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Encyclopedia > Veterans Stadium
Philadelphia Veterans Stadium
"The Vet"

Location 3501 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19148 (now demolished)
Broke ground October 2, 1967
Opened April 10, 1971
Closed September 28, 2003
Demolished March 21, 2004
Owner City of Philadelphia
Operator Department of Recreation
Surface AstroTurf (1971-2000)
NexTurf (2001-2003)
Construction cost $50 million (US)
Architect Hugh Stubbins and Associates
Tenants
Philadelphia Phillies (NL) (1971-2003)
Philadelphia Eagles (NFL) (1971-2002)
Philadelphia Atoms (NASL) (1973-1975)
Philadelphia Fury (NASL) (1978-1980)

Philadelphia Stars (USFL) (1983-1984)
Temple University (NCAA) (1978-2002) Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Veterans Stadium (full name Veterans Memorial Stadium) is a multi-use stadium in New Britain, Connecticut. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 564 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 722 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about artificial grass. ... Citigroup Center in New York Hugh Asher Stubbins Jr. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert (official) Andy Reid (de facto) Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... NFL redirects here. ... The Philadelphia Atoms were a soccer team based out of Philadelphia that played in the North American Soccer League (NASL). ... North American Soccer League or (NASL) was a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada that operated from 1968 to 1984. ... The Philadelphia Fury were a soccer team based out of Philadelphia that played in the NASL. They played from 1978 to 1980. ... The Philadelphia Stars (later Baltimore Stars) were a professional American football team which played in the United States Football League in the mid-1980s. ... “USFL” redirects here. ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

Capacity
62,306 (baseball, 2003)
65,386 (football, 2002)
Dimensions
Left field - 330 feet (100.6 m)
Left center - 371 feet (113 m)
Center field - 408 feet (124.3 m)
Right Center - 371 feet (113 m)
Right field - 330 feet (100.6 m)
Home plate to backstop - 54 feet (2003)
First and Third Base to Dugouts - 45 feet

Philadelphia Veterans Stadium (informally called "The Vet") was a professional sports facility located at the northeast corner of Broad Street and Pattison Avenue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It housed the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League from 1971 through 2002 and the National League's Philadelphia Phillies from 1971 through 2003. The listed capacity for baseball in 1971 was 56,371 and for football was listed with a 62,000 seat capacity. The 1976 and 1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Games were held at the venue. The Vet also hosted the annual Army-Navy football game 17 times, first in 1976 and last in 2001. In addition, numerous concerts were performed here by artists ranging from The Rolling Stones to Bruce Springsteen to 'N Sync and religious events from annual Jehovah's Witnesses conventions to a Billy Graham crusade in 1992. The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert (official) Andy Reid (de facto) Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... NFL redirects here. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... M*A*S*H, see The Army-Navy Game (M*A*S*H episode). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... N Sync (also stylized *NSYNC) was an American boy band, widely regarded as one of the most successful pop acts of the late 90s and early 2000s, selling over 56 million records worldwide. ... The Reverend William Franklin Graham, Jr. ...

Contents

History

Philadelphia voters approved a $25 million bond issue for a new stadium in 1964, but had to go to the polls yet again in 1967 and approve another $13 million due to cost overruns. At a total cost of $50 million, it was one of the most expensive ballparks to date.


