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Encyclopedia > Verger
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Anglicanism
Organization

Anglican Communion
'focus of unity':
Archbishop of Canterbury
'instruments of communion':
Lambeth Conferences
Anglican Consultative Council
Primates' Meeting
Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 1040 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: United Kingdom Canterbury Cathedral ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Anglican Consultative Council is one of the four Instruments of Unity of the Anglican Communion. ... The Anglican Communion Primates Meetings are regular meetings of the senior archbishops and bishops of the Anglican Communion. ...

Background

Christianity
English Reformation
Apostolic Succession
Catholicism
Episcopal polity
Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... King Henry VIII of England The English Reformation refers to the series of events in sixteenth century England by which the church in England broke away from the authority of the Pope and consequently the entire Catholic church; it formed part of the wider Protestant Reformation, a religious and political... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ composed of the Apostles. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      As a Christian ecclesiastical... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ...

People

Henry VIII
Thomas Cranmer
Thomas Cromwell
Elizabeth I
Richard Hooker
Charles I
William Laud
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... Thomas Cromwell: detail from a portrait by Hans Holbein, 1532-3 Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex ( 1485 - July 28, 1540) was an English statesman, one of the most important political figures of the reign of Henry VIII of England. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... This article is about the Anglican theologian. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Archbishop William Laud (October 7, 1573 – January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right. ...

Liturgy and Worship

Book of Common Prayer
High Church · Low Church
Broad Church
Oxford Movement
Thirty-Nine Articles
Book of Homilies
Doctrine
Ministry
Sacraments
Saints in Anglicanism For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Broad church is a term referring to latitudinarian churches in the Church of England. ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... During the Reformation in England, Thomas Cranmer and others saw the need for local congregations to be taught Reformed theology and practice. ... Look up doctrine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... The provinces of the Anglican Communion commemorate many of the same saints as those in the Roman Catholic calendar, often on the same days, but also commemorate various famous (often post-Reformation and/or English) Christians who have not been canonized. ...

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This is a traditional verger gown.
This is a traditional verger gown.
This is a traditional virge. Note the brass ball at the end with a small cross on top.
This is a traditional virge. Note the brass ball at the end with a small cross on top.

A verger (or virger, so called after the staff of the office) is a person, usually a layperson, who assists in the ordering of religious services, particularly in Anglican churches. Image File history File linksMetadata TraditionalVergerGown. ... Image File history File linksMetadata TraditionalVergerGown. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Virge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Virge. ... The Virtual Reality Graphics Engine (ViRGE) graphics chipset was one of the first 2D/3D accelerators designed for the mass market. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate...

Contents

History

The Office of the Verger has its roots in the early days of the Church of England's history. The Order shares certain similarities with the former Minor Orders of Porter and Acolyte. Historically Vergers were responsible for the order and upkeep of the house of worship, including the care of the church buildings, its furnishings, and sacred relics, preparations for liturgy, conduct of the laity, and the ever-popular grave-digging responsibilities. Although there is no definitive historical examination of the Office of Verger, evidence from Rochester, Lincoln, Exeter, and Salisbury Cathedrals points to the existence of Vergers even in the 12th century. Koster is the Dutch word for sexton or verger, derived from the Latin custos (the equivalent German word is "Küster"). The symbol of a Guild of Cathedral vergers is the Crossed keys. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The minor orders are the lowest ranks in the Christian clergy. ... An ostiarius, a Latin word sometimes anglicized as Ostiary but often literally translated as porter or doorman, originally was a servant or guard posted at the entrance of a building. ... This article is about religious acolytes. ... Relics can be: Relics: the remains of saints (usually bones), honored in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... Rochester Cathedral is a Norman church in Rochester, Kent. ... Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. ... The west front. ... Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishops Grounds by John Constable c. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Koster is a small farming town situated on the watershed between the Orange and Limpopo Rivers in North West Province of South Africa. ... The word sexton has several uses: A sexton is an official largely concerned with church maintenance The sexton was a self-propelled artillery vehicle of World War II. Anne Sexton was an American poet. ... A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ... Crossed keys may refer to: the Keys of Saint Peter, an element in: the Coat of arms of the Holy See the arms used by the Guild of Cathedral Virgers The village of Crosskeys, in Wales Category: ...


