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Encyclopedia > Villanova University

Villanova University

Image File history File links Vu_seal. ...

Motto Veritas, Unitas, Caritas
(Truth, Unity, Charity)
Established 1842
Type Private
Religious affiliation Roman Catholic (Augustinian)
Endowment $278.6 million [1]
President Rev. Peter M. Donohue
Staff 510
Undergraduates 6,290
Postgraduates 3,200
Location Villanova
Radnor Township
, Pennsylvania, USA
Campus Suburban, 254 acres
(1.028 km²)
Colors Blue and white            
Mascot Wildcat
Fight song V for Villanova
Website www.villanova.edu

Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. Founded in 1842 by the Augustinian monastic order, the university can trace its roots back to old Saint Augustine's Church in Philadelphia, which the Augustinians founded in 1796, and to its parish school, Saint Augustine's Academy, which was established in 1811. Villanova is the oldest and largest Catholic university in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.[1] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Time Saving Truth from Falsehood and Envy, François Lemoyne, 1737 For other uses, see Truth (disambiguation). ... Oneness is a spiritual term referring to the experience of the absence of egoic identity boundaries, and, according to some traditions, the realization of the awareness of the absolute interconnectedness of all matter and thought in space-time, or ones ultimate identity with God (see Tat Tvam Asi). ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck // The word charity entered the English language through the O.Fr word charite which was derived from the Latin caritas.[1] In Christian theology charity, or love (agapÄ“), is the greatest of the three theological virtues... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Rev. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Villanova is an unincorporated community in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Radnor Township is a municipality in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other meanings of Wild Cat and wildcat, see wildcat. ... A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Radnor Township is a municipality in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Detail of St. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... St. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ...

Contents

History

In October 1841, two Augustinians from Saint Augustine's Church in Philadelphia purchased the 200-acre "Belle Air" estate in Radnor Township with the intention of starting a school. The school, which was called the "Augustinian College of Villanova," opened in 1842. However, the Philadelphia Nativist Riots of 1844 that burned Saint Augustine's Church in Philadelphia caused financial difficulties for the Augustinians, and the college was closed in February 1845. The college reopened in 1846 and graduated its first class in 1847. In March 1848, the governor of Pennsylvania incorporated the school and gave it the power to grant degrees. In 1857, the school closed again as the demand for priests in Philadelphia prevented adequate staffing, and the crisis of the Panic of 1857 strained the school financially. The school remained closed throughout the Civil War and reopened in September 1865; since then it has operated continuously.[2] Detail of St. ... The Philadelphia Nativist Riots (also known as the Philadelphia prayer riots of 1844 and the Bible Riots) were a series of riots that took place May 3 and July 4, 1844. ... The Panic of 1857 was a sudden downturn in the economy of the United States. ...


The first great expansion of Villanova began in the late 1890s. Desiring an institution that would "rank among the best in the United States," the college embarked on an ambitious building campaign that resulted in the construction of new college buildings, improved dormitories, expanded recreational facilities, and the acquiring of new instructional equipment.

Corr Hall from The Grotto
Corr Hall from The Grotto

The School of Technology was established in 1905, and in 1915, a two-year pre-medical program was established, in recognition of the new requirements for candidates wishing to matriculate in approved medical schools. This, in turn, led to the establishment of a four-year pre-medical program, the B.S. in biology, and the founding of the sciences division in 1926. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,920 × 2,560 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,920 × 2,560 pixels, file size: 2. ...


Villanova was a strictly all-male-school until 1918, when the college began evening classes to educate nuns to teach in the parochial school system. The first laywoman to receive a degree from Villanova did so in 1938. It was not until 1953, however that women permanently began attending Villanova full-time with the establishment of the nursing school. In 1958, the College of Engineering admitted its first female student; other colleges admitted women only as commuters. Villanova University became fully coeducational in 1968.[2]


After World War II, Villanova experienced great expansion. With the number of returning veterans, enrollments increased dramatically and the size of faculty grew fourfold. Additional facilities were built and in 1953, the College of Nursing and the School of Law were established. In recognition of its enhanced academic programs and reputation, Villanova achieved university status on November 18, 1953. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ...