The stadium was named by Philadelphia's City Council for the veterans of all wars in 1968, and originally scheduled to open in 1970. However, the opening was delayed a year due to a combination of bad weather and cost overruns. The stadium's design was nearly circular, and was known as an "octorad" design, which attempted to facilitate both football and baseball, unfortunately, as was the case with other cities in which this so-called "cookie-cutter" approach was employed (Washington, New York, Houston, Atlanta, St. Louis, San Diego, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh), the fundamentally different shapes of the playing fields made the stadium inadequate to the needs of either sport. RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., a typical cookie-cutter stadium. ... Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, informally known as RFK Stadium, is a sports stadium that opened in 1961. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... The Reliant Astrodome, formerly just the Astrodome, is a domed sports stadium in Houston, Texas, and is part of the Reliant Park complex. ... Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium was a baseball, football and soccer stadium that formerly stood in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Busch Memorial Stadium, or Busch Stadium was the home of the St. ... Qualcomm Stadium (a. ... For Riverfront Stadium located in Newark, New Jersey see Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium Riverfront Stadium, later known as Cinergy Field (1970 - 2002) was the home of the Cincinnati Reds National League baseball team and the Cincinnati Bengals National Football League team. ... Three Rivers Stadium was a multi-purpose sports stadium and event facility located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1970 through 2000. ...


Veterans Stadium was a complicated structure, its seating layered in seven separate levels. The lowest, or "100 Level," extended only part way around the structure, between roughly the 25-yard lines for football games and near the two dugouts for baseball. The "200 Level" comprised field-level boxes, and the "300 Level" housed what were labeled "Terrace Boxes. " These three levels collectively made up the "Lower Stands." The "400 Level" was reserved for the press and dignitaries; the upper level began with "500 Level" (or "Loge Boxes"), the "600 Level" (Upper reserved, or individual seats), and finally, the infamous "700 Level" (General Admission for baseball), where some of the most passionate sports fans on the East Coast could be found. Originally, the seats were in shades of brown, terra cotta, orange and yellow, to look like an autumn day, but in 1995 and 1996, blue seats replaced the fall-hued ones. The 700 Level referred to the cheap seats in the upper deck of Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


At one time, the stadium could seat almost 71,000 people for football, but restructuring in the late 1980s brought capacity down to around 66,000.


The stadium was harshly criticized by baseball purists. Even by "cookie-cutter" standards, the upper deck was exceptionally high, and many of the seats in that area were so far from the field that it was difficult to see the game without binoculars. As was the case in most cookie-cutter stadiums, foul territory was quite roomy. While the Vet's size enabled the Phillies to shatter previous attendance records, during the years the Phillies weren't doing as well even crowds of 35,000 looked sparse. Approximately 70 percent of the seats were in foul territory, adding to the Vet's cavernous feel. There was no dirt in the infield except for sliding pits around the bases. In the autumn, the football markings were clearly visible in the spacious outfield area.


The Vet had been known for providing both the Eagles and the Phillies with great home-field advantage. In particular, the acoustics greatly enhanced the crowd noise on the field, making it nearly impossible for opposing teams to audible.


Playing surface

The field's surface, originally composed of AstroTurf, contained many gaps and uneven patches. In several places, seams were clearly visible, giving it the nickname "Field of Seams." It perennially drew the ranking of the "NFL's worst field" in player surveys conducted by the NFL Players Association, and visiting players often fell prey to the treacherous conditions resulting in numerous injuries. The NFLPA reportedly threatened to sue the city for the poor conditions, and many sports agents told the Eagles not to even consider signing or drafting their clients. The Eagles, for their part, complained to the city on numerous occasions about the conditions at the stadium. This article is about artificial grass. ... The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ...


Baseball players also complained about the surface. It was much harder than other AstroTurf surfaces, and the shock of running on it often caused back pain.


Two of the most publicized came six years to the day of each other:

  • October 10, 1993: Bears receiver Wendell Davis had his cleat get caught in a seam while running a simple pass route. He tore both of his patella tendons, ending his career.
  • October 10, 1999: Michael Irvin suffered the neck injury that led to his premature retirement (The previously winless Eagles rallied from a 10-0 deficit and won 13-10.).

