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Encyclopedia > Venus (mythology)

Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love, beauty and fertility, the equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1182x740, 265 KB)Botticellis The Birth of Venus The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1182x740, 265 KB)Botticellis The Birth of Venus The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author... The Birth of Venus is a painting by Sandro Botticelli. ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (little barrel) (March 1, 1445 – May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... For beauty as a characteristic of a persons appearance, see Physical attractiveness. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ...


Venus was the consort of Vulcan. She was considered the ancestor of the Roman people by way of its legendary founder, Aeneas, and played a key role in many Roman religious festivals and myths. The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... The term Roman religion may refer to: Ancient Roman religion Imperial cult (Ancient Rome), Sol Invictus Mithraism Roman Christianity Category: ...

Contents

Venus in mythology

For more details on this topic, see Aphrodite.

Like most other gods and goddesses in Roman mythology, that of Venus consists of whole-cloth borrowings from the Greek mythology of her equivalent counterpart Aphrodite. The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...


Cult

Her cult began in Ardea and Lavinium, Latium. On August 15, 293 BC, her oldest-known temple was dedicated, and August 18 became a festival called the Vinalia Rustica. On April 25, 215 BC, a temple to Venus was dedicated outside the Colline gate on the Capitol, to commemorate the Roman defeat at the Battle of Lake Trasimene. Norris Patriticus is the son of Venus and Ares, who was the god of war. Ardea, an ancient town and comune in the province of Rome, 41°37N 12°33E, 37 m (121 feet) above sea-level. ... Lavinium was an ancient Roman city of the Latium, said to have been named by Aeneas in honor of Lavinia, daughter of Latinus, king of the Latins, and his wife, Amata. ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vinalia were Roman festivals in honour of Jupiter and Venus. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 23 - A temple is built on the Capitoline Hill dedicated to Venus Erycina to commemorate the Roman defeat at Lake Trasimene. ... Combatants Optimates Populares, Samnites Commanders Lucius Cornelius Sulla, Marcus Licinius Crassus Pontius The battle of the Colline Gate, fought in November of 82 BC, was the final battle of the civil war between the Populares (originally led by Marius) and the Optimates led by Sulla. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... Combatants Carthage Roman Republic Commanders Hannibal Gaius Flaminius † Strength 30,000 soldiers 30,000-40,000 soldiers Casualties 1,500 soldiers 15,000 killed or drowned 15,000 captured The Battle of Lake Trasimeno (June 24, 217 BC, April on the Julian calendar) was a Roman defeat in the Second...


Associated deities

The Campo Iemini Venus, Roman marble statue of the Capitoline Venus or Venus Pudica type, (British Museum)
The Campo Iemini Venus, Roman marble statue of the Capitoline Venus or Venus Pudica type, (British Museum)

Venus was commonly associated with the Greek goddess Aphrodite and the Etruscan deity Turan, borrowing aspects from each. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (320x640, 77 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (320x640, 77 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Venus de Medici The Venus de Medici or Medici Venus is a lifesize (1. ... The Ludovisi Cnidian Aphrodite, Roman marble copy (torso and thighs) with restored head, arms, legs and drapery support The Aphrodite of Cnidus was one of the most famous works of the Attic sculptor Praxiteles (4th century BC). ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... In Etruscan mythology, Turan was the goddess of love and vitality and patroness of Vulci (cur: Volci). ...


Additionally, Venus has been compared to other goddesses of love, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli in Aztec mythology, Kukulcan in Maya mythology, Frigg and Freyja in the Norse mythos, and Ushas in Vedic religion. Ushas is also linked to Venus by a Sanskrit epithet ascribed to her, vanas- ("loveliness; longing, desire"), which is cognate to Venus, suggesting a Proto-Indo-European link via the reconstructed stem *wen- "to desire".[1] In Aztec mythology, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli (lord of the star of the dawn; also spelled Tlahuizcalpantecutli or Tlahuixcalpantecuhtli) was the personification of the morning star, which is the planet Venus as seen in the morning. ... The Aztec civilization recognized a polytheistic mythology, which contained the many gods (over 100) and supernatural creatures from their religious beliefs. ... In Maya mythology, Gukumatz (feathered serpent) was a snake god, one of all three groups of gods who created Earth and humanity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... -1... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ... This article discusses the historical religious practices in the Vedic time period; see Dharmic religions for details of contemporary religious practices. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Look up cognate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ...


