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Encyclopedia > Victoria University of Manchester

The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. On October 1, 2004 it merged with UMIST to form a new institution called The University of Manchester. The Victoria University of Manchester was almost invariably known in recent times by its working title of The University of Manchester and only reverted to its full title to distinguish it from the new merged institution. A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees at all levels (bachelor, master, and doctor) in a variety of subjects. ... Manchester is a city in the North West of England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England is a university that was formed from the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ...

Contents


History

The university began in 1851 as Owens College (named after John Owens), a textile merchant who left a bequest of £96,942 for the purpose. It moved to its current location in 1873, and was granted its Royal Charter in 1880, becoming the first institution of the federal Victoria University. In 1884, University College Liverpool joined the University, followed, in 1887 by the Yorkshire College in Leeds. 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John Owens (1790–1846), English merchant, was born in Manchester, England in 1790, the son of a prosperous merchant. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This page is about the British Victoria University. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Leeds is a city in the metropolitan borough of the City of Leeds in West Yorkshire in the north of England. ...


In 1903, the University's college in Liverpool left the Victoria University to become the independent University of Liverpool and Leeds followed in 1904 to become the University of Leeds. The remaining Manchester site was renamed Victoria University of Manchester. 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool in the United Kingdom. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Parkinson Building, University of Leeds The University of Leeds, England, is one of the largest universities in the United Kingdom and the most popular by applicants, with 52,444 applicants in 2003 for 7,228 places (UCAS). ...


It was commonly known as the University of Manchester, and had over 18,000 full-time students (including 2500 international students from more than 120 countries) by the time it merged with UMIST. It was one of the top universities in the country, regularly getting top ratings for research [1].


On March 5, 2003 it was announced that the University was to merge with UMIST on October 1 2004, to form the largest conventional university in the UK. The new institution is simply called the The University of Manchester. In legal terms both the Victoria University of Manchester and UMIST ceased to exist when the University of Manchester came into existence on October 1 2004. March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England is a university that was formed from the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ...


Motto and Arms

The motto of the university was "Arduus Ad Solem", literally meaning "striving towards the sun". It is a metaphor for aspiring to enlightenment. The motto is a quote from Virgil's Aeneid, but the archives do not record the reasons for its choice. In the Aeneid, the quote refers to a serpent and the sun, both of which feature in the university coat of arms. Enlightenment (concept) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