The original AstroTurf was eventually replaced by a new surface, NexTurf, in 2001. The new surface was far softer, and reportedly much easier on the knees. However, the city crew that installed the new turf didn't install it properly, resulting in seams being visible in several places. is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Wendell Tyrone Davis (born January 3, 1966 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a former professional American football wide receiver who played for the Chicago Bears for six seasons from 1988 to 1993. ... The patella or kneecap is a thick, triangular bone which articulates with the femur and covers and protects the front of the knee joint. ... A tendon (or sinew) is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone and is built to withstand tension. ... Michael Jerome Irvin (born March 5, 1966 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida) is a former American football player for the Dallas Cowboys, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on August 4th, 2007. ...


The first football game on the new turf was due to take place on August 13, 2001 when the Eagles played the Baltimore Ravens. However, Ravens coach Brian Billick refused to let the Ravens take the field for warm-ups when he discovered a trench around an area where third base was covered up by a NexTurf cutout. City crews tried to fix the problem to no avail, forcing the game to be canceled. Later, players from both teams reported that they sunk into the turf in locations near the infield cutouts. Team president Joe Banner was irate after the game, calling the Vet's conditions "absolutely unacceptable" and "an embarrassment to the city of Philadelphia." City officials, however, promised that the stadium would be suitable for play when the regular season started. is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... Brian Billick (February 28, 1954) has been the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League since January 19, 1999. ... Joe Banner (born February 13, 1953) is a President/Chief Operating Officer for the Philadelphia Eagles. ...


The problem was caused by heavy rain over the weekend prior to the game, which made the dirt in the sliding pits and pitcher's mound so soft that the cutouts covering them in the football configuration became mushy and uneven. Even when new dirt was shoveled on top, it quickly became just as saturated as the old dirt. The problem was solved by using asphalt hot mix, which allowed for a solid, level playing surface, but required a jackhammer for removal whenever the stadium was converted from football back to baseball (between August and October of each year).


First Phillies game

The Phillies played their first game at the Vet on Saturday, April 10, 1971. The Phils beat Montreal, 4-1, before 55,352. Hall of Famer Jim Bunning was the winning pitcher while Bill Stoneman took the loss. Boots Day opened the game by grounding out to Bunning. Larry Bowa had the stadium's first hit and Don Money hit the first home run. James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ...


Memorable events

An empty Veterans Stadium after one of U2's Zoo TV Tour shows in 1992.
An empty Veterans Stadium after one of U2's Zoo TV Tour shows in 1992.

One of the most notable events in the Vet's history was Game 6 of the 1980 World Series on Oct. 21. In that game, the Phillies clinched their first world championship with a victory over the Kansas City Royals in front of 65,838 fans. Arguably the most memorable moment in Phillies history was Tug McGraw's strikeout of the Royals' Willie Wilson to clinch the series. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 544 pixelsFull resolution (1703 × 1158 pixel, file size: 173 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Veterans Stadium after completion of U2s Zoo TV show. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 544 pixelsFull resolution (1703 × 1158 pixel, file size: 173 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Veterans Stadium after completion of U2s Zoo TV show. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... For the fan club-exclusive album released from this tour, see Zoo TV Live. ... haha ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ...


The Phillies also went on to clinch the National League Championship Series at The Vet twice; the first was in 1983 over local legend Tommy Lasorda and his Los Angeles Dodgers. The second came in the 1993 National League Championship Series over future divisional rivals the Atlanta Braves, which was the last LCS with a two-division format. In Major League Baseball, the National League Championship Series (NLCS) determines who wins the National League pennant and advances to baseballs championship, the World Series, facing the winner of the American League Championship Series. ... Tommy Lasorda, 2006 photo by Phil Konstantin Thomas Charles Lasorda (born September 22, 1927 in Norristown, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League baseball pitcher and manager. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Series MVP Curt Schilling allowed only two runs in two starts The 1993 National League Championship Series was played between the Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston...