Another interesting association with Venus is the Latvian god Auseklis, whose name derives from the root aus-, meaning "dawn". Auseklis and Mēness, whose name means "moon", are both Dieva dēli ("sons of God"). For other uses, see Auseklis (disambiguation). ... In Latvian mythology, MÄ“ness was the god of the moon and the patron of travelers and soldiers. ...


Epithets

Like other major Roman deities, Venus was ascribed a number of epithets to refer to different aspects or roles of the goddess. Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Venus Acidalia was,[2] according to Servius, derived from the well Acidalius near Orchomenos, in which Venus used to bathe with the Graces; others con­nect the name with the Greek acides (άκιδες), i.e. cares or troubles.[3] Maurus (or Marius) Servius Honoratius, Roman grammarian and commentator on Virgil, flourished at the end of the 4th century AD. He is one of the interlocutors in the Saturnalia of Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius, and allusions in that work and a letter from Quintus Aurelius Symmachus to Servius show that he... Orchomenos (Greek: ), the setting for many early Greek Myths, is a rich archaeological site in Boeotia, (modern Viotia, Greece) that was inhabited from the Neolithic through the Hellenistic periods. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ...


Venus Cloacina ("Venus the Purifier"), was a fusion of Venus with the Etruscan water goddess Cloacina, likely resulting from a statue of Venus being prominent near the Cloaca Maxima, Rome's sewer system. The statue was erected on the spot where peace was concluded between the Romans and Sabines. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the album by CMX, see Cloaca Maxima (album). ... The Rape of the Sabine Women by Giambologna The tribe of the Sabines (Latin Sabini - singular Sabinus) was an Italic tribe of ancient Italy. ...


Venus Erycina ("Venus from Eryx"), also called Venus Erucina, originated on Mount Eryx in western Sicily. Temples were erected to her on the Capitoline Hill and outside the Porta Collina. She embodied "impure" love, and was the patron goddess of prostitutes. ERYX Type anti-tank Nationality France Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA Date of design Production period 1989 Service duration 1994 Operators Canadian, French, Norwegian armies Variants Number built Specifications Type Diameter 0. ... Eryx (Greek: ), was an ancient city and a mountain in the west of Sicily, about 10 km from Drepana (modern Trapani), and 3 km from the sea-coast. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ...


Venus Felix ("Lucky Venus") was an epithet used for a temple on the Esquiline Hill and for a temple constructed by Hadrian dedicated to "Venus Felix et Roma Aeterna" ("Favorable Venus and Eternal Rome") on the north side of the Via Sacra. This epithet is also used for a specific sculpture at the Vatican Museums. The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... The Temple apsis by night. ... The Via Sacra (Latin: Sacred Road) is the main street of ancient Rome, leading from the top of the Capitoline Hill, through some of the most important religious sites of the Forum (where it is the widest street), to the Colosseum. ...


Venus Genetrix ("Mother Venus") was Venus in her role as the ancestress of the Roman people, a goddess of motherhood and domesticity. A festival was held in her honor on September 26. As Venus was regarded as the mother of the Julian gens in particular, Julius Caesar dedicated a temple to her in Rome. This name has also attached to an iconological type of statue of Aphrodite/Venus. is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. ... GENS is an open source emulator for the Sega Genesis (Sega Megadrive). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ...

Venus Kallipygos ("Venus with the pretty bottom"), a form worshipped at Syracuse. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1589 KB) Foro di Cesare visto da nord, dallesterno, con il tempio di Venere Genitrice. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1589 KB) Foro di Cesare visto da nord, dallesterno, con il tempio di Venere Genitrice. ... Venus Genitrix temple in Forum of Caesar, Rome. ... The Imperial Forums consist of a series of monumental fora (public squares), constructed in Rome over a period of one and half centuries, between 46 BC and 113 AD. The forums were the heart of the late Roman Republic and of the Roman Empire. ... The Callipygian Venus or Venus Kallipygos, (In Greek, Aphrodite Kallipygos: Aphrodite of the Beautiful Buttocks), is a type of nude female statue of the Hellenistic era. ... Syracuse (Italian Siracusa, Sicilian Sarausa, Greek , Latin Syracusae) is an Italian city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse. ...


