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Encyclopedia > Villa Giulia
Sarcofago degli Sposi : the sarcophagus of the married couple
Sarcofago degli Sposi : the sarcophagus of the married couple

The Villa Giulia is a magnificent villa built by Pope Julius II on the edge of the city of Rome, 1550–1555. Today it is publicly owned, and houses an impressive collection of Etruscan art and artifacts. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 173 KB) Summary Source: de. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 173 KB) Summary Source: de. ... Julius II, born Giuliano della Rovere (December 5, 1443 – February 21, 1513), was Pope from 1503 to 1513. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...


Properly known as the Villa di Papa Giulio, the villa stands in an area of Rome known as the 'Vigna Vecchia' (which was once against the city walls) lying on the slopes where 'Monte Parioli' descends to the Tiber. The current villa is only a small part of a former property, comprising three vineyards. Here a party villa or 'Villa Suburbana' was built for Pope Julius III, who was an affable, deeply literate connoisseur of the arts, but no theologian. Julius assigned the design of the villa structure to Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola in 1551 - 1553. However, he assigned the nymphaeum and other garden structures to Bartolomeo Ammanati, all under the watchful supervision of Giorgio Vasari. Michelangelo worked there too. The knowledgable pope offered direct guidance himself; Julius spent vast amounts of money enhancing the beauty of the villa, which became one of the most delicate examples of Mannerist architecture. City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... The Aurelian Walls were built between 270 and 273, by Roman Emperor Aurelian. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs of... Julius III, né Gian Maria del Monte or Giovan Maria Giocci (September 10, 1487 – March 23, 1555), was pope from February 7, 1550 to 1555. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... The five orders, engraving from Vignolas Regole delle cinque ordini darchitettura set the standards Giacomo (or Jacopo) Barozzi da Vignola (Vignola, near Modena, October 1, 1507 - July 7, 1573) was one of the great Italian architects of 16th century Mannerism, also known as Vignola. ... Events Russia, Reforming Synod of the metropolite Macaire, Orthodoxy: introduction of a calendar of the saints and an ecclesiastical law code ( Stoglav ) Major outbreak of the sweating sickness in England. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... A Nymphaeum, in Greek and Roman antiquities, is a monument consecrated to the nymphs, especially those of springs. ... Bartolomeo Ammanati (1511-1592) was a Florentine architect and sculptor. ... Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ... Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, commonly known as Michelangelo, (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564) was a Renaissance artist and poet. ... Mannerism is the term used to describe the artistic style that arose in mid-16th century. ...


The villa

Like all suburban villas, the Villa Giulia had an urban entrance (on the Roman Via Flaminia) and a formal but rural garden behind. The Villa itself was a threshold between two worlds, an essentially Roman conception that was adopted in every urbane culture of Western Europe. A medal struck in 1553 shows the villa substantially as completed, but with a pair of cupolas that were never executed. The Via Flaminia was a Roman road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini), and was the most important route to the north. ... World map showing Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ...


Vignola's urban front of the building is a sombre two storey facade, each storey given equal value. It has at its centre the triple rhythm of a richly detailed rusticated triumphal arch flanked by symmetrical wings of two bays only. The facade is terminated at each end by Doric pilasters. In this facade of the Villa Giulia is the germ-idea of the seven-bay 18th century Georgian villa, which was reproduced as far away as the Tidewater region of Virginia. The rear of the building has Ammanati's large hemispherical loggia overlooking the first of three courtyards, laid out as a simple parterre. At its rear the visitor passes through the casina, which again has a hemispherical rear facade, enclosing paired flights of re-entrant marble steps that give access to the heart of the villa complex - a two-storey Nympheum for alfresco dining during the heat of the summer. This three-levelled structure of covered loggias, decorated with marble statuary, reclining river gods in niches, and balustrading, is constructed around a central fountain: here in this cool environment, sheltered from the blazing sun, daylong picnics would be held. The central fountain, Fontana dell'Acqua Vergine, is a wonderful work of art in itself; designed and sculpted by Vasari and Ammannati, it depicts river gods and caryatids. The fountain's source, the Acqua Vergine, also supplies the Trevi Fountain in Rome. Facade of the Palazzo del Te clearly showing rusticated stonework between the pilasters Rustication is an architectural term referring to the cutting of ashlar. ... Arc de Triomphe, Paris The Gateway of India, Mumbai, India A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... The uncompleted Doric temple at Segesta, Sicily, has been waiting for finishing of its surfaces since 430 - 420 BC The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Tidewater region of Virginia is the southeastern portion of the Commonwealth of Virginia, centered on Hampton Roads. ... Villa Godi by Palladio. ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ... A Nymphaeum, in Greek and Roman antiquities, is a monument consecrated to the nymphs, especially those of springs. ... The Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheion, Athens A drawing of the Erechtheion caryatids A caryatid is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural element such as a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on its head. ... The Aqua Virgo (also known as the Acqua Vergine) was one of the 11 aqueducts that supplied the city of ancient Rome. ... Fontana di Trevi (Roma) The Trevi Fountain (in Italian, Fontana di Trevi) is the largest (standing 85 feet high and 65 feet wide) and most ambitious of the Baroque fountains of Rome. ...


