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Encyclopedia > Vernor Vinge

Vernor Steffen Vinge (IPA: [ˈvɪndʒɪ]) (born February 10, 1944) is a mathematician, computer scientist and science fiction author who is best known for his Hugo award-winning novels A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky, as well as for his 1993 essay "The Technological Singularity", in which he argues that exponential growth in technology will reach a point beyond which we cannot even speculate about the consequences. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Euclid, detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Computer science is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Hugo Award is given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy stories of the previous year, and for related areas in fandom, art and dramatic presentation. ... A Fire Upon the Deep (1992) is a science fiction novel written by Vernor Vinge. ... A Deepness in the Sky (1999) is a science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... When plotted on a logarithmic graph, 15 separate lists of paradigm shifts for key events in human history show an exponential trend. ... In mathematics, a quantity that grows exponentially (or geometrically) is one that grows at a rate proportional to its size. ...


Vinge published his first short story, "Bookworm, Run!", in 1965 in Analog Science Fiction, then edited by John W. Campbell. He was then a moderately prolific contributor to SF magazines in the 1960s and early 1970s, including adapting two of his stories into a short novel, Grimm's World (1969), and publishing a second novel, The Witling (1975). 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... John Wood Campbell, Jr. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ...


Vinge came to prominence in 1981 with his novella True Names, which is one of the earliest stories to present a fully fleshed-out concept of cyberspace, which would later be central to stories by William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and others (and particularly to the cyberpunk genre). 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... True Names was the science fiction novella which brought Vernor Vinge to prominence in 1981. ... Cyberspace, a metaphoric abstraction used in philosophy and computing, is a (virtual) reality which represents the Noosphere/World 2 both inside computers and on computer networks. ... Some credit William Gibson with writing the most clear-cut examples of the Science Fiction genre known as cyberpunk, as well as coining the term cyberspace. ... Neal Stephenson Neal Town Stephenson (b. ... Berlins Sony Centre in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ...


His next two novels, The Peace War (1984) and Marooned in Realtime (1986), concern the impact of a technology which can create impenetrable force fields called "Bobbles" (with other properties which aren't revealed here as they are spoilers for the books). These books built Vinge's reputation as an author who would explore his science fictional ideas to their logical conclusions and in novel and particularly inventive ways. He was nominated for the Hugo Award for both books, but in each case lost to novels by William Gibson and Orson Scott Card. The Peace War is a science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge about authoritarianism and technological progress. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marooned in Realtime is a murder mystery and time-travel science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge, about a small group of people who are the only survivors of a technological singularity. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In general physics, a force field is a vector field representing the gradient of a potential. ... Stasis (IPA: ) is a science-fiction concept akin to suspended animation. ... A spoiler is a summary or description of a narrative (or part of a narrative) that relates plot elements not revealed early in the narrative itself. ... The Hugo Award is given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy stories of the previous year, and for related areas in fandom, art and dramatic presentation. ... Some credit William Gibson with writing the most clear-cut examples of the Science Fiction genre known as cyberpunk, as well as coining the term cyberspace. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951) is a prolific and best-selling author working in numerous genres. ...


These two novels and True Names also emphasized Vinge's interest in the technological singularity. True Names takes place in a world on the cusp of the singularity. The Peace War shows a world in which the singularity has been postponed by the Bobbles, while Marooned in Realtime follows a small group of people who have managed to miss the singularity which otherwise encompassed Earth. When plotted on a logarithmic graph, 15 separate lists of paradigm shifts for key events in human history show an exponential trend. ...


Vinge finally won the Hugo Award with his 1992 novel, A Fire Upon the Deep. In it, Vinge envisions a galaxy that is divided up into "zones of thought", in which the further one moves from the center of the galaxy, the higher the level of technology one can achieve. Earth is in "The Slow Zone", in which faster-than-light (FTL) travel cannot be achieved. Most of the book, however, takes place in a zone called "The Beyond", where the computations necessary for FTL travel are possible, but transcendence beyond the Singularity to superhuman intelligence is not. Thus Vinge could write a classic space opera despite his belief that the technology required for such stories would push us past the singularity. Fire includes a large number of additional ideas making for an unusually complex and rich universe and story. 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... A Fire Upon the Deep (1992) is a science fiction novel written by Vernor Vinge. ... Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel are staples of the science fiction genre. ... Space opera is a subgenre of speculative fiction or science fiction that emphasizes romantic adventure, interstellar travel, and space battles where the main storyline is centered around interstellar conflict and character drama. ...


A Deepness in the Sky (1999) was a prequel to Fire, following competing groups of humans in The Slow Zone as they struggle over who has the rights to exploit a technologically emerging alien culture. Deepness also won a Hugo Award in 2000. A Deepness in the Sky (1999) is a science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ...


Vinge has also won Hugos for his novellas, "Fast Times at Fairmont High" in 2002, and "The Cookie Monster" in 2004. The Cookie Monster is a 2004 Hugo Award winning novella by Vernor Vinge. ...


