FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Vestment" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Vestment

Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Methodists, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. Many other Protestant groups also make use of vestments, but this was a point of controversy in the Protestant Reformation and sometimes since - notably during the Ritualist controversies in England in the 19th century. The word leitourgia is derived from the two Greek words, leos and ergon. Leos, meaning the people of God and Ergon meaning the work. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The vestments controversy arose in the English Reformation, ostensibly concerning vestments, but more fundamentally concerned with English Protestant identity, doctrine, and various church practices. ... The Reformation was a movement in the 16th century to reform the Catholic Church in Western Europe. ... In general, the term, Ritualism can be used to describe an outlook which places a great (or even exaggerated) emphasis on ritual. ...


For other garments worn by clergy, see also Clerical clothing. Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. ...

Contents

Rubrics for vesting

The rubrics (regulations) for the type of vestments to be worn vary between the various communions and denominations. In some, clergy are directed to wear special clerical clothing in public at all, most, or some times. This generally consists of a clerical collar, clergy shirt, and (on certain occasions) a cassock. In the case of members of religious orders, non-liturgical wear includes a religious habit. This ordinary wear does not constitute liturgical vestment, but simply acts as a medium of identifying the wearer as a member of the clergy or a religious order. Rubrics are often used in alternative assessments in education but have gained ground as a way of establishing written guidelines or standards of assessments for formal professionally administered essay tests like some of the teacher assessment exams found in the PRAXIS series. ... Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. ... On the right, an example of a Clerical collar. ... The Order of Friars Minor is a major mendicant movement founded by Saint Francis of Assisi. ... St. ...


A distinction is often made between the type of vestment worn for Holy Eucharist or Holy Communion and that worn for other services. Non-Eucharistic vestments are typically referred to as "choir dress" or "choir habit," in the Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Anglican churches. In other traditions, there is no specific name for this attire, although it often takes the form of a Geneva gown worn with or without preaching bands and a stole or preaching scarf. The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Presbyterian minister wearing a Geneva gown with preaching bands and liturgical stole. ... Bands[1] are a form of formal neckwear, worn by some clergy and lawyers. ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... Meriwether Lewis wearing a tippet presented to him by Sacagaweas brother, Cameahwait. ...


Latin Catholic, Anglican and Protestant vestments

For the Eucharist, each vestment symbolizes a spiritual dimension of the priesthood, with roots in the very origins of the Church. In some measure these vestments harken to the Roman roots of the See of Peter.


Use of the following vestments varies. Some are used by all Western Christians in liturgical traditions. Many are used only in the Latin Catholic and Anglican churches, and there is much variation within each of those churches.


Used by Latin Catholics, Anglicans, Lutherans, and some Protestants

Surplice 
A decorative white tunic worn over the cassock.
Stole 
A long, narrow strip of cloth draped around the neck, a vestment of distinction, a symbol of ordination. Deacons wear it draped across the left shoulder diagonally across the body to the right hip. Corresponds to the Orthodox orarion and epitrachelion (see below).
Alb 
The common garment of all ministers at the eucharist, worn over street clothes or a cassock. Most closely corresponds to the Orthodox sticharion (see below). Symbolizes baptismal garment. See also Cassock-alb.
Pulpit robe 
A common simple vestment with open, wide, and bell-shaped sleeves .

An Anglican priest wearing a surplice as part of his choir dress. ... A Roman Catholic priest from Belgian Congo wearing the Roman cassock. ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... A deacon wearing an alb and cincture wth a purple stole. ... The cassock alb or cassalb, as its name implies, is a relatively modern garment and is a combination of the traditional cassock and alb. ... The Geneva gown, also called a pulpit gown, pulpit robe, or preaching robe, is an ecclesiastical garment customarily worn by ordained ministers in the Christian churches that arose out of the historic Protestant Reformation. ...

Used by Latin Catholics, Anglicans, Lutherans, and some Methodists

Chasuble 
The outermost sacramental garment of priests and bishops, often quite decorated. Corresponds to the Orthodox phelonion (see below). See also chasuble-alb.
Pulpit robe 
common vestment among clergy in the Methodist tradition.
Dalmatic 
The outermost garment of deacons.
Amice 
a cloth around the neck used to cover the collar of street attire.
Cincture 
or Girdle. Corresponds to the Orthodox zone.

