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Encyclopedia > Veneto
Veneto
Geography
Status Region
Capital Venice
President Giancarlo Galan
(Forza Italia-House of Freedoms)
Provinces 7
Area 18,391.22 km²
 - Ranked 8th (6.0 %)
Population (2007 est.)
 - Total 4,795,508
 - Ranked 5th (8.0 %)
 - Density 261/km²

Veneto is my fatherland. Even if there exists a Republic of Italy, this abstract idea is not my Fatherland. We Venetians have travelled throughout the world, but our Fatherland, that for which we would fight if it were necessary to fight, is Veneto. When I see "River sacred to the Fatherland" written on the bridges spanning the Piave, I am moved, not because I think of Italy, but rather because I think of Veneto. Image File history File links Venedig. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Giancarlo Galan (born in Padova on September 10, 1956), after an experience in the Italian Liberal Party, joined Forza Italia, as far as it was founded in 1994. ... Forza Italia (Forward Italy, FI) [1] is an Italian political party. ... Casa delle Libertà (CDL; Italian for House of Freedoms), was a major Italian center-right political alliance led by Silvio Berlusconi. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ...

Veneto or Venetia (Vèneto), is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about 4.8 million, and its capital is Venice. Once the cradle of the renowned Venetian Republic, then a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today among the wealthiest and most industrialized regions of Italy. Veneto's natural, historical, and artistic beauty makes it, by far, the most visited region of Italy, with about 60 million tourists every year (2007).[1] Spoken languages are Italian, Ladin and Venetian (a motion to recognize Venetian as an official regional language has been approved by the regional Parliament[2]). The Regional Constitution, approved by the Italian Parliament in 1971, also recognizes Veneto inhabitants as a "people" (i.e. a distinct people or "popolo" in Italian).[3] Goffredo Parise (December 8, 1929 - August 31, 1986) was an Italian writer and journalist. ... Corriere della Sera is an Italian newspaper printed in Milan. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[4] primarily in Italy. ... Ladin (Ladino in Italian, Ladin in Ladin, Ladinisch in German) is a Rhaetian language spoken in the Dolomite mountains in Italy, between the regions of Trentino-South Tyrol and Veneto. ... A sign in Venetian reading Here we also speak Venetian Venetian or Venetan is a Romance language spoken by over five million people,[1] mostly in the Veneto region of Italy. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...

Contents

Geography

Veneto is located in the northeastern part of Italy, bordering on the Italian regions of Emilia-Romagna and Lombardy, the autonomous Italian regions of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Friuli Venezia Giulia, and the nation of Austria. It lies between the Alps and the Adriatic Sea and is crossed by the rivers Po, Adige, Brenta and Piave. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x836, 329 KB) This map shows the provinces of the Italian region of Veneto. ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... With an area of 7844 km² and 1. ... Alp redirects here. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... PO may stand for: Pareto optimality Parole Officer Per os, Latin for by mouth or orally Perfect Orange a third wave ska based in Knoxville, TN from 2002-2005 Petty Officer, a Non-Commissioned Officer Rank in many Navies Pilkington Optronics, now Thales Optronics Pilot Officer, a junior commissioned rank... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ... The Brenta is an Italian river that runs from the Trento province to the Adriatic Sea in the Veneto region. ... Piave (from Latin Plavis ) is a river in north Italy. ...


Veneto is divided into seven provinces:

Belluno (It. ... Padua (It. ... Treviso (It. ... Rovigo (It. ... Venice (It. ... Verona (It. ... Vicenza (It. ...

History

The Venetic Period

Between the 2nd and 1st millennia B.C., the region was inhabited by the Euganei. According to ancient historians, the Veneti (sometimes called the Paleoveneti [4]), came from Paphlagonia in Asia Minor at the time of the Fall of Troy, led by prince Antenor, a comrade of Aeneas. In the 7th-6th centuries B.C. the local populations of Veneto entered into contact with the Etruscans and the Greeks. Venetic culture reached a highpoint during the 4th century B.C. These ancient Veneti spoke Venetic, an Indo-European language akin to, but distinct from Latin and the other Italic languages. Meanwhile, the Veneti prospered through their trade in amber and were well-known for their breeding of horses. Este, Padua, Oderzo, Adria, Vicenza, Verona, and Altino became centers of Venetic culture. However, over time, the Veneti began to adopt the dress and certain other customs of their Celtic neighbors. The Euganei (fr. ... The Veneti (Enetoi in Greek) were an ancient people who inhabited todays northeastern Italy, in a area comprised in the modern-day region Veneto. ... Paphlagonia was an ancient area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, situated between Bithynia and Pontus, and separated from Phrygia (later, Galatia) by a prolongation to the east of the Bithynian Olympus. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Antenor was a son of the Dardanian noble Aesyetes by Cleomestra. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Venetic is an extinct Indo-European language that was spoken in ancient times in the Veneto region of Italy, between the Po River delta and the southern fringe of the Alps. ... For other uses, see Indo-European. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Look up Italic, italic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Amber (disambiguation). ... Ercole I dEste was one of the most important patrons of arts in the Italian Renaissance. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Oderzo is a town in the province of Treviso, Veneto, Italy. ... Adria is a town in the province of Rovigo in the Veneto region of Northern Italy, situated between the mouths of the rivers Adige and Po. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Altinum (mod. ...


The Roman Period

During the third century B.C., the Veneti, together with the Cenomani Celts on their western border, sided with the Romans as Rome expanded and struggled against the Insubri and Boii Celts. During the Second Punic War (218 B.C. – 202 B.C.), the Veneti even sent a contingent of soldiers to fight alongside the Romans against Hannibal and the invading Carthaginians and Veneti were among those slaughtered at the Battle of Cannae (216 B.C.). In 181 B.C., a Roman triumvirate of Publius Scipio Nasica, Caius Flaminius, and Lucius Manlius Acidinus led three thousand families, mainly from Samnium but supplemented by native Veneti, to found a Latin colony at Aquileia as a base to protect the territory of the Veneti from incursions of the hostile Carni and Istri. From then on, Roman influence over the area increased. Thus, in 169 B.C. more colonizing families were sent from Rome to Aquileia. In 148 B.C. the Via Postumia was completed connecting Aquileia to Genua. In 131 B.C., the Via Annia joined Adria to Patavium to Altinum to Concordia to Aquileia. Gradually, the Roman Republic transformed its alliance with the Veneti into a relationship of dominance. After the 91 B.C. Italic rebellion, the cities of the Veneti, together with the rest of Transpadania, were granted partial rights of Roman citizenship according to the Lex Pompeia Transpadanis. Later in 49 B.C., by the Lex Rubria de Gallia Rome granted full Roman citizenship to the Veneti. Such citizens would have benefitted from the Via Claudia completed in 46 B.C. and connecting Altinum to Tarvisium to Feltria to Tridentum (modern Trento). [From Tridentum it continued north to Pons Drusus and south through Verona to Mutina (modern Modena).] After the Battle of Philippi (42 B.C.), which ended the Roman Civil War, the lands of the Veneti, together with the rest of Cisalpine Gaul, ceased to be a province and the territory of the Veneti, which included modern Friuli, became region X (Venetia et Istria) of a new entity named Italia (Italy). Aquileia became its capital. Meanwhile, under the Pax Romana, Patavium (modern Padua) became one of the most important cities of northern Italy. Other Venetic cities such as Opitergium (modern Oderzo), Tarvisium (modern Treviso), Feltria (modern Feltre), Vicetia (modern Vicenza), Ateste (modern Este), and Altinum (modern Altino) prospered and Romanized adopting the Latin language and Roman culture. Thus, by the end of the first century A.D., Latin had finally displaced the Venetic language. The Veneti (Enetoi in Greek) were an ancient people who inhabited todays northeastern Italy, in a area comprised in the modern-day region Veneto. ... The Cenomani (Greek: , Strabo, Ptol. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Boii (Latin plural, singular Boius; Greek Βοιοι) is the Roman name of an ancient Celtic tribe, attested at various times in Transalpine Gaul (modern France) and Cisalpine Gaul (northern Italy), as well as in Pannonia (today Western Hungary), Bohemia, Moravia and western Slovakia and also Transylvania (from 1st century to 18... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... For the 11th century battle in the Byzantine conquest of the Mezzogiorno, see Battle of Cannae (1018). ... Gaius Flaminius Nepos was a politician and consul of the Roman Republic in the 3rd century BC. He was the greatest popular leader to challenge the authority of the Senate before the Gracchi a century later. ... Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south, by Campania... Aquileia (Friulian Aquilee, Slovene Oglej) is an ancient Roman town of Italy, at the head of the Adriatic at the edge of the lagoons, about 10 km from the sea, on the river Natiso (modern Natisone), the course of which has changed somewhat since Roman times. ... Via Postumia, an ancient highroad of northern Italy constructed in 148 BC by the consul Spurius Postumius Albinus. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Map with location of Cisalpine Gaul This article is about the Roman province. ... Roman Empire at its greatest extent with the conquests of Trajan Pax Romana, Latin for the Roman peace (sometimes Pax Augusta), was the long period of relative peace and minimal expansion by military force experienced by the Roman Empire between 27 BC and 180 AD. Augustus Caesar led Rome into... Padua, Italy, (It. ... Oderzo is a town in the province of Treviso, Veneto, Italy. ... Feltre is a town and comune of the province of Belluno in Veneto, Italy. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


