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Encyclopedia > Vice President of the United States
Vice President of the
United States

Official seal
Incumbent:
Richard Bruce Cheney
Inaugural John Adams
Formation April 20, 1789

The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. As designated by the Constitution of the United States, the vice president also serves as the President of the Senate, and may break tie votes in that chamber. He or she may be assigned additional duties by the President. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Dick Cheney, Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... Inauguration Day is the day on which the President of the United States is sworn in and takes office. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ...


The current Vice President of the United States is Richard Bruce "Dick" Cheney. Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...

Contents

Eligibility

The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution states that "no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States." However, unlike the two-election limit imposed on the Presidency by the Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution, there is no restriction on the number of terms a person can serve as Vice President (as long as she or he has never been president for 6 or more years). Amendment XII in the National Archives The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution alterd Article II pertaining to presidential elections. ... Amendment XXII in the National Archives The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution sets a term limit for the President of the United States, providing that No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office...


To serve as Vice President, an individual must be:

  • a natural born U.S. citizen not younger than 35
  • a U.S. permanent resident for at least 14 years
  • eligible for the office of President (as stated in the Twelfth Amendment)

Oath

Unlike the president, the Constitution does not specify an oath of office for the vice president. Several variants of the oath have been used since 1789; the current form, which is also recited by Senators, Representatives and other government officers, has been used since 1884: Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...

I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.

Original Constitution, and reform

John Adams, America's first Vice President
John Adams, America's first Vice President

Under the original terms of the Constitution, the members of the U.S. Electoral College voted only for office of president rather than for both president and vice president. Each elector was allowed to vote for two people for the top office. The person receiving the greatest number of votes (provided that such a number was a majority of electors) would be president, while the individual who received the next largest number of votes became vice president. If no one received a majority of votes, then the U.S. House of Representatives would choose among the five highest vote-getters, with each state getting one vote. In such a case, the person who received the highest number of votes but was not chosen president would become vice president. If there were a tie for second, then the U.S. Senate would choose the vice president. Image File history File links John Adams presidential portrait. ... Image File history File links John Adams presidential portrait. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


The original plan, however, did not foresee the development of political parties and their adversarial role in the government. In the election of 1796, for instance, Federalist John Adams came in first, and Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson came second. Thus, the president and vice president were from opposing parties. Predictably, Adams and Jefferson clashed over issues such as states' rights and foreign policy. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1792 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1830s. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


A greater problem occurred in the election of 1800, in which the two participating parties each had a secondary candidate they intended to elect as vice president, but the more popular Democratic-Republican party failed to execute that plan with their electoral votes. Under the system in place at the time (Article Two, Section 1, Clause 3), the electors could not differentiate between their two candidates, so the plan had been for one elector to vote for Thomas Jefferson but not for Aaron Burr, thus putting Burr in second place. This plan broke down for reasons that are disputed, and both candidates received the same number of votes. After 35 deadlocked ballots in the U.S. House of Representatives, Jefferson finally won on the 36th ballot and Burr became vice president. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article Two of the United States Constitution Article Two of the United States Constitution creates the executive branch of the government, comprising the President and other executive officers. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


This tumultuous affair led to the adoption of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, which directed the electors to use separate ballots to vote for the president and vice president. While this solved the problem at hand, it ultimately had the effect of lowering the prestige of the vice presidency, as the office was no longer for the leading challenger for the presidency. The Twelfth Amendment may refer to the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution of Ireland Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution of Iraq Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution of Mars Category: ...


The separate ballots for President and Vice President became something of a moot issue later in the 19th century when it became the norm for popular elections to determine a state's Electoral College delegation. Electors chosen this way are pledged to vote for a particular presidential and vice-presidential candidate (offered by the same political party). So, while the Constitution says that the president and vice president are chosen separately, in practice they are chosen together.


If no vice presidential candidate receives an Electoral College majority, then the Senate selects the Vice President, in accordance with the United States Constitution. This is a curious anomaly since the sitting Vice President is also President of the Senate and would be called upon to break a tie vote, possibly for himself or his successor. The election of 1836 is the only election so far where the office of the Vice President has been decided by the Senate. During the campaign, President Martin Van Buren's running mate Richard Mentor Johnson was accused of having lived with a black woman. Virginia's 23 electors, who were pledged to Van Buren and Johnson, refused to vote for Johnson (but still voted for Van Buren). The election went to the Senate, where Johnson was elected, 33-17. Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ...