A fifteenth-century chasuble The chasuble is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist in Western-tradition Christian Churches that use full vestments, primarily the Roman Catholic Church, high church congregations in the Anglican Church, and by some clergy in the United Methodist Church. ... . ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... A chasuble-alb is a contemporary Eucharistic vestment that combines features of the chasuble and alb. ... The Geneva gown, also called a pulpit gown, pulpit robe, or preaching robe, is an ecclesiastical garment customarily worn by ordained ministers in the Christian churches that arose out of the historic Protestant Reformation. ... Rather similar to the chasuble, the dalmatic (one of the liturgical vestments of Catholic and Anglican churches) is the outermost vestment worn by a deacon at the Eucharist or Mass. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... The amice is a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church. ... An Anglican priest wearing a white cincture around his waist to hold his alb and stole in place. ...

Used by Latin Catholics and some Anglicans and Lutherans

Tunicle 
The outermost garment of subdeacons.
Cope 
A circular cape reaching to the ankle, used by bishops, priests and deacons.
Maniple 
A liturgical handkerchief bound about the wrist. According to some authorities, this corresponds to the Orthodox epigonation (see below). Modern usage of the maniple in either church is rare. It is mainly used in the Latin Catholic Church when celebrating Mass according to the Tridentine Rite and in some Anglo-Catholic parishes.
Humeral veil 
Long cloth rectangle draped around the shoulders and used to cover the hands when carrying a monstrance.
Rochet 
Surplice with narrower sleeves.
Zucchetto 
Skull cap, similar to the yarmulke
Mitre 
Worn by Bishops and abbots. Despite the having the same name, this does not really correspond with the Eastern mitre (see below), which has a distinct history and which was adopted much later.
Biretta 
May be worn by clergy of all ranks except the Pope; color signifies rank.

Until the abolition of minor orders in the Roman Catholic church after the Second Vatican Council, the tunicle was the distinguishing vestment of the subdeacon. ... Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... a priest wearing a cope The cope is a liturgical vestment, which may be of any liturgical colour, and is like a very long mantle or cloak, fastened at the breast by a clasp. ... No longer used as one of the vestments of the Roman Catholic church since the Second Vatican Council, the maniple was an embroidered band of silk, about 110cm long, 8cm wide and with ends about 12cm wide. ... Tridentine Rite refers to the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church as promulgated by the Council of Trent (December 13, 1545 till December 4, 1563). ... The humeral veil is one of the liturgical vestments of the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... A rochet is a vestment generally worn by a Catholic or Anglican Bishop in choir dress. ... The zucchetto is a small hat worn primarily by Roman Catholic prelates. ... A yarmulke (also yarmulka, yarmelke) (Yiddish יאַרמלקע yarmlke) or Kippah (Hebrew כִּפָּה kippāh, plural kippot) is a thin, usually slightly rounded cloth cap worn by Jews. ... A mitre. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... A traditional biretta The biretta is a square cap with three or four ridges or peaks, sometimes surmounted by a tuft, traditionally worn by Roman Catholic clergy, as well as by some clergy of the Anglican Churches. ...

Used only by Latin Catholics

Pallium 
A narrow band of lamb's wool decorated with six black crosses, worn about the neck with short pendants front and back, worn by the Pope and bestowed by him on Metropolitans and Archbishops. Corresponds to the Orthodox omophorion (see below).
Rationale 
An episcopal humeral worn over the chasuble. It is only used by the Bishops of Eichstätt, Paderborn, Toul, and Kraków. Until the 17th century, it was also in use in the Bishopric of Regensburg (Ratisbon). [1]
Fanon 
A double-layered mozzetta, now only occasionally worn by the Pope during solemn Pontifical High Masses.
Papal tiara 
Formerly worn by the Pope at his coronation and at key secular moments; it has fallen out of use but may be revived at any time if the reigning Pontiff wishes. This is strictly speaking not a vestment but an item of regalia since it was never worn within liturgical services with the exception of the blessing Urbi et Orbi.