The Middle Ages

Already in 166 A.D., the Quadi and Marcomanni had briefly invaded Venetia. In the fifth century, both Alaric the Goth and then Attila and the Huns devastated the area. Attila laid siege to Aquileia and turned it into a ruin in 452 A.D. Many of the mainland inhabitants sought protection in the nearby lagoons which would become Grado in the east and Venice more to the west. On the heels of the Huns came the Ostrogoths who not only invaded, but settled the land. During the mid-sixth century, Justinian reconquered Venetia for the Eastern Roman Empire. An Exarch was established at Ravenna while a military tribune was set up in Oderzo. Byzantine rule would not last long. Starting in 568 A.D, the Lombards crossed the Julian Alps. These invaders subdivided the territory of Venetia into numerous feuds ruled by Germanic dukes and counts (essentially creating the division of Veneto from Friuli). The invasion provoked another wave of migration from the mainland to the Byzantine controlled coast and islands. In 667, A.D. the Lombards conquered the Byzantine base at Oderzo and took possession of practically all of Veneto (and Friuli) except for Venice and Grado. The 36 Lombard duchies included Ceneda, Treviso, Verona, and Vicenza, and within the Veneto itself, a reminder of Lombard hegemony is seen today in palace names which begin with the word "Farra." By the middle of the eight century, the Franks had assumed political control and mainland Veneto became part of the Carolingian Empire. Though politically dominant these Germanic invaders were gradually absorbed into the Venetian population over the centuries. In the late ninth century, Berengar, Margrave of the March of Friuli was elected king of Italy. Under his turmultuous reign, the March of Friuli was absordbed into the March of Verona so that Verona's territory contained a large portion of Roman Venetia. // Alaric is a Germanic name that, broken into its parts means Ala: everyones and ric: ruler. This has various forms in the several Germanic languages, such as Alareiks in the original Gothic and Alrekr in Old Norse. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Events Attila, king of the Huns, invades Italy Northern Wei Tai Wu Di is succeeded by Northern Wei Nan An Wang, then by Northern Wei Wen Cheng Di as ruler of the Northern Wei Dynasty in China. ... Grado can refer to: Grado, a municipality in the province and autonomous community of Asturias, Spain. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... Events April 1 - King Alboin leads the Lombards into Italy; refugees fleeing from them go on to found Venice. ... A feud is a long-running argument or fight between parties—often groups of people, especially families or clans. ... The Daysan River floods Edessa in Asia Many people suddenly have a relief when they know Apocalypse didnt happen in the past year. ... Vittorio Veneto is a city situated in the Province of Treviso, in the region of Veneto, Italy, in the northeast of the Italian peninsula, between the Piave and the Livenza rivers. ... Look up Lombard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of Carolingian Empire The term Carolingian Empire is sometimes used to refer to the realm of the Franks under the dynasty of the Carolingians. ... Berengar of Friuli (? - 16 April 924) was a Margrave of Friuli, King of Italy (from 888 on) and Emperor from 915 on. ... The March of Friuli was a Carolingian frontier march against the Magyars in the ninth and tench centuries. ... Italy around the year 1000. ...

Venice in 1493, German illustration.
Venice in 1493, German illustration.

In the tenth century mainland Veneto, after suffering invasions from nearby Magyars and Slavs, was incorporated into the Holy Roman Empire. Gradually, the communes of the mainland grew in power and wealth. In 1167 an alliance (called the Lombard League) was formed among the Venetian cities such as Venice, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, and Verona with other cities of Northern Italy to assert their rights against the Holy Roman Emperor. The Second Treaty of Constance in 1183 confirmed the Peace of Venice of 1177 in which the cities agreed to remain part of the Empire as long as their jurisdiction over their own territories was not infringed upon. The league dissolved at the death of Emperor Frederick II in 1250. The period also witnessed the founding of the second oldest university in Italy, the University of Padua founded in 1222. Around this time, Padua also served as home to St. Anthony, the beloved saint called simply "il santo" ("the saint") by the inhabitants of the town. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Lombard League was an alliance formed around 1167, which at its apex included most of the cities of northern Italy (although its membership changed in time), including, among others, Milan, Piacenza, Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, Brescia, Bologna, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, Verona, Lodi, and Parma, and even some lords, such as... Northern Italy comprises of two areas belonging to NUTS level 1: North-West (Nord-Ovest): Aosta Valley, Piedmont, Lombardy, Liguria North-East (Nord-Est): Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Aosta Valley are regions with a... The Peace of Constance[1] of 1183 was signed in Konstanz by Frederick Barbarossa and representatives of the Lombard League. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... The Treaty or Peace of Venice, 1177, was an important peace treaty between the papacy and its allies, the north Italian city-states of the Lombard League, and Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... For others known as Saint Anthony, see Saint Anthony (disambiguation). ...


The Serenissima: The Republic of Venice

As the barbarians were interested in the wealth of the mainland, part of the Venetian population sought refuge on some of the isolated and unoccupied islands of lagoon, from which the city of Venetiae or Venice was born. After a period of Byzantine domination in 8th century, Venice became an independent maritime Republic ruled by its elected dux or doge. For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


The Republic proved to be a commercial superpower, and its influence lasted through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In fact, the Venetian Republic enjoyed 1100 years of uninterrupted influence throughout the Mediterranean. By the 16th century, Venetian Republic held dominion over Veneto, Friuli, part of Lombardy and Romagna, Istria, Dalmatia, the Ionian Islands of Corfu, Cefalonia, Ithaca and Zante. From the 13th to 17th centuries it held the island of Crete and from the mid-15th to mid-16th century, the island of Cyprus. Venetian mainland holdings led to Venetian involvement in European and in particular, Italian politics. Cities had to be fortified, one impressive example being Palmanova in Friuli. However, the wise rule and propserity brought by the Serenissima made the cities of the terra firma willing subjects. Eastern Islands served as useful ports for Venetian shipping. However, as the Ottoman Empire grew more powerful and aggressive, Venice was often put on the defensive. Ottoman control of the eastern Mediterranean and the discoveries of sea routes to Asia around Africa and of the Americas had a debilitating effect on the Venetian economy. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Friulian Coats of Arms Friuli (Furlan: Friûl, German: Friaul, Slovenian: Furlanija) is an area in northeastern Italy, comprising the major part of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Emilia-Romagna is an administrative region of Northern Italy comprising the two historic regions of Emilia and Romagna. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Palmanova (Friulian: Palme) is a town in northeastern Italy, close to the border with Slovenia. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


See also:

The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century Doges Palace Complex For some thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Republic of Venice was the Doge (Duke). ...

The French and Austro-Hungarian Periods

In 1797, Napoleon invaded the territory of the Venetian Republic. Overwhelmed by more powerful forces, Doge Ludovico Manin resigned and retired to his villa at Passariano in Friuli and the thousand year old Republic disappeared as an independent state. This proved very unpopular in the mainland cities where sympathies were strongly with the Republic of Venice. In many places peasants actively attempted to resist the French invaders who arrogantly claimed to bring them liberty. By the Treaty of Campoformio signed on October 17, 1797 part of the mainland Venetian territory was handed over to the Austrian Empire and a western part was annexed to the Cisalpine Republic. The territory soon reverted back to Napoleon in 1801, but after his defeat it was handed over to Austria again. The Veneto remained in Austrian hands, except certain cities briefly in 1848, until annexed by the Kingdom of Italy. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century For about a thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the Doge, a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux, as the major Italian parallel Duce and the English Duke. ... Lodovico Manin was the last Doge of The Most Serene Republic of Venice. ... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The flag of the Cisalpine Republic was the Transpadane Republic vertical Italian tricolour, with the square shape of the Cispadane Republic The Cisalpine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Cisalpina) was a French client republic in Northern Italy that lasted from 1797 to 1802. ...