Duties

During the service itself, a verger's main duty is ceremonially to precede the religious participants as they move about the church; he or she does not typically take any speaking part in the service itself. But although it could be argued that a verger's main pride during a service lies in his or her inconspicuousness, vergers often play a very prominent role "behind the scenes" — helping to plan the logistical details of service and discreetly shepherding the clergy through it. (In some churches these latter duties are handled by a Master of Ceremonies, while the verger functions as a sort of marshal in the procession.) A Master of Ceremonies or MC (sometimes spelled emcee), sometimes called a compere or an MJ for microphone jockey, is the host of an official public or private staged event or other performance. ...


The Virge

The office's title comes from the ceremonial rod which a verger carries, a virge (from the Latin virga, branch, staff or rod; see virgule). The Maces of State used in the House of Lords and the House of Commons of the British Parliament are examples of another modern use of the medieval virge. In former times, a verger might have needed to use his virge to keep back animals or an overenthusiastic crowd from the personage he was escorting or even to discipline unruly choristers. The Virtual Reality Graphics Engine (ViRGE) graphics chipset was one of the first 2D/3D accelerators designed for the mass market. ... A solidus, oblique or slash, /, is a punctuation mark. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


Vestments

The typical vestments of a verger are a black cassock with Fascia, purple or violet chimere, and a jabot. Today many modern vergers wear a scapular instead of a chimere. A Roman Catholic priest from Belgian Congo wearing the Roman cassock. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A chimere is a garment that can be worn as part of academic dress, or by Anglican bishops in choir dress. ... Jabot Cosmetics is a fictional cosmetics business on the CBS daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless. ... The Brown Scapular of Mount Carmel promises salvation to its wearer. ...


Modern function

In small churches today, the office of verger is often combined with that of sexton: the verger assisting at services and the sexton maintaining the church building the rest of the time are one and the same person. A sexton is a church officer charged with the maintenance of the church buildings and/or the surrounding graveyard. ...


The Roman Catholic Church

The office of Verger has, for the most part, disappeared in the Roman Catholic tradition, the closest function being that of the sexton or the head or senior usher, particularly in those churches (usually large establishments, like St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City) that have an organized and formal corps of ushers. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A sidesperson, correctly known as a sidesman, in the Anglican Church is responsible for greeting members of the congregation, overseeing seating arrangements in church, and for taking the collection. ... St. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


See also

A Churchwarden is a lay official in a parish church of the Anglican Communion. ... A sexton is a church officer charged with the maintenance of the church buildings and/or the surrounding graveyard. ... A sidesperson, correctly known as a sidesman, in the Anglican Church is responsible for greeting members of the congregation, overseeing seating arrangements in church, and for taking the collection. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
List of minor Star Wars Jedi knights - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8161 words)
Over a period of fifty years, Vergere lived with the Yuuzhan Vong, teaching them about the Republic and the Jedi while secretly building up a collection of information about the extragalactic aliens themselves; she was out of Palpatine's reach during the Great Jedi Purge.
Vergere was able to avoid having her Jedi powers detected by the Yuuzhan Vong war coordinators, the yammosks, by learning to make herself small.
Vergere died when she saved the Solo twins on Ebaq 9 by crashing an A-wing into the planet, killing all of the Yuuzhan Vong invaders that were on the surface except for one -- Warmaster of the Yuuzhan Vong, Tsavong Lah.
Vergere - Wookieepedia, the Star Wars Wiki (1267 words)
Vergere was able to avoid having her Jedi powers detected by the Force sensing Yuuzhan Vong war coordinators, the yammosks, by learning to "make herself small." Vergere would shrink her presence in the Force to a microscopic size, where she was almost undetectable.
Vergere was accompanying her mistress on a covert operation wherein Elan allowed herself to be captured by the Republic, claiming that she was defecting from the Yuuzhan Vong ranks, but in reality was preparing to spring a trap on the Jedi.
Vergere was able to escape, leaving behind a vial of her tears in the process, which turned out to be successful in slowing the deadly Coomb Spore disease that was affecting Mara Jade Skywalker.
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