During the 1970s and 1980s, Villanova embarked on a campaign to become a nationally recognized university. The quality of both the faculty and student body improved dramatically and international studies programs were introduced. Additional residential and recreational facilities were constructed, and efforts to increase the endowment were undertaken. A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


In the 1980s, endowed chairs were established in theology, philosophy, engineering, and business; scholarship funding was increased, and the curriculum expanded and improved. An extensive building campaign was also initiated that resulted in new facilities for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Commerce and Finance, and in student residences on the south and the west campuses. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ...


Campus

St. Thomas of Villanova Church, on the Villanova University campus.
St. Thomas of Villanova Church, on the Villanova University campus.

Villanova University sits on 254 acres just 12 miles from Philadelphia.[3] The campus is host to Arboretum Villanova which includes roughly 1,500 trees across campus, including the only known instance of a naturally-growing sequoia east of the Mississippi River.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1546x2222, 488 KB) St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1546x2222, 488 KB) St. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Arboretum Villanova (222 acres) is an arboretum located throughout the campus of Villanova University at 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, Pennsylvania. ...


The most prominent feature of the Villanova Campus is St. Thomas of Villanova Church, whose dual spires are Villanova's tallest structure. An important campus crossroads, the Church lies at the head of the path crossing Lancaster Avenue (Route 30) into the parking lots and toward South Campus. As such, it is a popular meeting place for students, and hosts three student-oriented masses on Sunday nights. U.S. Route 30 is an east-west main route of the system of United States Numbered Highways. ...


Situated behind the Church is Mendel Field, around which sit three major campus buildings: Mendel Hall, Tolentine Hall, and the CEER Building. Opened in 1998, the Center for Engineering Education and Research holds a state-of-the-art engineering lab and classroom facility where Engineering students spend many hours. Tolentine Hall houses classrooms, several academic offices, and computer labs, and is connected to Villanova's monastery, St. Thomas Hall. Mendel Hall, named for pioneering geneticist and Augustinian monk Gregor Mendel, holds numerous science labs, lecture halls, and other facilities. Mendel Hall's two large buildings are connected underground and by a second-floor indoor bridge that forms the gateway between West and Main Campus. In 1998, the college commissioned a 7-foot bronze sculpture of Mendel by Philadelphia sculptor James Peniston, and installed it outside the hall's entrance.[4] This article is about the general scientific term. ... “Mendel” redirects here. ... Rare, water preserved Greek Athlete 310. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Penistons 2007 Keys To Community stands in Girard Fountain Park in the Old City neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


Slightly east of Mendel Field sits The Grotto, a landscaped haven between Falvey Library and two residence halls, Corr Hall and Alumni Hall. While a student, Jim Croce reportedly penned "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" beneath the statue of the Blessed Mother.[citation needed] Often home to outdoor masses and other large gatherings, the Grotto is sometimes perfect for quiet contemplation. Falvey Library, the campus's main research library, houses over 1,000,000 books, thousands of periodicals, television production studios, and quiet places for solitary or group study.[5] James Joseph Croce (January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973), popularly known as Jim Croce (pronounced CRO-chee), was an American singer-songwriter. ... Bad, Bad Leroy Brown was a #1 hit in America in 1973 for Jim Croce from his album Life & Times. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture displayed sometimes in homes. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ...


East of Coor Hall sits Kennedy Hall, which houses the Campus's bookstore. Across a small courtyard lay Dougherty hall, home to "The Pit", one of three all-you-can-eat facilities on campus, as well as a few smaller eateries. Next to Kennedy is Connelly Center, the Student Union. With radically different architecture, the Connelly Center contains a multitude of eating places, meeting places, areas for group study, the cinema, as well as several ATM machines and a candy store.

The Oreo, with Connelly Center in the background.
The Oreo, with Connelly Center in the background.