The Italian Period

In 1866 after the Third War of Independence the Veneto was annexed to Italy. After a controversial referendum, it was occupied by Italian troops, the Carabinieri[citation needed]. In an effort to Italianize the population, the dialects of Venetian were forbidden[citation needed] while often people's surnames and place names were changed. Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... The Carabinieri are the military police of Italy. ...


Because of the conditions brought about by the new Italian government[citation needed], the 19th century became a period of massive emigration. With sorrow Hundreds of thousands Venetians made the difficult decision to abandon their native land and homes and seek more congenial circumstances in South America Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Central America locations such as Chipilo, Mexico and also the Caribbean Islands; Cuba, The Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and to other distant parts of the world such as Australia, Canada, and also the United States of America.[opinion needs balancing] In many of these places their descendants have maintained the use of their respective ancestral Venetian dialect. // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Flag of Rio Grande do Sul See other Brazilian States Capital Porto Alegre Largest City Porto Alegre Area 282,062 km² Population   - Total   - Density 10. ... Chipilo is a small city in the state of Puebla, Mexico. ... Motto: Spanish: Dios, Patria, Libertad (English: God, Homeland, Liberty) Anthem: Quisqueyanos valientes Capital (and largest city) Santo Domingo Spanish Government Republic  - President Leonel Fernández Independence from Haiti   - Date 27 February 1844  Area  - Total 48,442 km² (130st) 18,810 sq mi   - Water (%) 1. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


After Italy entered the First World War, the Veneto became a major front. The flooding of the Piave River would play a major role in the Italian victory at the Battle of Vittorio Veneto which was fought between October 24 and November 3, 1918 and serve as the major turning point in the War. After the Second World War, the Venetian spirit of sacrifice and a family orientation played a major role in an economic recovery that harmoniously blended traditional agriculture, trade, and industry[citation needed]. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Combatants Italy United Kingdom France United States Image:Flag of Austria-Hungary. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Economy

After the destruction and bombardments by the Allied forces in Second World War the Veneto region became one of the poorest places in Italy. Nevertheless, in short time, things began to turn around. Today, the Veneto, although to a large degree agricultural, is one of the most industrialized regions of Italy, with high annual economic growth and a very dynamic economy. Some Italian newspapers have called this industrialization "The Nord-Est Miracle", due to the economic boom during the last decade of the 20th century. During the last decade of the 20th century, a large number of Venetian industries opened some branches in Eastern European countries such as Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and the Czech Republic. The Romanian city of Timişoara is also known as "The Newest Venetian Province", due to the high presence of Venetian industries.[citation needed] For other uses of TimiÅŸ, see TimiÅŸ (disambiguation). ...


Agriculture

The agriculture of the region has witnessed significant progress during the past 20-30 years. The territory of Veneto is still dominated by small landholdings and agriculture is mixed. The other phenomenon is part-time work in the agricultural sector; after the working-day on a factory, people cultivate their private pieces of land. The principal agricultural products include maize, green peas, vegetables, apples, cherries, sugar beets, forage, tobacco, hemp. Significant production of grapes occurs in hilly zones, leading to the creation of well-regarded wines. The region also has extensive cattle-raising and fishing. This article is about the maize plant. ... Species Vitis acerifolia Vitis aestivalis Vitis amurensis Vitis arizonica Vitis x bourquina Vitis californica Vitis x champinii Vitis cinerea Vitis x doaniana Vitis girdiana Vitis labrusca Vitis x labruscana Vitis monticola Vitis mustangensis Vitis x novae-angliae Vitis palmata Vitis riparia Vitis rotundifolia Vitis rupestris Vitis shuttleworthii Vitis tiliifolia Vitis... Vineyard at Trento, Veneto region Veneto is a wine region in north-eastern Italy, one of a group of three highly productive Italian regions known collectively as the Venezie (after the ancient Venetian Republic) and the biggest DOC producer of the three. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ...


Industry

Thanks to ancient traditional artisan activities industry takes its origins from the past century in some pre-Alpine valleys. In the last 30-40 years industrialization transformed the appearance of the landscape, especially in the plains, where hundreds of industrial complexes were built. Metallurgical and chemical plants were built in Marghera and Mestre. In other parts of the region were affirmed little and medium activities in various sectors: food, textiles, chemistry, metal-mechanics, glass, electronics, eyeglasses (exported). Artisan production is also quite strong: Murano glass, laces of Burano and gold production of Vicenza. Apart from agriculture and industry activities such as commerce, banking and tourism are also important. In province of Belluno there is the more important area of the world for the production of eyeglasses (Luxottica, Safilo, Marcolin ecc.). Marghera, also known as Venezia Marghera, ia a frazione of the comune of Venice, Italy. ... Watchtower of Mestre. ... An artisan, also called a craftsman,[1] is a skilled manual worker who uses tools and machinery in a particular craft. ... A shop with boats, Murano Murano is usually described as an island in the Venetian Lagoon, although like Venice itself it is actually an archipelago of islands linked by bridges. ... Colourfully painted houses on Burano. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Veneto

The politics of Veneto takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democracy, whereby the President of Regional Government is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the Regional Government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the Regional Council. The constitution was promulgated on 22 May 1971. Once a stronghold of the Christian Democracy, Veneto is now a stronghold of the centre-right House of Freedoms coalition, which had governed the region since 1995, under President Giancarlo Galan (Forza Italia). ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... Representative democracy is a form of government founded on the principles of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... The Regional Government (Giunta Regionale) of Veneto Region is presided by the President of the Region (Presidente della Regione), who is elected every five years, and is composed by the President and the Ministers (Assessori), who are currently 12, including a Vice President. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... The Regional Government (Giunta Regionale) of Veneto Region is presided by the President of the Region (Presidente della Regione), who is elected every five years, and is composed by the President and the Ministers (Assessori), who are currently 12, including a Vice President. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The Regional Council of Veneto (Consiglio Regionale del Veneto) is the regional parliament of Veneto. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


Once a stronghold of the Christian Democracy, Veneto is now a stronghold of the centre-right House of Freedoms coalition, which has governed the region since 1995, under President Giancarlo Galan, Forza Italia. The governing coalition is composed also of Liga Veneta, National Alliance, the Union of Christian and Centre Democrats and the New Italian Socialist Party. Christian Democracy (Democrazia Cristiana, DC), the Christian democratic party of Italy, dominated government for nearly half a century until its demise amid a welter of corruption allegations in 1992-94. ... The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... Casa delle Libertà (CDL; Italian for House of Freedoms), was a major Italian center-right political alliance led by Silvio Berlusconi. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Giancarlo Galan (born in Padova on September 10, 1956), after an experience in the Italian Liberal Party, joined Forza Italia, as far as it was founded in 1994. ... Forza Italia (Forward Italy, FI) [1] is an Italian political party. ... Liga Veneta is a regionalist and autonomist party, founded in 1979 in Veneto, Italy, combinig Venetism and fiscal federalism. ... National Alliance (Alleanza Nazionale, AN) is a national-conservative Italian political party. ... The Union of Christian and Centre Democrats (Italian: Unione dei Democratici Cristiani e Democratici di Centro) is a political party in Italy formed by a merger of the former Centro Cristiano Democratico and Christiani Democratici Uniti parties. ... The New Italian Socialist Party (Nuovo Partito Socialista Italiano, NPSI) is a small Italian party which professes a social-democratic ideology and claims to be the successor to the old Italian Socialist Party, which was disbanded after the judiciary tempest of the early 1990s (see Mani Pulite). ...