The Phillies hurled two no-hit games, the only nine-inning no-nos in stadium history and both coming against the San Francisco Giants: the first by Terry Mulholland on August 15, 1990, in a 6-0 Phillies win[1], the other on April 27, 2003, by Kevin Millwood in a 1-0 win[2], upstaging the Phillie Phanatic's Birthday promotion that afternoon. A five-inning no-hitter curtailed by rain in 1988 by Montréal Expos pitcher Pascual Pérez was not recognized after the 1990 season due to rules changes requiring that no-hitters had to be at least nine innings and a complete game. These are now listed as a separate section in the MLB record book. Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Terry Mulholland (born Terence John Mulholland on March 9, 1963 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania) is a Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kevin Austin Millwood (born December 24, 1974 in Gastonia, North Carolina) is a Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who plays for the Texas Rangers . ... Image:Phanatic. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Montreal Expos were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 to 2004. ... Pascual Gross Perez (nicknamed I-285) (born May 17, 1957 in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic) was a right-handed baseball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Atlanta Braves, Montreal Expos, and New York Yankees. ...


The most notable football game ever played at The Vet took place less than three months after the Phillies' title, and was the Eagles' 20-7 victory over the hated Dallas Cowboys in the 1980 NFC Championship Game, actually played on January 11, 1981 in front of 71,250 fans. This contest was famous because the Eagles chose to wear their white jerseys for their home game in order to force the Cowboys into their "unlucky" blue jerseys. City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Silver, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1966) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present... The 1980 NFL season was the 61st regular season of the National Football League. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


The final football game played at the Vet was the Eagles' loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFC Championship game on January 19, 2003, as the team moved into Lincoln Financial Field the following autumn. This May 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lincoln Financial Field, familiarly known as The Linc, is the home stadium of the National Football Leagues Philadelphia Eagles. ...


In 1971, Willie Stargell hit the longest home run in stadium history. The spot where the ball landed was marked with a yellow star with a black "S" inside a white circle until Stargell's 2001 death, when the white circle was painted black. The star remained until the stadium's 2004 demolition. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 31 - The new Special Veterans Committee selects seven men for enshrinement to the Hall of Fame: former players Dave Bancroft, Jake Beckley, Chick Hafey, Harry Hooper, Joe Kelley, Rube Marquard, and executive George Weiss. ... Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... This article is about the baseball concept. ...


During the 1998 Army-Navy game, a serious accident occurred when a support rail collapsed and eight West Point cadets were injured. That led to the call for new stadiums for football and baseball for the main stadium tenants. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ...


Another game that is best remembered by Eagles fans was known as "The Body Bag Game", which took place on November 12, 1990, when the Washington Redskins visited The Vet for a Monday Night Football game. The Eagles' head coach at that time, Buddy Ryan, was quoted as saying that the Redskins' offense would "have to be carted off in body bags". The Eagles number-one defense scored three touchdowns in a 28-14 win and knocked nine Redskin players out of the game, including both of their quarterbacks. The Redskins were forced to finish the game using running back/returner Brian Mitchell (who would become an Eagles player over a decade later) at quarterback. is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... Buddy Ryan (born James David Ryan on February 17, 1934) is a former American football coach. ... Brian Keith Mitchell (born August 18, 1968 in Fort Polk, Louisiana) is a former American football player who played running back for the Washington Redskins (1990-1999), and later the Philadelphia Eagles (2000-2002) and New York Giants (2003). ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ...


Additionally, Veteran's Stadium was host to the latest finishing game in baseball history, a double-header between the Phillies and the Padres in 1993 which was famously interrupted multiple times by rain showers, and which the Padres won the first game of, and led in the second, but resulted a come-from-behind victory for the Phillies in the tenth inning off an RBI single by Phillies closing pitcher Mitch Williams. The game ended at 4:40 AM. RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mitchell Steven Williams (born November 17, 1964, in Santa Ana, California) was a baseball relief pitcher who appeared for six teams in Major League Baseball from 1986 to 1997. ...