now. ... In philosophy, the word rationality has been used to describe numerous religious and philosophical theories, especially those concerned with truth, reason, and knowledge. ... The Bishop of Eichstätt is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Eichstätt in the Archdiocese of Bamberg. ... Paderborn is a Roman-Catholic archdiocese in Germany; its seat is Paderborn. ... The Diocese of Toul was a Roman Catholic diocese seated at Toul in present-day France. ... Wawel Hill, Old Town, Kraków. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 129,175 in 2005) in Bavaria, Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. ... Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders. ... Pope Paul VI wearing the papal mozzetta. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (or Pope of Rome) (from... A Pontifical High Mass in the Roman rite before the changes brought forth by Vatican II is a Mass celebrated by a bishop that does not omit any elements which are omitted in the pontifical low mass, such as incense. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a symbol of the Roman Catholic papacy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (or Pope of Rome) (from... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Urbi et Orbi, literally to the City [of Rome] and to the World, was a standard opening of Roman proclamations. ...

Used only by Anglicans

Tippet 
(or Preaching Scarf). Black scarf worn by bishop, priests and deacons at choir offices and other non-sacramental services.
Chimere 
Red or black outer garment of bishops.
Hood 
Academic hood is sometimes worn by Anglican clergy at choir offices. It is also sometimes worn by Methodists and Reformed clergy with an Academic Gown ("Geneva Gown"), though this is fairly rare.
Apron 
A short cassock reaching just above the knee, worn by archdeacons (for whom it is black) and bishops (for whom it is purple). Now largely obsolete.
Gaiters 
Covering of the lower leg worn by archdeacons and bishops with the apron. Black, buttoned up the sides, and worn to just below the knee. Like the apron, these, too, are largely obsolete.
Canterbury cap 
a soft, square-shaped hat.

Meriwether Lewis wearing a tipped presented to him by Sacagaweas brother, Cameahwait. ... A chimere is a garment that can be worn as part of academic dress, or by Anglican bishops in choir dress. ... Academic dress or academical dress (also known in the United States as academic regalia) is traditional clothing worn specifically in academic settings. ... A full length apron An apron is an outer protective garment that covers primarily the front of the body. ... For the Major League Baseball player, see Maurice Archdeacon. ... Gaiters are a type of protective clothing for a persons ankles and legs below the knee. ... The Canterbury cap is a square cloth hat with sharp corners found in the Anglican communion, similar to the Counter-Reformations biretta, the notable exception being that a Canterbury cap has four ridges, compared to the birettas three. ...

Eastern Church vestments

In the Orthodox Church, any member of the clergy, of whatever rank, will be vested when serving his particular function during the Divine Liturgy or other service. Eastern Catholics use identical vestments as their Orthodox counterparts. As in the Latin-rite Catholic Church, the use of vestments is rooted in the early history of the church. The various vestments serve several different functions. The three forms of stole (Orarion, Epitrachelion, and Omophorion) are marks of rank. The three outer garments (Sticharion, Phelonion, and Sakkos) serve to distinguish the clergy from the laity. Some are practical (Zone and Epimanikia), holding the other vestments in place. Some (Nabedrennik and Epigonation) are awards of distinction. The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, order of rank proceeds from highest to lowest as follows: 1. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Look up Award in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In addition to these functions, most vestments carry a symbolic meaning as well. These symbolic meanings are often indicated by the prayer that the priest says as he puts each item on. These prayers are verses taken directly from the Old Testament, usually the Psalms. For example, the prayer for the Sticharion is from Isaiah 61:10: Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi (songs sung to a harp, originally from psallein play on a stringed instrument), Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... The sticharion is a liturgical vestment of the Eastern Orthodox Church, roughly analogous to the dalmatic or tunicle of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ...