Famous alumni

Physics

  • John Henry Poynting. Student 18671872 (one of the very first students in the new Physical Laboratories). Lecturer 18761879. Left to become Professor at Mason College (which became Birmingham University). He wrote on electrical phenomena and radiation and is best known for Poynting's vector. In 1891 he determined the mean density of the Earth and made a determination of the gravitational constant in 1893. The Poynting-Robertson effect was related to the theory of relativity.
  • Ernest Rutherford. Langworthy Professor of Physics 19071919. Awarded Nobel prize in 1908, for his investigations into the disintegration of the elements and the chemistry of radioactive substances. He was the first man to split the atom.
  • James Chadwick. Student (BSc & MSc) and Researcher 19081913 (under Rutherford). Discovered neutron and awarded Nobel prize 1935.
  • Hans Geiger, Researcher 19061914. Did the original "Rutherford scattering" experiment with Marsden (also the Geiger-Marsden experiment). Devised the famous Geiger ionization counter.
  • Sir Ernest Marsden was born in Lancashire in 1888. He won scholarships to attend grammar school and gain entry to Manchester University. It was here he met Rutherford in his honours year. Rutherford suggested a project to investigate the backwards scattering of alpha particles from a metal foil. He did this in conjunction with Hans Geiger (of Geiger counter fame), and it proved to be the key experiment in the demise of the Plum pudding model of the atom leading directly to Rutherford's nuclear atom. Rutherford also recommended Marsden for the position of physics professor at what is now Victoria University in Wellington.
  • Niels Bohr. Research Staff and Schuster Reader 1911–1916. Worked on structure of atom and first theory of quantum mechanics. Awarded Nobel prize in 1922.
  • William Lawrence Bragg. Director (Langworthy Professor of Physics) 19191937. Won a Nobel prize for X-ray crystallography in 1915, along with his father, William Henry Bragg. Their work led to the first discoveries of DNA and protein structures, which were made by Watson/Crick/Wilkins/Rosalin Franklin (DNA) and Kendrew/Perutz (protein) in Bragg's research group in Cambridge.
  • Nevill Francis Mott. Lecturer 19291930. Awarded Nobel prize in 1977, for his fundamental theoretical investigations of the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems.
  • Hans Bethe. Research staff and Temporary Lecturer 1932. Awarded Nobel prize in 1967, for his contributions to the theory of nuclear reactions, especially his discoveries concerning the energy production in stars.
  • Patrick M. Blackett 19371953. Director and Langworthy Professor of physics. Awarded Nobel prize for developing cloud chamber and confirming/discovering positron in 1948.
  • George D Rochester discovered strange particles in 1947 with Clifford C Butler. C C Butler co-discovered strange particles in 1947. Went on to be head of department at Imperial College and then VC at Loughborough.
  • Sir Arthur Eddington. Graduated in 1902 and became a lecturer in 1905. Founder of modern Astronomy. He made important contributions to the general theory of relativity and led an expedition team to validate it.
  • Sir Bernard Lovell, Professor (19511990) and creator of the giant radio-telescope (the first large radio-telescope in the world with a diameter of 218 feet) at Jodrell Bank and pioneered the field of radio astronomy.
  • Sir Arthur Schuster, Langworthy Professor of Physics (18881907), who made many contributions to optics and astronomy. Schuster's interests were wide-ranging: terrestrial magnetism, optics, solar physics, and the mathematical theory of periodicities. He introduced meteorology as a subject studied in British universities.
  • Henry Moseley, who identified atomic number as the nuclear charges. He studied under Rutherford and brilliantly developed the application of X-ray spectra to study atomic structure; his discoveries resulted in a more accurate positioning of elements in the Periodic Table by closer determination of atomic numbers . Moseley was nominated for the 1915 Nobel Prize but was unfortunately killed in action in August 1915 and could not receive the prize.
  • George de Hevesy, Research Staff 19101913, who won the Nobel prize in 1943 for his work on the use of isotopes as tracers in the study of chemical processes.
  • Sir John Douglas Cockcroft, studied mathematics under Horace Lamb in 19141915, and received BSc and MSc in Electrical Engineering at the Tech (UMIST), won the Nobel prize in physics in 1951 for his pioneering work on the transmutation of atomic nuclei by artificially accelerated atomic particles. Chancellor of UMIST. and Director of BAERE ( Manhattan Project Hall of fame ).
  • Sir John Lennard-Jones, entered Manchester University where he changed his subject to mathematics in 1912. After First World War service in the Royal Flying Corps, he returned to Manchester as Lecturer in Mathematics, 19191922. Founder of modern theoretical chemistry. Lennard-Jones potential and LJ fluid are named after him.

