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Encyclopedia > Vincent Gigante
Vincent Gigante

Born March 29, 1928(1928-03-29)
Manhattan, New York, U.S.
Died December 19, 2005 (aged 77)
Springfield, Missouri, U.S.

Vincent "The Chin" Gigante (March 29, 1928December 19, 2005) was a New York mobster who headed the Genovese crime family. Vincent "The Chin" was one of five brothers; himself, Mario, Pasquale and Ralph all became mobsters in the Genovese family. Only one brother, Louis, did not become a Genovese mobster and instead became a priest. Dubbed "the Oddfather," by the press, Gigante often wandered the streets of Greenwich Village, Manhattan in his bathrobe and slippers, mumbling incoherently to himself, in what police characterized as an elaborate act. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2440x3000, 775 KB) (Note: high resolution version from http://memory. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Springfield is a city in Christian and Greene Counties in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Genovese crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (pronounced Grennich Village; also called simply the Village) is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. ...

Contents

Gigante's Greenwich Village Crew

Vincent was an ex-professional boxer who weighed close to three hundred pounds. On May 2nd 1957, he was ordered by Vito Genovese to murder Frank Costello. Vincent shot Costello as he entered the lobby at 115 Central Park West, where he had an apartment, on the corner of 7nd Street, Manhattan. But just as Gigante fired his .38-caliber handgun, Costello moved, causing the bullet to graze the right side of his head. Because Costello went down as if he was dead, Gigante thought the mob boss was dead and sped away in a black Cadillac. Costello refused to identify his attempted assassin, yet the doorman at 115 Central Park West did. But when tried for the shooting, his defense team effectively challenged the credibility of the doorman, and Gigante went free. Gigante could pull off many miracles, though his favorite ploy was the "bug act", pretending to be punch-drunk from his boxing days. Even when not under indictment, he prepared for those inevitable times (knowing the police watched him) by picking up cigarette butts off the street and smoking them, gesturing wildly in the air, having long, loud arguments with himself, or dropping his pants to urinate in the street. Look up boxer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Vito Don Brandon Genovese (November 27, 1897 – February 14, 1969) was a mafioso who rose to power in America during the Castellammarese War to later become leader of the Genovese crime family. ... Frank Costello, born Francesco Castiglia, or Castilla (January 26, 1891 - February 18, 1973) was an American gangster who rose to the top of Americas underworld, controlled a vast gambling empire across the United States and had political influence like no other La Cosa Nostra boss. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Gigante ran a crew from Greenwich Village, Manhattan, that was formerly overseen by Vito Genovese and later Anthony "Tony Bender" Strollo. Gigante's crew was based out of the Triangle Social Club, located at 208 Sullivan Street, but also met with fellow crew members at the Dante Social Club at 81 McDougal Street, and the Panel Social Club at 208 Thompson Street. Besides those locations, Gigante met with gangsters and business associates at his mother's apartment located at 225 Sullivan Street. The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Vito Don Brandon Genovese (November 27, 1897 – February 14, 1969) was a mafioso who rose to power in America during the Castellammarese War to later become leader of the Genovese crime family. ... Anthony C. Strollo (June 18, 1899-April 8, 1962?), also known under his alias Tony Bender, was a New York mobster who served as a high ranking member in three of New Yorks Five Families. Born in New York City, New York, Strollo grew up on Monroe Street near... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Gigante's closest associates included his brother Mario Gigante, sons Andrew Gigante and Vincent Esposito, Dominick Alongi, Venero "Benny Eggs" Mangano, Frank "Frankie California" Condo, Dominick DiQuarto, Thomas D'Antonio, Frank Caggiano, Louis "Bobby" Manna, Dominick "Quiet Dom" Cirillo, Joseph Denti, and Joseph Sarcinella. Mario Gigante (b. ... Venero Frank Mangano (September 7, 1921-) is a high ranking member of the Genovese crime family. ... Louis Manna (b. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The crew controlled many of the organized crime activities throughout downtown Manhattan, and Gigante would go on to become the most powerful boss of the New York La Cosa Nostra from the early 1980s until his death. Some of the rackets included labor racketeering, gambling, loan sharking, hijackings, and extortion of businesses. Through his brother Mario, who later became a capo of his own crew, the Gigantes maintained influence in the Bronx, Yonkers and upper Westchester.


