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Encyclopedia > Victoria of the United Kingdom
Victoria
Queen of the United Kingdom, Empress of India (more...)
Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
Reign 20 June 183722 January 1901
Coronation 28 June 1838
Predecessor William IV
Successor Edward VII
Consort Albert, Prince Consort
Issue
Victoria, German Empress, Queen of Prussia and Princess Royal
Edward VII
Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse
Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Helena, Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein
Louise, Duchess of Argyll
Arthur, Duke of Connaught
Leopold, Duke of Albany
Beatrice, Princess Henry of Battenberg
Full name
Alexandrina Victoria
Titles
HIM The Empress of India
HM The Queen
HRH Princess Victoria of Kent
Royal house House of Hanover
Royal anthem God Save the Queen
Father Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent
Mother Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
Born 24 May 1819(1819-05-24)
Kensington Palace, London, England
Baptised 24 June 1819
Kensington Palace, London, England
Died 22 January 1901 (aged 81)
Osborne House, Isle of Wight, England
Burial 2 February 1901
Frogmore, Windsor, Berkshire, England

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 25 May 181922 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. Her reign lasted 63 years and seven months, longer than that of any other British monarch. In general, the period centred on her reign is known as the Victorian era. People known as Queen Victoria: Victoria of the United Kingdom, Queen of the United Kingdom from 1837-1901. ... The precise style of British Sovereigns has varied over the years. ... Image File history File links Queen_Victoria_bw. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Victoria of the United Kingdom (born Victoria Adelaide Mary Louise) 21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was the eldest child and daughter of Queen Victoria and her consort Albert. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary; later The Grand Duchess of Hesse; April 25, 1843 – December 14, 1878), was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ... Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Alfred Ernest Albert; 6 August 1844 – 30 July 1900) was the third Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha between 1893 and 1900. ... The Princess Helena, (Helena Augusta Victoria), (25 May 1846 - 9 June 1923), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth-born child and the third daughter of Queen Victoria. ... The Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, (Louise Caroline Alberta; 18 March 1848 - 3 December 1939) was a member of the British Royal Family, the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. ... Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (Arthur William Patrick Albert; 1 May 1850 – 16 January 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... The Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (Leopold George Duncan Albert; 7 April 1853 – 28 March 1884) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ... The Princess Beatrice, (Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore), (14 April 1857 - 26 October 1944), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth daughter and the youngest child of Queen Victoria. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ... HRH The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. ... Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (Mary Louise Victoria; 17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861), later HRH The Duchess of Kent, was the mother of Queen Victoria. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Frogmore or Frogmore House is a former royal residence in England, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, and is the site of the Frogmore Mausoleum containing the grave of Victoria and Albert. ... This article is about the English town. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... // This is a list of the monarchs of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed in the British Isles, namely: The Kingdom of Scotland, from 843 up to 1707; The Kingdom of... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Signature of King Edward VIII The R and I after his name indicate king and emperor in Latin (Rex and Imperator, respectively). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Queen Victoria, the longest-reigning monarch of the UK The following is a list of the monarchs who have reigned for the longest amount of time in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (Northern Ireland after 1922), the Kingdom of Great Britain, the Kingdom of England, or the... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


The Victorian era was at the height of the Industrial Revolution, a period of significant social, economic, and technological progress in the United Kingdom. Victoria's reign was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire; during this period it reached its zenith, becoming the foremost Global Power of the time. Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The top global powers usually have relatively high military budgets, reflecting their powerful military capabilities. ...


Victoria was the granddaughter of George III, and was almost entirely of German descent. She was the last British monarch of the House of Hanover. Her son King Edward VII belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria...

Contents

Early life

At the age of 50, Edward, the Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of George III, married a widow, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. Victoria, the couple's only child, was born in Kensington Palace, London on 24 May 1819. At birth she was fifth in line for the British crown. HRH The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. ... Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (Mary Louise Victoria; 17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861), later HRH The Duchess of Kent, was the mother of Queen Victoria. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Victoria was christened in the Cupola Room of Kensington Palace on 24 June 1819 by the Archbishop of Canterbury (Charles Manners-Sutton).[1] Although christened Alexandrina Victoria - and from birth formally styled Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria of Kent - Victoria was called Drina within the family.[2] She was taught German, English, Italian, Greek, Chinese, and French, arithmetic, music and her favourite subject, history.[3] Her teachers were the Reverend George Davys and Baroness Louise Lehzen, her governess.[4] When she learned from Baroness Lehzen that one day she could be queen, Victoria replied, "I will be good."[5] is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Charles Manners-Sutton (February 17, 1755–July 21, 1828), was a British clergyman who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1805 to 1828. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... George Davys (died 1864) was tutor to Victoria I of the United Kingdom and later Bishop of Peterborough. ... Louise Lehzen (1784 – 1870) was a German baroness. ...


Her name, though finally agreed upon as Victoria Carolina, was disputed over by her mother and uncles. King William IV proposed Elizabeth, while objecting to naming the princess for her mother, saying Victoria was "never known heretofore as a Christian name of this country." The Duchess of Kent refused. Charlotte was not even considered, out of respect for the dead princess. Engraving from a portrait of Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales, in the National Portrait Gallery, attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (January 7, 1796 – November 6, 1817) was the only child of the ill-fated marriage between George IV (at that time the Prince of Wales...


Victoria's father died of cancer just eight months after she was born and her grandfather, King George III, died six days later of syphillus. Her uncle, the Prince of Wales, inherited the Crown, becoming King George IV, but he too died childless when Victoria was only 11. The crown now passed to his brother, the Duke of Clarence and St Andrews, who became King William IV. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ...


Heiress to the Throne

King George III's eldest son, the Prince of Wales and future King George IV, had only one child, Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales. When she died in 1817 the remaining unmarried sons of King George III scrambled to marry and father children to guarantee the line of succession.[6] “George III” redirects here. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Engraving from a portrait of Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales, in the National Portrait Gallery, attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (January 7, 1796 – November 6, 1817) was the only child of the ill-fated marriage between George IV (at that time the Prince of Wales...


Although William was the father of ten illegitimate children by his mistress, the actress Dorothy Jordan, he had no surviving legitimate children. As a result, the young Princess Victoria became heiress presumptive. Mrs Jordan ( November 21, 1761 – July 5, 1816), actress, was the mistress of King William IV of the United Kingdom. ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ...


The law at the time made no special provision for a child monarch. Therefore, a Regent needed to be appointed if Victoria were to succeed to the throne before coming of age at the age of eighteen. Parliament passed the Regency Act 1830, under which it provided that Victoria's mother, the Duchess of Kent and Strathearn, would act as Regent during the queen's minority. Parliament did not create a council to limit the powers of the Regent. King William disliked the Duchess and, on at least one occasion, stated that he wanted to live until Victoria's 18th birthday, so a regency could be avoided. The Regency Acts are Acts of the British Parliament passed at various points in time, to provide a regent if the British monarch were to be incapacited or in minority (under the age of 18). ...


Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Queen Victoria Receiving the News of Her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837 from the picture by H. T. Wells, R.A., at Buckingham Palace.

Princess Victoria met her future husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, when she was just 16 years old in 1836.[7] But it was not until a second meeting in 1839 that she said of him, " …dear Albert… He is so sensible, so kind, and so good, and so amiable too. He has besides, the most pleasing and delightful exterior and appearance you can possibly see."[8] Prince Albert was Victoria's first cousin; his father was her mother's brother, Ernst. As a monarch, Victoria had to propose to him. Their marriage proved to be very happy.[9] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Ernst I of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Early reign

Accession to the Throne

On 24 May 1837 Victoria turned 18, meaning that a regency was no longer necessary. On 20 June 1837, Victoria was awakened by her mother to find that William IV had died from heart failure at the age of 71.[10] In her diary Victoria wrote, "I was awoke at 6 o'clock by Mamma …who told me the Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Conyngham were here and wished to see me. I got out of bed and went into my sitting-room (only in my dressing gown) and alone, and saw them. Lord Conyngham then acquainted me that my poor Uncle, the King, was no more, and had expired at 12 minutes past 2 this morning, and consequently that I am Queen…"[11] Victoria was now Queen of the United Kingdom.[12] Her coronation took place on 28 June 1838. is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Under Salic Law, however, no woman could be heir to the throne of Hanover, a realm which had shared a monarch with Britain since 1714. Hanover passed to her uncle, the Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, who became King Ernest Augustus I of Hanover. The King of the Franks, in the midst of the military chiefs who formed his Treuste -- or armed court, dictates the Salic Law (Code of the Barbaric Laws). ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: ) was a historical territory in todays Germany, at various times a principality, an electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom and a province of Prussia and of Germany. ... Ernest Augustus I of Hanover Ernest Augustus I, King of Hanover (5 June 1771 – 18 November 1851), also known (1799-1837) as the Duke of Cumberland, was the fifth son and eighth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ...

