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Encyclopedia > Vine
A curling tendril
A curling tendril

A vine is any plant of genus Vitis (the grape plants) or, by extension, any similar climbing or trailing plant. The word, ultimately derived from Latin vīnea, originally referred exclusively to the grape-bearing plant; the modern extended sense is largely restricted to North American English, which then uses grapevine to refer specifically to the grape-bearing Vitis species. (Conversely, British English tends to use climber to refer to the broader category, including, for example, ivy.) Look up vine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Download high resolution version (768x1025, 33 KB)Photo of a vine, from http://pdphoto. ... Download high resolution version (768x1025, 33 KB)Photo of a vine, from http://pdphoto. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Veraison be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Veraison be merged into this article or section. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... North American English is a collective term used for the varieties of the English language that are spoken in the United States and Canada. ... British English (BrE) is a broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere. ... Species Hedera algeriensis – Algerian Ivy Hedera azorica – Azores Ivy Hedera canariensis – Canaries Ivy Hedera caucasigena Hedera colchica – Caucasian Ivy Hedera cypria Hedera helix – Common Ivy Hedera hibernica – Irish Ivy Hedera maderensis – Madeiran Ivy Hedera maroccana Hedera nepalensis – Himalayan Ivy Hedera pastuchowii – Pastuchovs Ivy Hedera rhombea – Japanese Ivy Hedera sinensis...


The remainder of this article uses the term vine in its broader, North American sense.


Climbing plants

Climbing plant, covering a chimney
Climbing plant, covering a chimney

Certain plants always grow as vines, while a few grow as vines only part of the time. For instance, poison ivy and bittersweet can grow as low shrubs when support is not available, but will become vines when support is available. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1155x1668, 1268 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vine Talk:Chimney ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1155x1668, 1268 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vine Talk:Chimney ... Species See text. ... Species Solanum dulcamara - Bittersweet Bittersweet, Solanum dulcamara, is a species of vine in the potato genus Solanum, family Solanaceae. ...


A vine is a growth form based on long, flexible stems. This has two purposes. A vine may use rock exposures, other plants, or other supports for growth rather than investing energy in a lot of supportive tissue, enabling the plant to reach sunlight with a minimum investment of energy. This has been a highly-successful growth form for plants such as kudzu and Japanese honeysuckle, both of which are invasive exotics in parts of North America. Conversely, there are some tropical vines that develop skototropism and grow away from the light, a type of negative phototropism. Stem showing internode and nodes plus leaf petiole and new stem rising from node. ... For other uses, see Kudzu (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Lonicera japonica Thunb. ... Purple flowers of the highly invasive Pattersons Curse infest the Warrumbungle National Park in New South Wales, Australia. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Skototropism is another term for negative phototropism, growth away from a light source. ... The Thale Cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) is regulated by blue to UV light (plantphys. ...


The vine growth form may also enable plants to colonize large areas quickly, even without climbing high. This is the case with periwinkle and ground ivy. Vinca is Vinca, a botanical genus; see Periwinkle (plant). ... Binomial name Glechoma hederacea Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea), also called Ground Ivy, of the Mint family (Lamiaceae), is a viney, invasive plant considered a weed in lawns. ...


A climbing habit has evolved independently in several plant families, using many different climbing methods. Some plants climb by twining their stems around a support (e.g., morning glories, Ipomoea species). Others climb by way of adventitious, clinging roots (e.g., ivy, Hedera species), with twining petioles (e.g., Clematis species), or using tendrils, which can be specialized shoots (Vitaceae), leaves (Bignoniaceae), or even inflorescences (Passiflora). Species of Parthenocissus (Vitaceae) produce twining tendrils that are modified stems, but which also produce adhesive pads at the end that attach themselves quite strongly to the support. Species I. alba- Moonflower I. aquatica- Water spinach I. batatas- Sweet potato I. purpurea I. violacea - Beach morning glory The Genus Ipomoea, with over 500 species, is the largest genus in the Family Convolvulaceae. ... Species See text Hedera, English name Ivy (plural, Ivies), is a genus of about 10 species of climbing or ground-creeping evergreen woody plants in the Araliaceae, native in the Atlantic Islands, Europe, North Africa and across Asia east to Japan. ... Species See text. ... In botany, a tendril is a specialized stem, leaf or petiole with a threadlike shape that is used by climbing plants for support and attachment, generally by twining around whatever it touches. ... Genera Acareosperma Ampelocissus Ampelopsis (peppervine) Cayratia Cissus (treebind, treebine) Clematicissus Cyphostemma Nothocissus Parthenocissus (creeper) Pterisanthes Pterocissus Rhoicissus Tetrastigma Vitis (grape) Vua The Vitaceae (or Vitidaceae) are a family of dicots including the grape and Virginia creeper. ... Genera See text The Family Bignoniaceae, or trumpet creeper family, is a taxon of flowering plants comprised mainly of trees, shrubs, lianas, and a few herbs. ... Species Passiflora amalocarpa Passiflora amethystina Passiflora aurantia Passiflora caerulea Passiflora capsularis Passiflora edulis Passiflora foetida Passiflora helleri Passiflora holosericea Passiflora incarnata Passiflora karwinskii Passiflora mucronata Passiflora murucuja Passiflora tenuifila Passiflora tulae Passiflora vitifolia Passiflora yucatanensis Passion flower refers to vines in the genus Passiflora—flowering plants known for their... Parthenocissus is a genus of climbing plants from the grape family, Vitaceae. ...


