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Encyclopedia > Vince Foster
Vincent Walker Foster, Jr.

Vince Foster
Born January 15, 1945(1945-01-15)
Hope, Arkansas
Died July 20, 1993 (aged 48)
Fairfax County, Virginia
Occupation Deputy White House counsel
Spouse Lisa Foster
Children 3
Website
Vince Foster's journal

Vincent Walker Foster, Jr. (January 15, 1945July 20, 1993) was a Deputy White House Counsel during the first term of President Bill Clinton, and also a law partner and friend of Hillary Rodham Clinton. His death was ruled a suicide by multiple official investigations, but remains a subject of interest among conspiracy theorists. Image File history File links Vince_Foster. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life and education

Foster was born in Hope, Arkansas, where he was a childhood neighbor and friend of Bill Clinton for the first eight years of his life, until Clinton moved away. He graduated from Hope High School in 1963[citation needed] as president of his class.[1] He attended Davidson College, graduating in 1967.[citation needed] After starting at Vanderbilt University Law School, he transferred to the University of Arkansas School of Law, where he was managing editor of the law review[2] and graduated first in his class in 1971.[citation needed] Additionally he scored the highest in his class on the Arkansas bar exam.[3] Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Hope High School can refer to: Hope High School in Los Angeles, California Hope High School in Hope, Arkansas Hope High School in Hope, Kansas Hope High School in Hope, North Dakota Hope High School in Providence, Rhode Island Hope High School in Salford, England Categories: | ... Davidson College is a private liberal arts college for 1,700 students in Davidson, North Carolina, USA. Both the town and college were named for Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, a Revolutionary War commander. ... The Vanderbilt University Law School (VULS) is the law school at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The University of Arkansas School of Law was established in 1924 at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ... A bar examination is an series of tests conducted at regular intervals to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given American examination usually consists of the following: complicated essay questions concerning that jurisdictions law; the Multistate Bar Examination, a standardized, nationwide examination containing generalized...


Foster married Elizabeth (Lisa) Brader in 1968.[citation needed] They had three children, Vince III, Laura, and Brugh.[citation needed]


Arkansas lawyer

After law school Foster joined the Rose Law Firm in Arkansas,[4] and within two years was made partner,[2] one of only nine in the firm at the time.[5] He was the head of the Arkansas Bar Association committee that oversaw legal aid, and as such worked with legal aid clinic worker Hillary Rodham in successfully overcoming an unreasonable measuring requirement for indigent clients.[4] Foster then initiated the hiring of Rodham at Rose Law Firm, where she became its first ever female associate[4] (and later partner); Foster and fellow partner Webster Hubbell were instrumental in overcoming the reluctance of other partners to hire a woman.[5] Rose Law Firm is a law firm headquartered in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... Most liberal democracies consider that it is necessary to provide some level of legal aid to persons otherwise unable to afford legal representation. ... Webster Lee Hubbell (born 1949), known as Webster L. Hubbell, was an Arkansas lawyer and politician. ...


Hillary Rodham Clinton's memoirs call Foster "one of the best lawyers I've ever known," and compared him in style and substance to Gregory Peck's Atticus Finch role in the classic 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird.[4] Writer Carl Bernstein has described Foster as "tall, with impeccable manners and a formal mien...elegant in perfectly tailored suits, and soft-spoken to the point of taciturnity."[5] Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Atticus Finch is a character in Harper Lees Pulitzer Prize-winning fictional novel To Kill A Mockingbird. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 Academy Award winning film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ...


Foster practiced mostly corporate law,[6] eventually earning nearly $300,000 a year.[6] By the time Bill Clinton was elected president in 1992, Vince Foster was at the pinnacle of the Arkansas legal establishment,[7] having received the Outstanding Lawyer Award from the Arkansas Bar Association,[2], while being described as the "soul" of Rose Law Firm[2] and soon being named one of "The Best Lawyers in America."[2] Corporate law (also corporations law or company law) refers to the law establishing separate legal entities known as the company or corporation and governs the most prevalent legal models for firms, for instance limited companies (Ltd or Pty Ltd), publicly limited companies (plc) or incorporated businesses (Inc. ...