Genovese Crime Boss

Vincent Gigante was a protege of both Vito Genovese and ultra-secretive boss Philip "Benny Squints" Lombardo. As boss of the family, Gigante strengthened the family's stranglehold of some of New York City's most lucrative rackets, including the New York Coliseum, Jacob K. Javits Center, labor racketeering, the drywall business, Concrete Club, Fulton Fish Market, drug trafficking, private waste industry, and gambling. Vito Don Brandon Genovese (November 27, 1897 – February 14, 1969) was a mafioso who rose to power in America during the Castellammarese War to later become leader of the Genovese crime family. ... Philip Benny Squint Lombardo (1911-?) was a New York City mob boss to the Genovese crime family in 1981. ... The Markets Interior The Fulton Fish Market is a fish market in New York, United States. ...


Gigante was a very reclusive boss, managing to never be picked up on a wiretap by the FBI or other law enforcement agencies and managed to remain on the streets longer than all of his contemporaries. Gigante made Venero "Benny Eggs" Mangano his underboss and sent his orders only through his closest associates thereby insulating himself from the other family's bosses and lower ranking wiseguys. Venero Frank Mangano (September 7, 1921-) is a high ranking member of the Genovese crime family. ...


While preferring to remain by the scenes, Gigante would not hesitate to authorize the use of violence and was responsible for ordering the slayings of Philadelphia family mobsters John "Johnny Keys" Simone, Anthony Caponigro, Fred Salerno, and Frank Sindone for the unsanctioned murder of Philadelphia boss Angelo Bruno, and Philadelphia mobsters Frank Narducci and Rocco Marinucci for the unsanctioned murder of Bruno's successor. Gigante also ordered the murders of Genovese soldier Jerry Papa and many other New York City wiseguys who failed to adhere to the powerful Genovese boss's directives. This article is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Angelo Bruno (1911 - March 12, 1980) was a member of the US Mafia who ran the Mafias faction in Philadelphia. ...


During his tenure as boss of the Genovese borgata, Gigante would come to be known as the de facto Capo de tutti Capi, the "Boss of all Bosses", even though that position had been abolished decades before. Gigante was the most cunning, intelligent, and generally powerful Cosa Nostra don of his era. Don Chin was a true politician and godfather who understood the rules and politics of Cosa Nostra.


Feigning legal insanity

In 1969, Gigante started feigning mental illness to escape criminal prosecution. He escaped conviction on bribery charges by producing a number of prominent psychiatrists who testified that he was legally insane. The doctors said Gigante suffered from schizophrenia, dementia, psychosis, and other disorders. Gigante allegedly enlisted his mother and wife to help him in these deceptions. In 1986, the official Genovese boss, Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno, was convicted on charges of murder and racketeering and sentenced to 100 years in prison. However, former mobster and turncoat Vincent Cafaro soon revealed that Salerno was just a front boss, a figurehead; the real boss of the family since 1981 was Gigante. Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Bribery is a crime implying a sum or gift given alters the behaviour of the person in ways not consistent with the duties of that person. ... For other uses, see Psychiatrist (disambiguation). ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder typically stemming from a form of mental illness. ... For other uses, see Dementia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Psychosis (disambiguation). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthony Salerno (1911 - July 27, 1992) was a member of the US Mafia and headed the Genovese family during the 1980s. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Vincent Vinny the Fish Cafaro (b. ...


In 1990, Gigante was arrested and charged with racketeering and murder; however, it wasn't until 1997 that he was brought to trial. During that time period, Gigante's lawyers produced witness after witness who testified that Gigante was mentally ill and unfit to stand trial. However, all this changed when a number of prominent Mafia members from various families began to cooperate with the government in the early 1990s. This article is about the year. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ...


Foremost among the cooperating witnesses was Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano, former underboss of the Gambino crime family, who became a cooperating witness in 1991. Gravano testified that on the two occasions he met Gigante, the mob boss was perfectly lucid and clear in his thinking. Other turncoat witnesses such as Phil Leonetti of the Bruno crime family of Philadelphia implicated Gigante in ordering the murder of several Bruno family members in the early 1980s. Additionally, Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso, former underboss of the Lucchese crime family, implicated Gigante in a 1986 plan to have Casso kill new Gambino boss John Gotti, Gotti associate Frank DeCicco and Gotti's brother Gene Gotti. Sammy The Bull Gravano (born March 12, 1945) was underboss of the Gambino family in the 1980s under John Gotti. ... John Gotti, The Dapper Don The Gambino Crime Family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities based in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Phillip Leonetti Date of birth: March 27,1953 Height: 5 ft 7 in Weight: 150 lb. ... The Philadelphia crime family is an Italian criminal organization based in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Anthony Gaspipe Casso. ... The Lucchese crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... For other persons named John Gotti, see John Gotti (disambiguation). ... Frank DeCicco (1935 - April 13, 1986) was a New York mobster and member of the Gambino crime family. ... Gene Gotti Gene Gotti is a member of the American Mafias Gambino crime family. ...


