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Encyclopedia > Vasistha

Vasishtha, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptarishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. He was the manasaputra of Brahma. He had in his possession the divine cow Kamadhenu, and Nandini her child, who could grant anything to their owners. Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Saptaŗişhi or Saptarşi (सप्तर्षि, pronounced as səptərŞhi) in Sanskrit means the Seven Sages or rishis who are extolled at many places in the Vedas and other Hindu literature. ... A Rajaguru or Raja Guru is a teacher for the king. ... Brahma carving at a temple in Halebid. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ...


Arundhati is the name of the wife of Vasishta. The star Mizar of the stellar constellation Ursa Major is thought of as Vasishta and the small one beside it, Alcor, as Arundhati. Ursa Major (Ursa Maior in Latin) is a constellation visible throughout the year in the northern hemisphere. ...


Vasishtha is credited as the chief author of Mandala 7 of the Rigveda. Vasishtha and his family are glorified in RV 7.33, besides Bhavayavya the only mortal to have a Rigvedic hymn dedicated to him. The seventh Mandala of the Rig Veda has 104 hymns, to Agni, Indra, the Visvadevas, the Maruts, Mitra-Varuna, the Asvins, Ushas, Indra-Varuna, Varuna, Vayu (the wind), two each to Sarasvati and Vishnu, and to others. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns counted among the four Hindu religious texts known as the Vedas. ...

Contents


Tales featuring Vashishta

Vashishta is featured in many tales and folklore, a few of which are briefly described below.


The tale of Vishwamitra

This tale tells of how Vashishta possessed a cow named Kamadhenu who could produce enough food for a whole army of troops instantly. The king Vishwamitra, who visited Vashishta's hermitage, was very impressed with the cow and tried to take it away from Vashishta by force, but Vashishta's spiritual power acquired through penance was too great for him. After being unable to conquer Vashishta, Vishwamitra decided to acquire power himself through penance. He gained much power and many divine weapons from Lord Shiva. And once again he attempted to conquer Vashishta. But even the divine weapons he acquired could not defeat the power of Vashishta's Brahmadanda (punishment). Vishwamitra finally decided to become a Brahmarishi himself, and he renounced all his possessions and luxury and led the life of a simple forest ascetic. Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... Brahmarishi Viswamitra is one of the seven venerated sages of Hindu mythology. ... A hermitage is the retreat of a hermit. ... Penance (via Old French penance from the Latin Poenitentia, the same root as penitence, which in English means repentance, the desire to be forgiven, see contrition; in many languages only one single word is derived) is, strictly, repentance of sins as well as the actual name of the Catholic Sacrament... This article is about the Hindu God. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ...


The tale of King Dileepa

King Dileepa was a king of the Raghuvamsha dynasty. He had a wife named Sudakshina, but they had no children. For this reason, Dileepa visited the sage Vashishta in his ashram, and asked him for his advice. Vashishta replied that they should serve the cow Nandini, child of Kamadhenu, and perhaps if Nandini was happy with their service, she would grant them with a child. So, according to Vashishta, Dileepa served Nandini every day, and attended to her every need for twenty-one days. On the twenty-first day, a lion attacks Nandini. Dileepa immediately draws his bow and tries to shoot the lion. But he finds that his arm is paralysed and cannot move. He reasons that the lion must have some sort of divine power. As if to confirm this, the lion started to speak to him. It said that Dileepa had no chance of saving the cow because the cow was the lion's chosen meal. The lion tells Dileepa to return to Vashishta's ashram. Dileepa replies by asking if the lion would let Nandini go if he offered himself in Nandini's place. The lion agreed and Dileepa sacrificed his life for the cow. But then the lion mysteriously disappeared. Nandini explained that the lion was just an illusion to test Dileepa. Because Dileepa was truly selfless, Nandini granted him with a son. Dillipa in Hindu mythology is said to have been one of the most righteous and chivalrous emperors that the Solar Dynasty had ever produced. ... Kalidasas Raghuvamsha tells of the family of Rama and his descendents, including the conqueror Raghu. ... Ashrams in ancient India were Hindu hermitages where sages lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... Ashrams in ancient India were Hindu hermitages where sages lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... An illusion is a distortion of a sensory perception. ...


See also

Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Brahmarishi Viswamitra is one of the seven venerated sages of Hindu mythology. ... In Hinduism, Bharadwaja was a rishi (sage)who lived three times before he died and ascended to Heaven, to a union with the Sun. ... The Rāmāyaņa (Sanskrit: रामायण (a sandhi form of rāma-ayana = march or journey (Āyana) of Rāma) is part of the Hindu smriti, written by Valmiki. ...

Sources

  • Mythological Tales - Vashishta
  • Raguvamsha



Hinduism | Hindu mythology | Itihasa
Male Deities: Brahma | Vishnu | Shiva | Rama | Krishna | Ganesha | Indra | Lakshman | Hanuman | Surya | more...
Female Deities: Gayatri | Lakshmi | Saraswati | Durga | Devi | Sita | Radha | Kali | Parvati | Shakti | more...
Texts: Vedas | Upanishads | Puranas | Ramayana | Mahabharata

 
 

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