Veneto is also home for Venetism, a political movement that appeared during the 1970s and 1980s, demanding autonomy for the region, considered as a nation separated from Italy, and promoting Venetian culture, language and history. This is the political background in which Liga Veneta was launched in 1980. Then, other Venetist parties, such as Liga Repubblica Veneta and North-East Project, emerged, but they never touched the popularity of Liga Veneta, which was a founding member of Lega Nord in 1991. Venetism is a term used to define an autonomist movement demanding more autonomy for Veneto from Rome, if not the independence, refusing the validity of the result of the referendum with which Veneto was united with Italy in 1866 and wanting to re-discover the Republic of Venices traditions... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The North-East Project is a strongly autonomist and federalist party founded in Veneto in 2004 by Giorgio Panto, former members of the Liga Veneta-Northern League and former members of Liga Fronte Veneto, as former leader and Venetist historian Ettore Beggiato. ... The Lega Nord (Northern League, LN), whose complete name is Lega Nord for the Independence of Padania, is an Italian political party founded in 1991 as a federation of several regional parties in northern Italy, most of which had arisen, and all of which had expanded their share of the... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Liga Veneta scores always between 10 and 30%. In the 2005 regional election it received 14.7% of the votes and the three major Venetist parties combined won 21.5%. However, since 1999, the strongest party in the region is Forza Italia, led by Galan, who is a keen autonomist and fiscal federalist. The last regional election took place on 3-4 March 2005. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Fiscal federalism is the system of transfer payments or grants by which a federal government shares its revenues with lower levels of government. ...


Demographics

A land of emigration until the 1970s, the Veneto has come to attract an influx of foreign immigrants since the economic industrial boom of the 1980s. As of 2006, the Italian national institute of statistics ISTAT estimated that 320,793 foreign-born immigrants live in Veneto, equal to 6.7% of the total regional population.


Towns of Veneto with a population of 50,000 or more:

Comune Population (2007 est.)
Venice 268,516
Verona 262,025
Padua 210,273
Vicenza 113,946
Treviso 81,627
Rovigo 51,295
Chioggia 50,859

For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Rovigo is a town in the Veneto region of Northern Italy, the capital of the homonymous province. ... Chioggia is a coastal town and comune of the province of Venice in the Veneto region of northern Italy, 45°13N 12°17E, situated on a small island at the southern entrance to the Lagoon of Venice about 25 km south of Venice (50 km by road); causeways connect it...

Religion

Christianity entered the region very early on. The region venerates the second century bishop St. Hermagoras and his deacon St. Fortunatus, both of Aquileia and both marytrs, as patrons. Aquileia became the metropolitan see of Venetia. Aquileia had its own liturgical rites which were used throughout the dioceses of the Veneto until the later Middle Ages when the Roman Rite replaced the Aquileian Rite. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Hermagoras, of Temnos, Greek rhetorician of the Rhodian school and teacher of oratory in Rome, flourished during the first half of the 1st century BC. He obtained a great reputation among a certain section and founded a special school, the members of which called themselves Hermagorei. ... A rite is an established, ceremonious, usually religious act. ... The Aquileian Rite was a particular liturgical tradition within the schismatical province of the ancient patriarchal see of Aquileia. ...


As of 2004, over 95% of the population claimed to be Roman Catholic. The region of the Veneto along with the regions of the Friuli and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol form the ecclesiastical region of Triveneto under the Patriarchate of Venice. The Patriarchate of Venice is an archdiocese and metroplitan see of an ecclesiastical province which includes suffragan episcopal sees of Adria-Rovigo, Belluno-Feltre, Chioggia, Concordia-Pordenone, Padua, Treviso, Verona, Vicenza, and Vittorio Veneto.[5] The Archdiocese of Venice was elevated to an honorary Patriarchate by the pope on October 8, 1457 when the Patriarchate of Grado was suppressed. The saintly first patriarch of Venice was Laurence, a nobleman of the Giustiniani family. During the twentieth century the patriarch was often also named a cardinal, and three cardinal patriarchs, Giuseppe Sarto, Angelo Roncalli, and Albino Luciani were elected popes Pius X, John XXIII, and John Paul I, respectively. The Patriarchate of Venice claims St. Mark the Evangelist as its patron. His symbol of the winged lion became a typical symbol of the Venetian Republic. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Angelo Cardinal Scola, Patriarch of Venice. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... A patriarchate is the office or jurisdiction of a patriarch. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ... Saint Lorenzo Giustiniani (1381 - 1455), the Laurentius Justinianus (Lawrence Justinian) of the Roman calendar, is venerated as a saint by the Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Angelo Cardinal Scola, Patriarch of Venice. ... Mark the Evangelist (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter. ...


Language

Most of the people of the Veneto speak standard Italian. However, there is widespread usage of the various local dialects of Venetian. Each of the Venetian dialects derive from the Latin as spoken by the Veneti with words borrowed from Germanic invaders. The Venetian dialects are classified as an Italo-Western Romance language. Variants include an Eastern/Coastal (Venice), a Central type (Padua, Vicenza, Polesine), Western (Verona), North-Central (Treviso), and Northern (Belluno, Feltre, Agordo, Cadore, Zoldo Alto). Each is mutually intelligble to varying degrees. Ladin is spoken in parts of the province of Belluno. A sign in Venetian reading Here we also speak Venetian Venetian or Venetan is a Romance language spoken by over five million people,[1] mostly in the Veneto region of Italy. ... Veneti may mean: The Adriatic Veneti, Enetoi in Greek, a bygone people of north-eastern Italy who spoke an Italic language. ... Italo-Western redirects here. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Ladin (Ladino in Italian, Ladin in Ladin, Ladinisch in German) is a Rhaetian language spoken in the Dolomite mountains in Italy, between the regions of Trentino-South Tyrol and Veneto. ...


Culture

Veneti are very proud of their culture. Each section of the various towns has its patron saint whose feast day is celebrated. Many other festivals are closely allied to the religious calendar. Among these:

  • Panevin celebrated around Epiphany;
  • Carneval celebrated the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday;
  • Pasqua (Easter Sunday);
  • Saint Mark's feast day (April 25);
  • La Sensa (Ascension Thursday);
  • San Giovanni Battista (June 24);
  • La festa del Redentór (mid July);
  • Vendemmia (grape harvest in September);
  • San Nicolò de Bari (St. Nicholas, December 6);
  • Nadàl (Christmas)

Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 17th century (Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio). ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Climate

The variations between climates are influenced by the particular morphology. Continental on the plains, the climate is milder along the Adriatic coast, around Lake Garda and in the open hilly areas. Winters are often harsh everywhere due to northeasterly winds: in the mountains, temperatures can be very low, as low as -35/-30°C in places like Marcesina, 1500 m, near Asiago, or Cansiglio in Belluno area, 900 m; the coastline, with Venice and just to a few kilometers from the sea, is slightly milder than the inner plain, but often covered by thick fog as the central and southern plain; snow is usually abundant in the mountains, where on the highest pikes it may fall even during mid summer, less frequent but not unusual at plain. Precipitation is scarce (750 mm. /year) on the lower plain, especially near river Po, more abundant (750-1,100 mm./year) on the upper plain; the highest values (up to 3,200 mm./year) are recorded in the Bellunese Prealps, near Pasubio and on the Asiago plateau. Lake Garda (Italian Lago di Garda or Benaco) is the largest lake in Italy. ... The River Piave next to Belluno. ... PO may stand for: Pareto optimality Parole Officer Per os, Latin for by mouth or orally Perfect Orange a third wave ska based in Knoxville, TN from 2002-2005 Petty Officer, a Non-Commissioned Officer Rank in many Navies Pilkington Optronics, now Thales Optronics Pilot Officer, a junior commissioned rank... Asiago (Cimbrian: Schleghe, German: Schlägen) is the name of both a minor township (population roughly 6,500, ) and the surrounding plateau region (the Altopiano di Asiago) in the Province of Vicenza in the Veneto region of Northeastern Italy. ...


Main tourist attractions

The Veneto region ranks first in the tourist sector in Europe, with about 60 million tourists every year[citation needed].


The cities of art

Image:Venice 1.jpg Image:Venice 2.jpg Image:Venice 3.jpg Image File history File links Venice_1. ... Image File history File links Venice_2. ... Image File history File links Venice_3. ...


Venice: The kaleidoscopic scenario born of an amazing, intricate and harmonious communication network of water and stone casts light and shadows unique in the world upon a city already singular for its art, history and culture. Venice and its lagoon are listed as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ...


Image:Padua 1.jpg Image:Padua 2.jpg Image:padua 3.jpg Image:padua 4.jpg Image File history File links Padua_1. ... Image File history File links Padua_2. ... Image File history File links Padua_3. ... Image File history File links Padua_4. ...


Padua: also known as the "City of the Saint", is a city of huge importance for its cultural, historical and economic aspects and the Orto botanico di Padova is on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites. Padua, Italy, (It. ... The Orto Botanico di Padova is the worlds oldest academic botanical garden that is still in its original location. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...


