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Encyclopedia > Video game console

A video game console is an interactive entertainment computer or electronic device that manipulates the video display signal of a display device (a television, monitor, etc.) to display a game. The term "video game console" is used to distinguish a machine designed for consumers to buy and use solely for playing video games from a personal computer, which has many other functions, or arcade machines, which are designed for businesses that buy and then charge others to play. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... An example of typical classic console. ... Game development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Composite video is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ...

Contents

Use of the term

The "video" in "video game console" traditionally refers to a raster display device.[1] However, with the popular use of the term "video game" the term now implies all display types and formats. The term "console" is used in the user manuals of several early video game systems. Its use, however, is not synonymous with "video game system" or the same as its modern usage. It refers to a specific part of the video game system. The Atari 2600, NES, and other consoles from those decades were called "video game systems" at the time.[2][3] Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Namcos Pac-Man is one of the most popular video games ever made. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... “NES” redirects here. ...


The first company to use the term "console" to officially refer to its video game system was Fairchild with the Video Entertainment System (VES) in 1976.[4] Since then, definition has widened to include entire systems, as well as to describe alternate platforms such as handheld game consoles, TV games, and multimedia devices.[5] The Fairchild Channel F is the worlds second cartridge-based video game console, after the Magnavox Odyssey. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... TV Games are becoming popular as adults are able to play the nostalgic games, such as Asteroids, without the need for an Emulator. ...


Elements of a video game console

Controllers: Video controllers allow the user to input information and interact with onscreen objects. A game controller is an input device used to control a video game. ...


Power supply: a power supply converts 100-240 volt AC utility power into direct current (DC) at the voltages needed by the electronics. The top cover has been removed to show the internals of a computer Power supply Unit. ...


Console/Core Unit: The core unit in a video game console is the hub where the television, video game controllers, and game program connect. It usually contains a CPU, RAM, and an audiovisual coprocessor. CPU can stand for: in computing: Central processing unit in journalism: Commonwealth Press Union in law enforcement: Crime prevention unit in software: Critical patch update, a type of software patch distributed by Oracle Corporation in Macleans College is often known as Ash Lim. ... Look up RAM, Ram, ram in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Game Media: Most video game consoles have their programs stored on external media. Game console redirects here. ...


Memory Card: Some video game consoles, like the Sony PlayStation and the Nintendo Gamecube have memory cards to save, load, and delete files. Four major types of memory cards (from left to right: CompactFlash, Memory Stick, Secure Digital, and xD. A memory card or flash memory card is a solid-state electronic flash memory data storage device used with digital cameras, handheld and Mobile computers, telephones, music players, video game consoles, and other... The original PlayStation was produced in a light grey colour; the more recent PSOne redesign sports a smaller more rounded case. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ...


History

Further information: History of computer and video games

Home video-game systems became popular during the 1970s and 80s. ...

First generation

Although the first computer games appeared in the 50s[3], they used vector displays, not video. It was not until 1972 that Magnavox released the first home video game console, the Magnavox Odyssey, invented by Ralph H. Baer. The Odyssey was initially only moderately successful, and it was not until Atari's arcade game Pong popularized video games, that the public began to take more notice of the emerging industry. By the autumn of 1975 Magnavox, bowing to the popularity of Pong, cancelled the Odyssey and released a scaled down console that only played Pong and hockey, the Odyssey 100. A second "higher end" console, the Odyssey 200, was released with the 100 and added onscreen scoring, up to 4 players, and a third game - Smash. Almost simultaneously released with Atari's own home Pong console through Sears, these consoles jump-started the consumer market. As with the arcade market, the home market was soon flooded by dedicated consoles that played simple pong and pong-derived games. The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Example showing effect of vector graphics versus raster graphics. ... Magnavox (Latin for great voice) is an electronics company founded by Edwin Pridham and Peter L. Jensen. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ... Ralph H. Baer (born March 8, 1922) is a German-born American inventor, noted for his many contributions to games and the video game industry. ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... Sears, Roebuck and Company is an American mid-range chain of international department stores, founded by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck in the late 19th century. ... Dedicated consoles are video game consoles that are dedicated to a built in game or games, and are not equipped for additional games, via cartridge or other media. ...


Second generation

Atari 2600
Atari 2600

Fairchild released the Fairchild Video Entertainment System (VES) in 1976. While there had been previous game consoles that used cartridges, either the cartridges had no information and served the same function as flipping switches (the Odyssey) or the console itself was empty and the cartridge contained all of the game components. The VES, however, contained a programmable microprocessor so its cartridges only needed a single ROM chip to store microprocessor instructions. The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 475 pixelsFull resolution (1938 × 1151 pixels, file size: 783 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 475 pixelsFull resolution (1938 × 1151 pixels, file size: 783 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Fairchild Channel F is the worlds second cartridge-based video game console, after the Magnavox Odyssey. ...


