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Encyclopedia > Victoria University of Wellington
Victoria University of Wellington
Te Whare Wānanga o Te Ūpoko o te Ika a Māui
Victoria University of Wellington shield
Motto Sapientia magis auro desideranda (Wisdom is more to be desired than gold)
Established 1897
Type Public
Chancellor Tim Beaglehole
Vice-Chancellor Pat Walsh
Students 20,380 total
Postgraduates 4,200 graduate
Location Wellington, New Zealand
Website www.vuw.ac.nz
Victoria University's Kelburn Campus.
Victoria University's Kelburn Campus.

Victoria University of Wellington, also known in Māori as Te Whare Wānanga o te Ūpoko o te Ika a Māui,[1] was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament, and was a former constituent college of the University of New Zealand. It is particularly well known for its programmes in law, the humanities, and some scientific disciplines, but offers a broad range of other courses as well. Entry to all courses at first year is open, although entry to second year in some programmes (eg, law, architecture) is restricted. Victoria had the third highest average research grade in the New Zealand Government's 2003 Performance-Based Research Fund exercise.[2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x834, 72 KB) Summary Using Inkscape with Lupins of academic shields, with the crowns from Peterhouse, the book from Harvard, and the shield from Christs. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Emeritus Professor Timothy Holmes Beaglehole (1933-) is the current Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Wellington (Te Whanganui-a-Tara or Poneke in Māori) is the capital of New Zealand, the countrys second largest urban area and the most populous national capital in Oceania. ... This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... Image File history File linksMetadata VUW.jpg‎ [edit] Summary Picture of Victoria University from Kelburn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata VUW.jpg‎ [edit] Summary Picture of Victoria University from Kelburn. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... // Balancing scales are symbolic of how law mediates peoples interests For other senses of this word, see Law (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Performance Based Research Fund is a New Zealand tertiary education funding process, assessing the research performance of tertiary education organisations (TEOs) and then funding them on the basis of their performance. ...

Contents

General information

Victoria has 20,380 students (including some 3,400 international students), of whom 14,000 are undergraduates. It has around 1,900 full-time equivalent staff.


Its main campus is in Kelburn, a suburb on a hill overlooking the Wellington central business district, where its administration and humanities & social science and science faculties are based. The law and commerce and administration faculties are in the Pipitea Campus, near Parliament Buildings, which consists of the Rutherford Building, the restored Government Buildings, and the West Wing of the Wellington Railway Station. A smaller campus in the Te Aro district of Wellington is the base for the architecture and design schools. The Faculty of Education is in the Karori campus. Panorama of Wellington including the Kelburn cable car. ... The Beehive (left) and Parliament House (right), Wellington New Zealand Parliament Buildings houses the New Zealand Parliament and is situated on a 45,000 square metre site in and around the northern end of Lambton Quay, Wellington. ... Wellington Railway Station at night Wellington Railway Station is the southern terminus of New Zealands North Island Main Trunk railway. ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ... City-end Karori from Wrights Hill Karori is a suburb located at the western edge of the urban area of Wellington, New Zealand, some four km from the city centre. ...


Day-to-day governance is in the hands of the University Council, which consists of 20 people: five elected by the Court of Convocation, three elected by the academic staff, one elected by the general staff, two appointed by the student union executive, four appointed by the Minister of Education, four selected by the Council itself, and the Vice-Chancellor. The Court of Convocation is composed of all graduates who choose to participate. A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...


For New Zealand residents to entry to most courses is open, with a few exceptions. Performance Music requires an audition. There is selection for entry into the second year in degrees such as the LLB, BArch and BDes. The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries. ... The Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course that generally lasts three or four years. ...


The University is one of only three institutions (University of Auckland and Unitec New Zealand being the others) to offer a degree in Architecture in New Zealand. The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is New Zealands largest research-based university. ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ...


Victoria in conjunction with Massey University also governs The New Zealand School of Music Massey University is a university of New Zealand. ...