Image:Verona 1.jpg Image:Verona 2.jpg Image:Verona 3.jpg Image File history File links Verona_1. ... Image File history File links Verona_2. ... Image File history File links Verona_3. ...


Verona: The city of the most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet. It is one of the cities that has better preserved its artistic heritage in Italy. Verona has been named a UNESCO world heritage site. This article is about the city in Italy. ... For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ...


Image:Vicenza 1.jpg Image:Vicenza 2.jpg Image:Vicenza 3.jpg Image File history File links Vicenza_1. ... Image File history File links Vicenza_2. ... Image File history File links Vicenza_3. ...


Vicenza is on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites, together with a number of the Palladian Villas. Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto is a cluster of works by Andrea Palladio and his disciples which were inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1994 and expanded two years later. ...


Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Belluno the capital of the Dolomites, the bells tower by the architect Filippo Juvarra The River Piave next to Belluno. ... // The Dolomites (Italian: Dolomiti; German: Dolomiten; Friulian: Dolomitis) are a section of the Alps. ... Filippo Juvarra. ...


Image:Montagnana 1.jpg Image File history File linksMetadata Montagnana_1. ...


Montagnana is a commune in the province of Padova with great famous perfectly conserved medieval walls Montagnana is a commune in the province of Padova, in Veneto. ... Padua (It. ...


Image:Bassano 1.jpg Image File history File links Bassano_1. ...


Bassano del Grappa with its wooden covered bridge or Ponte degli Alpini on the river Brenta, designed in 1569 by the architect Andrea Palladio Country Italy Region Veneto Province Vicenza (VI) Mayor Gianpaolo Bizzotto Elevation 129 m Area 46 km² Population  - Total (as of 2001) 40,411  - Density 879/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Bassanesi Dialing code 0424 Postal code 36061 Frazioni Campese, Marchesane, Quartiere Prè, Rubbio, San Lazzaro, San Michele... The Alpini are a highly decorated elite infantry corps of the Italian Army. ... Andrea Palladio (November 30, 1508 – August 19, 1580), was an Italian architect, widely considered the most influential person in the history of Western architecture. ...


Image:Marostica 1.jpg Image File history File links Marostica_1. ...


Marostica : The 'Chess Game' event takes place on the second weekend of September and it involves over 550 characters and lasts two hours. Marostica, in venetian language Maròstega, is a town in the province of Vicenza, Veneto, Italy. ...


Image:Asolo 1.jpg Image File history File links Asolo_1. ...


Asolo is known as 'The Pearl of province of Treviso', and also as 'The City of a Hundred Horizons'. Asolo is a town in the Veneto Region of Northern Italy. ... Treviso (It. ...


Image:Este.JPG Image File history File links Este. ...


Este : The House of Este held the city until 1240, when they moved their capital to Ferrara. Este is a comune of the Province of Padua, in the Veneto region of northern Italy. ... Ercole I dEste was one of the most important patrons of arts in the Italian Renaissance. ... Ferrara is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ...


Ville Venete

Image:La Rotonda little.jpg Image:Villa cornaro.jpg Image:maser.jpg Image:Malcontenta.jpg Image File history File links La_Rotonda_little. ... Image File history File links Villa_cornaro. ... Image File history File links Maser. ... Image File history File links Malcontenta. ...


All over the Venetian plain, but especially in the Provinces of Treviso, Padua, Vicenza and Venice, there stand numerous remarkable artistic rural constructions, the Ville Venete. The dates of construction of these villas range from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries. There are approximately five thousand Ville Venete, of which 1,400 are declared of historical and monumental interest. Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto is a cluster of works by Andrea Palladio and his disciples which were inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1994 and expanded two years later. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • CISA : The Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio (Palladio Centre and Museum) in Vicenza is an independent Foundation, supported by the Veneto Regional Government and by the Italian state

Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... A charitable foundation is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations that either donate funds and support to other organizations, or provide the sole source of funding for their own activities. ... “Italian Republic” redirects here. ...

Parks

An old Italian wall surrounded by flowers.
An old Italian wall surrounded by flowers.

Cansiglio is a pre-alpine massif located in the northeastern Veneto within the provinces of Treviso and Belluno. In geology, a massif is a section of a planets crust that is demarcated by faults or flexures. ...


Parco Nazionale Dolomiti Bellunesi is situated in the southern section of the Province of Belluno, it has beautiful landscapes, waters, woods typical of Dolomites.


Link: Official Web Site


Lakes

Punta San Vigilio
Punta San Vigilio

Lake Garda has boasted of a mild climate and a Mediterranean-type environment since the days of Pliny the Elder and Catullus. The area is a major tourist destination. Various towns along the lake, such as Lazise, Cisano, Bardolino, Garda (VR), Torri del Benaco and Malcesine, have become resorts. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1023x691, 395 KB) Description: Punta San Vigilio and Baia delle Sirene, Lago di Garda (Italy) Source: photo by Markus Bernet, 09/27/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Lake Garda ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1023x691, 395 KB) Description: Punta San Vigilio and Baia delle Sirene, Lago di Garda (Italy) Source: photo by Markus Bernet, 09/27/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Lake Garda ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Fresco from Herculaneum, presumably showing a love couple. ... Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Verona (VR) Mayor Elevation 76 m Area 65. ... For the wine, see Bardolino (wine). ... Garda is a commune in the province of Verona, in Veneto, Italy, on the shores of Lake Garda. ... Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Verona (VR) Mayor Elevation 89 m Area 68. ...


Mountains

Image:Cortina-panoramica.jpg Image File history File links Cortina-panoramica. ...

Cortina d'Ampezzo, it's situated in the Belluno's province, is probably among the three most exclusive mountain locations in Europe and it is well-known for its first-class hotels and shops. It was host to the 1956 Winter Olympics. Many travel to Cortina for winter sports. Just north is the Tre Cime di Lavaredo said to be a symbol of the Italian Dolomites.[6] Cortina dAmpezzo is a town and municipality in the province of Belluno, Veneto, northern Italy. ...

Image:Arabba 01.jpg Image File history File linksMetadata Arabba_01. ...

Arabba lies between the Sella group and the Marmolada. The Sella Group seen from Val Gardena Sella is a mountain group in the Italian Dolomites. ... Marmolada (the Italian name; also Latin: Marmoleda, German: Marmolata) is a mountain in northeastern Italy (just east of Trento) and the highest mountain of the Dolomites (a section of the Alps). ...

Image:Auronzo003.jpg Image File history File links Auronzo003. ...

Auronzo is in the upper Cadore. Cadore, a town and contado (countship) of in the North Italian region of Friuli, is a barren and poor district, watered by the Piave torrent poured forth from the Carnic Alps, and is at no great distance from Tirol. ...

Image:Sappada.jpg Image File history File links Sappada. ...

Sappada is in the extreme north of the region. Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Belluno (BL) Mayor Elevation m Area 62. ...

Rivers

The most important rivers of the Veneto are the Piave (sacred river), the Brenta, the Bacchiglione, the Livenza, the Po, and the Adige. Smaller rivers include the Meschio and the Sile.


Thermal bath

The thermal baths at Abano Terme are also an attraction. Although the most famous, Abano is by no means the only thermal town in the area. It is however one of the prettiest and most tranquil. Abano Terme (town changed its name from Abano Bagni in 1930) is a town in the province of Padua, in the Veneto region, Italy, on the eastern slope of the Colli Euganei; it is 6 miles (10 kilometers) southwest by rail from Padua. ...


Beaches

The Venetian Lagoon at sunset.
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset.

Venice's Lido is an 11-mile long sandbar, home to about 20,000 residents, greatly augmented by the (mainly Italian) tourists who move in every summer. The Venetian Lagoon The Venetian Lagoon or the Venetian Riviera is a lagoon off the Adriatic Sea in which the city of Venice is situated. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Lido and the Venetian Lagoon. ... Sand bars in the Mississippi River at Arkansas and Mississippi A bar is a linear shoaling landform feature within a body of water. ...


Jesolo is one of the most important seaside resort on the Adriatic coast, just few kilometers far from Venice. With a sandy beach more than 13 km long, Jesolo is one of the longest beaches in Italy. Every year Jesolo accommodates over 4.5 million tourists. Jesolo is a city of 23. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


Caorle: it is extremely pleasant to spend some time swimming in Caorle’s beautiful blue sea or sunbathing in its golden beaches, often awarded for being one of the cleanest beaches in Italy. Caorle is a coastal town in the province of Venezia, Veneto, Italy. ...