RCA and Atari soon released their own cartridge-based consoles.


Video game crash of 1977

In 1977, manufacturers of older obsolete consoles sold their systems at a loss to clear stock, creating a glut in the market and causing Fairchild and RCA to abandon their game consoles. Only Atari and Magnavox stayed in the home console market.

History of…
Video games
Video game consoles

First generation (1972–1977)
Second generation (1976–1984)
Video game crash of 1983
Third generation (1983–1992)
Fourth generation (1987–1996)
Fifth generation (1993–2002)
Sixth generation (1998–2006)
Seventh generation (2004–)
Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... E.T. for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ...

Arcade games

Golden Age of Arcade Games
This article contains a timeline of notable events in the history of video arcade gaming: // 1971 The Galaxy Game, the earliest known coin-operated arcade video game, makes its debut on the campus of Stanford University. ...

Rebirth of the home console market

The VCS continued to be sold at a profit after the 1977 crash, and both Bally (with their Home Library Computer in 1977) and Magnavox (with the Odyssey 2 in 1978) brought their own programmable cartridge-based consoles to the market. However it wasn't until Atari released a conversion of the arcade hit Space Invaders in 1980 that the home console industry was completely revived. Many consumers bought an Atari just for Space Invaders. Space Invaders' unprecedented success started the trend of console manufacturers trying to get exclusive rights to arcade titles, and the trend of advertisements for game consoles claiming to bring the arcade experience home. Bally Astrocade The Astrocade is an early video game console and simple computer system designed by a team at Midway, the videogame division of Bally. ... Philips Videopac G7000 shown playing Pickaxe Pete The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, and also by many other names, was a video game console released in 1978. ... Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ...


Throughout the early 1980s, other companies released video game consoles of their own. Many of the video game systems were technically superior to the Atari 2600, and marketed as improvements over the Atari 2600. However, Atari dominated the console market throughout the early 1980s.


Video game crash of 1983

E.T. The Extra Terrestrial for the Atari 2600 is often blamed for the video game crash of 1983.
E.T. The Extra Terrestrial for the Atari 2600 is often blamed for the video game crash of 1983.

In 1983, the video game business suffered a much more severe crash. A flood of consoles, glut of low quality video games by smaller companies (especially for the 2600), industry leader Atari hyping games such as E.T. that were poorly received, and a growing number of home computer users caused consumers and retailers to lose faith and interest in video game consoles. Most video game companies filed for bankruptcy, or moved into other industries, abandoning their game consoles. Mattel Electronics sold the rights for their Intellivision system to the INTV Corporation, who continued to produce Intellivision consoles and develop new games for the Intellivision until 1991. All other North American game consoles were discontinued by 1984. ET for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... Image File history File links ET2600-JD.png‎ // Summary Screenshot of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. ... Image File history File links ET2600-JD.png‎ // Summary Screenshot of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. ... Screenshot from E.T. was a video game created in 1983 for the Atari 2600 video game system, based on the 1982 movie E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. ... Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... Mattel Inc. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ...


Third generation

The Robotic Operating Buddy that came packaged with the NES
The Robotic Operating Buddy that came packaged with the NES

In 1983, Nintendo released the Famicom in Japan. Like the ColecoVision, the Famicom supported high-resolution sprites and tiled backgrounds, but with more colors. This allowed Famicom games to be longer and have more detailed graphics. Nintendo brought their Famicom over to the US in the form of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1985. In the US, video games were seen as a fad that had already passed. To distinguish its product from older video game consoles, Nintendo used a front-loading cartridge port similar to a VCR on the NES, packaged the NES with a Super Mario Brothers game and a light gun (the Zapper), and originally advertised it as a toy. The plastic "robot" (R.O.B.)was also sold as an individual purchase item and in some cases packaged with the NES system. In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... Image File history File links Robotic_Operating_Buddy. ... Image File history File links Robotic_Operating_Buddy. ... “NES” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “NES” redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses of R.O.B., see Rob. ...


Nintendo also built a lockout chip into the NES. This kept third parties from producing their own cartridges and forced all developers to go through Nintendo to get NES games published. This allowed Nintendo to do things like prevent developers from releasing low-quality games or games not suitable for children and limit developers to five titles a year.


Like Space Invaders for the 2600, Nintendo found its breakout hit game in Super Mario Bros. Nintendo's success revived the video game industry and new consoles were soon introduced in the following years to compete with the NES. This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ...


Sega's Master System was intended to compete with the NES, but never gained any significant market share in the US and was barely profitable. It fared notably better in PAL territories, especially Brazil. The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ...


