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Encyclopedia > Vasishtha

Vasishtha (Sanskrit: वसिष्ठ), in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptarishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. He was the manasaputra of Brahma. He had in his possession the divine cow Kamadhenu, and Nandini her child, who could grant anything to their owners. The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... SaptaÅ—iÅŸhi or SaptarÅŸi (सप्तर्षि, pronounced as sÉ™ptÉ™rÅžhi) in Sanskrit means the Seven Sages or rishis who are extolled at many places in the Vedas and other Hindu literature. ... Historically in India a Rajaguru or Raja Guru was a teacher for a king. ... The kshatriyas (warrior caste of india) can broadly be divided into two. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ...


Arundhati is the name of the wife of Vasishta. The star Mizar of the stellar constellation Ursa Major is thought of as Vasishta and the small one beside it, Alcor, as Arundhati. Ursa Major (IPA: ) is a constellation visible throughout the year in most of the northern hemisphere. ...


Vasishtha is credited as the chief author of Mandala 7 of the Rigveda. Vasishtha and his family are glorified in RV 7.33, extolling their role in the Battle of the Ten Kings, making him the only mortal besides Bhavayavya to have a Rigvedic hymn dedicated to him. Another immortal treatise dedicated by him to the humanity is "Vasishtha Samhitha" - a book on Vedic system of electional astrology (Muhurtha/ Muhurt)- based on which theory & principles of electional astrology have emanated & followed through millenniums & which have withstood test of the time. The seventh Mandala of the Rig Veda has 104 hymns, to Agni, Indra, the Visvadevas, the Maruts, Mitra-Varuna, the Asvins, Ushas, Indra-Varuna, Varuna, Vayu (the wind), two each to Sarasvati and Vishnu, and to others. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... The Battle of the Ten Kings () is a war bettwen the Indo-Iranians alluded to in Mandala 7 of the Rigveda (hymns 18, 33 and 83. ... This page is about the Buddhist concept. ...

Contents

Tales featuring Vashishtha

Vashishtha is featured in many tales and folklore, a few of which are briefly described below.


The tale of Vishwamitra

This tale tells of how Vashishtha possessed a cow named Kamadhenu who could produce enough food for a whole army of troops instantly. The king Vishwamitra, who visited Vashishtha's hermitage, was very impressed with the cow and tried to take it away from Vashishtha by force, but Vashishtha's spiritual power acquired through penance was too great for him. After being unable to conquer Vashishtha, Vishwamitra decided to acquire power himself through penance. He gained much power and many divine weapons from Lord Shiva. And once again he attempted to conquer Vashishtha. But even the divine weapons he acquired could not defeat the power of Vashishtha's Brahmadanda (punishment). Vishwamitra finally decided to become a Brahmarishi himself, and he renounced all his possessions and luxury and led the life of a simple forest ascetic. Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... Brahmarishi Viswamitra is one of the seven venerated sages of Hindu mythology. ... Onuphrius lived as a hermit in the desert of Upper Egypt in the late 4th century A hermit (from the Greek erēmos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion and/or isolation from society. ... Penance is repentance of sins, as well as the name of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation/Confession. ... This article is about the Hindu God. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ...


The tale of King Dileepa

King Dileepa was a king of the Raghuvamsha dynasty. He had a wife named Sudakshina, but they had no children. For this reason, Dileepa visited the sage Vashishtha in his ashram, and asked him for his advice. Vashishta replied that they should serve the cow Nandini, child of Kamadhenu, and perhaps if Nandini was happy with their service, she would grant them with a child. So, according to Vashishtha, Dileepa served Nandini every day, and attended to her every need for twenty-one days. On the twenty-first day, a lion attacks Nandini. Dileepa immediately draws his bow and tries to shoot the lion. But he finds that his arm is paralysed and cannot move. He reasons that the lion must have some sort of divine power. As if to confirm this, the lion started to speak to him. It said that Dileepa had no chance of saving the cow because the cow was the lion's chosen meal. The lion tells Dileepa to return to Vashishtha's ashram. Dileepa replies by asking if the lion would let Nandini go if he offered himself in Nandini's place. The lion agreed and Dileepa sacrificed his life for the cow. But then the lion mysteriously disappeared. Nandini explained that the lion was just an illusion to test Dileepa. Because Dileepa was truly selfless, Nandini granted him with a son. Dillipa in Hindu mythology is said to have been one of the most righteous and chivalrous emperors that the Solar Dynasty had ever produced. ... Kalidasas Raghuvamsha tells of the family of Rama and his descendents, including the conqueror Raghu. ... An Ashram (Pronounced aashram) in ancient India was a Hindu hermitage where sages (See Rishi) lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ... An Ashram (Pronounced aashram) in ancient India was a Hindu hermitage where sages (See Rishi) lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... An illusion is a distortion of a sensory perception, revealing how the brain normally organizes and interprets sensory stimulation. ...


