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Encyclopedia > Vinyl
Chemical structure of the vinyl functional group.
Chemical structure of the vinyl functional group.

A vinyl compound is any organic compound that contains a vinyl group, −CH=CH2. These are derivatives of Ethylene, CH2=CH2, with one hydrogen atom substituted with some other group. Image File history File links Vinyl. ... Image File history File links Vinyl. ... Benzene is the simplest of the arenes, a family of organic compounds An organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon and hydrogen; therefore, carbides, carbonates, carbon oxides and elementary carbon are not organic (see below for more on the definition controversy... General Name, Symbol, Number carbon, C, 6 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 14, 2, p Appearance black (graphite) colorless (diamond) Standard atomic weight 12. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... Covalent bonding is a form of chemical bonding that is characterized by the sharing of pairs of electrons between atoms. ... Ethylene (or IUPAC name ethene) is the chemical compound with the formula C2H4. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ...


A related phrase is vinylidene which stands for the vinyl residue in an organic compound for instance in 1,1-Dichloroethene. 1,1-Dichloroethene, commonly called 1,1-dichloroethylene or 1,1-DCE, is an organochloride with the molecular formula C2H2Cl2. ...


The vinyl group forms part of the allyl group and is also contained in all acrylates. Many alkenes contain a vinyl group. An allyl group is an alkene hydrocarbon group with the formula H2C=CH-CH2-. It is made up of a vinyl group, CH2=CH-, attached to a methylene -CH2. ... Acrylate monomers are esters that contain vinyl groups, that is, two carbon atoms double bonded to each other, directly attached to the carbonyl carbon. ... The chemical structure of ethylene, the simplest alkene. ...


Because of the Covalent bond, vinyls can be made to polymerize, forming vinyl polymers. In these polymers, the double bonds of the vinyl monomers turn into single bonds and the different monomers are joined by single bonds. This is an instance of addition polymerization. There are no vinyl groups in the resulting polymer. It is also important to ascertain the absence of unreacted vinyl monomer in the final product when the monomer is toxic or reduces the performance of the plastic. Covalent bonding is a form of chemical bonding that is characterized by the sharing of pairs of electrons between atoms. ... An example of alkene polymerisation, in which each Styrene monomer units double bond reforms as a single bond with another styrene monomer and forms polystyrene. ... Vinyl polymers are a group of polymers derived from vinyl monomers such as styrene (polystyrene), vinyl chloride (polyvinylchloride), ethylene (polyethylene), propylene (polypropylene) and butadiene (polybutadiene). ... In chemistry, a monomer (from Greek mono one and meros part) is a small molecule that may become chemically bonded to other monomers to form a polymer. ... Addition polymerization,also called polyaddition or chain growth polymerization, is a polymerization technique where monomer molecules add on to a growing polymer chain one at a time. ...


Polymers

Main article: Vinyl polymer

Vinyl polymers are a group of polymers derived from vinyl monomers such as styrene (polystyrene), vinyl chloride (polyvinylchloride), ethylene (polyethylene), propylene (polypropylene) and butadiene (polybutadiene). ... Polyvinyl chloride Polyvinyl chloride, (IUPAC Polychloroethene) commonly abbreviated PVC, is a widely used thermoplastic polymer. ... An example of alkene polymerisation, in which each Styrene monomer units double bond reforms as a single bond with another styrene monomer and forms polystyrene. ... In chemistry, a monomer (from Greek mono one and meros part) is a small molecule that may become chemically bonded to other monomers to form a polymer. ... Vinyl chloride, also known as chloroethene in IUPAC nomenclature, is an important industrial chemical chiefly used to produce its polymer, polyvinyl chloride (PVC). ... Polyvinyl acetate formula Polyvinyl acetate or PVA is a rubbery synthetic polymer. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Chemical structure of polyvinyl alcohol Polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH, PVA, or PVAL) is a water-soluble synthetic polymer. ... Hydrolysis is a chemical reaction or process in which a chemical compound reacts with water. ... Polyvinyl acetate formula Polyvinyl acetate or PVA is a rubbery synthetic polymer. ... Ethenol, also called vinyl alcohol, hydroxyethene or hydroxyethylene, is an alcohol with chemical formula C2H4O (H2C=CHOH) and CAS number 557-75-5. ... Tautomers are organic compounds that are interconvertible by a chemical reaction called tautomerization. ... R-phrases , , S-phrases , , , Flash point −39 °C Autoignition temperature 185 °C RTECS number AB1925000 Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ...

Etymology

The etymology of vinyl is the Latin vinum = "wine", because of its relationship with alcohol (in its original sense of ethyl alcohol). Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Functional group of an alcohol molecule. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
ATSDR - MMG: Vinyl Chloride (4296 words)
Vinyl chloride is thought to depress the CNS via a solvent effect on lipids and protein components of neural membranes that interrupts signal transmission.
Vinyl chloride may lower the myocardial threshold to the dysrhythmogenic effects of catecholamines; it might predispose patients to ventricular ectopy and fibrillation.
Vinyl chloride is rapidly eliminated from the body in the breath and its major metabolite, thiodiglycolic acid, is excreted in the urine.
The Vinyl Institute - How Is Vinyl Made? (344 words)
The vinyl polymer is unusual, however, because it is based only in part on hydrocarbon feedstocks: ethylene obtained by processing, or cracking, natural gas or petroleum.
These properties are passed on directly to vinyl end-products, making vinyl an excellent choice for applications such as electrical conduit and wiring that require high resistance to ignition and flame spread.
Vinyl resin, however, is still one step away from being a usable material: it must be combined with selected chemical additives and modifiers to achieve the various properties desired in vinyl end-products.
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