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Encyclopedia > Vaslav Nijinsky
Vaslav Nijinsky as Vayou in Nikolai Legat's revival of Marius Petipa's The Talisman, St. Petersburg, 1910
Vaslav Nijinsky as Vayou in Nikolai Legat's revival of Marius Petipa's The Talisman, St. Petersburg, 1910

Vaslav Fomich Nijinsky (Вацлав Фомич Нижинский; transliterated: Vatslav Fomich Nizhinsky; Polish: Wacław Niżyński) (March 12, 1890April 8, 1950) was a Russian ballet dancer and choreographer of Polish origin. Nijinsky was one of the most gifted male dancers in history, and he became celebrated for his virtuosity and for the depth and intensity of his characterizations. He could perform en pointe, a rare skill among male dancers at the time (Albright, 2004) and his ability to perform seemingly gravity-defying leaps was also legendary. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (774x1248, 274 KB) photo by unknown of Vaslav Nijinsky as Vayou in the ballet The Talisman. St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (774x1248, 274 KB) photo by unknown of Vaslav Nijinsky as Vayou in the ballet The Talisman. St. ... Nicholas Legat (also spelled Nikolai or Nicolai, 1869 - 1937) was a Russian Balletmaster. ... Marius Petipa, Circa 1890 Marius Petipa (11 March 1818 – 14 July 1910) - Unrivaled ballet master of the Tsars Imperial Ballet of St. ... Mathilde Kschessinskaya costumed as Niriti for the Grand Pas des Fleurs of Act II in Nikolai Legats revival of Petipas The Talisman, St. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (72nd in leap years). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... It has been suggested that pointe-related injuries be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

Early Life and Work

He was born in Kiev, Ukraine to a Russified Polish dancer's family of Eleonora Bereda and Tomasz Niżyński. In 1900 he joined the Imperial Ballet School, where he studied under Enrico Cecchetti, Nicholas Legat, and Pavel Gerdt. At 18 years old he had leading roles in the Mariinsky Theatre. Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... The Mariinsky Ballet is the most famous ballet school in history (formerly the Kirov Ballet), located in the Mariinsky Theatre of St. ... Enrico Cecchetti (born: 21 June 1850, Rome - died: 13 November 1928, Milan) was an Italian ballet dancer, founder of the Cecchetti method. ... Nicholas Legat (1869-1937) (also spelled Nikolai Legat) was a Balletmaster in St Petersburg, Russia. ... Pavel Gerdt Pavel Andreyevich Gerdt, better known as Paul Gerdt (1844-1917), was the foremost male dancer of the Mariinsky Theatre for 50 years. ... The Maryinsky (or Mariinsky) Theatre (or Theater), is the St Petersburg theatre where the Mariinsky Ballet is located. ...


Although he didn't speak Polish fluently, he represented himself as a Pole.


A turning point for Nijinsky was his meeting with Sergei Diaghilev, a member of the St Petersburg elite and wealthy patron of the arts, promoting Russian visual and musical art abroad, particularly in Paris. Nijinsky and Diaghilev became lovers, and Diaghilev became heavily involved in directing Nijinsky's career. In 1909 Diaghilev took a company to Paris, with Nijinsky and Anna Pavlova as the leads. The show was a great success and increased the reputation of both the leads and Diaghilev throughout the artistic circles of Europe. Diaghilev created Les Ballets Russes in its wake, and with choreographer Michel Fokine, made it one of the most well-known companies of the time. Portrait of Sergei Diaghilev by Valentin Serov (1904) Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Russian: / Sergei Pavlovich Dyagilev), also referred to as Serge, (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Photographic postcard of Anna Pavlova as Aspicia in The Pharoahs Daughter, circa 1910 Anna Pavlova as Nikiya in the Grand Pas Classique of the Shades from Act III of La Bayadere, circa 1902 Anna Pavlova is also the name of an Olympic gymnast. ... The ballet company Ballets Russes created a sensation in Western Europe in the early years of the 20th century, due to the great vitality of Russian ballet, as compared with what was current in France at the time. ... Michel Fokine or Mikhail Mikhailovich Fokin (Михаил Михайлович Фокин) (April 23 [O.S. April 11] 1880) – August 22, 1942) was a groundbreaking Russian choreographer and dancer. ...