Residency Limitations

The Constitution also prohibits electors from voting for both a presidential and vice presidential candidate from the same state as themselves. In theory, this might deny a vice presidential candidate with the most electoral votes the absolute majority required to secure election, even if the presidential candidate is elected, and place the vice presidential election in the hands of the Senate. In practice, this is rarely an issue, as parties avoid nominating tickets containing two candidates from the same state. In one notable case, former Wyoming congressman Dick Cheney had moved to Texas to serve as CEO of Halliburton Company, but reclaimed residency at his Wyoming home before accepting the 2000 GOP nomination for vice president, alongside presidential nominee and Texas governor George W. Bush. Absolute majority is a supermajoritarian voting requirement which is stricter than a simple majority. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Haliburton. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Nominating process

The vice presidential candidates of the major national political parties are formally selected by each party's quadrennial nominating convention, following the selection of their presidential candidates. The official process is identical to the one by which the presidential candidates are chosen, with delegates placing the names of candidates into nomination, followed by a ballot in which candidates must receive a majority to secure the party's nomination. In practice, the presidential nominee has considerable influence on the decision, and in 20th century it became customary for that person to select a preferred running mate, who is then nominated and accepted by the convention. In recent years, with the presidential nomination usually being a foregone conclusion as the result of the primary process, the selection of a vice presidential candidate is often announced prior to the actual balloting for the presidential candidate, and sometimes before the beginning of the convention itself. Often, the presidential nominee will name a vice presidential candidate who will bring geographic or ideological balance to the ticket or appeal to a particular constituency. The vice presidential candidate might also be chosen on the basis of traits the presidential candidate is perceived to lack, or on the basis of name recognition. Popular runners-up in the presidential nomination process are commonly considered, to foster party unity.


The ultimate goal of vice presidential candidate selection is to help and not hurt the party's chances of getting elected. An overly dynamic selection can backfire by outshining the presidential candidate. A classic example of this came in 1988, when Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis chose experienced Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen as his running mate. The public perception of Dukakis was so bland that one West Virginia elector cast a presidential ballot for Bentsen rather than Dukakis.[3] Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ...


The last presidential candidate to not name a vice presidential choice, leaving the matter up to the convention, was Democrat Adlai Stevenson in 1956. The convention chose Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver over Massachusetts Senator (and later president) John F. Kennedy. At the tumultuous 1972 Democratic convention, presidential nominee George McGovern selected Senator Thomas Eagleton as his running mate, but numerous other candidates were either nominated from the floor or received votes during the balloting. Eagleton nevertheless received a majority of the votes and the nomination. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ...


In cases where the presidential nomination is still in doubt as the convention approaches, the campaigns for the two positions may become intertwined. In 1976, Ronald Reagan, who was trailing President Gerald R. Ford in the presidential delegate count, announced prior to the Republican National Convention that, if nominated, he would select Senator Richard Schweiker as his running mate. This move backfired to a degree, as Schweiker's relatively liberal voting record alienated many of the more conservative delegates who were considering a challenge to party delegate selection rules to improve Reagan's chances.[citation needed] In the end, Ford narrowly won the presidential nomination and Reagan's selection of Schweiker became moot. Reagan redirects here. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Richard S. Schweiker Richard Schultz Schweiker (born June 1, 1926) is a former U.S. Congressman and Senator representing the state of Pennsylvania. ...


Role of the Vice President

Duties

The formal powers and role of the vice president are limited by the Constitution to becoming President in the event of the death or resignation of the President and acting as the presiding officer of the U.S. Senate. As President of the Senate, the Vice President has two primary duties: to cast a vote in the event of a Senate deadlock and to preside over and certify the official vote count of the U.S. Electoral College. For example, in the first half of 2001, the Senators were divided 50-50 between Republicans and Democrats and Dick Cheney's tie-breaking vote gave the Republicans the Senate majority. (See 107th United States Congress.) The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ... The Senate President only votes to break a tie. ... 2001-2003 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 2001 to December 20, 2001 The second session took place in Washington, DC from January 23, 2002 to November 22, 2002 President George W. Bush addressing a joint session of Congress, regarding the September...