White House Counsel

After Clinton's 1992 election, Foster joined his White House staff. The Foster residence was on Cambridge Place in Georgetown in Washington, D.C.[8] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ...


Foster had difficulty making the transition to life and politics in Washington.[7] He found his involvement in vetting new presidential appointments during the transition period to be causing him depression and anxiety,[7] and he blamed himself for the failed Zoe Baird nomination.[7] The failed Kimba Wood and Lani Guinier appointments were also in his purview.[9] His wife and youngest son were not with him, having stayed behind in Arkansas so the son could complete his senior year of high school.[1] Foster handled the Clintons' Madison Guaranty and Industrial Development Corporation paperwork,[10] and several Whitewater-related tax returns as Deputy White House counsel.[11] For other uses, see Depression. ... This article is about state anxiety. ... Zoe Baird (born 1952) was a U.S. lawyer. ... Kimba Wood (born 1944) is a U.S. federal judge. ... Lani Guinier (born 1950) is arguably one of the foremost American civil rights scholars in the United States. ... Madison Guaranty is an Arkansas financial trust company. ... The Whitewater Controversy (also called the Whitewater scandal or simply Whitewater) was an American political controversy concerning the real estate dealings of Bill and Hillary Clinton and their associates in the Whitewater Development Agency during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Tax returns (in the United States) are reports filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or with the state or local tax collection agency (California Franchise Tax Board, for example) containing information used to calculate income tax or other taxes. ...


In early May 1993, Foster gave the commencement address at his University of Arkansas Law School alma mater, and said: 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...

The reputation you develop for intellectual and ethical integrity will be your greatest asset or your worst enemy. You will be judged by your judgment. ... There is no victory, no advantage, no fee, no favor, which is worth even a blemish on your reputation for intellect and integrity. ... Dents to [your] reputation are irreparable."[1]

Days after the speech, the White House travel office controversy erupted.[1] Foster was the target of several hostile Wall Street Journal editorials in June and July 1993,[7] with titles such as "Who is Vincent Foster?"[6] He became quite upset over the travel office matter and the possibility of a congressional hearing[7] at which he may have been called to testify.[9] Disliking the public spotlight[6] and suffering from weight loss and insomnia,[7] he considered resigning his position but feared a personal humiliation upon returning to Arkansas.[7] The White House travel office controversy began on May 19, 1993, when several longtime employees of the White House Travel Office were fired. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Weight loss, in the context of medicine or health or physical fitness, is a reduction of the total body weight, due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue and/or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon and other connective tissue. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ...


Death

Location at Fort Marcy Park where Foster's body was found on July 20, 1993
Location at Fort Marcy Park where Foster's body was found on July 20, 1993

Wrestling with clinical depression, Foster was prescribed the mild sleeping aid/anti-anxiety pill Trazodone over the phone by his doctor, though he only had taken a few before he died. The next day, Foster was found dead in Fort Marcy Park, a federal park in Virginia. He was found with a gun in his hand and gunshot residue on that hand. An autopsy determined that he was shot in the mouth and no other wounds were found on his body. A suicide note of sorts, actually a draft of a resignation letter, was found torn into 27 pieces in his briefcase, a list of complaints specifically including, "The WSJ editors lie without consequence"[12] and lamenting, "I was not meant for the job or the spotlight of public life in Washington. Here ruining people is considered sport." At the end of the Civil War in 1865, the system of fortications (now known as Fort Circle Parks) which surrounded the capital city, Washington DC, were dismantled. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... Trazodone (trade names Desyrel, Molipaxin, Trittico, Thombran, Trialodine) is a psychoactive compound with sedative, anxiolytic, and antidepressant properties. ... At the end of the Civil War in 1865, the system of fortications (now known as Fort Circle Parks) which surrounded the capital city, Washington DC, were dismantled. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the medical procedure. ... A suicide note is a message left by someone who later attempts or commits suicide. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