Venus Libertina ("Venus the Freedwoman") was an epithet of Venus that probably arose from an error, with Romans mistaking lubentina (possibly meaning "pleasurable" or "passionate") for libertina. Possibly related is Venus Libitina, also called Venus Libentina, Venus Libentia, Venus Lubentina, Venus Lubentini and Venus Lubentia, an epithet that probably arose from confusion between Libitina, a funeral goddess, and the aforementioned lubentina, leading to an amalgamation of Libitina and Venus. A temple was dedicated to Venus Libitina on the Esquiline Hill. poop. ... In Roman mythology, Libitina was the goddess of death, corpses and funerals. ... The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ...


Venus Murcia ("Venus of the Myrtle") was an epithet that merged the goddess with the little-known deity Murcia or Murtia. Murcia was associated with the myrtle-tree, but in other sources was called a goddess of sloth and laziness.


Venus Obsequens ("Graceful Venus" or "Indulgent Venus") was an epithet to which a temple was dedicated in the late 3rd century BCE during the Third Samnite War by Quintus Fabius Maximus Gurges. It was built with money fined from women who had been found guilty of adultery. It was the oldest temple of Venus in Rome, and was probably situated at the foot of the Aventine Hill near the Circus Maximus. Its dedication day, August 19, was celebrated in the Vinalia Rustica. The Samnite Wars were three wars between the early Roman Republic and the tribes of Samnium. ... Quintus Fabius Maximus Gurges was the son of Quintus Fabius Maximus Rullianus and a Consul in 292, 276 and 265 BC. In 295 BC he was curule aedile, and fined certain matrons of noble birth for their disorderly life. ... This article is about the act of adultery. ... The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. ... , For other uses, see Circus Maximus (disambiguation). ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vinalia were Roman festivals in honour of Jupiter and Venus. ...


On April 1, the Veneralia was celebrated in honor of Venus Verticordia ("Venus the Changer of Hearts"), the protector against vice. A temple to Venus Verticordia was built in Rome in 114 BC, and dedicated April 1, at the instruction of the Sibylline Books to atone for the inchastity of three Vestal Virgins. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Veneralia (April 1) was the festival of Venus Verticordia, the goddess of love and beauty. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC - 110s BC - 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC Years: 119 BC 118 BC 117 BC 116 BC 115 BC - 114 BC - 113 BC 112 BC... The Sibylline Books or Sibyllae were a collection of oracular utterances, set out in Greek hexameters, purchased from a sibyl by the semi-legendary last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, and consulted at momentous crises through the history of the Republic and the Empire. ... Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ...


Venus Victrix ("Venus the Victorious") was an aspect of the armed Aphrodite that Greeks had inherited from the East, where the goddess Ishtar "remained a goddess of war, and Venus could bring victory to a Sulla or a Caesar."[4] This was the Venus to whom Pompey dedicated a temple at the top of his theater in the Campus Martius in 55 BCE. There was also a shrine to Venus Victrix on the Capitoline Hill, and festivals to her on August 12 and October 9. A sacrifice was annually dedicated to her on the latter date. In neo-classical art, this title is often used in the sense of 'Venus Victorious over men's hearts' or in the context of the Judgement of Paris (eg Canova's Venus Victrix, a half-nude reclining portrait of Pauline Bonaparte). For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L•CORNELIVS•L•F•P•N•SVLLA•FELIX)[1] (ca. ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... Pompeys Theater remains in Largo di Torre Argentina. ... Model of the ancient Campus Martius around 300 AD The Pantheon, a landmark of the Campus Martius since ancient Rome. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Judgment of Paris, Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1636 (National Gallery, London) For the wine-tasting event known as The Judgment of Paris, see Paris Wine Tasting of 1976 The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be... Canova may refer to: Antonio Canova Canova, South Dakota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pauline as Venus Victrix by Canova. ... Pauline Bonaparte, Princess and Duchess of Guastalla (October 20, 1780- June 9, 1825) (she spelled the named Buonaparte) was the younger sister of Napoleon I of France, and was his favorite sister. ...