John Tyler, the first Vice President to assume the Presidency following the death of the previous President
John Tyler, the first Vice President to assume the Presidency following the death of the previous President

The informal roles and functions of the Vice President depend on the specific relationship between the President and the Vice President, but often include drafter and spokesperson for the administration's policy, as an adviser to the president, as Chairman of the Board of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as a Member of the board of the Smithsonian Institution, and as a symbol of American concern or support. Their influence in this role depends almost entirely on the characteristics of the particular administration. Cheney, for instance, is widely regarded as one of George W. Bush's closest confidantes. Al Gore was an important advisor to President Bill Clinton on matters of foreign policy and the environment. Often, Vice Presidents will take harder-line stands on issues to ensure the support of the party's base while deflecting partisan criticism away from the President[citation needed]. Under the American system the President is both head of state and head of government, and the ceremonial duties of the former position are often delegated to the Vice President. He or she may meet with other heads of state or attend state funerals in other countries, at times when the administration wishes to demonstrate concern or support but cannot send the President himself. Not all Vice Presidents are happy in their jobs. John Nance Garner, who served as vice president from 1933 to 1941 under President Franklin Roosevelt, famously remarked that the vice presidency wasn't worth "a warm bucket of piss," although reporters allegedly changed the spelling of the last word for print.[4] File links The following pages link to this file: John Tyler Vice President of the United States Categories: U.S. history images ... File links The following pages link to this file: John Tyler Vice President of the United States Categories: U.S. history images ... John Tyler, Jr. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ...


In recent years, the vice presidency has frequently been used to launch bids for the presidency. Of the 13 presidential elections from 1956 to 2004, nine featured the incumbent president; the other four (1960, 1968, 1988, 2000) all featured the incumbent vice president. Former vice presidents also ran, in 1984 (Walter Mondale), and in 1968 (Richard Nixon, against the incumbent Vice President Hubert Humphrey). Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ...


Since 1974, the official residence of the vice president and his family has been Number One Observatory Circle, on the grounds of the United States Naval Observatory in Washington, DC. Number One Observatory Circle, official home of the Vice President of the United States, photographed in 2003. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


President of the Senate

As President of the Senate (Article I, Section 3), the vice president oversees procedural matters and may cast a tie-breaking vote. There is a strong convention within the U.S. Senate that the vice president not use his position as President of the Senate to influence the passage of legislation or act in a partisan manner, except in the case of breaking tie votes. As President of the Senate, John Adams cast twenty-nine tie-breaking votes—a record that no successor except for John C. Calhoun ever threatened. His votes protected the president's sole authority over the removal of appointees, influenced the location of the national capital, and prevented war with Great Britain. On at least one occasion he persuaded senators to vote against legislation that he opposed, and he frequently lectured the Senate on procedural and policy matters. Adams' political views and his active role in the Senate made him a natural target for critics of the Washington administration. Toward the end of his first term, as a result of a threatened resolution that would have silenced him except for procedural and policy matters, he began to exercise more restraint in the hope of realizing the goal shared by many of his successors: election in his own right as president of the United States of America. The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of the legislative branch of the United States government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... The Senate President only votes to break a tie. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... The Senate President only votes to break a tie. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ...


In modern times, the vice president rarely presides over day-to-day matters in the Senate; in his place, the Senate chooses a President pro tempore (or "president for a time") to preside in the Vice President's absence, and the Senate maintains a Duty Roster for the post, normally selecting the longest serving senator in the majority party. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ...


When the President is impeached, the Chief Justice of the United States of America presides over the Senate during the impeachment trial. Otherwise, the Vice President, in his capacity as President of the Senate, or the President pro tempore of the Senate presides. This may include the impeachment of the Vice President him- or herself, although legal theories suggest that allowing a person to be the judge in the case where he or she was the defendant wouldn't be permitted. If the Vice President did not preside over an impeachment, the duties would fall to the President Pro Tempore. Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ...


One duty required of President of the Senate is presiding over the counting and presentation of the votes of the U.S. Electoral College. This process occurs in the presence of both houses of Congress, on January 6 of the year following a U.S. presidential election. In this capacity, only four Vice Presidents have been able to announce their own election to the presidency: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Martin Van Buren, and George H. W. Bush. At the beginning of 1961, it fell to Richard Nixon to preside over this process, which officially announced the election of his 1960 opponent, John F. Kennedy, and in 2001, Al Gore announced the election of his opponent, George W. Bush. Nixon found himself in the opposite position in 1969, when Vice President Hubert Humphrey announced he had lost to Nixon. The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ...


Vice President John C. Calhoun became the first vice president to resign the office. He believed he would have more power as a senator. He had been dropped from the ticket by President Andrew Jackson in favor of Martin Van Buren. Already a lame-duck vice president, he was elected to the Senate by the South Carolina state legislature and resigned the vice presidency early to begin his Senate term. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...