Between the eating halls of Dougherty and the meeting halls of Connelly lay "The Oreo". A large black-and-white sculpture by Jay Dugan, some of the major campus celebrations have occurred in its circular shadow -- including celebratory vandalism in the wake of the 1985 NCAA Men's Basketball Championship. Sitting just west of The Quad, "The Awakening" (as it is officially known) has served as a major meeting place at the heart of the campus for generations of Villanovans. Image File history File linksMetadata Villanova-oreo-3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Villanova-oreo-3. ...


Still further east, The Quad is bordered by Sheehan and Sullivan residence halls, and Bartley Hall, home to the College of Business. Bartley is also situated near the other entrance to South Campus. Sitting diagonally across Lancaster Ave. and Ithan Ave., South Campus is home to several residence halls -- usually reserved for underclassmen -- and Donahue Hall, home to "The Spit". Short for "South Pit", Donahue hall also houses Donahue Market (nicknamed the "Sparket").


Situated north and west of Mendel hall is West Campus, home to St. Mary's Hall, the West Campus Apartments and the Law School. St. Mary's, a labyrinthine building of classrooms, residence rooms, a cafeteria, and large chapel, is home to the School of Nursing. Behind St. Mary's sit the Apartments -- eight buildings that house junior and senior resident students. Villanova University is a private, Catholic university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia on the Pennsylvania Main Line. ...


Academics

For more than a decade, Villanova University has been ranked #1 by U.S. News and World Report in the Best Universities-Masters category in the northern region. Villanova has several highly regarded academic programs, including an engineering school that is ranked #9 among undergraduate engineering programs whose highest degree is a masters by U.S. News and World Report. The School of Business was ranked #12 in the 2007 Business Week rankings of undergraduate business schools,[6] #87 in the 2006 U.S. News and World Report rankings of undergraduate business schools, and #29 in the Financial Times' ranking of top executive MBA programs.[7] Villanova University School of Law is ranked as a Top Law School by the 2008 edition of U.S. News & World Report's "Best Graduate Schools," placing 60th overall.[8]. In December 2006, PC Magazine and The Princeton Review ranked Villanova #1 in its review of top "wired colleges" in the United States.[9] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... Villanova University is a private, Catholic university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia on the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... PC Magazine (or PC Mag) is a computer magazine published biweekly (except in January and July) both in print and online. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


Villanova University offers bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and professional programs through its five divisions:

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (1842)

Dean: Kail Ellis, O.S.A., Ph.D.

Villanova School of Business (1922)

Dean: James M. Danko A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... B.S. redirects here. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...

Undergraduate
  • Accounting (B.S.)
  • Business Administration (B.S.)
    • Finance
    • International Business Co-Major
    • Management
    • Management Information Systems (MIS)
    • Marketing
  • Economics (B.S.)
Graduate
  • Full Time Equivalent M.B.A.
  • Professional M.B.A.
  • Master in Accountancy and Professional Consultancy (M.A.C.)
  • Master of Technology Management (M.T.M.)
  • M.S. in Finance (M.S.F.)
  • Executive M.B.A.

College of Engineering (1905)

Dean: Gary Gabriele, PhD B.S. redirects here. ... B.S. redirects here. ... B.S. redirects here. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... “MBA” redirects here. ...

  • Chemical Engineering (B.S., M.S.)
  • Civil Engineering (B.S., M.S.)
  • Computer Engineering (B.S., M.S.)
  • Electrical Engineering (B.S., M.S.)
  • Mechanical Engineering (B.S., M.S.)
  • Transportation Engineering(M.S.)
  • Water Resources & Environmental Engineering (M.S.)
  • Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program (Ph.D.)

College of Nursing (1953)

Dean: M. Louise Fitzpatrick, EdD, RN, FAAN B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...

School of Law (1953)

Dean: Mark A. Sargent A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Villanova University is a private, Catholic university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia on the Pennsylvania Main Line. ...

“J.D.” redirects here. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... “MBA” redirects here. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Drexel University is an institution of higher learning and research located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ...

Student life

Villanova offers a wide array of student organizations, ranging from standard club sports to cultural organizations and Greek letter fraternities and sororities.[10] Villanova students also participate in various charitable and philanthropic activities and organizations, including the largest student-run Special Olympics in the world.[11] The crowd at the 2003 Special Olympics World Summer Games Opening Ceremonies in Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland. ...