Fourth generation

Sega regained market share by releasing their next-generation console, the Sega Mega Drive, which was released in Japan on October 29, 1988, in the US in August 1989 (renamed as the Sega Genesis) and in Europe in 1990, two years before Nintendo could release the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ...


Sega extended the Mega Drive with the Mega CD/Sega CD, to provide increased storage space for multimedia-based games that were then in vogue amongst the development community. Later, Sega released the 32X, which added some of the polygon-processing functionality common in fifth-generation machines. However, the peripheral was a commercial failure due to lack of software support, with developers more keen to concentrate on more powerful machines, with a wider user base, such as the Saturn that followed shortly after. The Sega Mega (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia and Japan. ... The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. ...


Other consoles included in the fourth generation are NEC's TurboGrafx-16 and SNK Playmore's Neo Geo. NEC Corporation (Japanese: Nippon Denki Kabushiki Gaisha; TYO: 6701 , NASDAQ: NIPNY) is a Japanese multinational IT company headquartered in Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... SNK redirects here. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ...


Fifth generation

Going from left to right, top to bottom: Iron Soldier (Atari Jaguar), Gex (3DO), Star Fox (SNES), Donkey Kong Country 3 (SNES), Virtua Racing (Genesis), Vectorman (Genesis).
Going from left to right, top to bottom: Iron Soldier (Atari Jaguar), Gex (3DO), Star Fox (SNES), Donkey Kong Country 3 (SNES), Virtua Racing (Genesis), Vectorman (Genesis).

The first fifth generation consoles were the Atari Jaguar and the 3DO. Both of these systems were much more powerful than the SNES or Genesis (known as Mega Drive outside North America); they were better at rendering polygons, could display more onscreen colors, and the 3DO used CDs that contained far more information than cartridges and were cheaper to produce. Neither of these consoles were serious threats to Sega or Nintendo, though. The 3DO cost more than the SNES and Genesis combined, and the Jaguar was extremely difficult to program for, leading to a lack of games that used its extra power. Both consoles would be discontinued in 1996. In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (662x675, 340 KB)[edit] Summary Screenshots from emulators. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (662x675, 340 KB)[edit] Summary Screenshots from emulators. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Star Fox ) (also known as Star Wing in Europe due to trademark issues) is the first game in the Star Fox series of video games. ... Virtua Formula 8-machine plus commentator setup at the extinct Sega Virtualand, inside the Luxor Casino, Las Vegas, USA, in 1993. ... Vectorman is a platform video game created by Sega and BlueSky Software for use on the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis system. ... The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ... 3DO Interactive Multiplayer (most commonly referred to as the 3DO) is a line of video game consoles which were released in 1993 and 1994 by Panasonic, Sanyo and Goldstar, among other companies. ... CD redirects here. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ...


Nintendo released games like Donkey Kong Country that could display a wide range of tones (something common in fifth generation games) by limiting the number of hues onscreen, and games like Star Fox that used an extra chip inside of the cartridge to display polygon graphics. Sega followed suit, releasing Vectorman and Virtua Racing (the latter of which used the Sega Virtua Processor.) For the television series, see Donkey Kong Country (TV series). ... Star Fox ) (also known as Star Wing in Europe due to trademark issues) is the first game in the Star Fox series of video games. ... Vectorman is a platform video game created by Sega and BlueSky Software for use on the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis system. ... Virtua Formula 8-machine plus commentator setup at the extinct Sega Virtualand, inside the Luxor Casino, Las Vegas, USA, in 1993. ...


It was not until Sony's PlayStation, Sega's Saturn, and the Nintendo 64 were released that fifth generation consoles started to become popular. The Saturn and PlayStation used CDs to store games, while the N64 still used cartridges. All three cost far less than the 3DO, and were easier to program than the Jaguar. The Saturn also had 2D sprite handling power on par with the Neo-Geo. Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... In computer graphics, a sprite (also known by other names; see Synonyms below) is a two-dimensional/three-dimensional image or animation that is integrated into a larger scene. ... The original Neo-Geo console was greatly advanced for its time. ...