Other significant epithets for Venus included Venus Amica ("Venus the Friend"), Venus Armata ("Armed Venus"), Venus Caelestis ("Celestial Venus"), and Venus Aurea ("Golden Venus").


In art

Classical art

National Archaeological Museum, Athens
National Archaeological Museum, Athens

Roman and Hellenistic art produced many variations on the goddess, often based on the Praxitlean type Aphrodite of Cnidus. Many female nudes from this period of sculpture whose subjects are unknown are in modern art history conventionally called 'Venus'es, even if they originally may have portrayed a mortal woman rather than operated as a cult statue of the goddess. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 660 pixel, file size: 122 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 660 pixel, file size: 122 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Praxiteles of Athens, the son of Cephisodotus, was the greatest of the Attic sculptors of the 4th century BC, who has left an imperishable mark on the history of art. ... The Aphrodite of Cnidus was one of the most famous works of the Attic sculptor Praxiteles (4th century BC). ... // In the practice of religion, a cult image is a man-made object that is venerated for the deity, spirit or daemon that it embodies or represents. ...


Examples include:

Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... (Redirected from 130 BCE) Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC - 130s BC - 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC Years: 135 BC 134 BC 133 BC 132 BC 131 BC - 130 BC... The Venus de Medici The Venus de Medici or Medici Venus is a lifesize (1. ... The Esquiline Venus The Esquiline Venus, smaller-than-life-size nude marble sculpture of a female in a sandal and headdress, c. ... Venus Anadyomene, by Titian, ca. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1700x2830, 2774 KB) Template:BritishMuseum I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (521x949, 150 KB) From: http://runeberg. ... The Callipygian Venus or Venus Kallipygos, (In Greek, Aphrodite Kallipygos: Aphrodite of the Beautiful Buttocks), is a type of nude female statue of the Hellenistic era. ...

In non-classical art

Venus Anadyomene, by Titian (ca. 1525)
Venus Anadyomene, by Titian (ca. 1525)
Russian Venus by Boris Kustodiev (1926).
Russian Venus by Boris Kustodiev (1926).

Venus became a popular subject of painting and sculpture during the Renaissance period in Europe. As a "classical" figure for whom nudity was her natural state, it was socially acceptable to depict her unclothed. As the goddess of sexual healing, a degree of erotic beauty in her presentation was justified, which had an obvious appeal to many artists and their patrons. Over time, venus came to refer to any artistic depiction in post-classical art of a nude woman, even when there was no indication that the subject was the goddess. Image File history File links Anadyomene. ... Image File history File links Anadyomene. ... Venus Anadyomene (Greek - literally Venus rising from the sea), is a c. ... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... Self-Portrait in front of Troitse-Sergiyeva Lavra, 1912 Boris Mikhaylovich Kustodiev (Russian: ) (March 7, 1878–May 28, 1927) was a Russian art deco painter. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Sculptor redirects here. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Nude redirects here. ...

In the field of prehistoric art, since the discovery in 1908 of the so-called "Venus of Willendorf" small Neolithic sculptures of rounded female forms have been conventionally referred to as Venus figurines. Although the name of the actual deity is not known, the knowing contrast between the obese and fertile cult figures and the classical conception of Venus has raised resistance to the terminology. The Birth of Venus is a painting by Sandro Botticelli. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... The Sleeping Venus, also known as Dresden Madonna, is an influential painting by the Italian Renaissance master Giorgione, c. ... 1501 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Venus of Urbino (1538) is an oil painting by the Italian master Titian. ... Events Treaty of Nagyvarad. ... La Venus del espejo, also known as The Rokeby Venus, is a painting by Diego Velázquez in the National Gallery, London. ... Olympia is an oil on canvas painting by Edouard Manet. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Birth of Venus, painted in 1879 by Bouguereau. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pauline as Venus Victrix by Canova. ... Canova may refer to: Antonio Canova Canova, South Dakota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In the history of art, prehistoric art is all art produced in preliterate cultures (prehistory), beginning somewhere in very late geological history. ... Venus of Willendorf Venus of Willendorf, also known as the Woman of Willendorf, is an 11. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Venus of Willendorf Venus figurines is an umbrella term for a number of prehistoric statuettes of women sharing common attributes (many depicted as apparently obese or pregnant) from the Aurignacian or Gravettian period of the upper Palaeolithic, found from Western Europe to Siberia. ... A cult figure or cult icon is a person who attracts the attention of a small band of aficionados. ...