My soul will rejoice in the Lord, for he has clothed me with a garment of salvation and wrapped me in a robe of gladness; he has placed a crown on my head as on a bridegroom, and adorned me with beauty as a bride. [2]
Sticharion (Greek στιχάριον
Actually a form of the garment worn at baptism, this is the one vestment worn by all clergy. It is even used by non-ordained persons carrying out a liturgical function, such as an "altar boy". For priests and bishops, it is made of lightweight material, usually white. It corresponds most closely with the Western alb (see above).
Orarion (Greek ὀράριον
A long narrow strip of cloth worn by deacons over the left shoulder and reaching to the ankle in both front and back. It is also worn by subdeacons and, in some places of the Greek tradition, by tonsured altar servers. It corresponds to the Western stole (see above).
Epitrachelion (Greek ἐπιτραχήλιον, "over the neck") 
This stole is worn by priests and bishops as the symbol of their priesthood. It is worn around the neck with the two adjacent sides sewn or buttoned together, leaving enough space through which to place the head. It corresponds to the Western stole (see above).
Epimanikia (Greek ἐπιμανίκια
Cuffs bound with laces. The deacon wears them beneath the sticharion, priests and bishops above. They are not used by any lower rank.
Zone (Greek ζώνη) 
Cloth belt worn by priests and bishops over the epitrachelion. Corresponds to the Western cincture (see above).
Phelonion (Greek φαιλόνιον or φαινόλιον
Large conical sleeveless garment worn by priests over all other vestments, with the front largely cut away to free the hands. Byzantine rite Bishops may also wear the phelonion when not serving according to hierarchical rubrics. Corresponds to the Western chasuble (see above).
Sakkos (Greek σάκκος) 
Instead of the phelonion, the bishop usually wears the sakkos or Imperial dalmatic. This is a tunic reaching below the knees with wide sleeves and a distinctive pattern of trim. It is always buttoned up the sides.
Nabedrennik (Slavonic набедренникъ) 
A square or rectangular cloth suspended on the right side by two adjacent corners from a strap drawn over the left shoulder. This is a relatively recent Russian invention and is not used in the Greek tradition. It is an award, so it is not worn by all priests. Bishops do not use it.
Epigonation/Palitsa (Greek ἐπιγονάτιον "over the knee"; Slavonic палица, "club") 
A stiff diamond-shaped cloth that hangs on the right side of the body; it is suspended by one corner from a strap drawn over the left shoulder. It is worn by all bishops and as an award for priests.
Omophorion (Greek ὠμοφόριον
This is the distinctive episcopal vestment, a wide cloth band draped about the shoulders in a characteristic manner. It corresponds to the Western pallium (see above).
Mitre (Greek Μίτρα
The Byzantine Orthodox mitre is modeled on the ancient Byzantine imperial crown; it is worn by all bishops and awarded to some high-ranking priests. The bishop's mitre is surmounted by a cross, but the priest's is not; both are bulbous and adorned with icons. Coptic Orthodox & Ethiopian Orthodox bishops also wear the Byzantine mitre. Armenian Orthodox, on the other hand, have the Byzantine mitre as part of the normal vestments worn by priests of all ranks, and their bishops are distinguished by wearing mitres after the western shape. Mitres are not worn in the Syriac Orthodox tradition, where a decorated hood like an amice called masnaphto , meaning 'turban', is worn instead by prelates. [3].
Pectoral cross 
A large cross is worn around the neck by all bishops, but not necessarily by all priests. In Russian usage, the style of Pectoral cross worn indicates the rank of the priest.
Engolpion/Panagia 
Engolpion (Greek ἐγκόλπιον) is a general term for something worn upon the bosom; here, it refers to a medallion with an icon in the center. A Panagia (Greek Παναγία, All-holy, one of the titles of the Theotokos) is an engolpion with Mary as the subject of the icon; this is worn by all bishops. All primates and some bishops below primatial rank have the dignity of a second engolpion, which usually depicts Christ.
Mantiya (Greek μανδύας
This is a sleeveless cape that fastens at the neck and the feet, worn by all monks. The usual monastic mantle is black; that worn by the bishop as he enters the church for a service but before he is vested is more elaborately colored and decorated. This is, strictly speaking, an item of street wear, not a vestment; however, in modern usage it is worn only in church.
Varkas 
This is a broad stiff band of heavily embroidered brocade and decoration, functioning like a collar, worn exclusively by Armenian Orthodox priests over the phelonion. It corresponds to, and is likely derived from, the Western amice.