Bibione The clear and gentle Adriatic Sea, offer to Bibione a wide beach of golden sand. It is 10 km long, Bibione is also an important and fully equipped thermal resort


Eraclea is a small and tranquil paradise right in the middle of pine forests. Eraclea is a town in the province of Venice, Veneto, Italy. ...


Wines, Spirits, Food

There are some fine wines from the Veneto region of Italy, these include: Soave, Bardolino, Recioto, Amarone, Torcolato, Prosecco, Tocai Rosso,Garganega, and Valpolicella. Other common wines include Verduzzo, Raboso, Moscato, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Nero, Pinot Grigio, and Merlot. Homemade wine making is widespread. See also: Wines of Veneto and Wineries in the Veneto Vineyard at Trento, Veneto region Veneto is a wine region in north-eastern Italy, one of a group of three highly productive Italian regions known collectively as the Venezie (after the ancient Venetian Republic) and the biggest DOC producer of the three. ... A Soave is a crisp, dry white wine from the Veneto wine region of Italy. ... For the wine, see Bardolino (wine). ... A winemaking technique where grapes are left to partially dry. ... Amarone della Valpolicella is an often powerful Italian wine made from dried grapes of the Corvina, Rondinella, and Molinara varieties. ... The Torcolato is a white raisin wine with a warm golden color and sweet flavor, pleasantly persistent, round and thick; it is an excellent dessert wine, one of the top national wines. ... Prosecco is a variety of white grape grown in the Veneto region of Italy, and also gives its name to the sparkling wine made from the grape. ... There are no precise data regarding the origin of the Tocai Rosso. ... Garganega is a variety of white wine grape widely grown in the Veneto region of North East Italy. ... Valpolicella is a zone of the province of Verona, Italy, east of Lake Garda. ... Raboso is a red wine grape grown primarily in northeastern Italy around Veneto. ... The muscat family of grapes grow widely for wine, raisins and table grapes. ... Cabernet Franc is a red wine grape variety similar to and a parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. ... Pinot Noir vines at Gervey-Chambertin, on the Côte dOr, France Pinot Noir, known as Pinot Nero in Italian, is a red wine grape variety, considered to make some of the greatest wines. ... Pinot Gris is a white wine grape of species Vitis vinifera related to Pinot noir which goes by a lot of other names: Pinot Grigio (Italy) Pinot Beurot (Loire Valley, France) Ruländer (Austria and Germany, Romania, sweet) Grauburgunder or Grauer burgunder (Austria and Germany, dry) Grauklevner (Germany) Malvoisie (Loire... Merlot grapes on the vine. ... Vineyard at Trento, Veneto region Veneto is a wine region in north-eastern Italy, one of a group of three highly productive Italian regions known collectively as the Venezie (after the ancient Venetian Republic) and the biggest DOC producer of the three. ...


Spirits

After making wine, the alcohol of the pressed grapes is distilled to produce grappa or graspa in the local language. A glass of grappa Grappa is a fragrant grape-based pomace brandy of between 30% and 80% alcohol by volume (60 to 160 proof), of Italian origin. ...


Cheese

Among the well-known cheeses of the Veneto are: Asiago (PDO) (from Asiago), Monte Veronese (PDO), Piave (PDO), Morlacco, Grana Padano (PDO). Asiago cheese. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ... Asiago (Cimbrian: Schleghe, German: Schlägen) is the name of both a minor township (population roughly 6,500, ) and the surrounding plateau region (the Altopiano di Asiago) in the Province of Vicenza in the Veneto region of Northeastern Italy. ... FRESH MONTE VERONESE (PDO,DOP in italian) The great cheese of the Lessini mountains, Monte Veronese is produced like Asiago, in two versions: the fresh, made from whole milk has a brief aging period and has a sweet, intense flavor. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ... Piave is a cows milk cheese made only in the the Piave River Valley region of Bellunao, Italy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ... Grana Padano cheese is one of the most popular Denominazione di Origine Controllata cheeses of Italy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ...


Olive Oil

Garda and Veneto olive oils (PDO) are other noteworthy products of this region. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ...


Fresh & cured meats

The Sopressa Vicentina (PDO) is an aged salami, cylindrical in shape and prepared with raw, quality pork meat. It may or may not include garlic in its ingredients and comes in medium and large sizes. Vicenza (It. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ...


Prosciutto Veneto Berico-Euganeo (PDO) is obtained from the fresh meat of a top breed of adult hogs. The aroma is delicate, sweet and fragrant. Prosciutto Prosciutto (IPA: ) is the Italian word for ham, used in English to refer to dry-cured ham (prosciutto crudo). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ...

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Cereals, vegetables & fruits

Radicchio Rosso di Treviso (PGI) is a peculiar vegetable with a faintly bitter taste and a crunchy texture. The production area encompasses many town districts in the provinces of Treviso, Padua and Venice. Radicchio is a Leaf Chicory, sometimes known as Italian Chicory. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


The Radicchio Variegato di Castelfranco (PGI) has a delicate and slightly sweet taste and a crunchy texture. Radicchio is a Leaf Chicory, sometimes known as Italian Chicory. ... Castelfranco Veneto is a town and episcopal see of Veneto, Italy, in the Treviso province, 16 mi. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ...


Veronese Vialone Nano Rice from Verona (PGI)  : a white rice with short, plump grains, which have a creamy consistency when cooked. They are commonly used in risotto dishes and have a high starch content. The following is a list of varieties of rice. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ... Risotto prepared with mushrooms and scallions. ...


The Bean of Lamon (PGI) type is particularly prized for its delicate flavour and extremely tender skin. Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Belluno (BL) Mayor Elevation 594 m Area 54. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ...


The White Asparagus of Cimadolmo (PGI) has a characteristic scent and a very delicate taste. For the botanical genus, see Asparagus (genus). ... Cimadolmo is a commune with 3. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ...


The White Asparagus of Bassano is a delight of northern Vicentino, is a shoot which has not yet broken the earth and owes its characteristic whiteness to its brief underground existence. For the botanical genus, see Asparagus (genus). ... Country Italy Region Veneto Province Vicenza (VI) Mayor Gianpaolo Bizzotto Elevation 129 m Area 46 km² Population  - Total (as of 2001) 40,411  - Density 879/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Bassanesi Dialing code 0424 Postal code 36061 Frazioni Campese, Marchesane, Quartiere Prè, Rubbio, San Lazzaro, San Michele... Vicenza (It. ...


The San Zeno di Montagna (Verona) chestnut (PDO) with its sweet taste. Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Verona (VR) Mayor Elevation 590 m Area 28. ... Verona (It. ... Species Castanea alnifolia - Bush Chinkapin* Castanea crenata - Japanese Chestnut Castanea dentata - American Chestnut Castanea henryi - Henrys Chestnut Castanea mollissima - Chinese Chestnut Castanea ozarkensis - Ozark Chinkapin Castanea pumila - Allegheny Chinkapin Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut Castanea seguinii - Seguins Chestnut * treated as a synonym of by many authors Chestnut is a... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ...


Cerries of Marostica (PGI) in those the pulp varies in consistency from crisp to soft and the flavour is finely graded from sour to sweet. For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... Marostica, in venetian language Maròstega, is a town in the province of Vicenza, Veneto, Italy. ... Protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) are classifications defined in European Union Law to protect regional foods. ...


Miscellaneous

According to Robert Putnam,[4] the "institutional performance" of Veneto's regional government is higher than average in Italy, thus Veneto belongs to what Putnam defines as "civic North". Veneto has a long tradition of high quality public health care, which can be traced to the historical heritage of the Republic of Venice. Robert D. Putnam (2006) Robert David Putnam (born 1941 in Rochester, New York) is a political scientist and professor at Harvard University. ... The Most Serene Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ...


Veneto hosts one of the oldest universities in the world at Padua, which is the second oldest one in Italy after Bologna. OECD investigations[5] show that school education achievements in North-Eastern Italy (whose population comes mainly from Veneto) are the highest in Italy and comparable to France and Sweden. Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second biggest university in Italy. ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


Veneto is also the name of the main battleship class which Italian navy possessed during World War II. The Veneto class battleship includes Vittorio Veneto and Rome. Both ships were damaged in the famous Taranto raid of the British Royal navy and participated in most of the major sea battles between Britain and Italy in the Mediterranean.