Conviction and imprisonment

In Summer 1997, Gigante was finally convicted on several racketeering and conspiracy charges and sentenced to 12 years in a federal prison. Despite his lawyers' and psychiatrists' claims that he has been legally insane for more than 30 years, the jury convicted him on all but the murder charges, which would have mandated a life sentence without parole. In the criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between natural persons to break the law at some time in the future, and, in some cases, with at least one overt act in furtherance of that agreement. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ...


On April 7, 2003, he pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in Federal District Court, acknowledging that his "insanity" was a pretense in order to delay his racketeering trial. This was part of a deal to avoid another set of charges that would have brought on a lengthy trial (he was 75 at the time). Instead, he had another three years added to his sentence.[1] April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...


Death

In 2005, Gigante's health started to decline. He started suffering labored breathing, oxygen deprivation, swelling in the lower body, and bouts of unconsciousness. In November 2005, Flora Edwards, his lawyer, sued officials at the Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Missouri to transfer Gigante to an acute care hospital. Transferred to a private medical facility, Gigante rallied physically. In early December, he was transferred back to Springfield, where he died 10 days later on December 19, 2005. Springfield is a city in Christian and Greene Counties in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Acute care refers to necessary treatment of a disease for only a short period of time in which a patient is treated for a brief but severe episode of illness. ...


On December 23, 2005, after a service at Saint Anthony of Padua Church in Greenwich Village, Gigante's body was cremated at the historic Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. He is survived by eight children (five from his wife and three from his mistress) and his prominent cousins from Boston. (The cousins spell their name both Gigante and Giganti.) Gigante's lawyer has said that the family intends to sue the federal government over Gigante's health care treatment while in prison. The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York, now in Brooklyn. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ...


Gigante's release-year was 2010.


Further reading

  • Capeci, Jerry. The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Mafia. Indianapolis: Alpha Books, 2002. ISBN 0-02-864225-2
  • Jacobs, James B., Coleen Friel and Robert Radick. Gotham Unbound: How New York City Was Liberated from the Grip of Organized Crime. New York: NYU Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8147-4247-5
  • Maas, Peter. Underboss: Sammy the Bull Gravano's Story of Life in the Mafia. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1997. ISBN 0-06-093096-9
  • Raab, Selwyn. Five Families: The Rise, Decline, and Resurgence of America's Most Powerful Mafia Empires. New York: St. Martin Press, 2005. ISBN 0-312-30094-8

Footnotes

  1. ^ Vincent Gigante, Mob Boss Who Feigned Incompetence to Avoid Jail, Dies at 77 - New York Times

External links

Preceded by
Anthony Salerno
Genovese Crime Family Boss
1981-2005
Succeeded by
Dominick Cirillo
Boxrec. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Anthony Salerno (1911 - July 27, 1992) was a member of the US Mafia and headed the Genovese family during the 1980s. ... The Genovese crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vincent Gigante - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1105 words)
Gigante was arrested and charged in 1990 on charges of racketeering and murder, but it was another 7 years before he was brought to trial.
Gigante was finally convicted on several racketeering, conspiracy, and related charges in the summer of 1997 and sentenced to 12 years in a federal prison.
Gigante was cremated at the historic Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.
Vincent Gigante; 'Oddfather' kept feds at bay with mental-illness pretense | The San Diego Union-Tribune (1020 words)
Vincent Gigante, who feigned mental illness for decades to camouflage his position as one of the nation's most influential and dangerous Mafia leaders, died Dec. 19 at the U.S. Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Mo. He was 77.
Gigante was serving a 12-year prison sentence imposed in 1997 after he was convicted on federal charges of racketeering and conspiring to kill other mobsters.
Vincent Gigante was born March 29, 1928, in New York City and grew up on the same streets in Greenwich Village where he would spend most of his adult life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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