conducts the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... JMU redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library located on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. History Standard Oil president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Raleigh Trevelyan is an author and editor. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yale redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Wallenstein is an author and professor of History at Virginia Tech. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Smithsonian is a monthly magazine published by the Smithsonian Institution of the United States in Washington, DC External link Smithsonian webpage Categories: Smithsonian Institution | United States magazines | Stub ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... July 1, 2005 (Friday) Iraqs ambassador to the UN, Samir Sumaidaie, accuses U.S. Marines of the cold-blooded murder of his 21-year-old cousin during a June 25 raid of his home in Al Anbar province. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Founded 1742 Government  - Mayor Linda T. Johnson Area  - City  429. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded four million Americans. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TIME redirects here. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) aims to develop the civic, cultural, and intellectual life of the Commonwealth of Virginia by creating learning opportunities for all Virginians. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginia Museum of Fine arts, or ‘’’VMFA’’’ is an art museum in Richmond, Virginia. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chrysler Museum of Art was originally founded in 1939 in Norfolk, Virginia as the Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer-songwriter and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... For the officer of arms, see New Zealand Herald Extraordinary. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the Nations Report Card, is the only nationally representative and continuing assessment of what Americas students know and can do in various subject areas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... JMU redirects here. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine from Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1933 as United States News, which in 1948 merged with World Report. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine from Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1933 as United States News, which in 1948 merged with World Report. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Reason Foundation is a nonprofit think tank founded in 1986 that also publishes Reason magazine. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginia Department of Transportation, or VDOT, is the government agency responsible for building, maintaining and operating Virginias roads, bridges and tunnels. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Virginia National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Journal of Black Studies is—in the words of its publisher—a “leading source for dynamic, innovative, and creative research on the Black experience. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mid-Atlantic Sports Network (MASN) is a joint network that broadcasts both Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals games in the Washington/Baltimore area. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States National Arboretum is an arboretum in Washington D.C., owned by the United States Department of Agriculture. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Government Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

  • State Government website
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  • Constitution of Virginia

Tourism & recreation

  • Virginia Tourism Website
  • Virginia State Parks
  • Virginia Main Street Communities, a National Park Service Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary
  • WikiTravel guide

Culture & history

  • Virginia Historical Society
  • Virginia Historical Markers

Maps and Demographics

  • USGS geographic resources of Virginia
  • Virginia State Climatology Office
  • Virginia State Fact Sheet


Preceded by
New Hampshire
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on June 25, 1788 (10th)
Succeeded by
New York

Coordinates: 37.5° N 79° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Virginia Department of Education (0 words)
The Virginia Department of Education is seeking public comment on proposed school bus specifications under review by the Board of Education.
Virginia Commission on Youth – provides a legislative forum in which complex issues related to Virginia youth and their families may be explored and resolved.
Virginia's Community of Learning is a curriculum, instructional, technology and professional development resource for educators.
Virginia (1172 words)
Virginia is in the Western Hemisphere and the Northern Hemisphere.
She is bordered by Maryland to the north, West Virginia and Kentucky to the west, Tennessee and North Carolina to the south, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east.
Virginia is in the Coastal Plain and the Appalachian Mountains regions.
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