His funeral Mass was held at the Cathedral of St. Andrew Catholic Church in Little Rock. Bill Clinton gave an emotional eulogy in which he recalled their boyhood times together and quoted a line from Leon Russell's "A Song for You": "I love you in a place that has no space and time."[13] Foster was buried in Memory Gardens Cemetery in his hometown of Hope. Foster was 48 years old and left behind his wife and three adult children. For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Little Rock redirects here. ... Look up eulogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Leon Russell (born Claude Russell Bridges on April 2, 1942 in Lawton, Oklahoma, United States) is a singer, songwriter, pianist, and guitarist. ... A Song for You is a 1970 song written and originally performed by rock singer-songwriter Leon Russell. ...


Subsequent investigations

Main article: Death of Vince Foster

There have been three official investigations into Foster's death, all of which concluded that he committed suicide.[14] Vince Foster Deputy White House counsel Vince Foster was found dead in Fort Marcy Park off the George Washington Parkway in Virginia, outside Washington, D.C., on July 20, 1993. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


The first was by the United States Park Police in 1993, in whose jurisdiction the original investigation fell. Due to Foster's position in the White House, the Federal Bureau of Investigation assisted in the investigation. Investigations by a coroner and Independent Counsel Robert B. Fiske, in a 58-page report released in 1994, also concluded that Foster had committed suicide.[9] Conspiracy theories of a cover-up still persisted. After a three-year investigation, Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth Starr[15][16] released a report in 1997 also concluding that the death was a suicide.[9] The United States Park Police is the oldest uniformed federal law enforcement agency in the United States. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... United States Office of the Independent Counsel was an independent prosecutor — distinct from the Attorney General of the United States Department of Justice — that provided reports to the Congress under Title 28 of the United States Code, Section 595. ... Robert Bishop Fiske, Jr. ... This article is about a short-lived television series. ... Kenneth Winston Starr Kenneth Winston Starr (born July 21, 1946) is an American lawyer and former judge who was appointed to the Office of the Independent Counsel to investigate the death of the deputy White House counsel Vince Foster and the Whitewater land transactions by President Bill Clinton. ...


In addition, two investigations by the U.S. Congress also found that Foster committed suicide.[9] The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...


Legacy

Foster's death, occurring just six months into the new administration, is thought by some to have ended the optimism and remaining innocence from much of the White House staff.[17] White House chief-of-staff and childhood friend Mack McLarty said that "It was a deep cut. It clearly had a tremendous impact."[17] Fellow White House Counsel Bernard Nussbaum felt that if Foster had lived, he would have helped resist the calls to appoint Independent Counsels, and the many investigations lumped under the Whitewater umbrella that occupied the administration and the Clintons for the rest of their terms, might not have happened.[17] As it happened, how the White House and Hillary Clinton in particular handled Foster's files and documents immediately after his death became an issue of much investigation itself.[18][9] Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty III, (born 1946) is a prominent Arkansas business and political leader and former White House Chief of Staff for US President Bill Clinton, and current President of Kissinger McLarty Associates (his consulting company with Henry Kissinger) and President and Chief Executive Officer of Asbury Automotive Arkansas... Bernard W. Nussbaum was White House Counsel under Bill Clinton, and during his tenure was accused of being involved in Filegate. ...


See also

Vince Foster Deputy White House counsel Vince Foster was found dead in Fort Marcy Park off the George Washington Parkway in Virginia, outside Washington, D.C., on July 20, 1993. ... The Whitewater Controversy (also called the Whitewater scandal or simply Whitewater) was an American political controversy concerning the real estate dealings of Bill and Hillary Clinton and their associates in the Whitewater Development Agency during the 1970s and 1980s. ...