Queen Victoria, the first monarch to reside at Buckingham Palace, moved into the newly completed palace upon her accession in 1837
Queen Victoria, the first monarch to reside at Buckingham Palace, moved into the newly completed palace upon her accession in 1837

As the young queen was as yet childless (and not even married), Ernest Augustus also remained the heir presumptive to the throne of the United Kingdom until her first child was born in 1840.[13] Image File history File links Dronning_victoria. ... Image File history File links Dronning_victoria. ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ...


At the time of her accession, the government was controlled by the Whig Party, which had been in power, except for brief intervals, since 1830. The Whig Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne, at once became a powerful influence in the life of the politically inexperienced Queen, who relied on him for advice. (Some even referred to Victoria as "Mrs. Melbourne".)[14] However, the Melbourne ministry would not stay in power for long; it was growing unpopular and, moreover, faced considerable difficulty in governing the British colonies (see Rebellions of 1837). In 1839 Lord Melbourne resigned. The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... Arms of Lord Melbourne William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 1779–24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria. ... The Rebellions of 1837 were a pair of Canadian armed uprisings that occurred in 1837 and 1838 in response to frustrations in political reform and ethnic conflict. ...


Victoria's principal adviser was her uncle King Leopold I of Belgium (her mother's brother, and the widower of Princess Charlotte). Queen Victoria's cousins, through Leopold, were King Leopold II of Belgium and Empress Carlota of Mexico. Leopold I of the Belgians (Leopold George Christian Frederick of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, later of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) (b. ... Leopold II (Léopold Louis Philippe Marie Victor (French) or Leopold Lodewijk Filips Marie Victor (Dutch) (April 9, 1835 – December 17, 1909) was King of the Belgians. ... Charlotte of Belgium (Princess Marie Charlotte Amélie Augustine Victoire Clémentine Léopoldine of Belgium), (June 7, 1840–January 19, 1927) as Charlotte (or Carlota), Empress of Mexico was the consort of Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico. ...


The Queen then commissioned Sir Robert Peel, a Tory, to form a new ministry, but was faced with a débâcle known as the Bedchamber Crisis. At the time, it was customary for appointments to the Royal Household to be based on the patronage system (that is, for the Prime Minister to appoint members of the Royal Household on the basis of their party loyalties). Many of the Queen's Ladies of the Bedchamber were wives of Whigs, but Sir Robert Peel expected to replace them with wives of Tories. Victoria strongly objected to the removal of these ladies, whom she regarded as close friends rather than as members of a ceremonial institution. Sir Robert Peel felt that he could not govern under the restrictions imposed by the Queen, and consequently resigned his commission, allowing Melbourne to return to office.[15] For other people named Robert Peel, see Robert Peel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... The Bedchamber crisis (May 1839) is the unofficial name for the crisis that took place under Queen Victoria during a change of Her Majestys government. ... In all the medieval monarchies of western Europe the general system of government sprang from, and centred in, the royal household. ... ...


Marriage and assassination attempts

The Queen married her first cousin, Prince Albert, on 10 February 1840, in the Chapel Royal of St. James's Palace, London.[16] Albert became not only the Queen's companion, but also an important political advisor, replacing Lord Melbourne as the dominant figure in the first half of her life. A cousin couple is a pair of cousins with a romantic or sexual relationship. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Chapel Royal did not originally refer to a building but an establishment in the Royal Household. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ...


During Victoria's first pregnancy, eighteen-year old Edward Oxford[17] attempted to assassinate the Queen while she was riding in a carriage with Prince Albert in London. Oxford fired twice, but both bullets missed. He was tried for high treason, but was acquitted on the grounds of insanity. The shooting had no effect on the Queen's health or on her pregnancy and the first of the royal couple's nine children, named Victoria, was born on 21 November 1840. Edward Oxford (born Birmingham, 1822; date and place of death unknown) was tried for high treason for attempting to assassinate the British Queen, Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom while she was out riding on Constitution Hill with her husband, Prince Albert. ... {{main|Treason}} High treason, broadly defined, is an action which is grossly disloyal to ones country or sovereign. ... In criminal trials, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, by which defendants argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were legally insane at the time of the commission of alleged crimes. ... This article is about human pregnancy in biological females. ... Princess Victoria Adelaide Mary Louise (21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria and her consort Albert. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Marriage of Victoria and Albert
Marriage of Victoria and Albert
Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in a photo taken in 1854 before an evening Court.
Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in a photo taken in 1854 before an evening Court.

Two further attempts to assassinate Queen Victoria occurred in May and July 1842: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (1985 × 1113 pixel, file size: 223 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (1985 × 1113 pixel, file size: 223 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 462 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (754 × 979 pixel, file size: 131 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This work is in the public domain worldwide. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 462 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (754 × 979 pixel, file size: 131 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This work is in the public domain worldwide. ...


On 29 May at St. James's Park, John Francis fired a pistol at the Queen while she was in a carriage,[18] but was immediately seized by Police Constable William Trounce. Francis was convicted of high treason. The death sentence was commuted to transportation for life. is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... {{main|Treason}} High treason, broadly defined, is an action which is grossly disloyal to ones country or sovereign. ... For other uses see Transport (disambiguation) or Transportation (disambiguation). ...


On 13 June 1842, Victoria made her first journey by train, travelling from Slough railway station (near Windsor Castle) to Bishop's Bridge, near Paddington (in London), in a special royal carriage provided by the Great Western Railway. Accompanying her were her husband and the engineer of the Great Western line, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The Queen and Albert, Prince Consort, both complained the train was going far too fast at 20 mph (30 km/h), fearing the train would fall off the railway line. is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Slough railway station is a railway station in the town of Slough, Berkshire, England. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... For other places with the same name, see Paddington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ...


On 3 July, just days after Francis' sentence was commuted, another boy, John William Bean,[19] attempted to shoot the Queen. Prince Albert felt that the attempts were encouraged by Oxford's acquittal in 1840. Although his gun was loaded only with paper and tobacco, his crime was still punishable by death. Feeling that such a penalty would be too harsh, Prince Albert encouraged Parliament to pass the Treason Act of 1842. Under the new law, an assault with a dangerous weapon in the monarch's presence with the intent of alarming her was made punishable by seven years imprisonment and flogging. Bean was thus sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment; however, neither he, nor any person who violated the act in the future, was flogged. is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ...

A young Queen Victoria
A young Queen Victoria

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 445 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (840 × 1132 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Victoria of the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 445 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (840 × 1132 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Victoria of the...

Early Victorian politics and further assassination attempts

Peel's ministry soon faced a crisis involving the repeal of the Corn Laws. Many Tories - by then known also as Conservatives - were opposed to the repeal, but some Tories (the "Peelites") and most Whigs supported it. Peel resigned in 1846, after the repeal narrowly passed, and was replaced by Lord John Russell. Russell's ministry, though Whig, was not favoured by the Queen. Particularly offensive to Victoria was the Foreign Secretary, Lord Palmerston,[20] who often acted without consulting the Cabinet, the Prime Minister, or the Queen. The Corn Laws, in force between 1815 and 1846, were import tariffs ostensibly designed to protect British farmers and landowners against competition from cheap foreign grain imports. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, KG, GCMG, PC (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was an English Whig and Liberal politician who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Right Honourable Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid 19th century. ...


In 1849, Victoria lodged a complaint with Lord John Russell, claiming that Palmerston had sent official dispatches to foreign leaders without her knowledge. She repeated her remonstrance in 1850, but to no avail. It was only in 1851 that Lord Palmerston was removed from office; he had on that occasion announced the British government's approval for President Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte's coup in France without prior consultation of the Prime Minister. This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ... Coup redirects here. ...


The period during which Russell was prime minister also proved personally distressing to Queen Victoria. In 1849, an unemployed and disgruntled Irishman named William Hamilton attempted to alarm the Queen by firing a powder-filled pistol as her carriage passed along Constitution Hill, London. Hamilton was charged under the 1842 act; he pleaded guilty and received the maximum sentence of seven years of penal transportation. Several people have been known by the name William Hamilton; William is often shortened to Will or Bill. ... Constitution Hill is a road in the City of Westminster, London England. ...


In 1850, the Queen did sustain injury when she was assaulted by a possibly insane ex-Army officer, Robert Pate. As Victoria was riding in a carriage, Pate struck her with his gun, crushing her bonnet and bruising her. Pate was later tried; he failed to prove his insanity, and received the same sentence as Hamilton.


Ireland

The young Queen Victoria fell in love with Ireland, choosing to holiday in Killarney in Kerry. Her love of the island was matched by initial Irish warmth towards the young Queen. In 1845, Ireland was hit by a potato blight that over four years cost the lives of over one million Irish people and saw the emigration of another million. In response to what came to be called the Irish Potato Famine (An Gorta Mór), the Queen personally donated 2000 pounds sterling to the starving Irish people.[21] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Tralee Code: KY Area: 4,746 km² Population (2006) 139,616 Website: www. ... Potato blight (Phytophthora infestans) is a serious disease of the potato plant. ... For other uses, please see Great Famine. ... For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ...