Yoga Vasishtha

Yoga Vasishtha is an ancient scripture narrated by sage Vasistha to Rama. A unique and an extremely profound discourse, that provides innumerable insights and secrets to the inner world of consciousness. This extremely huge scripture covers all the topics that relate to the spiritual study of a seeker. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Yoga Vasistha or also known as Vasisthas Yoga, is the discourse of the great Sage Vasistha to Prince Rama when he is in a state of dispassion at a young age. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Rama ( in IAST, in Devanāgarī) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ...


This scripture is a must read for anyone trying to understand the concepts of consciousness, creation of the world, the multiple universes in this world, our perception of world, dissolution of the world and the liberation of this soul. Creation (theology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The soul, according to many religious and philosophical traditions, is the self-aware essence unique to a particular living being. ...


Yoga Vasistha propounds that everything from the blade of grass to the universes is all but consciousness alone. There is naught else but consciousness. It expounds the non-dual approach to this creation.


Just as the blue sky is an optical illusion this entire world and the creation is but such an optical illusion. When the illusion ends in the mind, the world and its miseries too end. The self is the seer of all, the self is the perceiver of all and the self is the experiencer of all. And that self is only one. There is no two, there is no subject, seer and the object. It is all one.


Another oft repeated verse in the text is that of Kakathaliya (coincidence). The story of how a crow alights on a coconut tree and that very moment the ripe coconut falls on the ground. The two events are apparently related, yet the crow never intended the coconut to fall nor did the coconut fall only because the crow sat on the tree. Yet, one event led to the other in a subtle way.


This entire creation is such a coincidence and yet there is absolutely no coincidence in this creation. Everything is connected, meaning no coincidence.


Story of Yoga Vasishtha

Rama, the eldest son of Dasaratha, after completing a piligrimage of holy places returns to the palace. After his return, he is constantly found wandering lost in thought and completely disenchanted with the worldly life and the pleasures of the kingdom. This surprises and concerns his father King Dasaratha. Dasaratha (Sanskrit: दशरथ, IAST Daśaratha) in Hindu history is the king of Ayodhya and a descendant of Raghuvamsa. ...


One day, in his court arrives the great sage Visvamitra. Visvamitra requests Dasaratha to send Rama with him while he conducts his yagna. He wants Rama to fight the demons who would disrupt the yagna. Brahmarshi Vishvamitra (Sanskrit all-friend) is one of the most venerated rishis or sages of since ancient times in India. ...


Dasaratha refuses to send Rama on the context that Rama is still a child who does not know the ways of battle. At this stage, before Visvamitra could get angry, Sage Vasistha interferes and pleads with Dasaratha to not refuse the request of Visvamitra and invite curses on himself.


When Dasaratha expresses his other concern about Rama's sudden change in behaviour, Vasistha asks for Rama to be brought before him.


Rama is then brought to the palace and Dasaratha asks him what is bothering him. Rama then explains his disenchantment with worldly things and expresses sadness at the miserable life as a worldly man.


The ensuing answer to Rama's questions forms the entire scripture that is Yoga Vasistha.