Sir Joseph John Thomson Sir Joseph John Thomson (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940), often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: People stubs | 1852 births | 1914 deaths | Physicists ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Poynting vector is the cross product of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Thomson Rees Wilson (February 14, 1869 - November 15, 1959) was a Scottish physicist. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson, OM, FRS (August 30, 1871 - October 19, 1937), called father of nuclear physics, pioneered the orbital theory of the atom notably in his discovery of rutherford scattering off the nucleus with his gold foil experiment. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir James Chadwick (October 20, 1891 – July 24, 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Johannes ( Hans ) Wilhelm Geiger (September 30, 1882 – September 24, 1945) was a German physicist. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Ernest Marsden (1889 - 1970), a British physicist affiliated to the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, UK. He conducted the famous alpha particle scattering experiment in 1908 together with Hans Geiger under the supervision of Ernest Rutherford. ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... A schematic representation of the plum pudding model of the atom. ... Niels Bohr Niels (Henrik David) Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made essential contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics. ... Sir William Lawrence Bragg CH, FRS, (March 31, 1890 - July 1, 1971) was a physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1915. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Henry Bragg OM, Cantab, OKW (Westward, Cumbria, England July 2, 1862 – March 10, 1942) was an English physicist and chemist, educated at King Williams College, Isle of Man, and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Sir Nevill Francis Mott (September 30, 1905 – August 8, 1996) was a British physicist. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Hans Bethe in 1945. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Douglas Rayner Hartree (March 27, 1897 - February 12, 1958) was an English mathematician and physicist most famous for the development of numerical analysis and its application to atomic physics. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The differential analyser was a mechanical analog computer invented by Vannevar Bush in 1927. ... Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, Baron Blackett (November 18, 1897—July 13, 1974) was a British experimental physicist known for his work on cloud chambers, cosmic rays, and paleomagnetism. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Sir Arnold Wolfendale is a British astronomer. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... One of Sir Arthur Stanley Eddingtons papers announced Einsteins theory of general relativity to the English-speaking world. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Bernard Lovell (born 1913) is a British radio astronomer, director (until 1981) of the Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... Arthur Schuster (September 12 1851 - October 17 1934 a versatile physicist known for his work in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, optics, X-radiography and the application of harmonic analysis to physics. ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Henry Moseley Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (November 23, 1887-August 10, 1915) was an English physicist. ... The atomic number (Z) is a term used in chemistry and physics to represent the number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... George Charles de Hevesy (also known as Georg Karl von Hevesy) (August 1, 1885 in Budapest – July 5, 1966) was a Hungarian chemist who was important in the development of the tracer method where radioactive tracers are used to study chemical processes, e. ... -1... 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... See also: John Cockroft (politician) Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (May 27, 1897 - September 18, 1967) was a British physicist. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... John Edward Lennard-Jones (October 27, 1894 - November 1, 1954) was a mathematician who held a chair of theoretical physics at Bristol University, and then a chair of theoretical science at Cambridge University. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Physiology and Medicine

  • Archibald Vivian Hill, Brackenburg Professor of Physiology, 19201923. won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1922 for his discovery relating to the production of heat in the muscle.

Archibald Vivian Hill CH CBE (September 26, 1886–June 3, 1977) was a British physiologist, one of the founders of the diverse disciplines of biophysics and operations research. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Chemistry

Nobel Prize Winners from Manchester Chemistry (Dates of awards in brackets):

  • Arthur Harden (awarded nobel prize in 1929), for investigations on the fermentation of sugar and fermentative enzymes.
  • Walter Howarth (awarded nobel prize in 1937), for his investigations on carbohydrates and vitamin C.
  • Robert Robinson (awrded nobel prize in 1947), for his investigations on plant products of biological importance, especially the alkaloids.
  • Alexander Todd (awarded nobel prize in 1957), for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co-enzymes.
  • Melvin Calvin (awarded nobel prize in 1961), for his research on the carbon dioxide assimilation in plants.
  • John Charles Polanyi (awarded nobel prize in 1986), for his contributions concerning the dynamics of chemical elementary processes.
  • Michael Smith (awarded nobel prize in 1993), for his fundamental contributions to the establishment of oligonucleiotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis and its development for protein studies.

Arthur Harden (October 12, 1865 – June 17, 1940) was an English biochemist. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir Robert Robinson (1886 - 1975). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Alexander Robertus Todd, Baron Todd (October 2, 1907 - January 10, 1997) was the 1957 Nobel Laureate in chemistry for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co_enzymes. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Charles Polanyi (born January 23, 1929) is a Canadian chemist. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Smith, C.C., O.B.C., Ph. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...

Economics

  • Sir Arthur Lewis (1979) for his pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries.
  • John Hicks (1974) for his pioneering contributions to general economic equilibrium theory and welfare theory.

Sir William Arthur Lewis (January 23, 1915 - June 15, 1991) was a British economist well known for his contributions in the field of economic development. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Sir John Richard Hicks (April 8, 1904 – May 20, 1989) was one of the most important and influential economists of the twentieth century. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ...