Tannhäuser

Tannhäuser in the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento.
Tannhäuser in the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento.

The medieval German legend Tannhäuser is an interesting survival of the Venus myth well after her worship was extirpated by Christianity. Download high resolution version (490x700, 150 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (490x700, 150 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... In the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


The German story tells of Tannhäuser, a knight and poet who found Venusburg, a mountain with caverns containing the subterranean home of Venus, and spent a year there worshipping the goddess. After leaving Venusburg, Tannhäuser is filled with remorse, and travels to Rome to ask Pope Urban IV if it is possible to be absolved of his sins. For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ...


Urban replies that forgiveness is as impossible as it would be for his papal staff to blossom. Three days after Tannhäuser's departure, Urban's staff blooms with flowers; messengers are sent to retrieve the knight, but he has already returned to Venusburg, never to be seen again.


See also

Venus may refer to: The planet Venus Venus (mythology), the Roman goddess of love, in Greek mythology known as Aphrodite Venus (comics), the Marvel Comics character, based on the above Venus (genus), a genus of clams in the bivalve mollusc family Veneridae Venus Bucureşti, a Romanian football team. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Suadela was a goddess of persuasion, particularly in romance, seduction and love. ... Astarte on a car with four branches protruding from roof. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... The Pyrgi Tablets, found in an excavation of a sanctuary of that town in Italy, a port of the southern Etruscan town of Caere, are three golden leaves that record a dedication made around 500 BC by Thefarie Velianas, king of Caere, to the Phoenician goddess ‘Ashtart. ... Inanna (DINANNA ) is the Sumerian goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare. ... For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... ISIS (Image and Scanner Interface Specification) is an industry standard interface for image scanning technologies, developed by Pixel Translations in 1990 (today: EMC captiva). ...

References

  1. ^ wen-1. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.. Retrieved on 2008-02-16.
  2. ^ Virgil, Aeneid i. 720
  3. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1867), "Acidalia", in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. 1, Boston, MA, pp. 12 
  4. ^ Thus Walter Burkert, in Homo Necans (1972) 1983:80, noting C. Koch on "Venus Victrix" in Realencyclopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft, 8 A860-64.
  • Champeaux, J. (1987). Fortuna. Recherches sur le culte de la Fortuna à Rome et dans le monde romain des origines à la mort de César. II. Les Transformations de Fortuna sous le République. Rome: Ecole Française de Rome. (pp. 378–395)
  • Hammond, N.G.L. and Scullard, H.H. (eds.) (1970). The Oxford Classical Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (p. 113)
  • Lloyd-Morgan, G. (1986). "Roman Venus: public worship and private rites." In M. Henig and A. King (eds.), Pagan Gods and Shrines of the Roman Empire (pp. 179–188). Oxford: Oxford Committee for Archaeology Monograph 8.
  • Nash, E. (1962). Pictorial Dictionary of Ancient Rome Volume 1. London: A. Zwemmer Ltd. (pp. 272–263, 424)
  • Richardson, L. (1992). A New Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press. (pp. 92, 165–167, 408–409, 411)
  • Room, A. (1983). Room's Classical Dictionary. London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul. (pp. 319–322)
  • Schilling, R. (1982) (2nd ed.). La Religion Romaine de Vénus depuis les origines jusqu'au temps d'Auguste. Paris: Editions E. de Boccard.
  • Scullard, H.H. (1981). Festivals and Ceremonies of the Roman Republic. London: Thames and Hudson. (pp. 97, 107)
  • Simon, E. (1990). Die Götter der Römer. Munich: Hirmer Verlag. (pp. 213–228).
  • Weinstock, S. (1971). Divus Julius. Oxford; Clarendon Press. (pp. 80–90)
  • Gerd Scherm, Brigitte Tast Astarte und Venus. Eine foto-lyrische Annäherung (1996), ISBN 3-88842-603-0

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aphrodite in classical art
  • 'Venus Chiding Cupid for Learning to Cast Accounts' by Sir Joshua Reynolds at the Lady Lever Art Gallery