Nijinsky's talent showed in Fokine's pieces such as “Le Pavillon d'Armide” (music by Nikolai Tcherepnin), “Cleopatra” (music by Anton Arensky and other Russian composers) and a divertissement “The Feast”. His execution of a pas de deux from the “Sleeping Beauty” (Tchaikovsky) was a tremendous success; in 1910 he shone in “Giselle”, and Fokine’s ballets “Carnaval" and “Scheherazade” (based on the orchestral suite by Rimsky-Korsakov). His partnership with Tamara Karsavina, also of the Mariinsky Theatre, was legendary. Nikolai Nikolayevich Tcherepnin (15 May [O.S. 3 May] 1873 1873 - 27 June 1945) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Anton Stepanovich Arensky (July 12, 1861 – February 25, 1906), was a Russian Romantic composer and music professor born in Novgorod, Russia. ... Divertimento is a music genre, with most of its examples stemming from the 18th century. ... Pas de deux is also a dressage preformance using two horses. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky[1] (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij;  ) (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (O.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (O.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a teacher of harmony and... Tamara Platonovna Karsavina (March 10, 1885 – May 26, 1978) was a famous Russian ballerina who eventually settled in England, where she helped found the Royal Academy of Dancing in 1920. ...


Then Nijinsky went back to the Mariinsky Theatre, but was dismissed for appearing on-stage wearing tights without the trunks obligatory for male dancers in the company. The Dowager Empress Marie Feodorovna complained that his appearance was obscene, and he was dismissed. It is probable that the scandal was arranged by Diaghilev in order that Nijinsky could be free to appear with his company, in the west, where many of his projects now centered around him. He danced leading roles in Fokine's new productions "Spectre de la Rose” (Weber), a role never satisfactorily danced since his retirement, and Igor Stravinsky's Petrouchka, in which his impersonation of a dancing but lifeless puppet was much admired. He then himself choreographed three ballets, L'après-midi d'un faune (The Afternoon of a Faun, based on Claude Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune) (1912), Jeux (1913), Till Eulenspiegel (1916) and Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring, with music by Igor Stravinsky (1913). Nijinsky created choreography far from that of traditional ballet. His radical angular movements, together with Stravinsky's radically modern score, caused a riot at the Théâtre de Champs-Elysées when Le Sacre du Printemps was premiered in Paris. As the title character in L'après-midi d'un faune the final tableau, during which he mimed masturbation with the scarf of a nymph, caused a scandal; he was accused by half Paris of obscenity, but defended by such artists as Rodin, Odilon Redon and Proust. Revivals of some of his work, based on accurate choreographic records, have shown him to be a very considerable, successful and inventive choreographer. Carl Maria von Weber Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst, Freiherr von Weber (November 18, 1786 in Eutin, Holstein – June 5, 1826 in London, England) was a German composer. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Pétrouchka (English: Petrushka; Russian: петрушка) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. ... Leon Bakst, Nijinsky in The Afternoon of a Faun George Barbier, Nijinsky as the faun, 1913 The ballet Laprès-midi dun faune (or The Afternoon of a Faun) was choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky for the Ballets Russes, and first performed in the Théâtre du Châtelet... Achille-Claude Debussy (IPA ) (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918) was a French composer. ... The Prélude à laprès-midi dun faune (or Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun) is a musical composition for orchestra by Claude Debussy that was first performed in 1894. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jeux (Games), described as a poème dansé (literally a danced poem), is the last work for orchestra written by Claude Debussy. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Till Eulenspiegel IPA: (Low German Dyl Ulenspegel) is a character who originated in Middle Low German oral tradition. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Rite of Spring is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Vaslav Nijinsky
Vaslav Nijinsky

Image File history File links Vaslav_Nijinsky_Photo. ... Image File history File links Vaslav_Nijinsky_Photo. ...

Marriage, Decline, and Demise

Tombstone of Vaslav Nijinsky in Cimetière de Montmartre in Paris. The statue shows Nijinsky as the puppet Petrouchka.
Tombstone of Vaslav Nijinsky in Cimetière de Montmartre in Paris. The statue shows Nijinsky as the puppet Petrouchka.