Victoria University's Pipitea Campus: Rutherford House with the Beehive in front and the Railway Station behind.
Victoria University's Pipitea Campus: Rutherford House with the Beehive in front and the Railway Station behind.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (740x937, 101 KB) Summary Rutherford House and Beehive Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (740x937, 101 KB) Summary Rutherford House and Beehive Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Beehive, Wellington The Beehive is the common name for the Executive Wing of the New Zealand Parliament Buildings, located at the corner of Molesworth Street and Lambton Quay, Wellington. ...

History

Victoria is named after Queen Victoria, as 1897 was the 60th anniversary of her coronation. There was initially a dispute as to where to site it, and it opened in temporary facilities in Thorndon. It was eventually decided to place it in Kelburn, where it still has its primary campus. This decision was influenced by the Cable Car company's offer of a donation [3] of £1000 if Victoria were located in Kelburn so students would patronise the car between the city and the University. The foundation stone of the historic Hunter Building was laid in 1904. On the dissolution of the University of New Zealand in 1961 Victoria became the independent Victoria University of Wellington, conferring its own degrees. Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Panorama of Wellington including the Kelburn cable car. ... The Wellington Cable Car is a funicular railway in Wellington, New Zealand. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ...

Hunter Building east entrance
Hunter Building east entrance

An extramural branch of Victoria was founded at Palmerston North in 1960. It merged with Massey College on 1 January 1963. The merged college itself, having become a branch of Victoria upon the University of New Zealand's 1961 demise, became an independent Massey University on 1 January 1964. [4] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (519x782, 127 KB) Summary Hunter building east entrance, Victoria University of Wellington Author: Dean S. Pemberton Image taken: 2003 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Victoria University of Wellington ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (519x782, 127 KB) Summary Hunter building east entrance, Victoria University of Wellington Author: Dean S. Pemberton Image taken: 2003 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Victoria University of Wellington ... Palmerston North, is the main city of the Manawatu-Wanganui region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... Massey University is a university of New Zealand. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


In recent years, Victoria has had to expand out of its original campus in Kelburn, and new campuses have been set up in Te Aro (architecture and design), Pipitea (opposite Parliament, housing the law, and commerce and administration schools) and Karori (education) - the Wellington College of Education, established in 1880, merged with the University to become its revived Faculty of Education on 1 January 2005. The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Faculties

The university's faculties are:

  • Architecture and Design
  • Commerce and Administration
  • Education
  • Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Law
  • Science
  • Toihuarewa

Undergraduate Degrees Offered

The Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course of study that generally lasts five years in North America. ... Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... A Bachelor of Commerce is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a curriculum that generally lasts three years in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom or four years in North America and South Africa. ... A Bachelor of Design (B.Des. ... Bachelor of Engineering (BAI (in latin), BEng, or BE) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded to a student after three, four or five years of studying engineering at an accredited university in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria and India. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws (or Baccalaureate of Laws) is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ...

Postgraduate Degrees offered

Victoria offers more than 25 Master's degrees in around 100 specialist subject areas, including:

  • Master of Architecture - MArch
  • Master of Design - MDes
  • Master of Industrial Design - MIndDes
  • Master of Building Science - MBSc
  • Master of Commerce and Administration - MCA
  • Master of Applied Finance - MAF
  • Master of Business Administration - MBA
  • Master of Financial Mathematics - MFinMath
  • Master of Information Management - MIM
  • Master of Library and Information Studies - MLIS
  • Master of Management Studies - MMS
  • Master of Public Management - MPM
  • Master of Public Policy - MPP
  • Master of Strategic Studies - MSS
  • Master of Tourism Management - MTM
  • Master of Education - MEd
  • Master of Teaching - MTeach
  • Master of International Relations - MIR
  • Master of Museum and Heritage Studies - MMHS
  • Master of New Zealand Studies - MNZS
  • Master of Midwifery - MMidW
  • Master of Nursing/Master of Nursing (Clinical) - MNurs
  • Master of Theatre Arts - MTA
  • Master of Music - MMus
  • Master of Laws - LLM
  • Master of Biomedical Science - MBmedSc
  • Master of Computer Science - MCompSc
  • Master of Conservation Biology - MConBio
  • Master of Development Studies - MSc (Development Studies)
  • Master of Environmental Studies - MSc (Evironmental Studies)
  • Master of Marine Conservation - MMCon
  • Master of Arts - MA
  • Master of Science - MSc
  • Doctor of Philosophy - PhD

