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Encyclopedia > Velars
Places of articulation
Labial consonant
Bilabial consonant
Labiodental consonant
Linguolabial consonant
Coronal consonant
Interdental consonant
Dental consonant
Retroflex consonant
Alveolar consonant
Postalveolar consonant
Alveolo-palatal consonant
Dorsal consonant
Palatal consonant
Labial-palatal consonant 
Velar consonant
Labial-velar consonant
Uvular consonant
Pharyngeal consonant
Epiglottal consonant
Glottal consonant
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Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum).


Since the velar region of the roof of the mouth is relatively extensive and the movements of the dorsum are not very precise, velars easily undergo assimilation, shifting their articulation back or to the front depending on the quality of adjacent vowels. They often become automatically fronted, that is partly or completely palatal before a following front vowel, and retracted before back vowels.


Palatalised velars (like English /k/ in keen or cube) are sometimes referred to as palatovelars. Many languages also have labiovelar phonemes, including the approximant /w/ and others given symbols like /kʷ/ etc. In these the articulation is accompanied by rounding of the lips.


The velar consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:

IPA Description Example
Language Orthography IPA Meaning
Image:Xsampa-k.png voiceless velar plosive English skip [s k ɪp] skip
Image:Xsampa-g.png voiced velar plosive English get [ ɡ ɛt] get
Image:Xsampa-N2.png velar nasal English ring [ɹɪ ŋ ] ring
Image:Xsampa-x.png voiceless velar fricative Hebrew מיכאל [mi x el] Michael
Image:Xsampa-G2.png voiced velar fricative Margi ɣfə́ [ ɣ fə́] arrow
Image:Xsampa-Mslash.png velar approximant Spanish pagar1 [pa ɰ aɾ] to pay
Image:Xsampa-Lslash.png velar lateral approximant Mid-Waghi aʟaʟe [a ʟ a ʟ e] dizzy
Image:Xsampa-w2.png labio-velar approximant English witch [ w ɪtʃ] witch
Image:Xsampa-X.png voiceless labio-velar fricative English which2 [ ʍ ɪtʃ] which


Notes:

  1. Intervocalic g in Spanish often described instead as a very lightly articulated voiced velar fricative.
  2. For English dialects that distinguish between which and witch

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Velar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (249 words)
Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum).
Since the velar region of the roof of the mouth is relatively extensive and the movements of the dorsum are not very precise, velars easily undergo assimilation, shifting their articulation back or to the front depending on the quality of adjacent vowels.
Many languages also have labialized velars, such as [kʷ], in which the articulation is accompanied by rounding of the lips.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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