References

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d Ronald W. Maris; Alan L. Berman, Morton M. Silverman (2000). Comprehensive Textbook of Suicidology. Guilford Press. ISBN 157230541X.  pp. 280–281.
  2. ^ a b c d e "TRIBUTE TO VINCENT FOSTER, JR.", Congressional Record, July 29, 1993.
  3. ^ Vince Foster: One of the Best and Brightest. Retrieved on 2006-05-02.
  4. ^ a b c d Hillary Rodham Clinton, Living History, Simon & Schuster, 2003, ISBN 0-7432-2224-5, pp. 78-81.
  5. ^ a b c Carl Bernstein, A Woman in Charge: The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton, Knopf, ISBN 0375407669. pp. 128-131.
  6. ^ a b c d Jason DeParle, " A Life Undone: Portrait of a White House Aide Ensnared by His Perfectionism", The New York Times, August 22, 1993. Accessed July 29, 2007.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h David Von Drehle and Howard Schneider, "Foster's Death a Suicide", The Washington Post, July 1, 1994. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  8. ^ Vince Foster Home. Retrieved on 2006-05-02.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Gerald S. Greenberg, Historical Encyclopedia of U.S. Independent Counsel Investigations, Greenwood Press, 2000. ISBN 0313307350. pp 133-134.
  10. ^ "Rose Law Firm billing records", Frontline, WGBH educational foundation: PBS. 
  11. ^ Jeff Gerth and Stephen Labaton, " Whitewater Papers Cast Doubt on Clinton Account of a Tax Underpayment", The New York Times, August 6, 1995. Accessed April 30, 2007.
  12. ^ "Robert L. Bartley: The Wall Street Journal's editor emeritus dies at 66", The Wall Street Journal, 2003-12-10. Retrieved on 2008-01-01. 
  13. ^ Jason DeParle, " President Returns Home To Bury Boyhood Friend", The New York Times, July 24, 1993. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  14. ^ Office of the Independent Counsel. "Report on the Death of Vincent W. Foster, Jr." October 10, 1997
  15. ^ Full text of the report on the 1993 death of White House counsel Vincent W. Foster, Jr., compiled by Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth Starr.
  16. ^ Report: Starr Rules Out Foul Play In Foster Death CNN February 23, 1997
  17. ^ a b c "One Death Altered Path of Presidency", Peter Baker, Washington Post, July 20, 1998.
  18. ^ "Memo Links First Lady To Handling Of Suicide Note", CNN.com, August 27, 1996.

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... This article is about the term as used among historical reenactors. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Alfred A. Knopf ( September 12, 1892 – August 11, 1984) was a leading American publisher of the 20th century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Jeff Gerth is a former investigative reporter for The New York Times who has written lengthy, probing stories that drew both praise and criticism. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Peter Baker is a reporter with the Washington Post, for whom he has written numerous front-page articles and interviewed leaders including Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice [1]. He was the Posts White House correspondent during Pres. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... CNN.com is the news website maintained by CNN. The website debuted on August 30, 1995, and it describes itself as the first major news and information website on the Internet. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Books

  • Clinton, Bill (2005). My Life. Vintage Publishing. ISBN 1-4000-3003-X.

My Life My Life is a 2004 autobiography written by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, who left office on January 20, 2001. ...

External links

...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vince Foster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2011 words)
Foster was 48 years old, and left behind a widow, Lisa, and three adult children, Vince III, Laura, and Brugh.
Some suspect that Foster committed suicide in a location that was embarrassing to figures connected to the Clinton administration and that government agents dumped his body in the park to avoid any embarrassment.
Others suspect that Foster died from a shot from a small-caliber pistol to the neck and his body was dumped in the park.
The Vince Foster Stonewall (20264 words)
Foster died from a gunshot wound to the right side of the neck, near the jawline, between the ear and the chin -- with the trajectory of the bullet going upwards through the tongue and into the brain.
Foster, the deputy White House counsel, was found in a suburban Virginia park on July 20, 1993, with a gunshot wound to the head.
Foster’s spectacles were also found 13 feet from his body with a spec of powder from the bullet on a lens, proving that he must have been wearing them when he was killed — disproving the claim that he threw them away before he shot himself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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