Fans

Virginia Tech and Temple meet at the Vet in 2001
Virginia Tech and Temple meet at the Vet in 2001

Fans who attended games in Veterans Stadium for a football game gained a reputation of being among the most vociferous in sports, especially those in the notorious 700 Level, the highest seating level in the stadium prior to the erection of luxury skyboxes behind that seating area. The stadium became famous for the rowdiness of Eagles fans, although the incident in which fans booed Santa Claus for failing to leave the field following a halftime show occurred in 1968 at Franklin Field. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 545 pixelsFull resolution (2308 × 1571 pixel, file size: 696 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 545 pixelsFull resolution (2308 × 1571 pixel, file size: 696 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Virginia Techs football team plays home games in Lane Stadium, considered one of the loudest stadiums in the country and recognized in 2005 by rivals. ... Logo Version - Temple Owl The Temple University football program is one of the most intriguing ones in all of college football. ... The 700 Level referred to the cheap seats in the upper deck of Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... A halftime show is a performance given between the first and second halves or the 2nd and 3rd quarters of a sporting event. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franklin Field is the University of Pennsylvanias stadium for football, field hockey, lacrosse, sprint football, and track and field (and formerly for soccer). ...


Perhaps no game is more well-known for the fans' behavior than the 1989 follow-up game to what many called "The Bounty Bowl". On Thanksgiving Day (November 23) that year, the Eagles beat the Cowboys at Texas Stadium in which former Eagles placekicker Luis Zendejas left the game with a concussion following a hard tackle by linebacker Jesse Small after a kickoff. After the game, Cowboys rookie head coach Jimmy Johnson commented that Eagles coach Buddy Ryan instituted a bounty on Zendejas and Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman. Two weeks later, on December 10, they played the rematch dubbed "Bounty Bowl II" at The Vet, which was covered with snow in the stands. The volatile mix of beer, the "bounty" and the intense hatred for "America's Team" (who were 1-15 that season) led to fans throwing snowballs at Dallas players and coaches. Beer sales were banned after that incident for two games. A similar incident a few years later at Giants Stadium during a nationally telecast San Diego Chargers-New York Giants game led the NFL to rule that seating areas must be cleared of snow within a certain time period before kickoff. See also: 1988 in sports, other events of 1989, 1990 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Darrell Waltrip won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Rusty Wallace CART Racing - season championship won by Emerson Fittipaldi Indianapolis 500 - Emerson Fittipaldi Formula One Championship - Alain... Bounty Bowl, the infamous NFL Thanksgiving Day game in Dallas when the Philadelphia Eagles supposedly put a $200 bounty on Dallas Cowboys kicker Luis Zendejas, cut by Philladelphia earlier that season. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Texas Stadium is the home field of the National Football Leagues Dallas Cowboys. ... Luis Zendejas (born October 22, 1961) was an American football player. ... “Cerebral Concussion” redirects here. ... This article relates to sports. ... Jimmy Johnson (born August 14, 1943 in Port Arthur, Texas) is an American football coach and broadcaster. ... Troy Kenneth Aikman (born November 21, 1966 in West Covina, California) // The youngest of three children, Aikman was born in West Covina, California on November 21, 1966 to Charlyn and Kenneth Aikman, and lived in Cerritos, California until age 12, when his family moved to a farm in Henryetta, Oklahoma. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bounty Bowl II, the snowball-riddled rematch of the infamous NFL Thanksgiving Day Bounty Bowl game in Dallas when the Philadelphia Eagles supposedly put a $200 bounty on Dallas Cowboys kicker Luis Zendejas. ... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which... “Chargers” redirects here. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ...


The Eagles fans' behavior during a Monday Night Football loss to the San Francisco 49ers in 1997 and a Dallas Cowboys game a year later was such that the City of Philadelphia assigned a Municipal Court Judge, Seamus McCaffrey, to The Vet on game days to deal with fans removed from the stands. Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Seamus McCaffrey is a former Philadelphia municipal court judge, who ran the infamous Eagles Court. Located beneath Veterans Stadium, the Court was established to deal with unruly fans of the Philadelphia Eagles football team in the middle of the 1998 season. ...