  • Atari's Jaguar was released to combat the dominance that Nintendo and Sega were fighting for. Atari's hope was that by designing a more powerful console, they would be able to leapfrog all of the released systems of the day and give gamers a technologically superior system. The Jaguar eventually faded away due to a number of reasons. For example, it was difficult to program for the Jaguar, thus making it too problematic to have good third party support. Another of the Jaguar's pitfalls was the dominance of the previously popular systems. In 1995, the releases of the Sony PlayStation and the Sega Saturn brought the end for the Jaguar. The failure of the Jaguar put Atari into a poor financial situation and forced it to reverse merge with JTS Inc., a short-lived maker of hard disk drives, to form JTS Corporation. The merger effectively ended the company, which existed as a small department for minor support of the Jaguar and the selling off of Atari's intellectual properties.
  • The 3DO was released in North America in October 1993. Although released to much fanfare, like the Jaguar, it faded out of the market with little popularity. The system was technically superior to all the consoles released at the time, but due to the oversaturated market and the hefty US$699.95 price tag, the system did not adopt well into the market. One unique aspect of the 3DO is that the rights to manufacturing the console itself were licensed to different manufacturers by the 3DO company, which only produced the specifications. These companies, in turn, released their own different styles of the same console.
  • Sony's PlayStation was released in Japan on December 3, 1994. The PlayStation was the eventual result of a breakdown of a business partnership plan between Sony and Nintendo to create a CD add-on for the SNES. Nintendo changed the deal and went to Philips; however, with the project nearing completion, Sony took what they had and marketed it off as a Sony-branded console. The PlayStation spawned a whole lineup of consoles from generation to generation and has earned Sony great respect as a video game company, becoming the first video game system to sell over 100 million consoles. Sony released a redesigned, smaller version of the PlayStation entitled the 'PSone' released July 7, 2000.
  • The Sega Saturn was the first independent Sega system to use a CD-ROM based media standard and used a special dual chip processor. The difficulty to program for the two chips in parallel was a factor in the console's demise. The Saturn was a mild success, but was overshadowed by Sony's dominance of the market. The Saturn was discontinued in 1998 with the release of Sega's last console, the Sega Dreamcast.
  • The Nintendo 64 was Nintendo's answer to the growing dominance of the PlayStation. It was a 64-bit console, the only one generally recognized in that class despite the 64 bit Atari Jaguar, which had actually been released earlier. Unlike the other companies' consoles of the generation, the N64 had continued to use ROM cartridges, which many saw as a hindrance to gameplay, as cartridges have much less memory space and are also more expensive than optical media; however, Nintendo's answer to this was that unlike CDs, cartridges cannot be damaged by a simple scratch to the surface, nor are load times much of an issue. Nevertheless, it is also possible that Nintendo did this for fear of then growing software piracy issues facing other consoles, such as the PlayStation.

The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ... JT Storage (also known as JTS) was a maker of inexpensive IDE hard drives for personal computers based in San Jose, California. ... 3DO can refer to: The 3DO Company, a developer of computer and video game software and hardware 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, the name of a number of video game consoles based on specifications created by above company This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... IBM PCjr; two ROM cartridge slots are below the floppy drives. ... The copyright infringement of software is often called software piracy by those seeking to reduce its incidence. ...

Sixth generation

This generation saw a move towards PC-like architectures in gaming consoles, as well as a shift towards using DVDs for game media. This brought games that were both longer and more visually appealing. Furthermore, this generation also saw experimentation with online console gaming and implementing both flash and hard drive storage for game data. The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...

  • Sega's Dreamcast was Sega's last video game console, and was the first of the generation's consoles to be discontinued. Sega implemented a special type of optical media called the GD-ROM. These discs were created in order to prevent software piracy, which had been more easily done with consoles of the previous generation; however, this format was soon cracked as well. The Dreamcast has been seen as far ahead of its time in technology and features[citation needed] (including online play), however it was discontinued in 2001, and Sega transitioned to software developing/publishing only.
  • Sony's PlayStation 2 was the follow-up to their highly successful PlayStation, and was also the first home game console to be able to play DVDs. As was done with the original PlayStation in 2000, Sony redesigned the console in 2004 into a smaller version. As of September 20, 2007, 120 million PlayStation 2 units have been shipped.[6]
  • The Nintendo GameCube was Nintendo's fourth home video game console and the first console by the company to use optical media instead of cartridges. The Nintendo GameCube did not play standard 12 cm DVDs, instead employing smaller 8 cm optical discs.
  • Microsoft's Xbox was the company's first video game console. The first console to employ a hard drive right out of the box to save games, the Xbox blurred the line between PC and console gaming, as it had similar hardware specifications to a low-end desktop computer at the time of its release. Though criticized for its bulky size, which was easily twice that of the competition, as well as for the awkwardness of the original controller that shipped with it, it eventually gained popularity due in part to the success of the Halo franchise.

The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... The copyright infringement of software (also known as software piracy) refers to several practices when done without the permission of the copyright holder: Creating a copy and/or selling it. ... PS2 redirects here. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... It has been suggested that Covenant Vehicles in Halo be merged into this article or section. ...

Seventh generation

The features introduced in this generation include using newer high-definition discs: Blu-Ray, utilized by the Playstation 3, and HD DVD supported by the Xbox 360. Another new technology is to use the motion of the controller as input (as demonstrated by the Wii and the PS3), and understanding where the controller is pointing on the screen (as implemented on the Wii). In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ... Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data...