The policies of her minister Lord John Russell were often blamed for exacerbating the severity of the famine, killing a million Irishmen, which adversely affected the Queen's popularity in Ireland.


Victoria was a strong supporter of the Irish. She supported the Maynooth Grant and made a point, on visiting Ireland, of visiting the seminary. The Maynooth Grant was a grant that was given to Maynooth College by the British government. ...


Victoria's first official visit to Ireland, in 1849, was specifically arranged by Lord Clarendon, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the head of the British administration, to try both to draw attention off the famine and also to alert British politicians through the Queen's presence to the seriousness of the crisis in Ireland. Notwithstanding the negative impact of the famine on the Queen's popularity, she still remained sufficiently popular for nationalists at party meetings to finish by singing God Save the Queen.[22] George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon (January 12, 1800 - June 27, 1870), was an English diplomat and statesman. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the...

Queen Victoria with her daughter Princess Beatrice, photo by Alexander Bassano
Queen Victoria with her daughter Princess Beatrice, photo by Alexander Bassano

However, by the 1870s and 1880s, the monarchy's appeal in Ireland had diminished substantially, partly as a result of Victoria's refusal to visit Ireland in protest of the Dublin Corporation's decision not to congratulate her son, the Prince of Wales, on both his marriage to Princess Alexandra of Denmark and on the birth of the royal couple's oldest son, Prince Albert Victor. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixels Full resolution (534 × 800 pixel, file size: 231 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Victoria of the United Kingdom... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixels Full resolution (534 × 800 pixel, file size: 231 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Victoria of the United Kingdom... The Princess Beatrice, (Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore), (14 April 1857 - 26 October 1944), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth daughter and the youngest child of Queen Victoria. ... Alexander Bassano (1829-1913) was the leading high society portrait photographer in Victorian London. ... Dublin Corporation is the former name given to the city government and its administrative organisation in Dublin between the twelfth century and 1 January 2002. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Victoria refused repeated pressure from a number of prime ministers, lords lieutenant and even members of the Royal Family, to establish a royal residence in Ireland.[23] Lord Midleton, the former head of the Irish unionist party, writing in his memoirs of 1930 Ireland: Dupe or Heroine?, described this decision as having proved disastrous to the monarchy and British rule in Ireland. William St John Fremantle Brodrick, 1st Earl of Midleton (1856 - 1942) was an English statesman. ...


Victoria paid her last visit to Ireland in 1900, when she came to appeal to Irishmen to join the British Army and fight in the Second Boer War. Nationalist opposition to her visit was spearheaded by Arthur Griffith, who established an organisation called Cumann na nGaedhael to unite the opposition. Five years later Griffith used the contacts established in his campaign against the queen's visit to form a new political movement, Sinn Féin. Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cumann na nGaedhael (IPA: ; Society of the Gaels), sometimes spelt Cumann na nGaedheal,[1] was an Irish language name given to two Irish political parties, the second of which had the greater impact. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ...


Widowhood

Albert's death

Albert, the Prince Consort, died of typhoid fever on 14 December 1861, due to the primitive sanitary conditions of Windsor Castle. His death devastated Victoria,[24] who entered a state of mourning and wore black for the remainder of her life. She avoided public appearances and rarely set foot in London in the following years. Her seclusion earned her the name "Widow of Windsor". She blamed her son Edward, the Prince of Wales, for his father's death, since news of the Prince's poor conduct had come to his father in November, leading Prince Albert to travel to Cambridge to confront his son. For a similar disease with a similar name, see typhus. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Margaret of Spain, Empress of Austria, in Mourning, 1666; note the children and servants in mourning dress behind her. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...


Victoria's self-imposed isolation from the public greatly diminished the popularity of the monarchy, and even encouraged the growth of the republican movement. Although she did undertake her official government duties, she chose to remain secluded in her royal residences, Balmoral in Scotland, Osborne House on the Isle of Wight and Windsor Castle. During this time, one of the most important pieces of legislation of the nineteenth century — the Reform Act 1867 — was passed by Parliament. Lord Palmerston was vigorously opposed to electoral reform, but his ministry ended upon his death in 1865. He was followed by Earl Russell (the former Lord John Russell), and afterwards by Lord Derby, during whose ministry the Reform Act was passed. Balmoral Castle. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Contemporary cartoon of Disraeli outpacing Gladstone. ... John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, KG, GCMG, PC (18 August 1792 – 28 May 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was an English Whig and Liberal politician who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ...


Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli was a staunch supporter of the expansion and preservation of the British Empire. He introduced the Royal Titles Act 1876, which created Queen Victoria Empress of India, putting her at the same level as the German Emperor and the Russian Tsar. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Royal Titles Act of 1876 (39 & 40 Vict. ... Signature of King Edward VIII The R and I after his name indicate king and emperor in Latin (Rex and Imperator, respectively). ...


John Brown

As time went by Victoria began to rely increasingly on a manservant from Scotland, John Brown.[25] A romantic connection and even a secret marriage have been alleged, but both charges are generally discredited. However, when Victoria's remains were laid in the coffin, two sets of mementoes were placed with her, at her request. By her side was placed one of Albert's dressing gowns while in her left hand was placed a piece of Brown's hair, along with a picture of him. Rumours of an affair and marriage earned Victoria the nickname "Mrs Brown".[26] The story of their relationship was the subject of the 1997 movie Mrs. Brown. This article refers to the servant of Queen Victoria. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1997 films | Best Actress Oscar Nominee (film) ...


Later years

Golden Jubilee and an assassination attempt

A silver double florin of Queen Victoria, dated 1887, with (from the top, clockwise) the arms of England, Ireland, England (again) and Scotland on the reverse.
A silver double florin of Queen Victoria, dated 1887, with (from the top, clockwise) the arms of England, Ireland, England (again) and Scotland on the reverse.

In 1887, the British Empire celebrated Victoria's Golden Jubilee. Victoria marked the fiftieth anniversary of her accession, 20 June 1887, with a banquet to which 50 European kings and princes were invited. Although she could not have been aware of it, there was a plan - ostensibly by Irish anarchists - to blow up Westminster Abbey while the Queen attended a service of thanksgiving. This assassination attempt, when it was discovered, became known as The Jubilee Plot. On the next day, she participated in a procession that, in the words of Mark Twain, "stretched to the limit of sight in both directions". By this time, Victoria was once again an extremely popular monarch. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (964x489, 219 KB) Silver pound of Queen Victoria, dated 1887, with the Windsor Crest on the reverse. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (964x489, 219 KB) Silver pound of Queen Victoria, dated 1887, with the Windsor Crest on the reverse. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... The Jubilee Plot was a failed assassination attempt on Queen Victoria during her Golden Jubilee which was held on June 20th 1887. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...

Queen Victoria in her Diamond Jubilee photograph. London, 1897
Queen Victoria in her Diamond Jubilee photograph. London, 1897

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (822x966, 205 KB) Photo by unknown of Queen Victoria of England / Empress Vicotria of India, London , 1897. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (822x966, 205 KB) Photo by unknown of Queen Victoria of England / Empress Vicotria of India, London , 1897. ... A Diamond Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary. ...

Diamond Jubilee

On 22 September 1896, Victoria surpassed George III as the longest reigning monarch in English, Scottish, and British history. The Queen requested all special public celebrations of the event to be delayed until 1897, to coincide with her Diamond Jubilee. The Colonial Secretary, Joseph Chamberlain, proposed that the Diamond Jubilee be made a festival of the British Empire. is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... “George III” redirects here. ... A Diamond Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... The Rt. ...


The Prime Ministers of all the self-governing dominions and colonies were invited. The Queen's Diamond Jubilee procession included troops from every British colony and dominion, together with soldiers sent by Indian Princes and Chiefs as a mark of respect to Victoria, the Empress of India. The Diamond Jubilee celebration was an occasion marked by great outpourings of affection for the septuagenarian Queen. A service of thanksgiving was held outside St. Paul's Cathedral. Queen Victoria sat in her carriage throughout the service. Queen Victoria wore her usual black mourning dress trimmed with white lace.[27] A septuagenarian is a person in the age group of 70 to 79 years old. ...


Death

A statue of Victoria now stands in George Square, Glasgow.
A statue of Victoria now stands in George Square, Glasgow.