Growth of the office

For much of its existence, the office of Vice President was seen as little more than a minor position. John Adams, the first vice president, described it as "the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived or his imagination conceived." Even 150 years later, 32nd Vice President John Nance Garner famously described the office as "not worth a pitcher of warm piss" (at the time reported with the bowdlerization "spit"). Thomas R. Marshall, the 28th Vice President, lamented: "Once there were two brothers. One went away to sea; the other was elected vice president. And nothing was heard of either of them again." When the Whig Party was looking for a vice president on Zachary Taylor's ticket, they approached Daniel Webster, who said of the offer "I do not intend to be buried until I am dead." The natural stepping stone to the Presidency was long considered to be the office of Secretary of State. For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... This article is about the urine of animals generally. ... Bowdlerise is a term inspired by Thomas Bowdler. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ...

Harry Truman had been Vice-President only three months when he became president; he was never informed of Franklin Roosevelt's war and postwar policies.
Harry Truman had been Vice-President only three months when he became president; he was never informed of Franklin Roosevelt's war and postwar policies.

For many years, the vice president was given few responsibilities. After John Adams attended a meeting of the president's Cabinet in 1791, no Vice President did so again until Thomas Marshall stood in for President Woodrow Wilson while he traveled to Europe in 1918 and 1919.[citation needed] Marshall's successor, Calvin Coolidge, was invited to meetings by President Warren G. Harding. The next Vice President, Charles G. Dawes, was not invited after declaring that "the precedent might prove injurious to the country." Vice President Charles Curtis was also precluded from attending by President Herbert Hoover. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... For the victim of Mt. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ...


Garret Hobart, the first Vice President under William McKinley, was one of the very few vice presidents at this time who played an important role in the administration. A close confidant and adviser of the President, Hobart was called Assistant to the President.[5] Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ...


In 1933, Roosevelt raised the stature of the office by renewing the practice of inviting the vice president to cabinet meetings, which has been maintained by every president since. Roosevelt's first vice president, John Nance Garner, broke with him at the start of the second term on the Court-packing issue and became Roosevelt's leading political enemy. Garner's successor, Henry Wallace, was given major responsibilities during the war, but he moved further to the left than the Democratic Party and the rest of the Roosevelt administration and was relieved of actual power. Roosevelt kept his last vice president, Harry Truman, uninformed on all war and postwar issues, such as the atomic bomb, leading Truman to wryly remark that the job of the vice president is to "go to weddings and funerals." The need to keep vice presidents informed on national security issues became clear, and Congress made the vice president one of four statutory members of the National Security Council in 1949. John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... The Judiciary Reorganization Bill of 1937, frequently called the Court-packing Bill, was a law proposed by United States President Franklin Roosevelt. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For the victim of Mt. ... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... The National Security Council (NSC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering national security and foreign policy matters with his senior national security advisors and cabinet officials. ...


Richard Nixon reinvented the office of vice president. He had the attention of the media and the Republican party, when Eisenhower ordered him to preside at Cabinet meetings in his absence. Nixon was also the first vice president to temporarily assume control of the executive branch; he did so after Eisenhower suffered a heart attack on September 24, 1955; ileitis in June 1956; and a stroke in November 1957. Nixon redirects here. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Crohns disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the alimentary tract and it can involve any part of it - from the mouth to the anus. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ...


President Jimmy Carter was the first president to formally give his vice president, Walter Mondale, an office in the West Wing of the White House. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... The West Wing (in foreground) The West Wing is the part of the White House Complex in which the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, and the Situation Room are located. ...


Succession and the 25th Amendment

President Lyndon Johnson is sworn in, following the assassination of President John Kennedy.
President Lyndon Johnson is sworn in, following the assassination of President John Kennedy.

The U.S. Constitution provides that should the president die or become disabled while in office, the "powers and duties" of the office are transferred to the vice president. Initially, it was unclear whether the vice president actually became the new president or merely acting president. This was first tested in 1841 with the death of President William Henry Harrison. Harrison's Vice President, John Tyler, asserted that he had succeeded to the full presidential office, powers, and title, and declined to acknowledge documents referring to him as "Acting President." Despite some strong calls against it, Tyler took the oath of office, becoming the tenth president. Tyler's claim was not challenged legally, and so the precedent of full succession was established. This was made explicit by Section 1 of the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1967. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1100, 324 KB) Description: Lyndon B. Johnson taking the oath of office on Air Force One following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Dallas, Texas, November 22, 1963 ARC identifier for use at NARA: 194235 Photographer: Cecil Stoughton Date: November 22... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1100, 324 KB) Description: Lyndon B. Johnson taking the oath of office on Air Force One following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Dallas, Texas, November 22, 1963 ARC identifier for use at NARA: 194235 Photographer: Cecil Stoughton Date: November 22... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the...