Special Olympics

The student-run Special Olympics at Villanova is associated with the statewide Special Olympics Pennsylvania (SOPA). Over 300 events are held statewide by SOPA, with athletes competing in 23 separate events. Athletes are given the opportunity to advance to regional and international competition through participation in local events, such as the Fall Festival held at Villanova. Over 1000 athletes and 400 coaches from 44 Pennsylvania counties, along with over 2000 volunteers from the Villanova student body participate in this statewide event, making it one of the most successful in the nation.[11]


Villanova Emergency Medical Services

Villanova Emergency Medical Services (VEMS), is a student-run ambulance service licensed and dedicated to serving the campus community. VEMS membership consists of more than 40 undergraduate student volunteers; the majority of whom are certified as Emergency Medical Technicians, volunteering more than 25,000 hours annually. Villanova is one of only a handful of colleges to provide EMS services to their campus, and one of only 52 who provide emergency response and transport to at least the Basic Life Support (BLS) Level.[12] VEMS has been recognized on a national level multiple times by the National Collegiate EMS Foundation, specifically being named 2001 Campus Organization of the Year and receiving EMS website of the year in 2000, 2004, and 2006. VEMS hosted the yearly NCEMSF Conference in Philadelphia in 2004. [13]


Campus publications and media

The Villanovan has been the officially recognized and accredited student newspaper since its founding in 1916. The tabloid-sized weekly has a circulation of 6,500 copies. The paper's awards include 2nd Place for Tabloid Feature Cover from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association's Collegiate Circle (2007); Certificate of Merit for Editorial Writing from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association's Collegiate Circle (2007); Certificate of Merit for portfolio of work in the Feature Photograph category from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association's Collegiate Circle (2007); Pennsylvania Newspaper Association's Keystone Award for Best Feature Story; and 1st Place with Special Merit and Outstanding Sports Coverage from the American Scholastic Press Association.[citation needed] The Villanovan has been the officially recognized and accredited student newspaper of Villanova University since its founding in 1916. ...


Villanova Times, an alumni-funded bi-weekly student newspaper, won the 2005-2006 Collegiate Network Award for Layout and Design.[citation needed] Collegiate Network The Collegiate Network (also, CN) is a non-profit, non-partisan tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization that provides financial and technical assistance to student editors and writers of almost 100 independent, largely conservative, publications at leading colleges and universities around the country. ...


WVTV (Villanova), the student-run campus television station, produces news, events, films and other programming for the Villanova community. WVTV (Channel 17) Villanova Television is a student-run campus television station within Villanova University, Pennsylvania. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ...


WXVU-FM, the student-operated 100-watt FM radio station, celebrating 60 years of continuous broadcasting in 2007[14], can be heard about eight miles beyond the Villanova campus. FM broadcasting is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation (FM) to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ...


NROTC

Villanova is home to a Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) program which claims to have commissioned more U.S. Navy admirals and Marine Corps generals than any institution but the U.S. Naval Academy. [15] In 2004, the commanders of both U.S. Naval Forces Atlantic and U.S. Naval Forces Pacific were Villanova NROTC graduates.[citation needed] The Navy Reserve Officers Training Corps commissions individiuals into either the United States Navy as an Ensign or United States Marine Corps as a Second Lieutenant. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... The Atlantic Fleet (USLANTFLT) of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The United States Pacific Fleet (USPACFLT) is part of the US Navy. ...


Habitat for Humanity

Villanova students participate in charitable organizations and service trips in the U.S. and abroad. In 2004, Villanova had more participants in the Habitat for Humanity Collegiate Challenge than any other U.S. university. [16] This article is about charitable organizations. ... Official Habitat for Humanity logo Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) (generally referred to as Habitat for Humanity or simply Habitat) is an international, ecumenical Christian, non-governmental, non-profit organization devoted to building simple, decent, and affordable housing. ...