In 1913 the Ballets Russes toured South America, and because of Diaghilev's belief that he was a witch and was consequently incappable of crossing water, he did not accompany them. Without his mentor's supervision Nijinsky entered a relationship with Pulszky Romola, a Hungarian countess. An ardent fan of Nijinsky, she took up ballet and used her family connections to get close to him. Despite her efforts to attract him, Nijinsky appeared unconscious of her presence. Finally Romola booked passage on board a ship that Nijinsky was due to travel on, and during the voyage Romola succeeded in engaging his affections. Numerous speculations as to the true reason for their marriage have arisen, including the suggestion that Nijinsky saw Romola's title and supposed wealth as a means to escape Diaghilev's repression. This is unlikely: he was far too unsophisticated and innocent to have engineered a match for such a reason. Romola has often been vilified as the woman who forced Nijinsky to abandon his artistry for cabaret fare, her pragmatic and plebeian ways often jarring with his sensitive nature. This contributed largely to his decline into madness. In his diary, Nijinsky famously said of Romola "My wife is an untwinkling star ..." They were married in Buenos Aires: when the company returned to Europe, Diaghilev, in a jealous rage because he and Nijinsky were supposed to be lovers, fired them both. Nijinsky tried to create his own troupe, but its crucial London engagement failed due to administrative problems. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 337 KB)Tomstone of Vaslav Nijinsky in Cimetiere du Montmartre in Paris. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 337 KB)Tomstone of Vaslav Nijinsky in Cimetiere du Montmartre in Paris. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in Théâtre Mogador, Paris; and then in Monte Carlo. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ... Pragmatism is a school of philosophy which originated in the United States in the late 1800s. ... In Ancient Rome, the plebs was the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


During World War I Nijinsky, a Russian citizen, was interned in Hungary. Diaghilev succeeded in getting him out for a North American tour in 1916, during which he choreographed and danced the leading role in Till Eulenspiegel. Signs of his dementia praecox were becoming apparent to members of the company. He became afraid of other dancers and that a trap door would be left open. Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Till Eulenspiegel IPA: (Low German Dyl Ulenspegel) is a character who originated in Middle Low German oral tradition. ... dementia praecox A term that referred to a psychotic disorder marked by rapid cognitive disintegration beginning soon after the clear onset of the disease, usually in the years following puberty. ...


Nijinsky had a nervous breakdown in 1919 and his career effectively ended. He was diagnosed with schizophrenia and taken to Switzerland by his wife where he was treated by psychiatrist Eugene Bleuler. He spent the rest of his life in and out of psychiatric hospitals and asylums. His wife devoted her life entirely to his care, and whatever criticisms may be made of her, her devotion to him was complete. Nijinsky died in a London clinic on April 8, 1950 and was buried in London until 1953 when his body was moved to Cimetière de Montmartre, Paris, France beside the graves of Gaetano Vestris, Theophile Gautier, and Emma Livry. Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Paul Eugen Bleuler (b. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Cimetière de Montmartre is a famous cemetery located at 37 Avenue Samson, in the 18th arrondissement of Paris, France. ... Gaetano Appolino Baldassare Vestris (1729 - 1808), French ballet dancer, was born in Florence and made his debut at the opera in 1749. ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 31, 1811 - October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist and literary critic. ... Photo of Emma Livry, c. ...


Nijinsky's Diary was written during the six weeks he spent in Switzerland before being committed to the asylum. Obscure and confused, it is obviously the work of a schizophrenic, but in many ways reflects a loving nature, combining elements of autobiography with appeals for compassion toward the less fortunate, and for vegetarianism and animal rights. Nijinsky writes of the importance of feeling as opposed to reliance on reason and logic alone, and he denounces the practice of art criticism as being nothing more than a way for those who practice it to indulge their own egoes rather than focusing on what the artist was trying to say. The diary also contains a bitter exposé of Nijinsky's relationship with Diaghilev.


As a dancer Nijinsky was clearly extraordinary in his time, though at the end of her life his great partner Tamara Karsavina suggested that any young dancer out of the Royal Ballet School could now perform the technical feats with which he astonished his contemporaries. His main talent was probably not so much technical (Itzikowsky could leap as high and as far) as in mime and characterisation; his major failing was that, being himself unable to form a satisfactory partnership with a woman, he was unsuccessful where such a relationship was important on-stage (in, say, Giselle). In epicene roles such as the god in Le Dieu Bleu, the rose in Spectre or the favourite slave in Scheherezade he was unsurpassed. That he was an astonishing and influential artist is not in question. Giselle, danced to familiar music by the French ballet and opera composer Adolphe Adam, and choreographed by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, is a Romantic-era ballet first danced in Paris in 1841. ...