  • Microsoft's Xbox 360 was released on November 22, 2005. An HD DVD drive is available as an accessory; however, with the death of the HD-DVD format,[7], this accessory has now had its production ceased by microsoft. The Xbox 360 was the first console with the ability to use wireless controllers out of the box. The Xbox Live service is the hallmark of the system, and the console can connect to the service via the Internet through a built-in ethernet port or a wireless accessory. The Xbox 360 is available in four versions, an "Arcade" version for $279, a "Premium" Version for $349, an "Elite" edition for $449, and a Halo 3 limited edition, $399. The biggest difference between these versions was the addition of a 20 GB hard drive in the "Premium" edition, along with a standard wireless controller, a 120 GB hard drive and HDMI in the 'Elite' edition, and the use of HDMI with a 120 GB hard drive. The Xbox 360 is capable of out putting full 1080p with its HDMI port, and with a 2006 update, it is able to output 1080p over component cables as well.[8]
  • Sony's PlayStation 3 was released, in Japan on November 11, 2006, in North America on November 17, 2006 and in Europe on March 23, 2007. All PlayStation 3s come with a hard drive and are ready to play Blu-ray Disc movies and games out of the box. The Playstation 3 was the first video game console to support HDMI out of the box, utilizing full 1080p. Controllers connect to the console through Bluetooth (up to 7) and have tilt-sensing capabilities. Four versions of the PS3 currently exist; a 20 GB HDD version for US$399 (discontinued in North America and Japan, and was never released in PAL territories), a 60 GB HDD version for €599.99/US$499 (formerly US$599) (Discontinued in North America, Japan and PAL terriotries), a 40 GB HDD version for €399.99/US$399 and an 80 GB HDD version which retails for US$499 (only in some NTSC territories).
  • Nintendo's Wii was released in North America on November 19, 2006, and in Japan on December 2, 2006, Australia on December 7, 2006, and in Europe on December 8, 2006. It is bundled with Wii Sports in all regions except for Japan. The Wii retails for approximately $250. Unlike the other systems of this generation, the Wii does not have an internal hard drive, but instead uses 512 MB of internal Flash memory and includes support for removable SD card storage. It also has a maximum graphics output of 480p, making it the only seventh generation console not utilizing High Definition. Along with its low price point, the Wii is renowned for its completely redesigned controller which resembles a TV remote. The system utilizes a "sensor bar" that detects where on the television screen the controller is pointing, and also detects motion and orientation. It is also the first Nintendo console to be backwards compatible with previous Nintendo consoles, where it can play all GameCube games and supports up to four GameCube controllers and two memory cards, along with Virtual Console which supports games from older systems, including those of former competitors.

Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... Xbox Live is a subscription-based online gaming service for Microsofts Xbox and Xbox 360 video game consoles. ... Ethernet is a large, diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies that operate at many speeds for local area networks (LANs). ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Blu-ray Disc (also known as Blu-ray or BD) is an optical disc storage media format. ... Bluetooth logo This article is about the electronic protocol named after Harald Bluetooth Gormson. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wii Sports is a video game produced by Nintendo for the Wii. ... 16Mb SD Card Secure Digital, or SD, is a flash memory data storage device based on Toshibas earlier Multi Media Cards (MMC). ... The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ...

Bits

Each new generation of console hardware made use of the rapid development of processing technology. Newer machines could output a greater range of colors, more sprites, and introduced graphical technologies such as scaling, and vector graphics. One way this increase in processing power was conveyed to consumers was through the measurement of "bits". The TurboGrafx-16, Sega Genesis, and SNES were among the first consoles to advertise the fact that they contained 16-bit processors. This fourth generation of console hardware was often referred to as the 16-bit era, and the previous generation as the 8-bit. In computer graphics, a sprite (also known by other names; see Synonyms below) is a two-dimensional/three-dimensional image or animation that is integrated into a larger scene. ... The term scaling can have several manings: Scaling can be defined as the determination of the interdependency of variables in a physical system. ... Example showing effect of vector graphics versus raster graphics. ... This article is about the unit of information. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... A CPU The processor sub-system of a data processing system processes received information after it has been encoded into data by the input sub-system. ...


The bit-value of a console referred to the word length of a console's processor (although the value was sometimes misused, for example the TurboGrafx 16 had only an 8-bit CPU, and the Genesis/Mega Drive had a 32-bit CPU, but both had a 16-bit dedicated graphics processor). As the graphical performance of console hardware is dependent on many factors, using bits was a crude way to gauge a console's overall ability, but served better to distinguish between generations. In computer hardware terminology, word size (word length) is the number of bits that a CPU can process at one time (the word). ... CPU can stand for: in computing: Central processing unit in journalism: Commonwealth Press Union in law enforcement: Crime prevention unit in software: Critical patch update, a type of software patch distributed by Oracle Corporation in Macleans College is often known as Ash Lim. ...