Athletics

Villanova logo
Villanova logo

Sports teams participate in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big East Conference, except for football and lacrosse. Football and Men's Lacrosse play in the Colonial Athletic Association. Women's lacrosse plays in the Patriot League. The Wildcats are also part of the Philadelphia Big 5, the traditional Philadelphia-area basketball rivalry. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Five and its variants, see Big five (disambiguation). ...


Men's Basketball

Main article: Villanova Wildcats men's basketball

In 1985, under the direction of coach Rollie Massimino, the men's basketball team won the national championship in the first year of the 64-team field. The final game, against defending champion and ten-point-favorite Georgetown, is often cited among the greatest upsets in college basketball history. [17] In 2005, under the direction of coach Jay Wright, Villanova's men's basketball team reached the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16, losing to #1 seed and eventual champion North Carolina by 1 point on a disputed traveling call on Allan Ray. In 2005-2006, the team began the year ranked #4 in the major polls from USA Today and the Associated Press. A 75-62 loss to eventual champion Florida ended the team's run for a second NCAA championship in the Regional Final. In the 2006-2007 season, the Wildcats had a record of 22-11, and lost to Kentucky in the first round of the 2007 tournament. Villanova University has fielded a basketball team since the 1920-21 season. ... See also: 1984 in sports, other events of 1985, 1986 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Bill Elliott won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Darrell Waltrip Ken Schrader enters NASCAR CART Racing - Al Unser Sr won the season championship Indianapolis 500 - Danny... Roland V. Rollie Massimino (born November 13, 1934 in Hillside, New Jersey, United States) is a mens college basketball coach. ... The 1985 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The Georgetown Hoyas are the athletics teams that officially represent Georgetown University in college sports. ... Jerold Jay Wright (born December 24, 1961) is an American basketball coach. ... 2005 Final Four, Edward Jones Dome The 2005 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The term Sweet Sixteen refers to the final sixteen teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the semi-final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Allan Ray (born May 17, 1984 in the Bronx, New York) is an American professional basketball player with the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... The 2007 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 NCAA schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


Traditions

The university seal

Plaque of the Seal of Villanova University at the Connelly Center
Plaque of the Seal of Villanova University at the Connelly Center

An adaptation of the seal of the Order of St. Augustine, the seal of Villanova University is one of the campus's most ubiquitous images. Adorning everything from buildings to chairs to backpacks, the seal reflects the Catholic traditions of the Augustine Friars and displays several elements of significance.[18] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,920 × 2,560 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,920 × 2,560 pixels, file size: 2. ...


Emblazoned across the ribbon, featured prominently is the motto of the University: Veritas, Unitas, Caritas. The seal serves as a constant reminder of the virtues to which every member of the Villanova Community should aspire: Truth, Unity, and Charity. Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... Time Saving Truth from Falsehood and Envy, François Lemoyne, 1737 For other uses, see Truth (disambiguation). ... Oneness is a spiritual term referring to the experience of the absence of egoic identity boundaries, and, according to some traditions, the realization of the awareness of the absolute interconnectedness of all matter and thought in space-time, or ones ultimate identity with God (see Tat Tvam Asi). ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck // The word charity entered the English language through the O.Fr word charite which was derived from the Latin caritas.[1] In Christian theology charity, or love (agapē), is the greatest of the three theological virtues...


The book at center carries several meanings. In addition to being symbolic of Augustine's dedication to education, it also symbolizes the Book of Scriptures where Augustine found Christianity. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


On the book lay the cincture, part of the habit worn by members of the Order of Saint Augustine. Hovering above is the flaming heart, symbolic of both Augustine's search for God and the love of neighbor that characterized his life. Behind the book is the crosier -- a staff traditionally held by a Bishop -- commemorating Augustine's service as Bishop of Hippo. An Anglican priest wearing a white cincture around his waist to hold his alb and stole in place. ... St. ... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Hippo Regius is the ancient name of the modern city of Annaba (or Bône), Algeria. ...


Above and behind the book are two crosses, symbolic of Augustine's conversion and the University's commitment to Christianity. Framing the central portion of the seal is a laurel wreath exemplifying victory through the pursuit of knowledge, and 1842 is the year of the University's founding. Surrounding the seal is the incorporated fide of the University -- Universitas Villanova In Statu Pennsylvaniae. A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... A laurel wreath decorating a memorial at the Folketing, the national parliament of Denmark. ...