Figure in Popular Culture

  • Nijinsky is mentioned in Groucho Marx's song Lydia the Tattooed Lady
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in W.H. Auden's poem September 1, 1939.
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in Sam Shepard's one-act play, "Action."
  • Presumably, the famous race horse, Nijinsky II, was named after him.
  • Nijinksy is mentioned in Arkansas Poet Frank Stanford's epic poem "The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You."
  • Nijinsky is the central speaker of Frank Bidart's poem "The War of Vaslav Nijinsky."
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in Alice's song "Prospettiva Nevski"
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in Chaplin (1992 film)
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in french series titled "les dames de la côtes"[1]
  • Nijinski is the title of the second solo album by french pop singer Daniel Darc (Bondage 1994)
  • Nijinsky is mentioned, along with other historical figures, in rock band Roxy Music's 1973 song "Do the Strand", which implored listeners to dance the dance. Vocalist/pianist Bryan Ferry sings at one point: "If you feel blue/look through who's who/ see La Goulue/and Nijinsky/Do the Standsky".
  • Nijinsky is mentioned (and the namesake) of the T. Rex (band) song "Nijinsky Hind", from the album Unicorn. He is also mentioned in the song "She Was Born To Be My Unicorn" from the same album.
  • Nijinski is mentioned in the Bauhaus songs "Muscle In Plastic" and "Dancing", both from the album Mask.
  • In the book Even Cowgirls Get The Blues, Tom Robbins has his main character (a legendary hitchhiker with exceptionally large thumbs) defending herself thusly: "You may claim I've an unfair advantage, but no more so than Nijinsky, whose reputation as history's greatest dancer is untainted by the fact that his feet were abnormal, having the bone structure of birds' feet. Nature built Nijinsky to dance, me to direct traffic...".
  • For Queen's music video, "I Want to Break Free", lead singer Freddie Mercury shaved off his trademark moustache to resemble Nijinski
  • Nijinsky is mentioned in John Saul's Novel "Black Lightning"

Julius Henry Marx, known as Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. ... Lydia the Tattooed Lady, which became one of Groucho Marxs signature tunes, was written by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg, and first appeared in the movie At the Circus (1939). ... Christopher Isherwood and W.H. Auden, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907–September 29, 1973) was an English poet. ... The poem September 1, 1939 by W. H. Auden describes the historical context from Luther until now and the feelings of the poet as he sits On Fifty-second Street on the first day of World War II. See also Fifty-second Street External links Audens poem at gametec. ... Actor Sam Shepard mulls over a scene in the motion picture Stealth, while filming on June 15, 2004, aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... You may be looking for: Alice (Italian singer) Alice (Japanese singer) Alice, for more things and people named Alice. ... Chaplin is a 1992 semi-biographical film about the life of Charles Chaplin. ... Daniel Darc (May 20, 1959 in Paris, France) is a French singer, who knew the success with his band Taxi Girl (with Mirwais Ahmadzaï) between 1978 and 1986, and with his last LP CrèvecÅ“ur (2004). ... Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Do the Strand is the first song from Roxy Musics second album, For Your Pleasure. ... Bryan Ferry (born 26 September 1945 in Washington, Tyne and Wear) is an English singer, musician and songwriter, famed for his suave visual and vocal style, who came to public prominence in the 1970s as lead vocalist and principal songwriter with Roxy Music. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... T. Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelled T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ... The unicorn (from Latin unus one and cornus horn) is a legendary creature whose power is exceeded only by its mystery. ... Bauhaus are an English Goth rock band, formed in Northampton in 1978. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... Mask is the second album by the British gothic rock band Bauhaus, released in 1981 on Beggars Banquet. ... Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is a 1976 novel by Tom Robbins. ... Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ... Queen are a seminal English rock band, formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury, and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ... I Want to Break Free is a song performed by Queen, which was written exclusively by bassist John Deacon. ... Freddie Mercury (5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991),[1] born Farrokh Bulsara, was a British-Indian rock musician, best known as the lead singer and pianist of the English rock band Queen. ... For the Canadian philosopher, see John Ralston Saul. ...