Following a custom she maintained throughout her widowhood, Victoria spent Christmas at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. She died there from a cerebral haemorrhage on 22 January 1901, at the age of 81. At her deathbed she was attended by her son, the future King, and her oldest grandson, German Emperor William II. As she had wished, her own sons lifted her into the coffin. She was dressed in a white dress and her wedding veil. Her funeral occurred on 2 February, and after two days of lying-in-state, she was interred beside Prince Albert in the Frogmore Mausoleum at Windsor Great Park. Since Victoria disliked black funerals, London was instead festooned in purple and white. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2485x1864, 1782 KB) Statute of Queen Victoria in George Square, Glasgow. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2485x1864, 1782 KB) Statute of Queen Victoria in George Square, Glasgow. ... George Square and Glasgow City Chambers George Square is the central square in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... A intracranial hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William II or Wilhelm II (born Prince Frederick William Albert Victor of Prussia; German: ) (27 January 1859–4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (German: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling both the German Empire and Prussia from 15 June 1888 to... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Frogmore Gardens is the location of Frogmore House, a former royal residence in the grounds of Windsor Castle, England. ... Deer crossing the Long Walk to Windsor Castle Windsor Great Park (locally referred to simply as the Great Park) is a large deer park and Crown Estate of 5,000 acres, to the south of the town of Windsor on the border of Berkshire and Surrey in England. ...


In fact, when she was laid to rest at Frogmore Mausoleum, it began to snow.[28] Victoria had reigned for a total of 63 years, seven months and two days—the longest reign in British history.


Succession

Victoria's death brought an end to the rule of the House of Hanover in the United Kingdom. As her husband belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, her son and heir Edward VII was the first British monarch of this new house. The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...


Legacy

Queen Victoria's reign marked the gradual establishment of modern constitutional monarchy. A series of legal reforms saw the House of Commons' power increase, at the expense of the Lords and the monarchy, with the monarch's role becoming gradually more symbolic. Since Victoria's reign the monarch has had only, in Walter Bagehot's words, "the right to be consulted, the right to advise, and the right to warn". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1466x1975, 578 KB) Victoria Memorial, London, England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1466x1975, 578 KB) Victoria Memorial, London, England. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Walter Bagehot (3 February 1826 – 24 March 1877), IPA (see [[1]]), was a nineteenth century British economist. ...


As Victoria's monarchy became more symbolic than political, it placed a strong emphasis on morality and family values, in contrast to the sexual, financial and personal scandals that had been associated with previous members of the House of Hanover and which had discredited the monarchy. Victoria's reign created for Britain the concept of the 'family monarchy' with which the burgeoning middle classes could identify.


Internationally Victoria was a major figure, not just in image or in terms of Britain's influence through the empire, but also because of family links throughout Europe's royal families, earning her the affectionate nickname "the grandmother of Europe". An example of that status can be seen in the fact that three of the main monarchs with countries involved in the First World War on the opposing side were themselves either grandchildren of Victoria's or married to a grandchild of hers. Eight of Victoria's nine children married members of European royal families, and the other, Princess Louise, was married to the Marquis of Lorne, a future Governor-General of Canada. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, (Louise Caroline Alberta; 18 March 1848 - 3 December 1939) was a member of the British Royal Family, the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. ... The Governor General and Commander-in-Chief in and over Canada, normally simply known as the Governor General of Canada in French, Gouverneur(e) général(e) is the Canadian representative of the monarch (presently Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II). ...

Victoria was the first known carrier of haemophilia in the royal line, but it is unclear how she acquired it. It may have been a result of a sperm mutation, her father having been 52 years old when Victoria was conceived. She may also have acquired it from her mother, though there is no known history of haemophilia in the maternal side of her family. Victoria herself was a carrier, as were her daughters Princess Alice and Princess Beatrice. Prince Leopold was affected by the disease. The most famous haemophilia victim among her descendants was her great-grandson, Alexei, Tsarevich of Russia and some of the sons of King Alfonso XIII and Queen Victoria Eugenia of Spain. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 163 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 163 KB) Summary http://www. ... Facade of the Victoria Memorial The Victoria Memorial, located in Kolkata, India is a memorial of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom who also carried the title of Empress of India. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... Haemophilia figured prominently in the history of European royalty. ... A spermatozoon or spermatozoan ( spermatozoa), from the ancient Greek σπέρμα (seed) and (living being) and more commonly known as a sperm cell, is the haploid cell that is the male gamete. ... Haemophilia or hemophilia (from Greek haima blood and philia to love[1]) is the name of a family of hereditary genetic disorders that impair the bodys ability to control blood clotting, or coagulation. ... Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary; later The Grand Duchess of Hesse; April 25, 1843 – December 14, 1878), was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ... Her Royal Highness The Princess Beatrice, (Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore), (14 April 1857 - 26 October 1944), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth daugther and the youngest child of Queen Victoria. ... The Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (Leopold George Duncan Albert; 7 April 1853 – 28 March 1884) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ... Tsarevich Alexei (1904-1918) Tsesarevich (Tsarevich) Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia (In Russian Царевич Алексей Николаевич) (August 12, 1904 - July 17, 1918), of the House of Romanov, was a Tsarevich of Russia and was the youngest child of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Alexandra of Hesse. ... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 - February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ...


As of 2007, the European monarchs and former monarchs descended from Victoria are: Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom (as well as her husband), the King of Norway, the King of Sweden, the Queen of Denmark, the King of Spain, the former King of the Hellenes and the former King of Romania (deposed). The pretenders to the thrones of Serbia, Russia, Prussia and Germany, Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Hanover, Hesse, Baden and France (Legitimist) are also descendants. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Harald V, KG (born February 21, 1937) is the King of Norway. ... Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden (Carl Gustaf Folke Hubertus; born 30 April 1946) is the current Swedish monarch and head of state of the Kingdom of Sweden. ... Margrethe II (Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid) (born 16 April 1940) is the Queen regnant of Denmark. ... Juan Carlos I (baptized as Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias; born January 5, 1938, Rome, Italy) is the reigning King of Spain. ... Constantine of Greece, formerly Constantine II, King of the Hellenes (born June 2, 1940) was King of Greece from 1964 until the abolition of the monarchy in 1974. ... King Michael and Queen Anne King Michael (Romanian Mihai) of Romania (born October 25, 1921) was the son of King Carol II and reigned from July 20, 1927 to June 8, 1930, and again from September 6, 1940 until December 30, 1947. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... Prince Aleksandar Karađorđević, oil technique, painter Uros Knezevic Aleksandar Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic Александар Карађорђевић) (1806–1885) was the prince of Serbia between 1842 and 1858. ... His Imperial and Royal Highness Prince Georg Friedrich Ferdinand of Prussia, Prince of Orange (born June 10, 1976 in Bremen). ... Prince Andreas of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Andreas Michael Friedrich Hans Armin Siegfried Hubertus) (born March 21, 1943) has been the Head of the Ducal Family of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha since 1998 and Duke of Saxony since his birth, as he is descended from the House of Wettin who... Ernst August, Prince of Hanover (German: Ernst August Albert Otto Rupprecht Oskar Berthold Friedrich-Ferdinand Christian-Ludwig Prinz von Hannover, in English also known as Ernest Augustus of Hanover) (born 26 February 1954 in Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany) is the eldest son of Ernest Augustus IV, Prince of Hanover (1914... HRH Moritz, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel (full name: Moritz Friedrich Karl Emanuel Humbert Landgraf von Hessen-Kassel) (b. ... HRH Maximilian, Margrave of Baden (Maximilian Andreas Friedrich Gustav Ernst August Bernhard, born 3 July 1933 in Schloss Salem, Salem, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... HRH Louis Alphonse de Bourbon, duc dAnjou (on his French National Identity Card; full name: Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Emanuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú, Duke of Anjou, born Madrid, April 25, 1974) is considered to be the head of the French Royal House by...


Queen Victoria experienced unpopularity during the first years of her widowhood, but afterwards became extremely well-liked during the 1880s and 1890s. In 2002, the British Broadcasting Corporation conducted a poll regarding the 100 Greatest Britons; Victoria attained the eighteenth place. This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... // In 2002, the BBC conducted a vote to determine whom the general public considers the 100 Greatest Britons of all time. ...

Queen Victoria statue and Neo-Romanesque 1890s Queen Victoria Building (QVB), Sydney.
The statue stood outside the Irish parliament building, Leinster House until 1947.

Innovations of the Victorian era include postage stamps, the first of which—the Penny Black (issued 1840)—featured an image of the Queen, and the railway, which Victoria was the first British Sovereign to ride. Queen Victoria statue in front of the Queen Victoria Building, beside the Town Hall, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Queen Victoria statue in front of the Queen Victoria Building, beside the Town Hall, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Bexar County Courthouse, San Antonio, Texas. ... The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a grand Victorian building located in the heart of Downtown Sydney. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The Penny Black, partially obscured by a red cancellation. ...


Several places in the world have been named after Victoria, including two Australian States (Victoria and Queensland), the capitals of British Columbia and (Regina) Saskatchewan, Canada, the capital of the Seychelles, Africa's largest lake, and Victoria Falls. See also List of places named after Queen Victoria. VIC redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... Nickname: Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location of Regina in the SE quadrant of Saskatchewan Coordinates: , Country Province District Municipality of Sherwood Established 1882 Government  - City Mayor Pat Fiacco  - Governing body Regina City Council  - MPs Dave Batters Ralph Goodale Tom Lukiwski Andrew Scheer  - MLAs Trent Wotherspoon Kevin Yates Kim... For other uses, see Victoria. ... For other places with the same name, see Lake Victoria (disambiguation). ... Victoria Falls entrance At lower water levels, more of the First Gorge can be seen. ... A number of places which were once in the former British Empire were named after the British monarch who reigned over it for the greater part of its most dominant period, Queen Victoria. ...