One issue that could not be addressed without the adoption of a constitutional amendment was the status of the vice presidency in the event that the vice president died in office, resigned, or succeeded to the presidency. The original Constitution had no provision for selecting a replacement, so the office of vice president remained vacant until the beginning of the next presidential and vice presidential terms. This issue had arisen most recently with the assassination of President Kennedy on November 22, 1963, and was rectified by section 2 of the 25th Amendment. Kennedy Assassination redirects here. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


The other remaining issue was the question of who has the power to declare that an incapacitated president is unable to discharge his duties. This question had arisen most recently with the illnesses of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Sections 3 and 4 of the 25th Amendment provided procedures for the transfer of power to the vice president in case of presidential disability. Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...

Chief Justice Warren Burger (right) swears in President Gerald Ford next to his wife, Betty Ford, following the resignation of President Richard Nixon
Chief Justice Warren Burger (right) swears in President Gerald Ford next to his wife, Betty Ford, following the resignation of President Richard Nixon

Section 2 of the 25th Amendment provides that "Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress." Gerald Ford was the first Vice President selected by this method, after the resignation of Vice President Spiro Agnew in 1973; after succeeding to the Presidency, Ford nominated Nelson Rockefeller as vice president. Caption: Gerald R. Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Mrs. ... Caption: Gerald R. Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Mrs. ... Warren Burger at a press conference in May 1969 shortly after he was nominated to be Chief Justice of the United States. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Betty Fords official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio Elizabeth Anne Bloomer Warren Ford (born April 8, 1918) is the widow of former United States President Gerald R. Ford and was the First Lady from 1974 to 1977. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ...


Sections 3 and 4 of the amendment provide means for the vice president to become Acting President upon the temporary disability of the president. Section 3 deals with self declared incapacity of the president, and section 4 deals with incapacity declared by the joint action of the Vice President and of a majority of the Cabinet. While section 4 has never been invoked, section 3 has been invoked three times: on July 13, 1985 when Ronald Reagan underwent surgery to remove cancerous polyps from his colon, and twice more on June 29, 2002 and July 21, 2007 when George W. Bush underwent colonoscopy procedures requiring sedation. Prior to this amendment, Vice President Richard Nixon informally replaced President Dwight Eisenhower for a period of weeks on each of three occasions when Eisenhower was ill. Acting President of the United States is a temporary office in the U.S. government, established under the auspices of the Constitution, particularly its 25th Amendment (ratified in 1967). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Reagan redirects here. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


Vice Presidents of the United States of America

See also: List of Vice Presidents of the United States

Prior to ratification of the 25th Amendment in 1967, no provision existed for filling a vacancy in the office of vice president. As a result, the vice presidency was left vacant 16 times (sometimes for nearly four years) until the next ensuing election and inauguration -- 8 times due to the death of the sitting president, resulting in the vice president becoming president; 7 times due to the death of the sitting vice president; and once due to the resignation of Vice President John C. Calhoun to become a senator. Since the adoption of the 25th Amendment, the office has been vacant twice while awaiting confirmation of the new vice president by both houses of Congress. This list includes those who have served as the Vice President of the United States since the first administration in 1789 and as recently as the current administration in 2007. ... Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and established procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the Vice President as well as responding to Presidential disabilities. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Congress in Joint Session. ...


Former Vice Presidents

As of 2008 four former Vice Presidents are alive: 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bush was elected President, while Mondale and Gore were unsuccessful nominees of their parties. Quayle briefly sought the Republican nomination. Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Former Vice Presidents are entitled to lifetime pension, but unlike former Presidents they are not entitled to Secret Service personal protection.[6] However, they unofficially receive Secret Service protection for up to six months after leaving office.[7] USSS redirects here. ...