Vinge has completed a new novel "Rainbows End", which is set in the same universe as "Fast Times at Fairmont High" and is scheduled for publication in the US on May 16, 2006. Rainbows End is the next book by Vernor Vinge, to appear in May 6th, 2006, according to Amazon. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Vinge retired in 2002 from teaching at San Diego State University in order to write full-time. For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... A landmark architecture featured in the school logo. ...


His ex-wife Joan D. Vinge is also an accomplished science fiction author. Joan D. Vinge (born 1948 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American science fiction author. ...


Most years, since its inception in 1999, Vinge has been on the Free Software Foundation's selection committee for their Award for the Advancement of Free Software. The Free Software Foundation logo The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a non-profit organization founded in October 1985 by Richard Stallman to support the free software movement (free as in freedom), and in particular the GNU project. ... The Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software is annually presented to a person who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software. ...


Bibliography

Novels

1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... The Peace War is a science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge about authoritarianism and technological progress. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marooned in Realtime is a murder mystery and time-travel science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge, about a small group of people who are the only survivors of a technological singularity. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Fire Upon the Deep (1992) is a science fiction novel written by Vernor Vinge. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... A Deepness in the Sky (1999) is a science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Rainbows End is the next book by Vernor Vinge, to appear in May 6th, 2006, according to Amazon. ...

Collections

  • True Names and Other Dangers ISBN 0-671-65363-6
    • "Bookworm, Run!"
    • "True Names"
    • "The Peddler's Apprentice" (with Joan D. Vinge)
    • "The Ungoverned" (occurs in the same milieu as Across Realtime)
    • "Long Shot"
  • Threats... and Other Promises ISBN 0-671-69790-0 (These two volumes collect Vinge's short fiction through the early 1990s.)
    • "Apartness"
    • "Conquest by Default"
    • "The Whirligig of Time"
    • "Gemstone"
    • "Just Peace" (with William Rupp)
    • "Original Sin"
    • "The Blabber" (occurs in a milieu similar to A Fire Upon the Deep)
  • Across Realtime
    • The Peace War
    • "The Ungoverned"
    • Marooned in Realtime
  • True Names and the Opening of the Cyberspace Frontier ISBN 0312862075 (contains "True Names" plus essays by others)
  • The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge ISBN 0312873735 (hardcover) or ISBN 0312875843 (paperback) (These two volumes collect Vinge's short fiction through 2001, including Vinge's comments from the earlier two volumes.)
    • "Bookworm, Run!"
    • "The Accomplice"
    • "The Peddler's Apprentice" (with Joan D. Vinge)
    • "The Ungoverned"
    • "Long Shot"
    • "Apartness"
    • "Conquest by Default"
    • "The Whirligig of Time"
    • "Bomb Scare"
    • "The Science Fair"
    • "Gemstone"
    • "Just Peace" (with William Rupp)
    • "Original Sin"
    • "The Blabber"
    • "Win A Nobel Prize!" (originally published in Nature, Vol 407 No 6805 "Futures")
    • "The Barbarian Princess" (this is also the first section of "Tatja Grimm's World")
    • "Fast Times at Fairmont High" (occurs in the same milieu as Rainbows End)

Joan D. Vinge (born 1948 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American science fiction author. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Joan D. Vinge (born 1948 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American science fiction author. ... Nature is one of the oldest and most reputable scientific journals, first published on 4 November 1869. ...

Uncollected Short Fiction

Worldcon, or more formally The World Science Fiction Convention, is the longest running science fiction convention, having been held from 1939 to 1941 and, after the interruption of World War II, every year since 1946. ... The Cookie Monster is a 2004 Hugo Award winning novella by Vernor Vinge. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rainbows End is the next book by Vernor Vinge, to appear in May 6th, 2006, according to Amazon. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Vernor Vinge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (771 words)
Vinge came to prominence in 1981 with his novella True Names, which is one of the earliest stories to present a fully fleshed-out concept of cyberspace, which would later be central to stories by William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and others (and particularly to the cyberpunk genre).
In it, Vinge envisions a galaxy that is divided up into "zones of thought", in which the further one moves from the center of the galaxy, the higher the level of technology one can achieve.
Vinge has completed a new novel "Rainbows End", which is set in the same universe as "Fast Times at Fairmont High" and is scheduled for publication in the US on May 16, 2006.
Salon | Vernor Vinge, online prophet (1085 words)
But Vinge was reluctant to let real-world technological change contaminate his fiction: To do so, he worried, would run the risk of incorporating massive inconsistencies in his future-history timeline.
Vinge, a math professor who teaches computer science at San Diego State, is convinced that the "problem of software complexity" is the main obstacle that programmers face in creating intelligent computers.
Vinge agrees that the rise of the open-source software development model -- which links thousands of programmers together via the Net in massively collaborative software creation projects -- offers hope that our collective intelligence may be increasing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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