Victoria Day is a Canadian statutory holiday celebrated on the last Monday before or on May 24 in honour of both Queen Victoria's birthday and the current reigning Canadian Sovereign's birthday. While Victoria Day is often thought of as a purely Canadian event, it is also celebrated in some parts of Scotland, particularly in Edinburgh and Dundee, where it is also a public holiday. Queen Elizabeth II in Canada for her official birthday, Victoria Day 2005, Edmonton, Alberta Victoria Day (French: Fête de la Reine) is a Canadian statutory holiday celebrated on the last Monday before or on May 24 in honour of both Queen Victorias birthday and the current reigning Canadian... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ...


Queen Victoria remains the most commemorated British monarch in history, with statues to her erected throughout the former territories of the British Empire. These range from the prominent, such as the Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace, which was erected as part of the remodelling of the façade of the Palace a decade after her death, to the obscure: in the town of Cape Coast, Ghana, a bust of the Queen presides, rather forlornly, over a small park where goats graze around her. Many institutions, thoroughfares, parks, and structures bear her name. See also Victoria (disambiguation). The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A large number of places, people and objects have been named Victoria. ...


Post-colonial sensitivities have led to the removal of Victoria's image and name from some of these legacies. For instance, probably the grandest train station and terminus in Mumbai (Formerly Bombay) India, Victoria Terminus, has been renamed after the seventeenth century Maratha King Chhatrapati Shivaji. A famous engineering college in the same city, Victoria Jubilee Technical Institute (VJTI) has been cleverly renamed after the queen mother of king Shivaji, Jijabai. The new name Veermata Jijabai Technical Institute retains the same well known abbreviation, VJTI. The statue of Queen Victoria sculpted by Irishman John Hughes, erected in front of Leinster House in Dublin in 1924, was removed in 1947 after years of criticism that it was inappropriate to have the British Queen's likeness stand in front of the Oireachtas, the parliament of the Irish Free State. After decades in storage the statue was given by Ireland to Australia and unveiled on 20 December 1987 to stand outside the Queen Victoria Building in the centre of Sydney, capital city of the Australian state of New South Wales. There is also a statue of Queen Victoria in Victoria Square in Adelaide, capital city of the Australian state of South Australia; in Brisbane, capital city of the Australian state of Queensland in Queen's Square; and in the Domain Gardens in Melbourne, the capital of the Australian State of Victoria. A bronze statue of Queen Victoria stands in the main street of the city of Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. At Bangalore, India, the statue of the Queen stands at the beginning of MG Road, one of the city's major roads. This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... The Oireachtas is the National Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the prior state. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a grand Victorian building located in the heart of Downtown Sydney. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Capital Adelaide Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Marjorie Jackson-Nelson Premier Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)  - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  1,558,200 (5th)  - Density  1. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd...


Titles, styles, coat of arms and cypher

Titles and styles

As the male-line granddaughter of a King of Hanover, Victoria also bore the titles of Princess of Hanover and Duchess of Brunswick and Lunenburg. In addition, she held the titles of Princess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Duchess in Saxony, etc, as the wife of Prince Albert. is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Coat of arms

Victoria's coat of arms were: Quarterly, I and IV Gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England); II Or a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland); III Azure a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland). This same coat of arms have been used by every subsequent British monarch.


Royal Cypher

Queen Victoria's Royal Cypher
Queen Victoria's Royal Cypher

Victoria's Royal Cypher was the first to be used on a postbox. The letters are "VR" interlaced, standing for Victoria Regina. Although Victoria eventually used the cypher "VRI" (Victoria Regina Imperiatrix) when she became Empress, this never appeared on postboxes. Victoria's cypher is the only one to appear on postboxes without a crown above it. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Cypher of Queen Elizabeth II, surmounted with a crown. ... Emperor is also a Norwegian black metal band; see Emperor (band). ...


Issue

Name Birth Death Notes
The Princess Victoria, Princess Royal 21 November 1840 5 August 1901 Married 1858, Friedrich III, German Emperor and King of Prussia; had issue.
King Edward VII 9 November 1841 6 May 1910 Married 1863, Princess Alexandra of Denmark; had issue.
The Princess Alice 25 April 1843 14 December 1878 Married 1862, Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine; had issue.
The Prince Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Duke of Edinburgh 6 August 1844 31 July 1900 Married 1874, Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna of Russia; had issue.
The Princess Helena 25 May 1846 9 June 1923 Married 1866, Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg; had issue.
The Princess Louise 18 March 1848 3 December 1939 Married 1871, John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll; no issue.
The Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn 1 May 1850 16 January 1942 Married 1879, Princess Louise Margarete of Prussia; had issue.
The Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany 7 April 1853 28 March 1884 Married 1882, Princess Helena of Waldeck and Pyrmont; had issue.
The Princess Beatrice 14 April 1857 26 October 1944 Married 1885, Prince Henry of Battenberg; had issue.

Victoria of the United Kingdom (born Victoria Adelaide Mary Louise) 21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was the eldest child and daughter of Queen Victoria and her consort Albert. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Friedrich III (October 18, 1831 – June 15, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruled 1888. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ... Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary; later The Grand Duchess of Hesse; April 25, 1843 – December 14, 1878), was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, K.G. (12 September 1837 in Bessungen, now Darmstadt - 13 March 1892 in Darmstadt), the ruler of the small German grand duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt (Hesse and by Rhine), was the husband... Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Alfred Ernest Albert; 6 August 1844 – 30 July 1900) was the third Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha between 1893 and 1900. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Her Imperial & Royal Highness The Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, also Duchess of Edinburgh, née Her Imperial Highness Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna of Russia (17 October 1853 – 24 October 1920) was the daughter of the Russian tsar who became the wife of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh... Her Royal Highness The Princess Helena, (Helena Augusta Victoria), (25 May 1846 - 9 June 1923), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth-born child and the third daughter of Queen Victoria. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (22 January 1831 - 28 October 1917) was a minor German prince who became a member of the British Royal Family through his marriage to Princess Helena (25 May 1846 - 9 June 1923), the third daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and... The Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, (Louise Caroline Alberta; 18 March 1848 - 3 December 1939) was a member of the British Royal Family, the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll, usually better known by his courtesy title of Marquess of Lorne, by which he was known before 1900 (August 6, 1845 - May 2, 1914) was Governor General of Canada. ... Dated October 30th, 1869, by Notman His Royal Highness The Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (Arthur William Patrick Albert) (1 May 1850 - 16 January 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia (Louise Margaret Alexandra Victoria Agnes; later Duchess of Connaught and Strathearn; 25 July 1860 - 14 July 1917) was a German princess, and later a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught. ... The Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (Leopold George Duncan Albert; 7 April 1853 – 28 March 1884) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Albany (née Her Serene Highness Princess Helene Friederike Auguste of Waldeck and Pyrmont) (17 February 1861 - 1 September 1922) was the daughter of George Victor of Waldeck-Pyrmont (1831-1893) and his wife Helene Wilhelmine of Nassau-Weilburg (1831-1888) She was born... Her Royal Highness The Princess Beatrice, (Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore), (14 April 1857 - 26 October 1944), was a member of the British Royal Family, the fifth daugther and the youngest child of Queen Victoria. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prince Henry of Battenberg Prince Henry of Battenberg (Colonel Henry Maurice Battenberg, KG, PC) (5 October 1858 – 20 January 1896) was a descendant of the Grand Ducal House of Hesse, and later became a member of the British Royal Family through his marriage to Princess Beatrice, the youngest daughter of...