Vasishtha head

A copper item representing a human head styled in the manner described for the Rigvedic Vasishthas has been dated to around 3700 B.C. in three western universities using among other tests carbon 14 tests, spectographic analysis, X-ray dispersal analysis and metallography (Hicks and Anderson. Analysis of an Indo-European Vedic Aryan Head - 4500-2500 B.C., in Journal of IE studies 18:425-446. Fall 1990.). This could suggest that some Rigvedic customs were already known at a very early time, though the possibility remains that the bronze head could have been recast from an earlier item. Unfortunately the head was not found in an archaeological context. (It was rescued from being melted down in Delhi.) In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... Metallograhy is a science, related to metallurgy that looks at the composition and structure of metals and alloys. ...


See also

Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Brahmarishi Viswamitra is one of the seven venerated sages of Hindu mythology. ... Bharadwaja (भरद्वाज) was one of the great sages (rishis) whose accomplishments are detailed in the Puranas. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ...

Sources

  • Mythological Tales - Vashishta
  • Raguvamsha



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Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages) is a religious tradition that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... Image File history File links Hindu_swastika. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as deities or murtis. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... In Hinduism, Saraswati (Sanskrit ) is one of the goddesses, the other two being Lakshmi and Durga, that form the female counterpart of the Trimurti. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This 14th century statue depicts Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In Hinduism, Gowri or Dakshayani is the Goddess of marital felicity and longevity, who is worshipped particularly by ladies to seek the long life of... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: , Bengali: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gayatri (Sanskrit: , IAST: ) is the feminine form of gāyatra, a Sanskrit word for a song or a hymn. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... A Rajastani style painting of Sri Radha Radha (Devanagari: राधा) is a famous female personality from Hindu, (Vedic) tradition, also known as Radharani, prefixed with the respectful term Srimati by devout followers. ... In Hinduism, the ten mahavidyas (Great Wisdoms) are aspects of Devi. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as deities or murtis. ... It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ... Shiva (also spelled Siva; Sanskrit ) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Ganesha (Sanskrit: ; ;  , also spelled Ganesa or Ganesh) is one of the best-known and most worshipped deities in Hinduism[8]. Although he is known by many other attributes, Ganeshas elephant head makes him easy to identify. ... Murugan (also Murugan) (Tamil: ) is a popular Hindu deity amongst Tamil Hindus. ... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya (film). ... Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ... In Hinduism, Surya (Devanagari: सूर्य, sÅ«rya) is the chief solar deity,one of the Adityas, son of Kasyapa and one of his wife Aditi[1] ,in Nordics Tyr he is said to be the son of Dyaus Pitar. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद) are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... Purana (Sanskrit: , meaning tales of ancient times) is the name of an ancient Indian genre (or a group of related genres) of Hindu or Jain literature (as distinct from oral tradition). ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ...

The Rigveda   (Mandalas: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10)
Deities: (Devas) Agni, Indra, Soma, Ushas | (Asuras) Mitra, Varuna, Vrtra | Visvedevas, Maruts, Ashvins
Rivers: Sapta Sindhu; Nadistuti; Sarasvati, Sindhu, Sarayu, Rasā
Rishis: Saptarishi; Gritsamada, Vishvamitra, Vamadeva, Atri, Angiras, Bharadvaja, Vasishta