Computer science and mathematics

  • Alan Turing, founder of computer science and AI. ACM Turing award is named after him.
  • Paul Erdős was one of the most prolific mathematicians of the 20th century. The Euler of our time, he posed and solved many problems in number theory and other areas. He was a founder of the field of extremal combinatorics, of major importance in theoretical computer science. He wrote 1,500 papers. In his early career, he held a post-doctoral fellowship at Manchester University and subsequently became an itinerant mathematician. Awarded the Cole Prize of the AMS.
  • James Lighthill was one of the most influential applied mathematicians of the 20th century. He made important contributions to the modern developments in theoretical aerodynamics and aeroacoustics (Lighthill's eighth power law) and was one of the founding fathers of the field of biofluiddynamics. He is also founder of IMA.
  • Osborne Reynolds is famous for his work in fluid mechanics. In 1886 he formulated a theory of lubrication and three years later he developed the standard mathematical framework used in the study of turbulence. The Reynolds number used in modelling fluid flow is named after him (his students include J. J. Thomson, who discovered the electron).
  • Ludwig Wittgenstein who is best known for his work in philosophy undertook aeronautical research in Manchester. Needing to understand more mathematics for his research he began a study which soon involved him in the foundations of mathematics.
  • Louis Mordell was a pure mathematician who made important contributions in number theory.
  • Sydney Goldstein was one of the most influential theoretical fluid mechanicians in this century. He is best known for his work in boundary layer theory where the Goldstein singularity is named after him.
  • Lewis Fry Richardson was a scientist who was the first to apply mathematics, in particular the method of finite differences, to predicting the weather (the father of CFD). He made contributions to calculus and to the theory of diffusion, in particular eddy-diffusion in the atmosphere. The Richardson number, a fundamental quantity involving gradients of temperature and wind velocity, is named after him.
  • Sir Horace Lamb was one of the six professors appointed when Manchester University received its Royal Charter (his chair was in Mathematics, and Osborne Reynolds was given the Chair in Engineering). He made many important contributions to applied mathematics, including the areas of acoustics and fluid dynamics. His book Hydrodynamics (first published in 1895) was for many years the standard text on the subject and is still essential reading for researchers. Lamb's main field of research was solid mechanics, and he made careful studies of the vibrations of spherical bodies which aided understanding in seismology. Research on waves in layered media led to the discovery of Lamb waves.
  • Bernhard Neumann spent more than a decade in Manchester. He is one of the leading figures in group theory.
  • Max Newman made important contributions to combinatorial topology, Boolean algebras and mathematical logic. He directed the now-famous Colossus cryptanalysis program in WWII.
  • John Littlewood is famous for his work on the theory of series, the Riemann zeta function, inequalities and the theory of functions. He held a lectureship at the University of Manchester from 1907 to 1910.
  • Harold Davenport worked in Manchester as a contemporary of Erdős and Mordell.
  • Kurt Mahler spent several periods of his academic life at Manchester. Major themes of his work were p-adic numbers, p-adic diophantine approximation, geometry of numbers and Mahler measures.
  • Frank Adams was a leading figure in algebraic topology and homotopy theory. He developed methods which led to important advances in calculating the homotopy groups of spheres (a problem which is still unsolved), including the invention of the Adams operations.
  • Brian Hartley is best known for his work in group theory. His book Rings, Modules and Linear Algebra (written with T. O. Hawkes) is a widely used undergraduate text.
  • Tom Kilburn and Freddie Williams invented the Williams-Kilburn Tube and the first modern electronic computer in the world, the Manchester Mark 1.
  • Sydney Chapman, developed important theory on thermal diffusion in highly ionized gases, magnetic storms, instability along magnetic neutral lines, noctilucent clouds and the fundamentals of gas dynamics.
  • Edward Milne, a leading figure in the study of radiative equilibrium, the structure of stellar atmospheres, theory of relativity and the interior structure of stars. President of London Maths Society.
  • M. S. Bartlett, professor of mathematical statistics from 1947 to 1960 made important contributions to the analysis of data with spatial and temporal patterns. He is also known for his work in the theory of statistical inference and in multivariate analysis.