Also former Democratic Vice Presidents are ex officio superdelegates to the Democratic National Convention. The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Superdelegate is an informal term for some of the delegates to the Democratic National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Democratic Party. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


Vice Presidential facts

Longevity
Age while in office
  • John C. Breckinridge, the youngest ever to serve, was 36 when he became vice president in 1857.
  • Alben W. Barkley, the oldest ever to serve, was 75 when he left the vice presidency in 1953.
Two served under two different Presidents
John C. Calhoun was the first vice president to resign from office.
John C. Calhoun was the first vice president to resign from office.
Seven died in office
Two resigned
Three were the apparent target of an assassination attempt (all three unsuccessful)
Two shot a man while serving as Vice President
Two were never elected to the office
  • Gerald Ford was nominated to office upon the resignation of Spiro Agnew in 1973. Following Richard Nixon's resignation, he became the first, and so far the only, person to become the President without having been elected to national executive office.
  • Nelson Rockefeller was nominated to office upon the succession of Gerald Ford to the Presidency in 1974.
Nine succeeded to the Presidency
  1. John Tyler became President when William Harrison died. Chose not to seek full term.
  2. Millard Fillmore became President when Zachary Taylor died. Sought the Whig nomination in 1852, but lost to Winfield Scott. Four years later, ran and lost as the candidate of the American and Whig Parties.
  3. Andrew Johnson became President when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. Sought the Democratic nomination in 1868, but was unsuccessful.
  4. Chester A. Arthur became President when James Garfield was assassinated. Sought a full term, but was not re-nominated.
  5. Theodore Roosevelt became President when William McKinley was assassinated; then was elected to full term. Didn't seek re-election. Four years after leaving office, ran again and lost.
  6. Calvin Coolidge became President when Warren Harding died; then was elected to full term. Did not seek re-election.
  7. Harry S. Truman became President when Franklin D. Roosevelt died; then was elected to full term. Did not seek re-election.
  8. Lyndon B. Johnson became President when John F. Kennedy was assassinated; then was elected to full term. Did not seek re-election.
  9. Gerald Ford became President when Richard Nixon resigned; then lost election to full term.
Four sitting Vice Presidents were elected President
  1. John Adams (1789-1797) was elected President in 1796.
  2. Thomas Jefferson (1797-1801) was elected President in 1800.
  3. Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) was elected President in 1836.
  4. George H. W. Bush (1981-1989) was elected President in 1988.
One non-sitting former Vice President was elected President

Nixon is the only person to be elected as Vice President for two terms and President for two terms. Because Nixon resigned during his second presidential term, no one has yet served more than one full term as Vice President and more than one full term as President. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt died shortly into his fourth term, it is Nixon who held nationally elected office for the longest duration, out-serving Roosevelt by a little more than a year and five months, although not consecutively. John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Image File history File links JohnCCalhoun. ... Image File history File links JohnCCalhoun. ... This page is for the Vice President George Clinton. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This page is for the Vice President George Clinton. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Nolo contendere, in criminal trials, in some common law jurisdictions, is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The 2007 Bagram Air Base bombing was a suicide attack that had killed up to 23 people and injured 20 more at the Bagram air base in Afghanistan, while Dick Cheney, the Vice President of the United States, was visiting. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... Alexander Hamilton (November 20, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, political economist,] financier, and political theorist. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A contemporary artistic rendering of the July 11, 1804 duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton by J. Mund. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... This article is about the Texas attorney. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... On February 11, 2006, U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney shot Harry Whittington, a 78-year-old Texas attorney, while participating in a quail hunt on a ranch in Kenedy County, Texas. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... John Tyler, Jr. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th (1921-1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...

Only one president had more than two different Vice Presidents
  1. John Nance Garner
  2. Henry A. Wallace
  3. Harry S. Truman were all Vice Presidents to Franklin D. Roosevelt
Two have been Acting President
  1. George H. W. Bush acted as President for Ronald Reagan on July 13, 1985.
  2. Dick Cheney has acted twice as President for George W. Bush, on June 29, 2002 and July 21, 2007.

They officially acted as President due to presidential incapacity under the 25th Amendment. John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Reagan redirects here. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the...

Living former Vice Presidents
  1. Walter Mondale
  2. George H. W. Bush
  3. Dan Quayle
  4. Al Gore

Of these, Bush was later elected President. Mondale and Gore were nominated by their parties, and ran for President unsuccessfully, while Quayle was unable to get the necessary support in order to do so. Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...