Template:Yoga Vasishtha by Swami Venkatesananda The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... The first Mandala (book) of the Rigveda has 191 hymns. ... The second Mandala of the Rigveda has 43 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra chiefly attributed to the Rishi . ... The third Mandala of the Rigveda has 62 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra. ... The fourth Mandala of the Rigveda has 58 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra. ... The fifth Mandala of the Rigveda has 87 hymns. ... The sixth Mandala of the Rig Veda has 75 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra. ... The seventh Mandala of the Rigveda has 104 hymns. ... The eighth Mandala of the Rigveda has 103 hymns. ... The ninth Mandala of the Rigveda, also called the Soma Mandala has 114 hymns, entirely[1] devoted to , Purifying Soma, the sacred potion of the Vedic religion. ... The tenth Mandala of the Rigveda has 191 hymns, to Agni and other gods. ... There are 1028 hymns in the Rigveda, most of them dedicated to specific deities. ... It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ... Chinese (Wu Xing) Japanese (Godai) Earth (地) | Water (æ°´) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism (Tattva) and Buddhism (MahābhÅ«ta) Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water Bön New Zealand Agni is a Hindu and Vedic deity. ... Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ... // In Hinduism In Hindu mythology, the Asura (Sanskrit: असुर) are a group of power-seeking deities, sometimes misleadingly referred to as demons. ... This article is about the Vedic deity Mitra. ... In Vedic religion, Varuna (Devanagari:वरुण, IAST:) is a god of the sky, of rain and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. ... In Hinduism, Vritra (Sanskrit वृत्र Vṛtra, the enveloper) was a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... The word Visvadevas means Lords of the Universe or All Gods. The term is used to address the various gods as a whole. ... In Hinduism the Maruts, also known as the Marutgana and the Rudras, are storm deities and sons of Rudra and Diti and attendants of Indra. ... The Ashvins ( possessor of horses, horse tamer, cavalier, dual ) are divine twin horsemen in the Rigveda, sons of Saranya, a goddess of the clouds and wife of either Surya in his form as Vivasvat. ... Rivers play a prominent part in the hymns of the Rigveda, and consequently in early Vedic religion. ... The Sapta Sindhu are the seven sacred rivers in Hindu mythology. ... The Nadistuti sukta (praise of the rivers) is hymn 10. ... The Sarasvati River is an ancient river that is mentioned in Hindu texts. ... The Indus River (Urdu: Sindh; Sindhi: Sindh; Sanskrit and Hindi: सिन्धु ; Persian: حندو ; Pashto: ّآباسنFather of Rivers; Tibetan: Lion River; Chinese: Yìndù; Greek: Ινδους Indus) is the longest and most important river in Pakistan and one of the most important rivers on the Indian subcontinent and has given the country India its... The Sarayu (also Sarju; Dev. ... Rasa () means moisture, humitidy in Vedic Sanskrit, and appears as the name of a western tributary of the Indus in the Rigveda (verse 5. ... In Hinduism, the Rishis are sages and/or seers who heard the hymns of the Devas; and then wrote them down as Vedic scriptures. ... SaptaÅ—iÅŸhi or SaptarÅŸi (सप्तर्षि, pronounced as sÉ™ptÉ™rÅžhi) in Sanskrit means the Seven Sages or rishis who are extolled at many places in the Vedas and other Hindu literature. ... Grtsamada is a rishi, credited with most of Mandala 2 of the Rigveda (36 out of 43, hymns 27-29 being attributed to his son Kurma and 4-7 to Somahuti). ... Brahmarshi Vishvamitra (Sanskrit all-friend) is one of the most venerated rishis or sages of since ancient times in India. ... In Hinduism, Vamadeva is the name of the preserver aspect of the god Shiva, one of five aspects of the universe he embodies. ... In Hinduism, Atri (Sanskrit: अत्रि) is a legendary bard and scholar, and a son of Brahma. ... In Hinduism, the Angiris (or Angiras) are a group of angels responsible for watching over humans performing sacrifices. ... In Hinduism, Bharadwaja was one of the great sages(rishi) who lived in ancient India. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


Commentaries on Yoga Vasistha

Commentary by Swami Venkatesananda - Vasistha's Yoga published by the State University of New York (SUNY)


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Yoga Vasishtha (1950 words)
The Yoga Vasishtha deals with the subject of effecting union of the individual soul with the Supreme Soul amidst all the trials and tribulations of life.
The doctrine of Drishti-Srishtivada is expounded in the Yoga Vasishtha.
Moksha, according to Yoga Vasishtha, is the attainment of the essence of the bliss of Brahman through knowledge of the Self.
Vasishtha (1359 words)
Vasishtha was the possessor of a "cow of plenty," called Nandini, who had the power of granting him all things (vasu) he desired, hence his name.
Though Vasishtha is classed among the Prajapatis who sprang from Brahma, a hymn in the Rigveda and other commentaries thereon assign him a different origin, or rather a second birth, and represent him and the sage Agastya to have sprung from Mitra and Varuna.
The hymn says, "Thou, O Vasishtha, are a son of Mitra and Varuna, born a Brahman from the soul of Urvasi.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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