Ancient source references

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aphrodite in post-classical art
  • Ovid, Metamorphoses IV.171-189
  • Cicero, De natura deorum II.20.53
  • Lactantius, Divinae institutiones I.17.10
  • Justine, Epitome Historiarum philippicarum Pompei Trogi XVIII.5.4, XXI.3.2
Roman polytheism was the religion of the Etruscans, Romans, and most of their subjects. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The Augur was a priest or official in ancient Rome. ... Bust of a flamen, 3rd century, Louvre A flamen was a name given to a priest assigned to a state supported god or goddess in Roman religion. ... The bronze sheeps liver of Piacenza, with Etruscan inscriptions In Roman practice inherited from the Etruscans, a haruspex (plural haruspices) was a man trained to practice a form of divination called haruspicy, hepatoscopy or hepatomancy. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... The rex Nemorensis, (Latin: the king of Nemi or the king of the grove) was a sort of sacred king who served as priest of the goddess Diana at Aricia in Italy, by the shores of lake Nemi. ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... Roman holidays generally were celebrated to worship and celebrate a certain god or mythological occurrence, and consisted of religious observances, various festival traditions and usually a large feast. ... Roman Funerals and Burial Introduction In ancient Rome, important people had elaborate funerals. ... The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Many adherents of Roman religion have been persecuted, mainly by Christians. ... The Sibylline Books or Sibyllae were a collection of oracular utterances, set out in Greek hexameters, purchased from a sibyl by the semi-legendary last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, and consulted at momentous crises through the history of the Republic and the Empire. ... The Temple of Hercules Victor, near the Teatro di Marcello in Rome (a Greek-style Roman temple) // Pagan history and architecture Originally in Roman paganism, a templum was not (necessarily) a cultic building but any ritually marked observation site for natural phenomena believed to allow predictions, such as the flight... This is a list of Roman deities with brief descriptions. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was Italic in origin. ... Vatican statue of Juno Sospita This article is about a figure in mythology. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... Mars, painting by Diego Velazquez Mars was the Roman warrior god, the son of Juno and Jupiter, husband of Bellona, and the lover of Venus. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... This article is about the Roman goddess. ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind... Lares (pl. ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was an early god of the Roman state. ... Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the Unconquered Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... Adranus or Adranos (Greek: ) was a fire god worshipped by the Sicels, the original inhabitants of the island of Sicily. ... The Averrunci, in antiquity, were an order of deities among the Romans, whose office was to avert dangers and evils. ... Averruncus is a minor god in Roman mythology. ... Bromius is the Roman god of wine. ... Caelus was the Latin name that the Romans used for the Greek sky god Uranus. ... In Roman mythology, Clitunno was a river god, an Oceanid. ... This article is about the Roman god. ... Dis Pater, or Dispater, was a Roman and Celtic god of the underworld, later subsumed by Pluto or Jupiter. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... Late second-century statue of Glycon. ... In Roman mythology, the god Inuus protected livestock. ... In Roman mythology, Lupercus was a name for the Greek god Pan. ... In Roman mythology, Orcus was a god of the underworld, punisher of broken oaths, more equivalent to Pluto than to the Greek Hades, and later identified with Dis Pater. ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... Aius Locutius is a Roman legend. ... In Roman mythology, Angerona or Angeronia was an old Roman goddess, whose name and functions are variously explained. ... In Roman mythology, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind... In Roman mythology, Spes was the goddess of hope. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Venus (284 words)
Venus is the daughter of Jupiter, and some of her lovers include Mars and Vulcan, modeled on the affairs of Aphrodite.
Venus' importance rose, and that of her cult, through the influence of several Roman political leaders.
Roman statues and portraits of Venus are usually identical to the Greek representations of Aphrodite.
Venus (mythology) - MSN Encarta (0 words)
Venus (mythology), in Roman mythology, originally a goddess of gardens and fields but later identified with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty.
As Venus Genetrix, she was worshiped as the mother of the hero Aeneas, the founder of the Roman people; as Venus Felix, the bringer of good fortune; as Venus Victrix, the bringer of victory; and as Venus Verticordia, the protector of feminine chastity.
Venus was the wife of Vulcan, god of metalwork, but she was often unfaithful to him.
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