Ancestry

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. George II of Great Britain & Ireland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Frederick, Prince of Wales
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. George III of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Frederick II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Princess Magdalena Augusta of Anhalt-Zerbst
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Prince Edward, Duke of Kent
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Adolf Frederick II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Charles Louis Frederick, Duke of Mecklenburg-Mirow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Christiane Emilie, Princess of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Ernest Frederick I, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Princess Elizabeth Albertine of Saxe-Hildburghausen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Sophia Albertine, Countess of Erbach-Erbach
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Queen Victoria
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. Francis Josias, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Ernest Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Princess Anna Sophie of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Sophia Antonia, Duchess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Antoinette Amalie, Duchess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
Dowager Princess of Leiningen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Henry XIX, Count of Reuss-Ebersdorf
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Henry XXIV, Count of Reuss-Ebersdorf
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Sophia Dorothea, Countess of Castell-Castell
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Princess Augusta Reuss of Ebersdorf
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. George Augustus, Count of Erbach-Schönberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Caroline, Countess of Erbach-Schönberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Ferdinanda, Countess of Stolberg-Gedern
 
 
 
 
 
 

George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Louis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701, Frederick... Caroline of Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II. // Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born on 1 March 1683, at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife... “George III” redirects here. ... Frederick II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (b. ... Augusta of Saxe-Gotha Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (November 30, 1719 – February 8, 1772) was Princess of Wales from May 8, 1736 to March 31, 1751. ... Magdalena Augusta (October 13, 1679 - October 11, 1740) was a Duchess of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg and grandmother of George III of England. ... HRH The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. ... Adolf Friedrich II of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (19 October 1658 - 12 May 1708) was reigning Duke from 1658 to his death. ... Charles Louis Frederick of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Strelitz, February 23, 1708 - Mirow, June 5, 1752) was the second son of the Prince of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and father of Queen Charlotte of England. ... Queen Charlotte, (née Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz; 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820). ... Ernest Frederick I, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen Ernst Frederick I, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen (b. ... Princess Elizabeth Albertine Princess of Saxe-Hildburghausen, Duchess in Saxony (4 August 1713 - 29 June 1761) was a member of the reigning family of Mecklenburg-Strelitz during the 18th century. ... Portrait of Duke Franz Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld Franz Josias, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (b. ... Ernst Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (b. ... Anna Sophie, Princess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (9 September 1700 — 11 December 1780) was a princess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt. ... Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg Saalfeld Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (b. ... Ferdinand Albert (German Ferdinand Albrecht; 29 May 1680 – 2 September 1735, Salzdahlum), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was an officer in the army of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Sofie Antonie of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (3 January 1724, Wolfenbüttel - 17 March 1802) was the tenth of 17 children of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (Mary Louise Victoria; 17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861), later HRH The Duchess of Kent, was the mother of Queen Victoria. ... Heinrich XXIV, Count of Reuss-Ebersdorf (b. ... Auguste Reuss of Ebersdorf as Artemisia, 1775, painted by Johann Heinrich Tischbein, sen. ...

Patrilineal descent

Victoria's patriline is the line from which she is descended father to son.


Patrilineal descent is the principle behind membership in royal houses, as it can be traced back through the generations - which means that Victoria’s historically accurate royal house was the House of Lucca (or Este, or Welf). Patrilineality is a system in which one belongs to ones fathers lineage; it generally involves the inheritance of property, names or titles through the male line as well. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... For Tolkiens fictional character, see Estë To know more about the city, see Este The House of Este is a European princely dynasty. ... The possessions of the Guelfs in the days of Henry the Lion The House of Welf (or House of Guelph) is a European dynasty that has included many German and British monarchs from the 11th century until the 20th century. ...


Descent before Oberto I is from [1] and may be inaccurate.

  1. Richbald of Lucca, 700 - 761
  2. Boniface I, Count of Lucca, 725 - 785
  3. Boniface II, Count of Lucca, d. 823
  4. Boniface III, Count of Lucca, d. 842
  5. Adalbert I, Margrave of Tuscany, d. 891
  6. Adalbert II, Margrave of Tuscany, d. 915
  7. Gui de Lucca, d, 929
  8. Adalbert III, Margrave of Tuscany, d. 955
  9. Oberto I, 912 - 975
  10. Oberto Obizzo, 940 - 1017
  11. Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan, 970 - 1029
  12. Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, d. 1097
  13. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria, 1037 - 1101
  14. Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria, 1074 - 1126
  15. Henry X, Duke of Bavaria, 1108 - 1139
  16. Henry the Lion, 1129 - 1195
  17. William of Winchester, Lord of Lunenburg, 1184 - 1213
  18. Otto I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1204 - 1252
  19. Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1236 - 1279
  20. Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1268 - 1318
  21. Magnus the Pious, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1304 - 1369
  22. Magnus II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1328 - 1373
  23. Bernard I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1362 - 1434
  24. Frederick II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1408 - 1478
  25. Otto IV, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1439 - 1471
  26. Heinrich, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1468 - 1532
  27. Ernest I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1497 - 1546
  28. William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1535 - 1592
  29. George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, 1582 - 1641
  30. Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover, 1629 - 1698
  31. George I of the United Kingdom, 1660 - 1727
  32. George II of the United Kingdom, 1683 - 1760
  33. Frederick, Prince of Wales, 1707 - 1751
  34. George III of the United Kingdom, 1738 - 1820
  35. Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, 1767 - 1820
  36. Victoria of the United Kingdom, 1819 - 1901

Oberto I (also Otbert) (died 15 Oct 975) was Count palatine of Italy. ... Albert Atto I (Italian: ; died 1029) was the son of Oberto II and Railend, widow of Sigfred, Count of Seprio. ... Albert Azzo II (c. ... Welf I (died about 9 November 1101, Paphos) was duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. ... Henry IX (died 13 December 1126), called the Black(Schulzbacher), a member of the House of Welf, was duke of Bavaria from 1120 to 1126. ... Henry, known as the Proud (around 1108 – October 20, 1139), was Duke of Bavaria (Henry X, 1126-1139), Duke of Saxony (Henry II, 1138-1139), and Margrave of Tuscany (1137-1139). ... Henry the Lion (statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral). ... William (11 April 1184, Winchester – 13 December 1213), called William of Winchester, William Longsword, or William of Lüneburg, was the youngest son of Duke Henry the Lion. ... Otto I of Brunswick-Lüneburg (about 1204 – 9 June 1252) was the first duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1235 until his death. ... Albert (Latin Albertus, German Albrecht; 1236 – 1279), called the Tall (Latin Longus), was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Albert (Latin Albertus; died 22 September 1318), called the Fat (pinguis), was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Magnus (died 1369), called the Pious (Latin Pius), was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Magnus (around 1328 – 1373, Leveste), called Magnus with the Necklace (Latin Magnus Torquatus) or Magnus II, was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Bernard (born between 1358 and 1364, died 11 June 1434, Celle), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, ruled over several principalities of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Ernest (German: Ernst; 27 June 1497, Uelzen – 11 January 1546), called the Confessor, was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... William (4 July 1535 – 20 August 1592) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1559 until his death. ... George (17 November 1582, Celle – 2 April 1641, Hildesheim) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Ernest Augustus (German: Ernst August; 20 November 1629, Herzberg – 23 January 1698, Herrenhausen) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and ruled over the Calenberg (or Hanover) subdivision of the duchy. ... George I King of Great Britain and Ireland George I (George Ludwig von Guelph-dEste) (28 May 1660–11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... George II King of Great Britain and Ireland George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Louis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701, Frederick... “George III” redirects here. ... HRH The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. ...

Biographic details

Queen Victoria statueQueens Gardens, Brisbane
Queen Victoria statue
Queens Gardens, Brisbane

When Queen Victoria died in 1901, at the age of 81, her own sons lifted her into the coffin. She wore a white dress and her wedding veil. Because Victoria had disliked black funerals, London was decorated in purple and white. Her last words were "Oh that peace may come. Bertie!"[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (940x2080, 271 KB)Queen Victoria statue in Queens Gardens, Brisbane ( this photograph was taken by Figaro ) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (940x2080, 271 KB)Queen Victoria statue in Queens Gardens, Brisbane ( this photograph was taken by Figaro ) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Statue of Queen Victoria in Queens Gardens Queens Gardens, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia showing the old State Library Building Queens Gardens, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia showing the old State Library Building Queens Gardens is located on a city block between George Street, Elizabeth Street and William Street, Brisbane. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ...


She surpassed her grandfather King George III as the longest-lived British monarch when she reached the age of 81 years and 240 days on 19 January 1901, only three days before her death. She will be surpassed by Elizabeth II on 21 December 2007 if she survives. Victoria spent over three-quarters of her life as Queen, the highest ratio of any British monarch since the Restoration in 1660. “George III” redirects here. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Restoration. ...


She outlived three of her nine children, and came within seven months of outliving a fourth (her eldest daughter, Vicky, who died of spinal cancer in August 1901 aged 60). She outlived eleven of her 42 grandchildren (two stillborn, six as children, and three as adults), and three of her 88 great-grandchildren. Upon the recent death of Lady Katherine Brandram on 2 October 2007, there is just one remaining great-grandchild of Queen Victoria who is still living: Count Carl Johan Bernadotte of Sweden, who recently celebrated his 90th birthday. Victoria of the United Kingdom (born Victoria Adelaide Mary Louise) 21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was the eldest child and daughter of Queen Victoria and her consort Albert. ... Spinal tumors are located in the spinal cord and are mostly metastases from primary cancers elsewhere (commonly breast, prostate and lung cancer). ... The Lady Katherine Brandram (née Princess Ekaterini of Greece and Denmark) (May 4, 1913 - ) is a daughter of Constantine I of Greece (1868- 1922) and Queen consort Sophie of Prussia. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Count Carl Johan Bernadotte af Wisborg formerly Prince Carl Johan, Duke of Dalecarlia (born October 31, 1916), is the son of King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden and Crown Princess Margaret of Connaught. ...