Final game and demolition

The final game ever played at the stadium was on September 28, 2003. The Phillies lost to the Atlanta Braves that afternoon, but a ceremony that followed pulled at the heartstrings of the sellout crowd. Both former general manager Paul "Pope" Owens and Tug McGraw made their final public appearances at the park that day. Later that winter, both men died. The last publicly-broadcast words ever uttered in the park were by veteran announcer Harry Kalas, who helped open the facility on April 10, 1971, paraphrasing his trademark home run call: "And now, Veterans Stadium is like a 3-1 pitch to Jim Thome or Mike Schmidt. It's on a looooooong drive...IT'S OUTTA HERE!!!" The team moved into Citizens Bank Park in 2004, with the first game being played there on April 12, 2004. is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Francis Owens (February 7, 1924 - December 26, 2003) was an American front office executive and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Frank Edwin Tug McGraw Jr. ... Harry Norbert Kalas (born March 26, 1936) is an American sportscaster, best known for his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseballs Philadelphia Phillies, National Football League radio broadcasts by Westwood One and as voice-over narrator for NFL Films, a regular feature on HBO... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... James Howard Jim Thome (born August 27, 1970 in Peoria, Illinois) is a Major League Baseball player who currently plays for the Chicago White Sox. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Citizens Bank Park is a 43,647-seat baseball-only stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that opened on April 3, 2004 and hosted its first regular season baseball game on April 12 of that same year, as the tenants of the facility, the Philadelphia Phillies lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 4... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The ultimate end came when the 33-year old stadium was imploded on March 21, 2004. A parking lot for the current sporting facilities was constructed in 2004 and 2005 at the site. On June 6, 2005, the anniversary of D-Day, a plaque and monument to commemorate the spot where the stadium stood and a memorial for all veterans was dedicated by the Phillies before their game against the Arizona Diamondbacks. On September 28 of that same year, the second anniversary of the final game, a historical marker commemorating where the ballpark once stood was dedicated. Granite spaces marking the former locations of home plate, the pitching mound, and the three bases for baseball, as well as the goalpost placements for football, were added onto the parking lot in April 2006 in western parking lot U.
is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) West Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Arizona Diamondbacks (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-backs, The Snakes Ballpark Chase Field (1998–present) a. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Marcos Pontes, Brazils first astronaut, reaches the International Space Station. ...

Trivia

The Vet was recreated in the 2006 movie Invincible, the movie based on former Philadelphia Eagle Vincent Papale. In this case, filming was at Franklin Field, on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, and digital effects were used to recreate the background. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Invincible is a 2006 film directed by Ericson Core set in 1976. ... Vincent Francis Papale (born February 9, 1946 in Glenolden, Pennsylvania) is a former professional American football player. ... Franklin Field is the University of Pennsylvanias stadium for football, field hockey, lacrosse, sprint football, and track and field (and formerly for soccer). ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


The final rock concert at the Vet took place on July 26, 2003. Bon Jovi headlined, with Sheryl Crow and the Goo Goo Dolls opening. Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The implosion of the Vet was shown in the DVD-only movie Punk Rock Holocaust, although there, it was alleged to be the Warped Tour's venue in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Punk Rock Holocaust is a 2004 movie directed by Doug Sakmann (who also appears as the bandana-wrapped killer). ... Warped Tour is a touring music and extreme sports festival. ... Map of Asbury Park in Monmouth County, NJ, along the Atlantic Ocean (also see: full-state map). ...