Vice Presidents who became Nobel Peace Prize Laureates
  1. Theodore Roosevelt 1906 (when he was the President)
  2. Charles Gates Dawes 1925
  3. Al Gore 2007 (after he left the office)
Three were named Johnson
  1. Richard Mentor Johnson
  2. Andrew Johnson
  3. Lyndon B. Johnson
Seven served two full terms
  1. John Adams
  2. Daniel Tompkins
  3. Thomas R. Marshall
  4. John Garner
  5. Richard Nixon
  6. George H. W. Bush
  7. Al Gore
Flag of the Vice President of the United States of America
Flag of the Vice President of the United States of America

Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865–April 23, 1951) was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Portrait of U.S. Vice President Daniel D Tompkins Daniel D[ecius?] Tompkins (June 21, 1774–June 11, 1825) was entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868–November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...

See also

The Vice Presidential Service Badge is a U.S. military badge of the Department of Defense. ... Lynne Cheney, the current Second Lady of the United States The Second Lady of the United States is an unofficial title for the wife of the Vice President of the United States styled relatively to the formal title of the First Lady who is wife to the President and principal...

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Vice President" may also be written "Vice-President", "Vice president" or "Vice-president". Because the modern usage is "Vice President", it has been used here for consistency.
  2. ^ Safire, William (1997-10-12). On Language; Potus and Flotus. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  3. ^ <a href="http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/electoral-college/scores.html#1988">U.S. National Archives Web Site, Electoral College</a>
  4. ^ Vice Squads: The New Yorker
  5. ^ Garret Hobart
  6. ^ Internet Public Library: FARQs
  7. ^ CNN.com

For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Vice President of the United States