The Queen and all her female-line descendants are known to be members of mitochondrial haplogroup H. In cell biology, a mitochondrion is an organelle found in the cells of most eukaryotes. ... In the study of molecular evolution, a haplogroup is a large group of haplotypes, which are series of alleles at specific locations on a chromosome. ... Haplogroup H is a mitochondrial DNA (or mtDNA) haplogroup. ...

  • The design of the Queen's head on the first postage stamp was based upon the 1837 Wyon City medal engraved by a famous coin engraver William Wyon. The design of Queen Victoria's head is based on a sitting when she was a princess aged 15.
  • Queen Victoria was 20 when the Penny Black stamp was issued on 6 May 1840. Her profile on British stamps never aged; the design of her head remained the same for 60 years.
  • Prince Albert introduced Christmas trees to the court and this was soon copied by Victoria's subjects.
  • Every day for forty years after her Prince Consort had died, the Queen ordered that his clothes be laid afresh on his bed in his suite at Windsor Castle.
  • Queen Victoria was known to the Blackfoot Nation as Ninaki or Chief Woman, while the common expression for her was Great Mother.[29]
  • After one of the attempts on her life, an armoured parasol was designed for her; it had a layer of chain mail between its cover and lining. The armour made it weigh more than three pounds, and it probably did not see any use.
  • Queen Victoria was the only world leader to respond positively to messages that were sent to 19th century monarchs by Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith, inviting them to establish a "Most Great Peace".
  • Queen Victoria started the tradition of a bride wearing a white dress at her wedding. Before Victoria's wedding a bride would wear her best dress of no particular colour.[citation needed]
  • Queen Victoria was the first sovereign to take up residence at Buckingham Palace, in 1837.
A statue of Queen Victoria, by Joseph Boehm stands on College Green, Bristol, England

is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... The Blackfeet Indian Reservation or Blackfeet Nation is an Indian reservation of the Blackfeet tribe in Montana in the United States. ... The Summons of the Lord of Hosts is a collection of the letters of Baháulláh, Founder of the Baháí Faith, to the kings and rulers of the world. ... Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 - May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... This article is about the generally-recognized global religious community. ... The Baháí Faith emphasizes the unity of humanity transcending all divisions of race, nation, gender, caste, and social class, while celebrating its diversity. ... Download high resolution version (500x633, 115 KB)Statue of Queen Victoria in the city centre, Bristol, England. ... Download high resolution version (500x633, 115 KB)Statue of Queen Victoria in the city centre, Bristol, England. ... Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm, Bart. ... College Green with Bristol Cathedral. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Cultural references

The Statue of Queen Victoria in Cubban Park in Bangalore, India
The Statue of Queen Victoria in Cubban Park in Bangalore, India
  • In the 2006 series of Doctor Who, Queen Victoria appears in the episode "Tooth and Claw", where she is played by Pauline Collins. In the episode, set in 1879, she is threatened by a werewolf that wants to infect her and take control of her empire. It is suggested that a scratch from the werewolf is the source of haemophilia in many of her descendants. Rose Tyler makes a bet with the Doctor for £10 that she can get the Queen to say "We are not amused."

At the episode's conclusion, she founds the Torchwood Institute, an integral feature of the spin-off series Torchwood, with various (fictional) speeches and proclamations by her available on the Torchwood Institute website. Victoria Hamilton (born 5 April 1971) is a British actress. ... Victoria the Great (1937) is a biography of Queen Victoria in the early years of her reign with her marriage to Prince Albert. ... Edward the Seventh was a TV drama series, made by Granada in 13 one-hour episodes. ... Annette Crosbie, OBE (born 12 February 1934) is a Scottish character actress, best known for her many television appearances. ... The Mudlark, made in England in 1950 by 20th Century Fox, is a completely fictionalized account of how Queen Victoria was eventually brought out of her mourning for Prince Albert. ... Irene Dunne (December 20, 1898 - September 4, 1990) was a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1997 films | Best Actress Oscar Nominee (film) ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Romy Schneider (September 23, 1938 – May 29, 1982) was a German-Austrian actress. ... For other uses, see Deus ex machina (disambiguation). ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an American former child actress. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes is a 1970 film directed and produced by Billy Wilder, and starring Robert Stephens as Sherlock Holmes. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes Smarter Brother is a 1975 comedy with Gene Wilder, Marty Feldman, Madeline Kahn, Dom De Luise and Leo McKern. ... From Hell is a graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell speculating upon the identity and motives of Jack the Ripper. ... Dr. William Withey Gull Sir William Withey Gull, 1st Baronet (December 31, 1816 – January 29, 1890) was an English physician. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... Around the World in Eighty Days (French: ) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, first published in 1873. ... Steamboy ) is a Japanese anime film, produced by Sunrise, and directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, his second major anime release, following Akira. ... The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... This page is about the wife of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. ... The Elephant Man redirects here. ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the Royal Household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the Great Officers of State. ... The Right Honourable Rowland Thomas Baring, 2nd Earl of Cromer GCB GCIE KCVO GCStJ PC ADC (November 29, 1877–May 13, 1953) was the son of Evelyn Baring, 1st Earl of Cromer. ... Laurence Housman (July 18, 1865 - [February 20,1959]]) was an English playwright. ... The history of Londons Gate Theatre Studio, often referred to as simply the Gate Theatre, is typical of many small independent theatres of the period. ... The Lyric Theatre in April 2007 The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster. ... Esmond in Ministry of Fear Carl Esmond (June 14, 1902 in Vienna, Austria - December 4, 2004) was a Austrian stage actor who fleed Nazi Germany, like many of his fellow actors, to England during World War II. Esmond continued to appear on the stage as well as appear in British... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Helen Hayes (October 10, 1900 – March 17, 1993) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress whose successful and award-winning career spanned almost 70 years. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... This article is about the television series. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett The Two Ronnies was a British sketch show that aired on BBC One from 1971 to 1987. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2128x2832, 988 KB) Statue of Queen Victoria in Cubban Park, Bangalore File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2128x2832, 988 KB) Statue of Queen Victoria in Cubban Park, Bangalore File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Bangalore (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television series. ... Tooth and Claw is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 22 April 2006. ... Pauline Collins (born September 3, 1940) is a British actress working extensively in movies and television. ... For other uses, see Werewolf (disambiguation). ... Rose Tyler is a fictional character played by Billie Piper in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Torchwood Institute is a fictional organisation from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its spin-off series, Torchwood. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ...

  • The BBC series Blackadder Goes Forth, set in World War I, alludes humorously to Queen Victoria's heritage. Captain Edmund Blackadder interrogates Captain Kevin Darling whom he suspects to be a German spy. Captain Darling: "I'm as British as Queen Victoria!" Captain Blackadder: "So – your mother's German, your father's half German and you married a German?". She also appears in Blackadder's Christmas Carol (1988), played by Miriam Margolyes in a realistic-looking portrayal.
  • The Kinks honour Queen Victoria and her empire in their 1969 song "Victoria". The song has since been covered by The Fall, Cracker, and Sonic Youth. Both The Kinks' and The Fall's versions were UK Top 40 hits.
  • Leonard Cohen refers to her in a mostly non-factual way in his 1964 poem "Queen Victoria and Me", and again in the 1972 song "Queen Victoria" (based on the poem). The song was later covered by John Cale.
  • Queen Victoria's reign features in the Paradox Interactive game, Victoria, An Empire Under the Sun. In this game a player guides a country through colonisation, the Industrial Revolution, warfare and various historic events.
  • In 2006, the Comics Sherpa online comic service started carrying a comic strip entitled The New Adventures of Queen Victoria using cut-out photographs and portraits of the Queen and others.
  • A 'Royal Diaries' book was written, documenting her childhood: Victoria, May Blossom of Britannia England in 1829 by Anna Kirwan.
  • After the release of the popular Victorian-era action film Van Helsing, several members of the cast reunited to lend their voices to an animated prequel, Van Helsing: The London Assignment. Queen Victoria and her royal physician, Dr. Henry Jekyll, are principal characters in the animated film.
  • Queen Victoria invited Martha Ann Ricks, on the behalf of Liberian Ambassador Edward Wilmont Blyden, to Windsor Castle on 16 July 1892. Martha Ricks, a former slave from Tennessee, had saved her pennies for more than fifty years, to afford the voyage from Liberia to England to see the Queen and thank the Queen for sending the British navy to patrol the coast of West Africa to prevent slavers from exporting Africans for the slave trade. Martha Ricks shook hands with the Queen and presented her with a Coffee Tree quilt, which Queen Victoria later sent to the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition for display. A mystery remains as to where the Coffee Tree quilt is today.
  • Emily Blunt has signed on to play Queen Victoria in the movie The Young Victoria, which is scheduled for release in 2009. The film will be produced by Martin Scorsese and Graham King. The screenplay was written by Julian Fellowes. It will revolve around the early years of Victoria's reign and her love affair with Prince Albert (Rupert Friend). The role of Victoria's neurotic mother, the Duchess of Kent, is to be played by Miranda Richardson.

Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Captain Edmund Blackadder (1871—1917 assumed, MIA) was the main character in the fourth and final series of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Captain Kevin Darling Captain Kevin Darling was a fictional character played by Tim McInnerny in series four of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... Miriam Margolyes OBE (born May 18, 1941) is a British character actress. ... The Kinks, a British Invasion pop/rock band, were formed in London in 1963 by Dave Davies and Peter Quaife. ... Victoria is a song written by Ray Davies of The Kinks, which appeared as the opening track of the 1969 concept album, Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire). ... This article is about the band. ... Cracker is an American alternative rock band featuring Camper Van Beethoven singer and guitarist David Lowery. ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... Not to be confused with J.J. Cale. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ... Paradox Interactive (formerly a division of Paradox Entertainment) is a Swedish company based in Stockholm that is known for producing historical strategy computer games. ... Victoria - An Empire Under the Sun or simply Victoria is a real-time strategy game by Paradox Entertainment. ... For the historic phenomenon of colonization and imperialism, see main article colonialism (and also decolonization). ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Edward Wilmot Blyden (1832-1912) was an educator, writer, diplomat, and politician in Liberia and Sierra Leone. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... Emily Olivia L. Blunt (born February 23, 1983) is a Golden Globe Award-winning English actress best known for her work in the films My Summer of Love and her appearance as Emily Charlton in The Devil Wears Prada and she was nominated for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture on... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Graham King (born 19 December 1961) is an English Academy Award-winning film producer. ... Fellowes as Lord Kilwillie Julian Fellowes (born August 17, 1949 in Egypt, although he is British) was an actor for over twenty years before winning the Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay in 2001 for Gosford Park. ... Rupert Friend (born October of 1981[1] ) is an English actor. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ...

See also

// This is a list of prominent individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a cousin, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. ... A number of places which were once in the former British Empire were named after the British monarch who reigned over it for the greater part of its most dominant period, Queen Victoria. ... Queen Victoria, wearing her small diamond crown in 1887. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Windsor Castle in Modern Times by Landseer depicts the Queen and the Prince Consort at home in the 1840s. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victorian morality is a distillation of the moral views of people living at the time of Queen Victoria (reigned 1837 - 1901) in particular, and to the moral climate of Great Britain throughout the 19th century in... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ...

References

  1. ^ Her godparents were the Prince Regent, the Emperor Alexander I of Russia (in whose honour she received her first name), Princess Charlotte, Princess Royal and the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
  2. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 11.
  3. ^ Victoria: A Biography by Christopher Hibbert, pp. 13–15.
  4. ^ Ibid.
  5. ^ Ibid, p. 27.
  6. ^ The Life and Times of Queen Victoria by Dorothy Marshall, p. 16.
  7. ^ The Life and Times of Victoria by Dorothy Marshall, p. 60.
  8. ^ Ibid.
  9. ^ Ibid, p. 76.
  10. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 56.
  11. ^ Ibid, p. 57.
  12. ^ Ibid, p. 9.
  13. ^ Victoria's Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard, pp. 14–15.
  14. ^ Victoria: A Biography by Christopher Hibbert, p. 44.
  15. ^ Ibid, p. 48.
  16. ^ Her bridesmaids were The Ladies Adelaide Paget, Sarah Child Villiers, Frances Cowper, Elizabeth West, Mary Grimston, Eleanora Paget, Caroline Gordon-Lennox, Elizabeth Howard, Ida Hay, Catherine Stanhope, Jane Pleydell-Bouverie and Mary Howard
  17. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 161.
  18. ^ Ibid, p. 162
  19. ^ Ibid, p. 163
  20. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, pp. 86–87.
  21. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 226.
  22. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, pp. 212–13.
  23. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 391
  24. ^ The Life and Times of Victoria by Dorothy Marshall, p. 155.
  25. ^ Ibid, p. 168
  26. ^ Ibid, p. 170.
  27. ^ Victoria: A Biography by Christopher Hibbert, p. 171.
  28. ^ Queen Victoria by Giles St. Aubyn, p. 600.
  29. ^ Library and Archives Canada. Aboriginal Documentary Heritage: Aboriginal Soldiers
  30. ^ Hull, David Stewart (1973). Film in the Third Reich. New York: Simon & Schuster. SBN 671-21486-1. 
  31. ^ All the Best People ...: The Pick of Peterborough 1929-1945, George Allen & Unwin, 1981; p. 139

George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Aleksandr I Pavlovich (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777 – December 1, 1825?), was Emperor of Russia from 23 March 1801-1 December 1825 and Ruler of Poland from 1815–1825, as well as the first Grand Duke of Finland. ... Queen Charlotte,(née Her Royal Highness The Princess Charlotte, Princess Royal) (Charlotte Augusta Matilda), (29 September 1766-5 October 1828) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest daughter of King George III. She was later the Queen consort of King Friedrich I of Württemberg. ... Auguste Reuss of Ebersdorf as Artemisia, 1775, painted by Johann Heinrich Tischbein, sen. ... Frances Elizabeth Jocelyn, Viscountess Jocelyn, VA (1820–26 March 1880) was a British courtier and amateur photographer. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ...

Books and additional materials

  • Auchincloss, Louis. Persons of Consequence: Queen Victoria and Her Circle. Random House, 1979. ISBN 0-394-50427-5
  • Cecil, Algernon. Queen Victoria and Her Prime Ministers. Eyre and Spottiswode, 1953.
  • Benson, Arthur Christopher & Esher (Viscount). The Letters of Queen Victoria: A Selection From Her Majesty's Correspondence Between The Years 1837 and 1861. John Murray, 1908
  • Eilers, Marlene A. Queen Victoria’s Descendants. 2d enlarged & updated ed. Falköping, Sweden: Rosvall Royall Books, 1997. ISBN 0-8063-1202-5
  • Farnborough, T. E. May (1st Baron). Constitutional History of England since the Accession of George the Third. 11th ed. Longmans, Green, 1896.
  • Hibbert, Christopher. Victoria: A Biography. George Rainbird Ltd, 1979. ISBN 0 7296 0207 9
  • Hicks, Kyra E. "Martha Ann's Quilt for Queen Victoria". Brown Books, 2007. ISBN 978-1-933285-59-7
  • Marshall, Dorothy. The Life and Times of Queen Victoria. George Weidenfeld and Nicolson Ltd, 1972.
  • Packard, Jerrold, M. Victoria's Daughters. St. Martin's Press, 1998. ISBN 0 312 24496 7
  • Potts, D. M. & W. T. W. Potts. Queen Victoria’s Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family. Alan Sutton, 1995. ISBN 0-7509-1199-9
  • St. Aubyn, Giles. Queen Victoria: A Portrait. Sinclair-Stevenson, 1991. ISBN 1 85619 086 2
  • The Royal Household. (2004). "Victoria." Official Website of the British Monarchy.
  • "Queen Victoria." Encyclopædia Britannica. 11th ed. Cambridge University Press, 1911.
  • Hibbert, Christopher. Queen Victoria: A Personal History. Harper Collins Publishing, 2000.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Victoria of the United Kingdom
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Victoria of the United Kingdom
  • The letters of Queen Victoria: a selection from Her Majesty's correspondence between the years 1837 and 1861: published by authority of His Majesty the king (1907) Volume I at archive.org
  • The letters of Queen Victoria: a selection from Her Majesty's correspondence between the years 1837 and 1861: published by authority of His Majesty the king (1907) Volume II at archive.org
  • The letters of Queen Victoria: a selection from Her Majesty's correspondence between the years 1837 and 1861: published by authority of His Majesty the king (1907) Volume III at archive.org
  • Speeches in Parliament, from her accession to the present time : a compendium of the history of Her Majesty's reign told from the throne (1882) at archive.org
  • Leaves from the journal of our life in the Highlands, from 1848-1861: To which are prefixed and added extracts from the same journal giving an account of earlier visits to Scotland, and tours in England and Ireland, and yachting excursions (1868) at archive.org
  • More leaves from the journal of a life in the Highlands, from 1862 to 1882 (1885) at archive.org
  • Victorian style, 1837-1901
Victoria of the United Kingdom
Cadet branch of the House of Welf
Born: 24 May 1819 Died: 22 January 1901
Regnal titles
Preceded by
William IV
Queen of the United Kingdom
20 June 1837 – 22 January 1901
Succeeded by
Edward VII
Vacant
Title last held by
Bahadur Shah II
Empress of India
1 May 1876 – 22 January 1901
British royalty
Preceded by
Prince William, Duke of Clarence
later became King William IV
Heir to the Throne
as heiress presumptive
1830 – 1837
Succeeded by
Ernest Augustus I of Hanover



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