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a masters degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines. ... The Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) is the masters degree that is required for most professional librarian positions. ... The Master of Public Policy (M.P.P.) is a professional Masters degree that traditionally provided training in policy analysis and program evaluation at public policy schools. ... The Master of Education (M.Ed or M.A.E.) is a degree conferred by American institutions for educators moving on in their field. ... The Master of Music (M.M. or M.Mus. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Ph. ...

Institutions

The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (often simply called the MacDiarmid Institute) is a New Zealand research organisation specialising in materials science and nanotechnology. ... The Centre for Strategic Studies:New Zealand (CSS:NZ) is a international and military affairs research centre located in Wellington, New Zealand. ... The Victoria University of Wellington Students Association (VUWSA) is the official students association at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. ... Salient is the weekly students magazine of the Victoria University of Wellington Students Association (VUWSA) at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. ... The Adam Art Gallery is an art gallery of Victoria University of Wellington. ... Logo of the VUW Australs 2006 VUW Debsoc, Joynt Scroll 2006 The Victoria University of Wellington Debating Society (Inc. ...

Notable Alumni

Graduation Ceremony, May 2005
Graduation Ceremony, May 2005

Of either the university and college of education: Image File history File links VUWGraduation. ... Image File history File links VUWGraduation. ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ...

Fleur Adcock (born February 10, 1934) is a New Zealand born poet and editor of Irish ancestry who has lived much of her life in England. ... The Gold Medal for Poetry, originally instituted by King George V, is awarded in some years on 23 April, for a book of verse written by a United Kingdom or British Commonwealth citizen; before 1985 it was awarded only to British writers (this rule clearly not having hardened by 1940). ... Barbara Anderson (born 1926) is a New Zealand writer who has become internationally recognised despite only starting her writing career in her late fifties. ... New Zealand 1995 stamp issue featuring Brian Barratt-Boyes Sir Brian Gerald Barratt-Boyes, KBE (1924 - March 8, 2006) was a pioneering heart surgeon from New Zealand. ... Cardiology is the branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. ... Jacqueline Celia Sturm is a poet and writer of short stories. ... James Keir Baxter (June 29, 1926—October 22, 1972) was a New Zealand poet, and a controversial figure in New Zealand society. ... Professor John Cawte Beaglehole OM CMG (June 13, 1901–October 10, 1971) was born in Wellington, New Zealand. ... James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Józef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... Robert William Burchfield (January 27, 1923 - July 5, 2004) was a scholar, writer, and lexicographer. ... Alistair Campbell is a poet, born on the Cook Islands, but resident for most of his life in New Zealand. ... John Campbell John Campbell is the presenter of Campbell Live, a primetime 7. ... Jane Campion (born April 30, 1954 in Wellington, New Zealand) is an Academy Award Winning film maker. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... John Morrison Clarke (born July 29, 1948) is a comedian and writer. ... Fred Dagg is a fictional archetype satirist from New Zealand created and acted on stage, film and television by John Morrison Clarke. ... The Right Honourable Robin Brunskill Cooke, Baron Cooke of Thorndon of Wellington in New Zealand and of Cambridge in the County of Cambridgeshire. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Frank Corner CMG FRSA (b. ... The Rth Hon Sir Thomas Eichelbaum GBE QC Born 1931 Konigsberg, Germany. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... Gareth Farr ONZM (born February 29, 1968) is a New Zealand composer and percussionist. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... New Zealand Merchant banker, one of the richest ten men in that country, who backed New Zealands first Americas Cup campaign in 1987 that won through to challenge in the final before losing to the US. In 1988 Fay backed a challenge to Dennis Conners American team... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Two-time Academy Award nominee John Feeney (August 10, 1922 - December 6, 2006) was a director with the New Zealand National Film Unit, National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and in Egypt. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Patricia Grace (born in Wellington, New Zealand in 1937) is a notable Māori writer of novels, short stories, and childrens books. ... -1... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... Harry Bertram Hawthorn OC (born 1910) is a Canadian anthropologist. ... See Anthropology. ... Fred Hollows Frederick Cossom (Fred) Hollows, AC (April 9, 1929 – February 10, 1993) was an ophthalmologist who became known for his work in restoring eyesight for countless thousands of people in Australia and many other countries. ... Witi Tame Ihimaera-Smiler (born 1944), generally known as Witi Ihimaera, is a New Zealand author, and is often regarded as the most prominent Maori writer alive today. ... The Whale Rider is a 2003 book by New Zealand Maori author Witi Tame Ihimaera. ... Sir Robert Bob Edward Jones (born 1939) is a property tycoon, author and former politician in New Zealand. ... A business magnate, sometimes referred to as a mogul, tycoon, or industrialist is a person who controls a large portion of a particular industry and whose wealth derives primarily from this control. ... The Right Honourable Sir Kenneth James Keith KBE QC (19 November 1937 – ) is a New Zealand Judge appointed to the International Court of Justice in November 2005. ... Douglas Lorimer Kidd, DCNZM, (12 September 1941 - ) is a former New Zealand politician. ... In New Zealand the Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, the New Zealand House of Representatives (often also referred to as Parliament). The Speaker fulfils a number of important functions in relation to the operation the House, which is based... Dr Michael King OBE (15 December 1945 - 30 March 2004) was a widely respected Pakeha New Zealand historian, author and biographer. ... Sir George Robert Laking, KCMG, (b. ... Right Honourable Sir John Ross Marshall GBE (March 5, 1912 – August 30, 1988), generally known as Jack Marshall, was a New Zealand politician. ... Sir Thaddeus McCarthy ONZ KBE (1907—April 11, 2001) was a New Zealand judge. ... Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Sir Alister Donald Miles McIntosh, KCMG (29 November 1906-30 November 1978), New Zealand diplomat. ... John William Money, Ph. ... Sexology is the systematic study of human sexuality. ... Sir Guy Richardson Powles, ONZ, KBE, ED, (b. ... An ombudsman is an official, usually (but not always) appointed by the government or by parliament, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ... The Right Reverend Sir Paul Alfred Reeves GCMG GCVO QSO (December 6, 1932–) was Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand and Bishop of Auckland from 1980 to 1985 and Governor-General of New Zealand from 1985 to 1990. ... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... The Archbishop of New Zealand is the head of the Anglican church in the Province of New Zealand and has under his direction nine dioceses. ... Dr. Jonathan Sarfati Jonathan D. Sarfati (born October 1, 1964) is an Australian writer and researcher who works for Creation Ministries International (CMI), formerly part of Answers in Genesis (AiG), a non-profit Christian apologetics ministry specializing in Young-Earth creationism. ... NEW ZEALAND CHESS CHAMPIONS Note: Up to 1934 foreign players were eligible for the title. ... William Ball Sutch (27 June 1907 - 28 September 1975) was a New Zealand writer and civil servant. ... Ronald Syme Sir Ronald Syme (11 March 1903 – 4 September 1989), New Zealand-born historian, was the preeminent classicist of the 20th century. ... Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Right Honourable Sir Brian Edward Talboys AC, CH, KCB, (7 June 1921-) was a New Zealand politician. ... Speculation about her future began in 2004 after she criticised a speech by leader Don Brash. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The word Māori refers to the indigenous people of New Zealand and to their language. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Sir Jack Kent Hunn KCMG, (24 August 1906-14 June 1997). ... Fran Walsh and her husband Peter Jackson Frances Walsh MNZM is an Academy Award-winning screenwriter and film producer and also a musician. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a three-time Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA winning New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novels... Marilyn Waring (born 1952) is a renowned New Zealand feminist, an activist for female human rights, an author and an academic. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Massey University is a university of New Zealand. ... Albert Wendt is a New Zealand writer, the author of six novels, three collections of short stories, four volumes of poetry and a play. ... A poet is someone who writes poetry. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Gillian Karawe Whitehead (born 1941) is a New Zealand composer. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The Right Honourable Sir Herbert Richard Churton Wild (known as Richard), (20 September 1912 - 22 May 1978) QC, was Chief Justice of New Zealand. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... Cardinal Williams Thomas Stafford Williams ONZ, ChStJ (born 20 March 1930) is a New Zealand Cardinal and the Emeritus (retired) Archbishop of Wellington. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, a member of the College of Cardinals, ranking below the Pope and appointed by him during a consistory of the College. ... Jack Yan (甄爵恩, Pinyin: Zhēn Juéēn) is a publisher, designer and businessman, born 1972 in Kowloon, Hong Kong. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Good Morning is a New Zealand daytime television magazine talk show that airs weekday mornings on TV ONE. It is currently hosted by Brendon Pongia and Sarah Bradley, and each episode includes several segments related to cooking, interior design, gardening, and other topics related to the domestic arts. ...