Timeline

Note: This is an abridged timeline of video game consoles in North America. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...



Note: This is an abridged timeline of video game consoles in Japan.



Note: This is an abridged timeline of video game consoles in Europe.



Note some consoles are omitted from the timelines due to a lack of known dates; see the list of video game consoles. This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ...


Media

Cartridges

Standard game cartridges for several popular consoles. From front to back: Game Boy Color, Sega Genesis, and Atari 2600.
Standard game cartridges for several popular consoles. From front to back: Game Boy Color, Sega Genesis, and Atari 2600.

Game cartridges consist of a printed circuit board housed inside of a plastic casing, with a connector allowing the device to interface with the console. The circuit board can contain a wide variety of components. All cartridge games contain at the minimum, read only memory with the software written on it. Many cartridges also carry components that increase the original console's power, such as extra RAM or a coprocessor. Components can also be added to extend the original hardware's functionality[9] (such as gyroscopes, rumble packs, tilt-sensors, light sensors, etc.); this is more common on handheld consoles where the user does not interact with the game through a separate video game controller.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... The Mega Drive/Genesis was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world as the Mega Drive. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... Part of a 1983 Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer board. ... Rom is also the name of a toy and comic book character Rom (Spaceknight). ... Kirby Tilt n Tumble is a Game Boy Color video game made by Nintendo that features a built-in tilt sensor. ... Boktai is a video game series developed by Konami for the Game Boy Advance handheld console. ...


Cartridges were the first external media to be used with home consoles and remained the most common until 1995 continued improvements in capacity(Nintendo 64 being the last mainstream game console to use cartridges).[11] Nevertheless, the relatively high manufacturing costs saw them completely replaced by optical media for home consoles by the early 21st century. Although, they are still in use in some handheld video game consoles.


Due to the aforementioned capabilities of cartridges such as more memory and coprocessors, those factors make it harder to reverse engineer consoles to be used on emulators.


Cards

Further information: Smart Card

Several consoles such as the Sega Master System and the TurboGrafx-16 have used different types of smart cards as an external medium. These cards function similar to simple cartridges. Information is stored on a chip that is housed in plastic. Cards are more compact and simpler than cartridges, though. This makes them cheaper to produce and smaller, but limits what can be done with them. Cards cannot hold extra components, and common cartridge techniques like bank switching (a technique used create very large games) were impossible to miniaturize into a card in the late 1980s.[12][13] Smart card used for health insurance in France. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... A smartcard or smart card is a tiny secure cryptoprocessor embedded within a credit card-sized or smaller (like the GSM SIM) card. ... Bank switching (also known as paging, but only loosely related to the ordinary meaning of paging in computing) was a technique common in 8-bit microcomputer systems, to increase the amount of addressable RAM and ROM without extending the address bus. ...


Compact Discs reduced much of the need for cards. Optical Discs can hold more information than cards, and are cheaper to produce. Many modern systems use writable memory cards for storage, but the Nintendo DS is the only modern system to use cards for game distribution. Nintendo has long used cartridges with their Game Boy line of hand held consoles because of their durability, small size and low battery consumption. Nintendo switched to cards for the DS, because advances in memory technology made putting extra memory on the cartridge unnecessary. [14] Memory cards are solid-state electronic flash memory data storage devices used with digital cameras, handheld and laptop computers, phones, music players, video game consoles and other electronics. ... NDS redirects here. ...


Magnetic media

Two common forms of magnetic media. From front to back: Cassette and 3½-inch floppy disk.
Two common forms of magnetic media. From front to back: Cassette and 3½-inch floppy disk.

Home computers have long used magnetic storage devices. Both tape drives and floppy disk drives were common on early microcomputers. Their popularity is in large part because a tape drive or disk drive can write to any material it can read. However, magnetic media is volatile and can be more easily damaged than game cartridges or optical discs.[15] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Compact Cassette, often referred to as audio cassette, cassette tape, cassette, or simply tape, is a magnetic tape sound recording format. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... Magnetic storage is a term from engineering referring to the storage of data on a magnetised medium. ... A tape drive, also known as a streamer, is a peripheral device that reads and writes data stored on a magnetic tape or a punched tape. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... Apple IIc Generally, a microcomputer is a computer with a microprocessor (µP) as its CPU. Another general characteristic of these computers is that they occupy physically small amounts of space. ...