The Liberty Bell's "Sister Bell"

The old wing of the Falvey Library.
The old wing of the Falvey Library.

Villanova University is also home to the Liberty Bell's "Sister Bell," the replacement bell ordered from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry after the original bell cracked in 1753. [19] This new bell was installed at the Pennsylvania State House (Independence Hall), and attached to the State House clock. The Sister Bell rang the hours until the late 1820s, when the bell was removed during a renovation and loaned to the Olde St. Augustine Church in Philadelphia. In 1829, the bell was hung in a new cupola and tower designed by architect William Strickland. There it remained until May 8, 1844, when it was destroyed, along with the Olde St. Augustine Church, during the Philadelphia Nativist Riots. The friars of St. Augustine had the "Sister Bell" recast and transferred to Villanova University. [19] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1443 KB) The Old Falvey library building at Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA. Taken by submitter 19 Dec 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1443 KB) The Old Falvey library building at Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA. Taken by submitter 19 Dec 2006. ... This article is about the bell. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ... Churches and other ecclesiastical buildings dedicated to Augustine of Canterbury or, less commonly, Augustine of Hippo include: In the United Kingdom: St. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Strickland was a noted architect in 19th Century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... The Philadelphia Nativist Riots (also known as the Philadelphia prayer riots of 1844 and the Bible Riots) were a series of riots that took place May 3 and July 4, 1844. ... Detail of St. ...


At the university's centennial celebration, the bell was rung by Archbishop Dennis Joseph Dougherty to open the ceremonies. In 1954, the bell was displayed as part of an exhibit at Gimbels department store in Philadelphia that focused on the growth and development of the university. [20] The Sister Bell is currently enshrined in the Falvey Memorial Library on Villanova's campus. [19] [20] Dennis Joseph Cardinal Dougherty (August 16, 1865 - May 31, 1951) was archbishop of Philadelphia and ranking prelate of the Roman Catholic hierarchy in the U.S. Categories: Stub | 1865 births | 1951 deaths ... Gimbels was a major American department store corporation from 1887 through the late 20th century. ...


Campus myths

Alumni Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus.
Alumni Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus.

A number of legends are spread around campus by students. Some of these include the existence of secret tunnels and catacombs under campus, the haunting of some of the older dormitories (sometimes linked to their use as hospitals during the Civil War),[21] and speculation over the existence of an entire wing of St. Mary's Hall which is completely blocked off. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1392 KB) Alumni Hall on the campus of Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA. Taken by submitter 19 Dec 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1392 KB) Alumni Hall on the campus of Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA. Taken by submitter 19 Dec 2006. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The three buildings most commonly discussed as being haunted are Alumni Hall (located by St. Thomas of Villanova church on the main campus), St. Mary's Hall and Dundale (both located on the west campus).


Alumni Hall dates back to 1848 and stands as one of the oldest structures on campus. The school was closed in 1861 due to the Civil War and reopened in 1865. In that time this hall is believed to have been used as a military hospital and potential evidence of that use, such as a pulley located at the top of the main stairwell for moving bodies up and down, can still be seen. The building was used as a hospital again for influenza patients after World War I.[21] This history has led to rumors that the building is haunted.


St. Mary's Hall was built in 1962 and served as an Augustinian Seminary until 1972.[citation needed] Laid out with long corridors and over a thousand rooms, there is a large chapel and many partial floors, basements and sub-basements to feed the legends of blocked off wings.[21]


The property on which Dundale Hall is located was originally purchased by an industrialist, Israel Morris II, in 1874, and was built as a mansion for his family. Purchased from his family in 1978, it has been used for a variety of meetings and is home to several offices. On more than a handful of occasions, the school's Public Safety officers have been called out late at night to investigate lights in the building coming on inexplicably.[21]


People

Ed Rendell, current Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, received his J.D. in 1968.
Main article: List of notable alumni of Villanova University

Villanova University has fathered several notable alumni. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Edward Gene Ed Rendell (born January 5, 1944) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... Various notable individuals in many professions attended Villanova University at some point in their educational careers. ...


