FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ventricle (heart)

In the heart, a ventricle is a heart chamber which collects blood from an atrium (another heart chamber that is smaller than a ventricle) and pumps it out of the heart. The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... In anatomy, the atrium (plural: atria) is the blood collection chamber of a heart. ... An electrically driven pump (electropump) for waterworks near the Hengsteysee, Germany. ...


In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation for the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation for the rest of the body. (See Double circulatory system for details.) Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) under the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... Pulmonary circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the heart, to the lungs, and returns oxygenated blood back to the heart. ... Respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Systemic circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart. ... In the first circuit, the blood is pumped to the lungs, where it acquires oxygen. ...


Ventricles have thicker walls than the atria, and thus can create higher blood pressure. Comparing the left and right ventricle, the left ventricle has thicker walls because it needs to pump blood to the whole body. A sphygmomanometer, a device used for measuring blood pressure. ...


See also

Cardiology is the branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. ... At rest, the ventricular myocyte membrane potential is about -80 mV, which is close to the potassium reversal potential. ... In cardiovascular physiology, ejection fraction (Ef) is the fraction of blood pumped out of a ventricle with each heart beat. ... A Ventricular assist device, or VAD, is mechanical device that is used to partially or completely replace the function of a failing heart. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ventricle (heart) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (165 words)
In the heart, a ventricle is a heart chamber which collects blood from an atrium (another heart chamber that is smaller than ventricle) and pumps it out of the heart.
In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation for the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation for the rest of the body.
Ventricles have thicker walls than the atria, and thus can create the higher blood pressure.
Heart - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1457 words)
In the human body, the heart is normally situated slightly to the left of the middle of the thorax, underneath the sternum (breastbone).
The heart is enclosed by a sac known as the pericardium and is surrounded by the lungs.
Amphibians and reptiles have a three-chambered heart, in which oxygenated blood from the lungs and de-oxygenated blood from the respiring tissues enters by separate atria, and is directed via a spiral valve to the appropriate vessel—aorta for oxygenated blood and pulmonary vein for deoxygenated blood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m