See also

Philadelphia Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... The following is a list of stadiums throughout the world. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Veterans Stadium
  • Stadium diagram (Clem's Baseball)
  • The Vet - A digital tribute (700level.com)
  • Veterans Stadium History (Phila.gov)
  • Photos of the Implosion (SkyscraperSunset.com)
Philadelphia Eagles
v  d  e
FranchiseHistoryPlayersDivision
StadiumsBaker BowlPhiladelphia Municipal StadiumConnie Mack StadiumFranklin FieldVeterans StadiumLincoln Financial Field
CultureFight SongSwoop
Super Bowl AppearancesXVXXXIX
LoreThe Miracle at the MeadowlandsBounty BowlBounty Bowl II • The Body Bag Game • 4th and 26
Head Coaches Starting Quarterbacks
WrayBellNealeMcMillinMillnerTrimbleDevoreShawSkorichKuharichWilliamsKhayatMcCormackVermeilCampbellBruneyRyanKotiteRhodesReid O'BrienThompsonVan BrocklinJurgensenSneadLiskeGabrielJaworskiCunninghamPeeteDetmerHoyingDetmerPedersonMcNabbMcMahonGarcia
League Championships (3)
1948, 1949, 1960
Preceded by
Franklin Field
Home of the Philadelphia Eagles
19712002
Succeeded by
Lincoln Financial Field
Preceded by
Shibe Park
Home of the Philadelphia Phillies
19712003
Succeeded by
Citizens Bank Park
Preceded by
Milwaukee County Stadium
Host of the All-Star Game
1976
Succeeded by
Yankee Stadium
Preceded by
The Ballpark in Arlington
Host of the All-Star Game
1996
Succeeded by
Jacobs Field
Preceded by
Camp Randall Stadium
1992
Host of the Drum Corps International World Championship
1993
Succeeded by
Foxboro Stadium
1994

Coordinates: 39°54′23.90″N, 75°10′15.78″W Franklin Field is the University of Pennsylvanias stadium for football, field hockey, lacrosse, sprint football, and track and field (and formerly for soccer). ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert (official) Andy Reid (de facto) Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Lincoln Financial Field, familiarly known as The Linc, is the home stadium of the National Football Leagues Philadelphia Eagles. ... Shibe Park, known for the last one-third of its existence as Connie Mack Stadium, was a Major League Baseball park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Citizens Bank Park is a 43,647-seat baseball-only stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that opened on April 3, 2004 and hosted its first regular season baseball game on April 12 of that same year, as the tenants of the facility, the Philadelphia Phillies lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 4... Milwaukee County Stadium (locally known as just County Stadium) was a ballpark in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1953 to 2000. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Rangers Ballpark in Arlington is a baseball stadium in Arlington, Texas, located between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Jacobs Field (informally called The Jake) is a baseball stadium located in the middle of downtown Cleveland, Ohio. ... Camp Randall Stadium was built in 1917 and is the current home of the Wisconsin Badgers football team. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For the present stadium in Foxborough, see Gillette Stadium. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Veterans Stadium (701 words)
Veterans Stadium was built on a 74-acre site in South Philadelphia, part of a complex that also included the Spectrum, home of both the Flyers (NHL) and 76ers (NBA), and JFK Stadium, site of the annual Army-Navy college football game.
Veterans Stadium replaced 62-year-old Shibe Park (A.K.A. Connie Mack Stadium), which was located north of the city.
At the Veterans Stadium opening, the ceremonial first pitch was dropped from a helicopter to Phillies catcher Mike Ryan, who bobbled the ball but held on.
Veterans Stadium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1383 words)
Philadelphia Veterans Stadium (or "The Vet") was located at the northeast corner of Broad Street and Pattison Avenue in Philadelphia.
The stadium became famous for the rowdiness of Eagles fans (although the infamous incident in which fans booed Santa Claus during a halftime show occurred in 1968 at Franklin Field) and none more so than the 1989 follow-up game to what many called "The Bounty Bowl".
The ultimate end came when the 33-year old stadium was imploded on March 21, 2004 as shown in the time-lapse photo on the left.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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