Golden Globe-nominated actress Maria Bello got her first taste of the stage in a production at Vasey Hall. Tim Hauser, founder of Manhattan Transfer, Jim Croce, and Don McLean have all been prominent members of the musical tradition at Villanova. David Rabe had his first premier for In the Boom Boom Room at Vasey Hall. The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Maria Elaine Bello (born April 18, 1967) is an American actress. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Manhattan Transfer is From 1910 to 1937, a Pennsylvania Railroad and Hudson and Manhattan Railroad station between Newark and Jersey City, New Jersey where passengers had to change trains on their way to New York. ... James Joseph Croce (January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973), popularly known as Jim Croce (pronounced CRO-chee), was an American singer-songwriter. ... For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ... David William Rabe (born March 10, 1940 in Dubuque, Iowa) is an American playwright and screenwriter. ... In the Boom Boom Room (sometimes referred to simply as Boom Boom Room) is a Tony nominated play by David Rabe. ...


In addition to current Pennsylvania Governor and Democratic luminary Ed Rendell, Villanova has produced several military and governmental officials. Wife to the governor and federal judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, Marjorie Rendell, is also a graduate. Numerous Marine generals and Naval Admirals are products of Villanova's Naval ROTC program, including William J. Fallon, Admiral of the United States Navy, and Commander of United States Central Command and George B. Crist, Marine General, and the first Marine to be designated Commander in Chief, Central Command. Edward Gene Ed Rendell (born January 5, 1944) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States District Courts: District of Delaware District of New Jersey Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Pennsylvania District of the United States Virgin Islands The court is based at... Marjorie (Midge) Osterlund Rendell is a federal judge in Pennsylvania. ... The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps commissions individiuals into either the United States Navy or United States Marine Corps. ... William Joseph Fallon (born December 30, 1944) is an Admiral in the United States Navy and the Commander of U.S. Central Command. ... The United States Central Command (CENTCOM) is a theater-level Unified Combatant Command unit of the U.S. armed forces, established in 1983 under the operational control of the U.S. Secretary of Defense. ... General George B. Crist United States Marine Corps (Ret. ...


The business world, too, has had several prominent businessmen who got their start at Villanova. Robert J. Darretta, Jr. -- chief financial officer and vice chairman of Johnson & Johnson, John Drosdick -- CEO of Sunoco, Thomas G. Labrecque -- former Chairman and CEO of Chase Manhattan Bank, Francis Saul -- president of Chevy Chase (Bank), and Martin McGuinn -- Former CEO of Mellon Financial Corp. have all studied at Villanova at some point in their careers. Robert J. Darretta, Jr. ... CFO is usually short for Chief Financial Officer, but may also mean: Carrier frequency offset Ceramic fiber optics Chief Fire Officer Chief of Flight Operations Conselho Federal de Odontologia (cfo. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... John G. Drosdick is an American businessman. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... This article is about the American oil company. ... The Chase Manhattan Bank, now part of JPMorgan Chase, was formed by the merger of the Chase National Bank and the Bank of the Manhattan Company in 1955. ... Chevy Chase Bank is the largest bank headquartered in Washington DC. According to its commericals it claims to have the largest network of ATMs of all banks in the area. ... Mellon Financial Corporation, NYSE: MEL based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is engaged in the business of institutional and high-net-worth-individual asset management, including the Dreyfus family of mutual funds; business banking; and shareholder and investor services. ...


John Cardinal O'Connor, Archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York, obtained a Masters degree in Advanced Ethics at Villanova University. John L. Hennessy, president of Stanford University earned a Bachelor's in Electrical Engineering, and Deirdre Imus, Head of the Diedre Imus Environmental Center for Pediatric Oncology (and wife to radio pariah Don Imus) is also a graduate. John Cardinal OConnor John Joseph Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... St. ... John LeRoy Hennessy, the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Deirdre Coleman Imus fat coc k(born 1964) is the founder and president of the Deirdre Imus Environmental Center for Pediatric Oncology, part of [[Hackensack cleaning products. ... John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ...