Despite their often elaborate design, the vestments are generally intended to focus attention on God, and the office of the person wearing them, rather than on the person himself. It is partly for this reason that a Russian phelonion is designed with a very high back, so that when the priest is standing facing the altar his head is almost completely hidden. Other items, such as the epimanikia or cuffs, represent manacles or chains, reminding the wearer and others that their office is a position of service. The sticharion is a liturgical vestment of the Eastern Orthodox Church, roughly analogous to the dalmatic or tunicle of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Orarion is the distinguishing vestment of the deacon in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... Tonsure is the practice of some Christian churches of cutting the hair from the scalp of clerics as a symbol of their renunciation of worldly fashion and esteem. ... An altar server is a lay assistant to a member of the clergy during a religious service. ... epitrachelion The Epitrachelion (from the Greek, επιτραχηλιον around the neck; often called simply a stole in casual English-language usage) is the liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Orthodox Church as the symbol of their priesthood, corresponding to the Western stole. ... Epimanikia (singular epimanikion) are liturgical vestments of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The Zone (Greek ζωνη) is a liturgical belt worn as a vestment by priests and bishops of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The phelonion (plural, phelonia) is a liturgical vestment worn by a priest of the Eastern Christian tradition. ... Rubrics are written directions for liturgical actions found in religious service and liturgical books, especially in Christianity. ... The Sakkos (Greek: σάκκος) is a vestment worn by an Orthodox bishop instead of the priests phelonion. ... Rather similar to the chasuble, the dalmatic (one of the liturgical vestments of Catholic and Anglican churches) is the outermost vestment worn by a deacon at the Eucharist or Mass. ... A Nabedrennik (Russian: набедренник) is a vestment worn by some Orthodox priests. ... Fresco from 14th century of a bishop wearing the epigonation The epigonation (Greek: , over the knee) or palitsa (Russian: палица, club) is a vestment used in some Eastern Christian churches. ... The Epigonation(Greek: επιγονάτιο, over the knee) or Palitsa (Russian: палица, club) is an Orthodox vestment worn by all bishops and as an award for priests. ... A club, cudgel, truncheon, night stick, or bludgeon is among the simplest of all weapons. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... . ... In the Orthodox liturgical tradition, the omophorion is one of the bishops vestments and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical authority. ... A mitre. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. ... The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church is one of the original churches, having separated from the then-still-united Roman Catholic/Byzantine Orthodox church in 506, after the Council of Chalcedon (see Oriental Orthodoxy). ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... A Pectoral cross (sometimes simply Pectoral, from the Latin pectoralis, of the chest) is a cross, usually large, worn around the neck on a cord or a chain. ... A Pectoral cross (sometimes simply Pectoral, from the Latin pectoralis, of the chest) is a cross, usually large, worn around the neck on a cord or a chain. ... An Engolpion or Enkolpion(Greek: εγκόλπιον, on the chest) is a general term for something worn upon the bosom [1]. Formerly also including pectoral crosses, Engolpion is nowadays used for a medallion with an icon in the center, worn as a vestment by an Orthodox bishop. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... A Mantle is a piece of clothing, similar to a robe but open on the front side and often sleeveless. ... St. ... The amice is a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church is one of the original churches, having separated from the then-still-united Roman Catholic/Byzantine Orthodox church in 506, after the Council of Chalcedon (see Oriental Orthodoxy). ... The phelonion (plural, phelonia) is a liturgical vestment worn by a priest of the Eastern Christian tradition. ... Epimanikia (singular epimanikion) are liturgical vestments of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Vestments Glossary (4011 words)
Vestments have their origin in the ordinary street clothes of the first century, but have more or less remained the same as clothing fashions have changed.
Today, vestments are designed to be worn over street clothes and serve a number of practical purposes: they conceal the distractions of fashionable street clothing, they remove any consideration of what constitutes appropriate attire, and they remind the congregation that the ministers are not acting on their own, but performing in their official capacities.
The cassock is a clerical, not a vestment.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dalmatic (2059 words)
vestment consists of two vertical stripes running from the shoulder to the hem; according to Roman usage these stripes are narrow and united at the bottom by two narrow cross-stripes.
vestment in the pre-Carolingian era, and in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries regularly shaped openings were often substituted for the slits.
vestment with broad and elegantly embroidered bands which were united on the breast and back by cross-bands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m