Alan Turing is often considered the father of modern computer science. ... Paul ErdÅ‘s, pictured in lecture, late in life. ... Leonhard Euler aged 49 (oil painting by Emanuel Handmann, 1756) Leonhard Euler (April 15, 1707 - September 18, 1783) (pronounced oiler) was a Swiss mathematician and physicist. ... Number theory is the formal study of numbers. ... Extremal combinatorics is a field of combinatorics, which is itself a part of mathematics. ... Computer science (informally, CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... The Cole Prize is one of two prizes awarded to mathematicians by the American Mathematical Society, one for an outstanding contribution to algebra, and the other for an outstanding contribution to number theory. ... AMS is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: American Meteorological Society Advanced Management Systems Aerospace Material Specification Accelerator mass spectrometry or accelerator mass spectrometer. ... Sir Michael James Lighthill (23 January 1924 - 17 July 1998) was a British applied mathematician. ... Applied mathematics is a branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the application of mathematical knowledge to other domains. ... Aerodynamics is a branch of fluid dynamics concerned with the study of gas flows. ... Aeroacoustics is a branch of acoustics that deals with the study of aerodynamic sound. ... The Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) is one of the UKs professional bodies for mathematicians (the other main ones being the London Mathematical Society and the Royal Statistical Society). ... Osborne Reynolds Osborne Reynolds (23 August 1842–21 February 1912) was an Irish fluid dynamics engineer. ... The hydrogeology is study about of water-bearing formation. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Lubrication occurs when opposing surfaces are completely separated by a lubricant film. ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by random, stochastic property changes. ... The Reynolds number is the most important dimensionless number in fluid dynamics and provides a criterion for determining dynamic similitude. ... Sir Joseph John Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 – April 29, 1951) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking works to modern philosophy, primarily on the foundations of logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind. ... Louis Joel Mordell (28 January 1888 - 12 March 1972) was a British mathematician, known for pioneering research in number theory. ... Lewis Fry Richardson (October 11, 1881 - September 30, 1953) was a mathematician, physicist and psychologist. ... There are two subfields of mathematics that concern themselves with finite differences. ... Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is the use of computers to analyze problems in fluid dynamics. ... Schematic drawing of the effects of diffusion through a semipermeable membrane. ... The Richardson number is named after Lewis Fry Richardson (1881 - 1953). ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Solid mechanics is the branch of physics and mathematics that concern the behavior of solid matter under external actions (e. ... Seismology (from the Greek seismos = earthquake and logos = word) is the scientific study of earthquakes and the movement of waves through the Earth. ... Group theory is that branch of mathematics concerned with the study of groups. ... Maxwell Herman Alexander Newman (February 7, 1897 – February 22, 1984) was a British mathematician. ... In mathematics, combinatorial topology was an older name for algebraic topology, dating from the time when topological invariants of spaces (for example the Betti numbers) were regarded as derived from combinatorial decompositions such as simplicial complexes. ... Wikibooks has more about Boolean logic, under the somewhat misleading title Boolean Algebra For a basic intro to sets, Boolean operations, Venn diagrams, truth tables, and Boolean applications, see Boolean logic. ... Mathematical logic is a discipline within mathematics, studying formal systems in relation to the way they encode intuitive concepts of proof and computation as part of the foundations of mathematics. ... Colossus may refer to: A colossus, a giant statue. ... Cryptanalysis (from the Greek kryptós, hidden, and analýein, to loosen or to untie) is the study of methods for obtaining the meaning of encrypted information, without access to the secret information which is normally required to do so. ... John Edensor Littlewood (June 9, 1885 - September 6, 1977) was a British mathematician. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... -1... Harold Davenport (30 October 1907 - 9 June 1969) was an English mathematician, known for his extensive work in number theory. ... Kurt Mahler is a British mathematician and a Fellow of the Royal Society. ... The p-adic number systems were first described by Kurt Hensel in 1897. ... In number theory, the field of Diophantine approximation, named after Diophantus of Alexandria, deals with the approximation of real numbers by rational numbers. ... In number theory, the geometry of numbers is a topic and method arising from the work of Hermann Minkowski, on the relationship between convex sets and lattices in n-dimensional space. ... In mathematics, the Mahler measure of a polynomial p is Here p is assumed complex-valued and is the lα norm of p. ... Frank Adams may also refer to Frank Dawson Adams a Canadian geologist. ... Algebraic topology is a branch of mathematics in which tools from abstract algebra are used to study topological spaces. ... An illustration of a homotopy between the two bold paths In topology, two continuous functions from one topological space to another are called homotopic (Greek homeos = identical and topos = place) if one can be continuously deformed into the other, such a deformation being called a homotopy between the two functions. ... In mathematics, the homotopy groups of spheres are the groups πk(Sn) in algebraic topology, more specifically homotopy theory, where πk(.) for k ≥ 1 denotes the homotopy group and Sn the n-sphere. ... In mathematics, an Adams operation ψk is a cohomology operation in K-theory, or any allied operation in algebraic K-theory or other types of algebraic construction, defined on a pattern introduced by Frank Adams. ... Tom Kilburn (August 11, 1921 - January 17, 2001) was an English engineer. ... Sir Frederic Calland Williams (1911 - 1977), known as Freddie Williams, was an English engineer. ... The Williams tube or (more accurately) the Williams-Kilburn tube (after Freddie Williams and coworker Tom Kilburn) was a cathode ray tube used to store electronic data. ... Manchester Mk1 can also refer to the Avro Manchester heavy bomber in RAF service during the early stages of World War II. The Manchester Mark I was one of the earliest electronic computers, built at the University of Manchester in England, in 1949. ... Noctilucent clouds (also known as polar mesospheric clouds) are rare bright cloudlike atmospheric phenomena visible in a deep twilight (the name means roughly night shining). They are most commonly observed in the summer months at latitudes between 50° and 60° (north and south). ... Edward Arthur Milne (February 14, 1896 – September 21, 1950) was a British mathematician and astrophysicist. ... Maurice Stevenson Bartlett (June 18, 1910 - January 8, 2002) was an English statistician who made particular contributions to the analysis of data with spatial and temporal patterns. ... A graph of a bell curve in a normal distribution showing statistics used in educational assessment, comparing various grading methods. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Data is the plural of datum. ... Space is a general or specialized concept of a local, relative, containing, or otherwise relevant area —where all objects within have a relationship with (the) space which follows various (theoretically) defineable rules. ... Watches are used to measure time Trying to understand time has long been a prime occupation for philosophers, scientists and artists. ... The topics below are usually included in the area of interpreting statistical data. ... Multivariate statistics or multivariate statistical analysis in statistics describes a collection of procedures which involve observation and analysis of more than one statistical variable at a time. ...

See also

This page is about the British Victoria University. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England is a university that was formed from the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ...

External links

  • The University of Manchester
  • old website of The Victoria University of Manchester

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Victoria University (466 words)
Victoria University of Wellington was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament as the fifth constituent college of the University of New Zealand.
Category: Disambiguation Victoria College is or was the name of several institutions of secondary or higher education, including: Victoria College, Alexandria, Egypt Victoria University in the University of Toronto, University of Toronto Victoria College, Texas Victoria College of Art Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne Victoria College, Jersey, Channel Islands...
In granting autonomy to the University of Victoria, the University Act of 1963 vested administrative authority in a Chancellor elected by the Convocation of the University, a Board of Governors, and a President appointed by the Board; academic authority was given to a Senate which was representative both of the Faculties and of the Convocation.
Victoria University of Manchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2030 words)
The Victoria University of Manchester almost always referred to as simply the University of Manchester (except where there was a need to distinguish between it and the new university in which case it was often known by its initials VUM) was a university in Manchester in England.
In 1903, the University's college in Liverpool left the Victoria University to become the independent University of Liverpool and Leeds followed in 1904 to become the University of Leeds.
On March 5, 2003 it was announced that the University was to merge with UMIST on October 1 2004, to form the largest conventional university in the UK.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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