Further reading

  • Tally, Steve (1992). Bland Ambition: From Adams to Quayle--The Cranks, Criminals, Tax Cheats, and Golfers Who Made It to Vice President. Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-613140-4. 
For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This list includes only those persons who were sworn into office as President of the United States following the ratification of the United States Constitution, which took effect in 1789. ... The following list is based upon the persons age at the time of ascension to the office, not election to the Presidency. ... The Seal of the President of the United States The following is two lists of U.S. Presidents, organized by Date of Birth and Birthday. ... This is a complete list of United States Presidents by date of death. ... Sculptor Gutzon Borglum and Presidents Calvin Coolidge selected Washington, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Lincoln to appear on Mount Rushmore. ... The United States Constitution names the President of the United States the Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. armed forces. ... This is the list of all of the living people who have served as President of the United States at each moment in US history. ... This is a chronology of who was the oldest living President of the United States, former or current, at any given time. ... This is a list of United States Presidents by time in office. ... The following table illustrates the life span and terms of the U.S. presidents from the birth of George Washington until the present. ... This article is intended to be a comprehensive list of all presidents, grouped by political party. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by political occupation; that is, a list of various other political offices held by Presidents of the United States. ... This is a list of the previous Executive Experience of Presidents before they became President of the United States. ... Inauguration Day 2005 on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. ... Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States are given each time that a United States President is inaugurated. ... United States Presidential doctrines are key goals, attitudes, or stances for United States foreign affairs outlined by many Presidents that were subsequently dubbed their doctrines during the 20th century. ... The following is partial list of people pardoned by a United States president. ... The word veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation by the Congress of the United States to be presented to the President of the United States for his approval. ... In United States history, the degree to which the President has the same party alignment as the House and Senate determines his power (e. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidential assassination attempts. ... George Washington and Calvin Coolidge on the 1926 Sesquicentennial of American Independence commemorative half dollar This is a complete list of Presidents of the United States by currency appearances on official banknotes, coins for circulation and commemorative coins of the United States, Confederate States of America, Philippine Islands, and the... This is a list of United States Presidential libraries. ... List of United States Presidential names contains lists of nicknames, name origins, and the first, middle and last names of each President of the United States. ... // This is a list of United States Presidents who are related to each other by direct descent. ... This is a list of United States Presidents college educations. ... The United States Constitution names the President of the United States the commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces. ... This is a list of pets belonging to various US Presidents and their families, while serving their term(s) in office. ... States shown by number of US Presidents born there This is a list of Presidents of the United States by place of birth. ... This is a list of U.S. Presidents by place of primary affiliation. ... This is a list of the occupations of Presidents before they entered politics. ... This is a list of the religious affiliations of Presidents of the United States. ... This is an incomplete list of U.S. presidential residences, which are not the official residences (the White House or Camp David). ... This is a list of children of U.S. Presidents, step-children, adopted children, and alleged illegitimate children included. ... This list includes those who have served as the Vice President of the United States since the first administration in 1789 and as recently as the current administration in 2007. ... This is a complete list of United States Vice Presidents by time in office. ... List of the Vice Presidents of the United States by age of ascension to the office: John Adams (53-year old) Thomas Jefferson (53) Aaron Burr (45) George Clinton (65) Elbridge Gerry (68) Daniel D. Tompkins (42) John C. Calhoun (42) Martin Van Buren (50) Richard M. Johnson (56) John... This is a list of U.S. Vice Presidents by date of birth. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... At 50 years, 355 days, Daniel Tompkins was the shortest-lived Vice President. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This is a list of U.S. Vice Presidents by place of primary affiliation. ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ... A designated survivor is a member of the United States Cabinet who stays at a physically distant, secure, undisclosed location when the countrys top leaders, including the president are gathered at a single location such as during State of the Union Addresses and presidential inaugurations, in order to maintain... The table below is a list of United States presidential elections ordered by margin of victory in the Electoral College vote. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a list of 2004 U.S. presidential electors, by state. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... [1] Died in office. ... This is a list of heights of United States presidential candidates. ... The following is a list of major party U.S. presidential candidates who lost their home state. ... This is a list of former United States Presidents who actively campaigned to regain political office (the presidency, a seat in congress or governor) after leaving office. ... This is a list of unsuccessful candidates for the office of President of the United States. ... Since the office of President of the United States is somewhat hallowed, fiction writers often choose to invent a president in their stories to prevent a real one from being possibly insulted, to avoid having their stories become outdated over time, for dramatic license, or to provide literary flexibility. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This is a list of fictional candidates who ran for the office of President of the United States. ... The somewhat elaborate rules and laws governing succession to the Presidency have long provided fodder for creators of fiction. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... This is a list of First Ladies of the United States by longevity, followed by a list of women who were married to Presidents but never became First Ladies. ... This is the list of all of the living First Ladies of the United States at each moment in US history. ... Lynne Cheney, the current Second Lady of the United States The Second Lady of the United States is an unofficial title for the wife of the Vice President of the United States styled relatively to the formal title of the First Lady who is wife to the President and principal... The Executive Office of the President (EOP) consists of the immediate staff of the President of the United States, as well as multiple levels of support staff reporting to the President. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... The Deputy White House Chief of Staff is the top aide to the White House Chief of Staff, who is the senior aide to the President of the United States. ... The White House Press Secretary is a senior White House official with a rank one step below Presidential Cabinet level. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... The White House Communications Director is responsible for developing and promoting the voice of the administration. ... ... The White House Office of the Executive Clerk was created in 1865. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... The National Security Council (NSC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering national security and foreign policy matters with his senior national security advisors and cabinet officials. ... The Homeland Security Council (HSC) is an entity within the Executive Office of the President of the United States and was created by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 1 (HSPD-1) on October 29, 2001. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government that falls within the Executive Office of the President. ... The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), a component of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, was established in 1988 by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act. ... The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) is a group of economists set up to advise the President of the United States. ... The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) is a division of the White House that coordinates federal environmental efforts in the United States and works closely with agencies and other White House offices in the development of environmental and energy policies and initiatives. ... The Domestic Policy Council (DPC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering domestic policy matters, excluding economic matters which are the domain of the National Economic Council. ... The National Economic Council (NEC) is a United States government agency. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (OFBCI) is a department under the Office of the President of the United States that was established by President George W. Bush through Executive Order on January 29, 2001, and which represents one of the key domestic policies of Bush... Congress established Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. ... The Presidents Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board (PFIAB) is part of the Executive Office of the President of the United States. ... George W. Bush speaks in front of a USA Freedom Corps display. ... The Director of the White House Military Office (WHMO) is the principal advisor to the White House for all military support. ... Image File history File links Seal_Of_The_President_Of_The_Unites_States_Of_America. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vice President of the United States - MSN Encarta (1395 words)
The vice president assumes the top position if the president dies in office, resigns, becomes unable to do his or her job, or is removed from office through impeachment.
Nine vice presidents have assumed the presidency upon the death or resignation of the president.
In such cases, the president may hand over power to the vice president by sending a written message to the Congress of the United States stating that he or she is unable to carry out the presidential duties.
Vice President - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
In politics, a vice president is a politician whose primary function is to replace the president on the event of his or her death or resignation.
Vice Presidents are often elected jointly with the president as his or her running mate, elected separately, or appointed independently after the president's election.
In Germany, the de facto vice president is the President of the Bundesrat (upper house) and in France it is the speaker of the Senate.
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