Plays

  • Nijinsky: God's Mad Clown (1986)

Written by Glenn J. Blumstein. Productions: The Kennedy Center (Washington, D.C. 1987); Teatr na Małej Bronnej (Moscow - 1997-1999); Występy w Teatrze Bagatela (Krakow, Poland, 1999)). 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Nijinsky: God's Mad Clown (Amazon.com link)
  • Chinchilla (1977)

Written by Robert David MacDonald, Citizens' Theatre Company, Glasgow. For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ...


Movies

  • Nijinsky (1970)

Directed by Tony Richardson, the screenplay was written by Edward Albee. The film was to star Rudolph Nureyev as Vaslav, Claude Jade as Romola and Paul Scofield as Diaghilev, however producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman canceled the project and it was left unfinished. Tony Richardson (June 5, 1928 - November 14, 1991) was a British theatre and film director and producer. ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, and The Sandbox. ... Rudolf Nureyev Rudolf Khametovich Nureyev (Russian spelling Рудольф Хаметович Нуреев, Tatar form Rudolf Xämät ulı Nuriev) (17 March 1938 – 6 January 1993), Russian-born dancer, was regarded... Claude Jade Claude Marcelle Jorré (8 October 1948 - 1 December 2006) was a French actress. ... David Paul Scofield, CH, CBE (born 21 January 1922) is a British actor who was born in Hurstpierpoint, Sussex, England. ... Albert Romolo Broccoli, CBE (Hon) (April 5, 1909 – June 27, 1996) known to movie fans as Cubby Broccoli (a nickname used by a cousin), produced more than forty movies, but will be best remembered for his contribution to one of the most successful film franchises in history, James Bond. ... Harry Saltzman (October 27, 1915 - September 28, 1994) was a film producer best known for co-producing the James Bond film series with Albert R. Broccoli until selling his share of the franchise to United Artists in 1975. ...

  • Nijinsky (1980)

Directed by Herbert Ross, starring George de la Pena as Vaslav, Leslie Browne as Romola, Alan Bates as Diaghilev and Jeremy Irons as Fokhine. Romola Nijinsky had a writing credit for the film. Herbert David Ross (May 13, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York - October 9, 2001 in New York City), also known as Herb Ross, was a prolific film director, producer, choreographer and actor from the 1950s to the 1990s. ... George de la Peña (b. ... Leslie Browne (born 1958) is an American ballet dancer and actress. ... Alan Bates as butler in Gosford Park (2001) Sir Alan Arthur Bates CBE, (February 17, 1934 – December 27, 2003) was a British actor. ... Jeremy Irons (born September 19, 1948) is an Oscar, Tony and double-Emmy award winning English film, television and stage actor. ...

  • The Diaries of Vaslav Nijinsky (2001)

Directed and written by Paul Cox. The screenplay was based directly on Nijinksy's diaries and read over related imagery. The subject matter included his work, his sickness, and his relationships with Diaghilev as well as his wife. An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid its being considered...


Sources

  • Kopelson, Kevin (1997) The Queer Afterlife of Vaslav Nijinksy. Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-2950-6
  • Buckle, Richard (1971) "Nijinsky"
  • Buckle, Richard (1979) "Diaghilev
  • Parker, Derek (1988) "Nijinsky: God of the Dance"
  • Albright, Daniel (2004). "Modernism and Music: An Anthology of Sources", p.19. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-01267-0.
  • Bergamini, John (1969) "The Tragic Dynasty: A History of the Romanovs," pg. 430. Konecky and Konecky. ISBN 1-56852-160-X

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

External links

  • Vaslav Nijinsky: Creating A New Artistic Era Vaslav, New York Public Library.
  • The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky (Unexpurgated) (Amazon.com link)
  • Internet Movie Database: The Diaries of Vaslav Nijinsky
  • Internet Movie Database: Nijinsky (Tony Richardson)
  • Vaslav Nijinsky in Giselle
  • The Queer Afterlife of Vaslav Nijinsky (Amazon.com link)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vaslav Nijinsky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1085 words)
Leon Bakst - Nijinsky in the ballet L'après-midi d'un faune, 1912
Vaslav Fomich Nijinsky (Вацлав Фомич Нижинский; transliterated: Vatslav Fomich Nizhinsky; Polish: Wacław Niżyński) (March 12, 1890 – April 8, 1950) was a Polish-born Russian ballet dancer and choreographer.
Nijinsky was one of the most gifted male dancers in history, and he became celebrated for his virtuosity and for the depth and intensity of his characterizations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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