Commencement speakers

Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... OBrien, c. ... NBA redirects here. ... JFK redirects here. ... James Albert Michener (February 3, 1907? - October 16, 1997) was the American author of such books as Tales of the South Pacific (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948), Hawaii, The Drifters, Centennial, The Source, The Fires of Spring, Chesapeake, Caribbean, Caravans, Alaska, Texas, and Poland. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Ortegas signature, as used on American currency Katherine Dávalos Ortega (born 1934 in Tularosa, New Mexico) was the 38th Treasurer of the United States. ... The Treasurer of the United States is the only position within the United States Department of the Treasury older than the Department itself. ... Xavier L. Suarez was the first Cuban-born mayor of the City of Miami, Florida. ... Miami redirects here. ... For the member of the Irish folk band The Clancy Brothers, see Tom Clancy (singer) and for the American Celticist, see Thomas Owen Clancy. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Katherine Anne Katie Couric (born January 7, 1957) is an American media personality who became well-known as co-host of NBCs Today. ... This article is about the television network. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... CBS Evening News is the flagship nightly television news program of the American television network CBS. The network has broadcast this program since 1948, and has used the CBS Evening News title since 1963. ... Edward Rudolph Bradley, Jr. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... James Earl Jones (b. ... An Emmy Award. ... Share Our Strength Share Our Strength, one of the nations leading anti-hunger organizations, is committed to building the first hunger-free generation in America. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Anna Quindlen (Born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and opinion columnist whose New York Times column, Public and Private, won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1992. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Doris Kearns Goodwin (born January 4, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is an award-winning American author and historian. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... John LeRoy Hennessy, the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Cisco may refer to: Cisco Systems, a computer networking company Cisco IOS, an internet router operating system CISCO Security Private Limited, a security company in Singapore Commercial and Industrial Security Corporation, a statutory board in Singapore Abbreviation for San Francisco, California Cisco (wine) The Cisco Kid, a fictional character created... This article is about the corporation. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... This article is about the American journalist. ... NBC Nightly News is the flagship evening news program for NBC News and broadcasts from the GE Building, Rockefeller Center in New York City. ... Spinney appears on a 1970s episode of Whats My Line Caroll Spinney, sometimes credited as Carroll Spinney or Ed Spinney (born December 26, 1933 in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA) is a puppeteer most famous for playing Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on the childrens television show Sesame Street. ... Big Bird finds Ernie in a game of Journey to Ernie. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Mary Patricia McAleese (Irish: [1]; born 27 June 1951) is the eighth, and current, President of Ireland. ... This article is about the journalist. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Villanova.edu: University Profile. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  2. ^ a b The Mission and Heritage of Villanova University. Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  3. ^ Campus location. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  4. ^ James Peniston Sculpture. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  5. ^ Launch Villanova University Virtual Tour. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  6. ^ VSB In The Rankings. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  7. ^ Financial Times Ranks the Villanova School of Business Executive MBA Program Among the Top 30 in the Nation. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  8. ^ U.S. News and World Report Law School Rankings. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  9. ^ "Top 10 Wired Colleges." PC Magazine. 20 December 2006. Retrieved 22 December 2006.
  10. ^ Campus organizations. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  11. ^ a b Special Olympics. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  12. ^ NCEMSF Database. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  13. ^ NCEMSF Awards. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  14. ^ Villanova Parents' Connection newsletter (Spring 2007)
  15. ^ Villanova University NROTC. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  16. ^ Office of Communication and Public Affairs: Habitat for Humanity applauds Villanova participation. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  17. ^ ESPN.com: Page 2's List for top upset in sports history. Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  18. ^ The University Seal. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  19. ^ a b c Villanova Magazine Fall 2003 Edition. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  20. ^ a b Villanova University Archives: The Liberty Bell's Sister. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  21. ^ a b c d The facts about the history of Villanova. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See Also

Various notable individuals in many professions attended Villanova University at some point in their educational careers. ... Villanova University is a private, Catholic university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia on the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... Education in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is provided by many private and public institutions. ...

External links


 
 

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