Notable people from the Veneto

Oderzo is a town in the province of Treviso, Veneto, Italy. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... Marcus Vitruvius Pollio was a Roman writer, architect and engineer, active in the 1st century BC. He was the author of De Architectura, known today as The Ten Books of Architecture, a treatise in Latin on architecture, and perhaps the first work about this discipline. ... Events By place Roman Empire The Emperor Titus inaugurates the Flavian Amphitheatre with 100 days of games. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC - 70s BC - 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC Years: 75 BC 74 BC 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20... Titus Livius (around 59 BC - 17 AD), known as Livy in English, wrote a monumental history of Rome, Ab Urbe Condita, from its founding (traditionally dated to 753 BC). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56... For other uses, see number 17. ... For other uses, see History of Rome (disambiguation). ... Penguin Classics 1976 edition of Livys Ab Urbe condita, books XXXI-XLV Ab Urbe condita (literally, from the city, having been founded) is a monumental history of Rome, from its founding (ab Urbe condita, dated to 753 BC by Varro and most modern scholars). ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC Events and Trends 756 BC - Founding of Cyzicus. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Fresco from Herculaneum, presumably showing a love couple. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 89 BC 88 BC 87 BC 86 BC 85 BC - 84 BC - 83 BC 82 BC 81... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51... A poet (from the ancient Greek ποιητης, poïêtes (artisan) ; ποιέω, poieō) is a person who writes poetry. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... Publius Clodius Thrasea Paetus, Roman senator and Stoic philosopher, lived during the reign of Nero. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... This article is about the year 66. ... Totila, born in Treviso, was king of the Ostrogoths, chosen after the death of his uncle Ildibad, having engineered the assassination of Ildibads short-lived successor his cousin Eraric in 541. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Events July - Battle of Taginae: The Byzantine general Narses defeats and kills Totila, king of the Ostrogoths. ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ostrogoths Commanders Narses Totila† Strength 20,000 unknown infantry 2,000 horsemen Casualties unknown 6,000 At the battle of Taginae (also known as the battle of Busta Gallorum) in July of 552, the Byzantine Empire under General Narses broke the power of the Ostrogoths in Italy... Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus (c. ... Battle of Daras: Belisarius and Hermogenes defeat the Persians in a major battle which blunts a Persian offensive into Roman Mesopotamia. ... Events Byzantine general Belisarius conquers Milan and the Ostrogoth capital Ravenna. ... Valdobbiadene is a town in the province of Treviso, Veneto, Italy. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The Diocese of Poitiers is a Roman Catholic diocese of France. ... The population of the Earth rises to about 208 million people. ... Events The Pantheon is consecrated to the Virgin Mary and all saints (or 610). ... Dandolo Preaching the Crusade, by Gustav Dore Tomb of Enrico Dandolo Enrico Dandolo (1107?-1205) was the Doge (1192-1205) of Venice during the Fourth Crusade. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254[1] – January 9, 1324 at earliest but no later than June 1325[2]) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Publication of Defensor pacis by Marsilius of Padua Mansa Kankan Musa I, ruler of the Mali Empire arrives in Cairo on his hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Explorer redirects here. ... A page of The Travels of Marco Polo The Travels of Marco Polo is the usual English title of Marco Polos travel book, Il Milione. ... Benedict XI, né Nicholas Boccasini (1240 -July 7, 1304), pope (1303 - 1304), succeeded the famous Dominican education, and when he was made Master General of the order in 1296, he issued ordinances forbidding public questioning of the legitimacy of Bonifaces election on the part of any Dominican. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 20 July - Fall of Stirling Castle: Edward I of England takes the last rebel stronghold in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... Gregory XII, né Angelo Coraria (Venice 1326 - October 18, 1417), pope from 1406 to 1409, succeeded Innocent VII on 30th November 1406, having been chosen at Rome by a conclave consisting of only fifteen cardinals, under the express condition that, should Benedict XIII, the rival pope at Avignon, renounce all... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Antipope Benedict XIII is deposed, and Pope Martin V is elected. ... Eugenius IV, né Gabriel Condulmer (1383 - February 23, 1447) was pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Year 1383 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 6 - Nicholas V becomes Pope. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1431 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 6 - Nicholas V becomes Pope. ... Pope Paul II, né Pietro Barbo (February 23, 1418 - March 22, 1471), was pope from 1464 to 1471. ... Events Antipope Benedict XIII is deposed, and Pope Martin V is elected. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 1471, not the BT caller ID service accessible by dialling 1-4-7-1. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February - Christian I of Denmark and Norway who was also serving as King of Sweden is declared deposed from the later throne. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1471, not the BT caller ID service accessible by dialling 1-4-7-1. ... Panfilo Castaldi (c. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ... The River Piave next to Belluno. ... Year 1479 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Agony in the Garden (1455) is the pinnacle of Mantegnas early style. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua The city of Padua (Lat. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1506 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Mantua (disambiguation). ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Alternate uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Pietro Bembo (May 20, 1470 - 18 January 1547), Italian cardinal and scholar. ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Sebastian Cabot (ca 1476 - 1557 or soon after), (originally Sebastiano Caboto) was an explorer, born probably in Venice, who may have sailed with his father John Cabot, the Genoese, in the service of England, in May, 1498. ... Events January 5 - Battle of Nancy - Charles the Bold of Burgundy is again defeated, and this time is killed. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Events March 17 - formation of the Cathay Company to send Martin Frobisher back to the New World for more gold May 28 - Publication of the Bergen Book, better known as the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord, one of the Lutheran confessional writings. ... A purported self-portrait of Giorgione, represented in the guise of David. ... The Creation of Adam, Michelangelos work in the Sistine Chapel. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... // January 8 - The present Royal Netherlands Navy was formed By decree of Maximillian of Austria. ... Events Tirant Lo Blanc by Joanot Martorell, Martí Joan De Galba is published. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 5 - Peace of Beaulieu or Peace of Monsieur (after Monsieur, the Duc dAnjou, brother of the King, who negotiated it). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vittorio Veneto is a city situated in the Province of Treviso, in the region of Veneto, Italy, in the northeast of the Italian peninsula, between the Piave and the Livenza rivers. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... Reginald Cardinal Pole Reginald Pole (1500 - 1558) Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, was the son of Margaret Pole who was the daughter of George, Duke of Clarence. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Angelo Beolco (Padua, 1502–1542), better known by the nickname il Ruzzante or el Ruzante, was an Italian actor and playwright. ... 1502 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Andrea Palladio (November 30, 1508 – August 19, 1580), was an Italian architect, widely considered the most influential person in the history of Western architecture. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1 - Michel de Montaigne signs the preface to his most significant work, Essays. ... A hydrogen radio frequency discharge, the first element inside a hydrogen maser (see description below) A maser is a device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification due to stimulated emission. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Andrea Gabrieli (c. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Tintoretto (real name Jacopo Comin; September 29, 1518 - May 31, 1594) was one of the greatest painters of the Venetian school and probably the last great painter of the Italian Renaissance. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 27 - Henry IV is crowned King of France at Rheims. ... San Marco in the evening. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... Giovanni Gabrieli Giovanni Gabrieli (c. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 20 - Mathias becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... San Marco in the evening. ... Andrea Gabrieli (c. ... Alexander VIII, né Pietro Vitto Ottoboni (April 22, 1610 - February 1, 1691), pope from 1689 to 1691, was born of a noble Venetian family, was created cardinal, and then successively bishop of Brescia and datary. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Francesco Morosini was the Doge of Venice from 1688 to 1694, at the height of the Great Turkish War. ... For a bill proposed in USA in 1998, see Bill 1618. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Náfplio (Ναύπλιον) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... Marco dAviano, Capuchin friar, 1631-1699. ... // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ... Aviano, 46°04′ N 12°35′ E, is a town and comune of Pordenone province at the foot of the Dolomites mountain range in northern Italy. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Bartolomeo Cristofori di Francesco (May 4, 1655 - January 27, 1731) was an Italian maker of musical instruments, generally regarded as the inventor of the piano. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Benedetto Marcello (July 31 or August 1, 1686–July 24, 1739), was an Italian composer. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... The Capitoline Temple. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... An advocate is one who speaks on behalf of another, especially in a legal context. ... A magistrate is a judicial officer. ... Vivaldi redirects here. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ... Clement XIII, né Carlo della Torre Rezzonico (Venice, March 7, 1693 - Rome, February 2, 1769) was pope from 1758 to 1769. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Pietro Longhi (1702-1785) was a Venetian genre painter. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Baldassarre Galuppi (October 18, 1706 - January 3, 1785) was a Venetian composer noted for his operas, and particularly opera buffa. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Opera buffa (a form of comic opera), also known as Commedia in musica or Commedia per musica, is a genre of opera. ... Carlo Goldoni Carlo Osvaldo Goldoni (25 February 1707 - 6 February 1793) was a celebrated Italian playwright, whom critics today rank among the European theatres greatest authors. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Luigi Pirandello (June 28, 1867 – December 10, 1936) was an Italian dramatist, novelist, and short story writer awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1934. ... Giovanni Battista (also Giambattista) Piranesi (4th October 1720 in Mogliano Veneto (near Treviso) - 9th November 1778 in Rome) was an Italian artist famous for his etchings of Rome and of fictitious prisons. Etching of the Pyramid of Cestius Piranesi studied his art at Rome, where the remains of that city... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... Mogliano Veneto is a town and commune in the province of Treviso, in the Veneto, Italy. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Christ Preaching, known as The Hundred Guilder print; etching c1648 by Rembrandt Etching is the process of using strong acid to cut into the unprotected parts of a metal surface to create a design in intaglio in the metal (the original process - in modern manufacturing other chemicals may be used... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Casanova redirects here. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Duchcov, also known as Dux, Tokczav , is a town in Czech Republic. ... For other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... Duchcov, also known as Dux, Tokczav , is a town in Czech Republic. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Lodovico Manin was the last Doge of The Most Serene Republic of Venice. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1802 (MDCCCII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Lorenzo da Ponte Lorenzo Da Ponte (March 10, 1749–August 17, 1838) was an Italian librettist born in Ceneda (now Vittorio Veneto). ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the state. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Antonio Salieri Antonio Salieri (August 18, 1750 – May 7, 1825), was an Italian composer and conductor. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1750 (MDCCL) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Legnago is a town in the Province of Verona, Italy, on the Adige river, 29 m. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Canova may refer to: Antonio Canova Canova, South Dakota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Marble sculpture is the art of creating three-dimensional forms from marble. ... Nude redirects here. ... Gregory XVI, né Bartolommeo Alberto Cappellari (September 18, 1765 - June 1, 1846), was Pope from 1831 to 1846. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The River Piave next to Belluno. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Danièle Manin (May 13, 1804 - September 22, 1857), Venetian patriot and statesman, was born in Venice. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Rovigo is a town in the Veneto region of Northern Italy, the capital of the homonymous province. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Khartoums location in Sudan Coordinates: , Government  - Governor Abdul Halim al Mutafi Population (2005)  - Urban 2. ... Pope Pius X (1903-1914), pictured in 1904, wearing the 1834 Triple Tiara of Pope Gregory XVI Saint Pius X, né Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto, (2 June 1835 - 20 August 1914) was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope... The term Ecclesiastical Latin (sometimes called Church Latin) refers to the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Riese is a village in the Province of Treviso in Venice, famous of the birthplace of Pope Pius X Category: ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Servant of God Elia Angelo Cardinal Dalla Costa (May 14, 1872—December 22, 1961) was an Italian prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Villaverla is a town in the province of Vicenza, Veneto, Italy. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... John Paul I, seen here on the papal throne, is wearing an inexpensive silver pectoral cross, not the standard golden cross worn by Popes and his uncut hair, simply brushed back, was considered unusual but more genuine and modest than the dandy coifs of the other Cardinals. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The River Piave next to Belluno. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Andrea Zanzotto (born 1921) is an Italian poet. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Pieve di Soligo is a town in the province of Treviso, Veneto, Italy. ... Treviso (It. ... Mario Rigoni Stern (b. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Asiago (Cimbrian: Schleghe, German: Schlägen) is the name of both a minor township (population roughly 6,500, ) and the surrounding plateau region (the Altopiano di Asiago) in the Province of Vicenza in the Veneto region of Northeastern Italy. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... Luigi Meneghello (born 1922) is an Italian writer and scholar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Grave of Nono in the San Michele Cemetery, Venice. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... His Eminence Severino Cardinal Poletto (born 18 March 1933) is a Cardinal Priest and Archbishop of Turin in the Roman Catholic Church. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Federico Faggin (born December 1, 1941) is an Italian-born physicist/electrical engineer, principally responsible for the design of the first microprocessor and responsible for leading the 4004 (MCS-4) project to its successful outcome and for promoting its marketing. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... An engineers degree is an academic degree which is intermediate in rank between a masters degree and a doctorate; it is occasionally to be encountered in the United States in technical fields. ... An inventor is a person who creates new inventions, typically technical devices such as mechanical, electrical or software devices or methods. ... A microprocessor incorporates most or all of the functions of a central processing unit (CPU) on a single integrated circuit (IC). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vittorio Veneto is a city situated in the Province of Treviso, in the region of Veneto, Italy, in the northeast of the Italian peninsula, between the Piave and the Livenza rivers. ... Four members of the Italian Benetton family founded the Benetton Group S.p. ... It has been suggested that high end be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Brand (disambiguation). ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ... Dino Meneghin (b. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... This article is about the sport. ... jumipylly on laite jota sara simeon käytti kauriin metsästykseen. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the athletic event. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Riccardo Patrese (born April 17, 1954) is an Italian former Formula One (F1) racing driver, from 1977 to 1993. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... F1 redirects here. ... Renzo Rosso (born 1955) is an Italian clothing designer and founder of the Diesel clothing company. ... Diesel SpA simply known as Diesel is an Italian based designer clothing company which produces apparel for men and women between 18 and 35 years old. ... Gelindo Bordin (April 2, 1959) is a former Italian athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1988 Summer Olympics. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Roberto Baggio (born 18 February 1967 in Caldogno, Veneto) is an Italian retired footballer, among the most technically gifted and popular players in the world throughout the 1990s. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Alessandro Del Piero, Cavaliere Ufficiale OMRI[3][4] (born November 9, 1974 in Conegliano) is an Italian World Cup-winning footballer. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Conegliano is a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Treviso, 17 miles N. by rail from the town of Treviso, 230 ft. ... Damiano Cunego (born September 19, 1981) is an Italian professional road bicycle racer. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Country Italy Region Veneto Province Province of Verona (VR) Mayor Elevation 730 m Area 10. ... Verona (It. ... Road bicycle racing is a popular bicycle racing sport held on the road (following the geography of the area), using racing bicycles. ... Francesca Segat. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Vittorio Veneto is a city situated in the Province of Treviso, in the region of Veneto, Italy, in the northeast of the Italian peninsula, between the Piave and the Livenza rivers. ... Treviso (French: Trévise, Latin: Tarvisium, Venetian: Trèviso) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ [1] Regione Veneto: Statistical Report 2007: 1.2 Production Sectors - Tourism
  2. ^ [2] By statute of the Regional Parliament
  3. ^ [3] By statute of the Regional Parliament
  4. ^ Putnam, R. D. Making Democracy Work. Civic traditions in modern Italy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1993.
  5. ^ Oecd-Pisa 2005, Il livello di competenza dei quindicenni italiani in matematica, lettura, scienze e problem solving - Prima sintesi dei risultati di Pisa 2003, pag.7, also available on www.invalsi.it; see also lavoce.info, La scuola non è uguale per tutti

External links

General Information

  • Regione Veneto — Official homepage
  • Tourism Web Site
  • Map of Veneto

Education

  • University of Padova
  • University of Verona
  • University of Rovigo
  • University of Venezia "Ca' Foscari"
  • University of Venezia "IUAV"

Transportation

  • Padova Airport
  • Verona Airport
  • Venice Airport
  • Vicenza Airport
  • Treviso Airport

Coordinates: 45°30′N, 11°45′E The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... “Abruzzi” redirects here. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Basilicata is a region in the south of Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Puglia (Apulia) to the east, Calabria to the south, it has one short coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea and another of the Gulf of Taranto in the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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TangoItalia - Veneto food (1023 words)
The 'Veneto' is an essentially agricultural region growing wheat, maize, mulberry bushes, olive, fruit trees and vines.
Farmers in bucolic districts such as Piedmont, the Veneto, Umbria, Friuli, and Tuscany customarily wanted a strong drink to help patch up their workday wounds and salve their aches for the night It was grappa that became Italy's national spirit.
Veneto’s contribution to Italy’s pasta culture is a style of fresh pasta called bigoli, which gets its name from the traditional kitchen implement that’s used to make it, called a bigolaro, a four-inch-wide bronze tube.
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