Most vines are flowering plants. These may be divided into woody vines or lianas, such as wisteria, kiwifruit, and common ivy, and herbaceous (nonwoody) vines, such as morning glory. A liana is woody climber. ... Species See text. ... The kiwifruit (commonly known as kiwi) is the edible fruit of a cultivar group of the woody vine Actinidia deliciosa and hybrids between this and other species in the genus Actinidia. ... Species See text Hedera, English name Ivy (plural, Ivies), is a genus of about 10 species of climbing or ground-creeping evergreen woody plants in the Araliaceae, native in the Atlantic Islands, Europe, North Africa and across Asia east to Japan. ... Morning Glory flower An unopened spiral bud of a morning glory flower Morning glory is a common name for over a thousand species of flowering plants in the family the Convolvulaceae, belonging to the following genera: Calystegia Convolvulus Ipomoea Merremia Rivea As the name implies, morning glory flowers, which are...


One odd group of vining plants is the fern genus Lygodium, called climbing ferns. Here, the plant's stem does not climb, but rather the fronds (leaves) do. The fronds unroll from the tip, and theoretically never stop growing. In the meantime, they can form thickets as they unroll over other plants, rockfaces, and fences. Species Lygodium palmatum - American climbing fern Lygodium japonicum - Japanese climbing fern Lygodium microphyllum The Climbing Ferns are an unusual group of plants (genus Lygodium) of tropical zones, with one temperate and one subtropical species. ...


Climbing plants as Garden plants

Gardeners can use the tendency of climbing plants to grow quickly. If a plant display is wanted fast a climber can achieve this. Climbers can be trained over walls, pergolas, fences etc. Climbers can be grown up other plants to provide additional attraction. Artificial support can also be provided. Some climbers climb by themselves; others need work, such as tying them in and training them. A gardener is any person involved in the growing and maintenance of plants, notably in a garden. ... A brick wall A wall is a usually solid structure that defines and sometimes protects an area. ... In Valencia a newly-installed pergola shows its structure, which the climbing roses will cover. ... A fence in Westtown Township, Pennsylvania A fence is a freestanding structure designed to restrict or prevent movement across a boundary. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Appriss, Inc. - Technology to Serve and Protect (264 words)
VINE communicates with jail and prison booking systems in near real-time, transmitting updated information to the Appriss Data Network™.
Crime victims and the general public can access the information by calling a local toll-free number or visiting www.vinelink.com any time of the day or night.
When a notification is triggered, VINE automatically calls the number or numbers the victim has provided.
Vine - LoveToKnow 1911 (4221 words)
The cultivated vine has usually hermaphrodite flowers; but as it occurs in a wild state, or as an escape from cultivation, the flowers manifest a tendency towards unisexuality: that is, one plant bears flowers with stamens only, or only the rudiments of the pistil, while on another plant the flowers are bisexual.
The vine is hardy in Britain so far as regards its vegetation, but not hardy enough to bring its fruit to satisfactory maturity, so that for all practical purposes the vine must be regarded as a tender fruit.
The vines should be planted inside the house, from 1 to 2 ft. from the front wall, and from 6 ft. to 8 ft. apart, the roots being placed an inch deeper in the soil than before, carefully disentangled and spread outwards from the stem, and covered carefully and firmly with friable loam, without manure.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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