Notable Academics

Of either the university and college of education: The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ...

There are two notable people named James Belich. ... Art education is the area of learning that, in the United States of America, is based upon the visual, tangible arts—drawing, painting, sculpture, and design in jewelry, pottery, weaving, fabrics, etc and design applied to more practical fields such as commercial graphics and home furnishings. ... [[Image:Conner- Pottery production is a process by which abody, clay mixed with other minerals, is shaped and allowed to dry. ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ... Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist. ... Mai Chen (b. ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ... Douglas Gordon Lilburn (2 November 1915 - 6 June 2001) was a prolific and influential New Zealand composer. ... Bill Manhire (born in Invercargill in 1946) is an award-winning New Zealand poet and short story writer. ... Front cover of the Penguin Classics paperback edition of the New Cambridge Paragraph Bible (2006). ... The Faculty of Education of Victoria University of Wellington was formed from the former School of Education (of the Faculty of Humanities of Social Sciences) of the University, and the former Wellington College of Education on 1 January 2005. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American as was T.S Eliot, Salman... This article is about the former New Zealand Prime Minister. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is most senior officer in the Government of New Zealand. ... Matthew Simon Russell Palmer, born 12 May 1964, was the Dean of the Victoria University Law Faculty from 2000 until June 2006. ... Professor Matt Visser is a Mathematics Professor at Victoria University of Wellington. ...

Panorama

Panorama of the view from the fifth floor stairwell of the Cotton Building, Kelburn Campus.
Panorama of the view from the fifth floor stairwell of the Cotton Building, Kelburn Campus.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (9104x1728, 2511 KB) Summary 180 degree panorama taken from the 5th floor of the Cotton building on the Kelburn Campus of the Victoria University of Wellington. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (9104x1728, 2511 KB) Summary 180 degree panorama taken from the 5th floor of the Cotton building on the Kelburn Campus of the Victoria University of Wellington. ... In its most general sense, a panorama is any wide view of a physical space. ... Panorama of Wellington including the Kelburn cable car. ...

References

  1. ^ Victoria University's Māori Name, retrieved 27 December 2006
  2. ^ Performance-Based Research Fund—Evaluating Research Excellence: the 2003 assessment, retrieved 27 December 2006. Specifically this PDF at p. 49.
  3. ^ Victoria University of Wellington 1899 ~ 1999 A History p. 25. Retrieved 27 December 2006.
  4. ^ "History", Massey University Calendar 2007. Retrieved 27 December 2006.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Victoria University of Wellington
  • Victoria University of Wellington's website
    • VUW Student Recruitment and Course Advice
    • The Faculty of Education's website
    • Law Faculty
    • MacDiarmid Institute
    • SoAD: School of Architecture & Design
  • Victoria University of Wellington Students' Association
  • Victoria University of Wellington History at the New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

  Results from FactBites:
 
Victoria University of Wellington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (835 words)
Victoria University of Wellington was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament as the fifth constituent college of the University of New Zealand.
In theory, the governing body of the University is the General Court of Convocation, composed of all graduates of the university who choose to participate.
The University was named after Queen Victoria, as 1897 was the 60th anniversary of her coronation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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