The Casino della Vigna ("little house in the vineyard"), as it was sometimes known, and its gardens were set in the midst of well-tended vineyards, which could be viewed from shaded arcades on the outsides of the garden walls. At this time, before the English style of naturalistic landscaping gained in popularity, the most pleasant imaginable vista from a garden was that of orderly husbandry, where the hand of man had tamed the wanton disorder and danger that Nature represented. Papal parties would embark on a boats at the gates of The Vatican and be transported up the Tiber to the villa's long-gone private landing stage, to enjoy the delights and magnificence of the Villa, stroll in the gardens and eat leisurely meals in the nympheum. A vineyard Vineyard with bird netting Wine grapes with netting as protection against birds A vineyard (vignoble in French, vigna or vigneto in Italian, vinha in Portuguese, viña or viñedo in Spanish, Weinberg in German) is a place where grapes are grown for making wine, raisins, or table... The State of the City of the Vatican or the Vatican City (Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanae, Italian Stato della Città del Vaticano) is the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population), a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs of...


Following Pope Julius's death, his successor Pope Paul IV confiscated all the properties he had assembled; the villa was divided, the main building and part of the gardens became the property of the Camera Apostolica. The Villa was reserved for the use of the new pope's Borromeo nephews. Paul IV, né Giovanni Pietro Carafa (June 28, 1476 – August 18, 1559) was Pope from May 23, 1555 until his death. ...


The Etruscan museum

The Villa Giulia was restored in 1769 on the initiative of Pope Clement XIV. In the wake of the Risorgimento and the demise of the Papal States, the villa became in 1870 the property of the Kingdom of Italy. Since the beginning of the 20th century it has housed the national museum for Etruscan Art, the Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia. 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Pope Clement XIV, born Giovanni Vincenzo Antonio Ganganelli (Sant Arcangelo di Romagna, 31 October 1705 – Rome, 22 September 1774), was Pope from 1769 to 1774. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... There have been several entities known as the Kingdom of Italy. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...


The Museo Nazionale Etrusco was founded in 1889 with the aim of collecting together all the pre-Roman antiquities of Latium, southern Etruria and Umbria belonging to the Etruscan and Faliscan civilizations. Its most famous single treasure is the terracotta funerary monument, the almost life-size Bride and Groom ("Sarcofago degli Sposi") reclining happily as if they were at a dinner party (illustration, upper right). 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Etruria was an ancient country in Central Italy, located in an area that covered part of what now are Tuscany, Latium and Umbria. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Falisci, a tribe of Sabine origin or connections, but speaking a dialect closely akin to Latin, who inhabited the town of Falerii, as well as a considerable tract of the surrounding country, probably reaching as far south as to include the small town of Capena. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ...


Other remains held are:

  • The Etruscan-Phoenician Pyrgi Tablets.
  • The Apollo of Veii
  • A reconstructed frieze displaying Kreugas eating the brain of his enemy.

The Pyrgi Tablets, found in an excavation of a sanctuary of that town in Italy, a port of the southern Etruscan town of Caere, are three golden leaves that record a dedication made around 500 BC by Thefarie Velianas, king of Caere, to the Phoenician goddess ‘Ashtart. ... Veii - or Veius - was in ancient times, an important Etrurian city 18 km NNW of Rome, Italy. ...

External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Villa Giulia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (830 words)
The Villa Giulia is a magnificent villa built by Pope Julius II on the edge of the city of Rome, 1550–1555.
In this facade of the Villa Giulia is the germ-idea of the seven-bay 18th century Georgian villa, which was reproduced as far away as the Tidewater region of Virginia.
In the wake of the Risorgimento and the demise of the Papal States, the villa became in 1870 the property of the Kingdom of Italy.
Villa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1041 words)
There were a concentration of Imperial villas near the Bay of Naples, especially on the Isle of Capri, at Monte Circeo on the coast and at Antium (Anzio).
Rome had more than its share of villas with easy reach of the small 16th century city:Villa Madama, the design of which, attributed to Raphael, was carried out by Giulio Romano in 1520, was one of the most influential private houses ever built; elements derived from Villa Madama appeared in villas through the 19th century.
In the 19th century villa was extended to describe any suburban house that was free-standing in a landscaped plot of ground, as opposed to a 'terrace' of joined houses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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