Among the first consoles to use magnetic media were the Bally Astrocade and APF-M1000, both of which could use cassette tapes through expansions. In Bally's case, this allowed the console to see new game development even after Bally dropped support for it. While magnetic media remained limited in use as a primary form of distribution, two popular subsequent consoles also had expansions available to allow them to use this format. The Starpath Supercharger can load Atari 2600 games from audio cassettes; Starpath used it to cheaply distribute their own games from 1982 to 1984 and today it is used by many programmers to test, distribute, and play homebrew software. The Famicom Disk System was released by Nintendo in 1985 for the Japanese market. Nintendo sold the disks cheaply and sold vending machines where customers could have new games written to their disks up to 500 times.[16] Bally Astrocade The Astrocade is an early video game console and simple computer system designed by a team at Midway, the videogame division of Bally. ... The APF-M1000 is an early 8-bit cartridge-based game console released in 1978 by APF Electronics Inc. ... Starpath Supercharger The Starpath Supercharger was an add-on module created by Starpath to expand the game capabilities of the Atari 2600 video game console. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ...


Optical media

The most widely used forms of optical media are DVDs and compact discs. Shown is a CD-ROM (left) and a game in Nintendo's proprietary optical disc format.
The most widely used forms of optical media are DVDs and compact discs. Shown is a CD-ROM (left) and a game in Nintendo's proprietary optical disc format.

In the mid-1990s, various manufacturers shifted to optical media, specifically CD-ROM, for games. Although they were slower at loading game data than the cartridges available at that time, they were significantly cheaper to manufacture and had a larger capacity than the existing cartridge technology. By the early 21st century, all of the major home consoles used optical media, usually DVD-ROM or similar disks, which are widely replacing CD-ROM for data storage. The PlayStation 3 system uses even higher-capacity Blu-ray optical discs for games and movies while the Xbox 360 uses HD DVD's (a separate accessory and only used for movies). Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... CD re-directs here; see Cd for other meanings of CD. Image of a compact disc (pencil included for scale) A compact disc (or CD) is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Nintendo optical discs refer to the optical disc format used to distribute video games released by Nintendo. ...


Internet distribution

All three seventh generation of consoles (the PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360) offer some kind of Internet games distribution service, allowing users to download games for a fee onto some form of non-volatile storage, typically a hard disk or flash memory. Recently the console manufacturers have been taking full advantage of internet distribution with arcade games, television shows and film trailers being available.

  • Microsoft's Xbox Live service includes the Xbox Live Arcade & Xbox Live Marketplace, featuring digital distribution of classic and original titles. These include arcade classics, original titles, and games originally released on other consoles. The Xbox Live Marketplace also includes many different hit movies and trailers in high definition, and is accessible with a free Xbox Live Silver Membership.
  • Sony's online game distribution is known as the Playstation Network (PSN). It offers free online gaming, downloadable content such as classic PlayStation games, high definition game and movie trailers, and original games such as flOw and Everyday Shooter as well as some games that also release on blu-ray disk such as Warhawk and Gran Turismo 5: Prologue. A networking service, dubbed PlayStation Home, is due for release in Spring 2008. They have also announced a video/movie service and music service for some time in 2008.
  • Nintendo 64, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, NES/Famicom, TurboGrafx-16, SNES/Super Famicom, and Neo Geo (and in Japan Sega Master System and Game Gear)games are currently being emulated on the Nintendo Wii console through Nintendo's Virtual Console service. Nintendo also plans to have original content available for download in the future through their WiiWare service.

