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Encyclopedia > Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act
U.S. Firearms
Legal Topics
Assault weapons ban
ATF (law enforcement)
Brady Handgun Act
Federal Firearms License
Firearm case law
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Violent Crime Control Act

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (1994) is a piece of legislation, sponsored by Rep. Jack Brooks and supported by Sen. Barbara Boxer on the heels of the 1993 101 California shooting and passed by the US Congress, which expanded Federal law in several ways. Its most famous provision banned the manufacture of 19 specific semi-automatic "assault weapons" as well as many others defined by a combination of 5 features. This law also banned possession of newly manufactured magazines holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition. Other provisions of the law included a greatly expanded Federal death penalty, new classes of individual banned from possessing firearms, and a variety of new and federal offenses, in areas such as immigration law, hate crimes, sex offenses, and gang-related crime. // Legal Topics Primary Organizations Liberty Belles Prominent individuals Advocates of firearms Gary Kleck Charlton Heston Wayne LaPierre John Lott Ted Nugent Advocates of firearms control Darrell Scotts Congressoinal Speech Michael D. Barnes Michael Bellesiles James Brady Sarah Brady Tom Diaz Arthur Kellermann Michael Moore (Bowling for Columbine) Josh Sugarmann... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ... ATF (BATFE) Seal The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (officially ATF[1], less frequently BATF or BATFE) is a United States federal agency; more specifically a specialized law enforcement and regulatory organization within the United States Department of Justice. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994. ... // A Federal Firearms License, or FFL, is a license that enables an individual or a company to engage in a business that pertains to the production of firearms and ammunitions or the interstate and intrastate sale of firearms. ... Firearm case law decisions are numerous in the history of the United States. ... The Firearm Owners Protection Act (FOPA) is a United States federal law that revised many statutes in the Gun Control Act of 1968. ... The Gun Control Act of 1968, Pub. ... Many US states have legislated gun (firearm) laws, independent of existing federal firearms laws. ... In the United States of America the right to bear arms is addressed in the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... Gun politics in the United States is a contentious topic in the United States. ... The National Firearms Act (NFA), cited as the Act of June 26, 1934, Ch. ... Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, declares the necessity for a well regulated militia, and prohibits infringement of the right of the people to keep and bear arms. ... A straw purchase is a situation in which a buyer uses an intermediary (a straw purchaser) through which to acquire one or more firearms from a licensed firearms dealer. ... The Sullivan Act is a controversial gun control law in New York City. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Jack Bascom Brooks (born December 22, 1922) is a Texas politician. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... 101 California Street is an office building in San Francisco, California. ... Type Bicameralism Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D, since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D, since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The government of the United States of America, established by the U.S. Constitution, is a... Manufacturing, a branch of industry which accounts for about one-quarter of the worlds economic activity, is the application of tools and a processing medium to the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale. ... An Assault weapon is one of a wide group of weapons which some consider inappropriate for civilian ownership. ... A 30-round STANAG magazine. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... Sex crimes are forms of human sexual behavior that are crimes. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Assault Weapons Ban

Main article: Federal assault weapons ban (USA) The Federal Assault Weapons Ban, or AWB, is a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that includes a prohibition on the sale of semiautomatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (600 words)
The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (1994) is a piece of legislation, passed by the US Congress, which expanded Federal law in several ways.
Other provisions of the law included a greatly expanded Federal death penalty, new classes of individual banned from possessing firearms, and a variety of new and federal offenses, in areas such as immigration law, hate crimes, sex offenses, and gang-related crime.
Title VI, the Federal Death Penalty Act, created several new death penalty offenses, including crimes related to drug dealing, drive-by shootings which result in death, civil-rights related murders, murder of a Federal law enforcement officer, and acts of terrorism or the use of weapons of mass destruction which result in death.
Legislating Repression The Federal Crime Bill and the Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (2683 words)
Crime is a commodity that gets politicians elected, creates millions of jobs, and yields enormous profits to news media conglomerates, who compete to report the most heinous crimes.
Crime Bill statisticians have obviously used computer models to project the growth of crime rates beyond the year 2000, and to ensure that none of the buildings constructed with our $10.5 billion will be vacant, the Crime Bill establishes more stringent laws and longer sentencing.
Under the Crime Bill, 60 new offenses are punishable by death, including terrorist homicides; murder of a federal law enforcement official; and large-scale drug trafficking, drive-by shootings, and car-jackings that result in death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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