Generally, high-definition refers to an increase in resolution or clarity such as in: High-definition television (HDTV), television formats that have a higher resolution than their contemporary counterparts High-definition video, which is used in HDTV broadcasting, as well as digital film and computer HD video file formats HDV... Generally, high-definition refers to an increase in resolution or clarity such as in: High-definition television (HDTV), television formats that have a higher resolution than their contemporary counterparts High-definition video, which is used in HDTV broadcasting, as well as digital film and computer HD video file formats HDV... Look up flow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Everyday Shooter is available on Windows and downloadable game on the PlayStation Store. ... Warhawk is a superhero who has appeared in animated series based on DC Comics. ... The PlayStation Home logo Home (trademarked as Homeâ„¢ and known more practically as PlayStation Home) is a community-based service for the PlayStation Network which has been in development since early 2007. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... The Wii Menu as displayed on a widescreen television The Wii Menu is the top level menu interface of the Wii game console. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Atari 2600 Game Catalog Scans
  3. ^ Atari 2600 Manuals Scans
  4. ^ Channel F manual
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ KAZUO HIRAI, PRESIDENT AND GROUP CEO OF SONY COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT, OUTLINES PLANS FOR PLAYSTATION BUSINESS AT TOKYO GAME SHOW 2007 KEYNOTE SPEECH. Sony Computer Entertainment Inc (2007-09-20). Retrieved on 2007-09-28.
  7. ^ HD DVD: Just another brick in the wall of defunct formats. Net (2008-02-19). Retrieved on 2008-02-24.
  8. ^ Xbox 360 adds 1080p, HD DVD drive is $170 US for November 22nd in Japan. Engadget (2006-09-20). Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
  9. ^ Dauer, James (March 20 2006). Sonic: A History - From South Island to Cosmic Eternity (.html). Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  10. ^ Kevin Horton (April 18 1997). "Cart Information" (.txt). 6.00. Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  11. ^ Polsson, Ken (May 9 2007). Chronology of Video Game Systems (.html). Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  12. ^ Richard Talbot-Watkins (June 10 1998). "SEGA MASTER SYSTEM TECHNICAL INFORMATION" (.txt). Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  13. ^ Jeff Bogumil (September 27 1997). "SEGA MASTER SYSTEM Frequently Asked Questions" (.txt). 2.06. Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  14. ^ Nintendo DS Details Explosion - Screen, Battery, GBA Compatibility and More (.html) (January 29 2004). Retrieved on June 9, 2007.
  15. ^ Swearingen, Kirsten; Peter Charles, Nathan Good, Laheem Lamar Jordan, Joyojeet Pal. How Much Information? 2003 (.html). Retrieved on June 20, 2007.
  16. ^ Family Computer Disk System (.html) (January 20 2000). Retrieved on June 20, 2007.

Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up C, c in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Engadget is a popular technology weblog and podcast (on hold as of 31/08/2007) about consumer electronics. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Video games Portal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ... A console manufacturer is a company that manufactures and distributes video game consoles. ... Home video-game systems became popular during the 1970s and 80s. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A dedicated console is a video game console that is dedicated to a built in game or games, and is not equipped for additional games, via cartridge or other media. ... The term unlockable games refers to full video games that can be unlocked within another videogame, often as easter eggs. ...

Books

  • Forster, Winnie (2005). The Encyclopedia of Game Machines - Consoles, handheld & home computers 1972-2005. Gameplan. ISBN 3-00-015359-4. 

External links

This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ... Philips Videopac G7000 shown playing Pickaxe Pete The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, and also by many other names, was a video game console released in 1978. ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... The Telstar is a video game console produced by Coleco which first went on sale in 1976. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... The Fairchild Channel F is the worlds second cartridge-based video game console, after the Magnavox Odyssey. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... The VC 4000 is an early 8-bit cartridge-based game console released in Germany in 1978 by Interton. ... Magnavox Odyssey² video game console The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, in the United States as the Magnavox Odyssey² and the Philips Odyssey², and also by many other names, is a video game console released in 1978. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... Emerson Arcadia 2001, intended as a portable game console, the Arcadia 2001 was released by Emerson Radio Corp in mid-1982. ... The Atari 5200 SuperSystem, or simply Atari 5200, is a video game console that was introduced in 1982 by Atari as a replacement for the famous Atari 2600. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Vectrex is an 8-bit video game console developed by General Consumer Electric (GCE) and later bought by Milton Bradley Company. ... The SG-1000 ), which stands for Sega Game 1000, is a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Atari 7800 is a video game console released by Atari in June 1986 (a test market release occurred two years earlier). ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... CD-i or Compact Disc Interactive is the name of an interactive multimedia CD player developed and marketed by Royal Philips Electronics N.V. CD-i also refers to the multimedia Compact Disc standard utilized by the CD-i console, also known as Green Book, which was co-developed by... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... 3DO Interactive Multiplayer (most commonly referred to as the 3DO) is a line of video game consoles which were released in 1993 and 1994 by Panasonic, Sanyo and Goldstar, among other companies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The PC-FX console The PC-FX was NECs 32-bit sequel to its PC Engine (US:TurboGrafx 16). ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Video game console - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (950 words)
Note that the advertised number of bits of post-32-bit consoles were in large part created by the console makers' marketing departments and may have little to do with the actual architecture or processing power of the systems.
Video game consoles have created a whole self-supporting market for thousands of different video game accessory manufacturers who would otherwise not be able to produce their own video game consoles.
Video Game and Console Timeline, a Brief Video Game and Console Timeline
Computer and video games - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3697 words)
The popularity of computer and video games, as a whole, has been increasing steadily ever since the 1984-1987 drop-off caused by the video game crash of 1983, and the popularity appears to be continuing to increase.
Computer and video games have been the subject of frequent controversy and censorship, due to the depiction of graphic violence, sexual themes, advertising, consumption of illegal drugs, consumption of alcohol or tobacco, propaganda, or profanity in some games.
Video games are made by developers, who used to do this as individuals or small teams in the 80's.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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