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Encyclopedia > Vanir

Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. The name is perhaps from the PIE root wen "to strive, win", cognate to Venus (compare Vanadis), Wynn (Proto-Germanic *Wanizaz). Norse or Scandinavian mythology refers to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Æsir (pron. ... A slice of strawberry-rhubarb pie à la mode A pie is a baked dish, with a baked shell usually made of pastry that covers or completely contains a filling of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, cheeses, creams, chocolate, custards, nuts, or other sweet or savoury ingredient. ... Genitive Venusian or Venetian (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Freyja in Wagners operas See Freya radar for German World War II radar. ... Categories: Language stubs | Old English language | Runes | Uncommon Latin letters ... Map of the Pre-Roman Iron Age culture(s) associated with Proto-Germanic, ca 500 BC-50 BC. The area south of Scandinavia is the Jastorf culture Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish...

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They include Niordthe father of the gods of Vanir and god of the sea, Freyr, the god of fertility, and Freya (Freyja), goddess of love and sexuality, who lived among the Æsir at Yggdrasil directly below the Aesir. Although the Vanir are respected for their having the power to keep peace, one incident with Freyr caused a war between the Vanir and Aesir. Freyr, sitting on top of Odin's throne above the worlds spied a woman who he fell in love with. He married her and traded his sword to the giants thus infuriating Odin and giving cause to the beginnings of fear of Ragnarok. To end the war between the gods, the Vanir cut off the head of Mímir and sent it to the Aesir. Odin accepted the head and placed it under the tree of life where in order to divine knowledge of the future, he had to relinquish one of his eyes. The origins as Vanir of Skaði, Lýtir, Gerðr and Óðr may be debated. Óðr is mentioned in the Eddas very shortly as the husband of Freyja, but nothing more is actually known about him (although it is often remarked that it was one of Óðinn's names). The gods Njord and Freyr appear in Snorri's Ynglinga saga as Kings of Sweden. Their descendants on the Swedish throne can be called Vanir, such as: Njord (Old Norse Njǫrðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion; not so much in Norse mythology as one might suppose, for there he actually appears in only one surviving story, but very much in the cult. ... This article uses English names. ... The Æsir (pron. ... This article contains nonstandard pronunciation information which should be rewritten using the International Phonetic Alphabet. ... Odin is considered to be the supreme god of late Germanic and Norse mythology. ... For other meanings of the word giant, see Giant (disambiguation) Giants are humanoid creatures of prodigious size and strength, a type of legendary monster that appear in the tales of many different races and cultures. ... Look up Ragnarok on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Norse mythology, Ragnarok (fate of the gods1) is the battle at the end of the world. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... This article is about the Scandanavian goddess. ... Ódr is described in Snorri Sturlusons Edda as follows: Freyja is most gently born (together with Frigg): she is wedded to the man named Ódr. ... Odin is considered to be the supreme god of late Germanic and Norse mythology. ... Njord or Njordr (Old Norse Njörðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of the fertile land along the seacoast, as well as seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion; not so much in Norse mythology as one might suppose, for there he actually appears in only one surviving story, but very much in the cult. ... Snorri Sturlason (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... The Ynglinga saga or Ynglingesaga, was originally written in Old Norse by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson about 1225 CE. He based it on an earlier Ynglingatal which is attributed to the Norwegian 10th century skald Tjodolf of Hvin, and which also appears in Historia Norwegiae. ... In sources such as Heimskringla and Ynglinga saga there appear early Swedish kings who belong in the domain of mythology, but it is often suggested that they have a historical basis. ...

humouristic image by Albert Engström (1869-1940): Fjölnir, Fjölner or Fjolner was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling, at Gamla Uppsala. ... Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD, or GORD when -oesophageal, the BE form, is substituted) is injury to the esophagus that develops from chronic exposure of the esophagus to acid coming up from the stomach (reflux). ... Sveigder or Swegde was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology Vanaheim is the home of the Vanir. ... Vanlade, Vanlande was a Swedish king at Uppsala of the House of Yngling. ... The giants seize Freya. ... Snær (Old Norse) Snærr, East Norse Sniō, Latin Snio) snow, in Norse mythology seemingly a personification of snow, appearing in extant text as an euhemerized legendary Scandinavian king. ...

Characteristics

They are gods of fertility, the sea, and prosperity. While the Æsir were war gods, the Vanir were understood to be rich, the givers of riches, the patrons of fecundity, pleasure, and peace, and with the Aesir, the bringers of unity. They have a deep knowledge of magical arts, so that they also know the future. It is said that it was Freyja who taught magic to the Æsir. They also practiced endogamy and even incest, both forbidden among the Æsir; as an example Freyr and Freyja were children of Njǫrðr and his sister (see Nerthus). Later conflicts with Christians attempting to convert the pagan Norse were especially hard due to cults favoring the Vanir. Early pagan Norse either chose between cults of the Vanir, Aesir, or both. Areas where fishing and boating were prominent tended to have greater Vanir cults. Endogamy is the practice of marrying within a social group because of social norms that encourage or require it. ... Incest is the sexual activity or marriage between very close family members (and sometimes friends in some societies). ... The goddess Nerthus was a Germanic fertility goddess described by Tacitus. ...


Location

The Vanir live in Vanaheim, also called Vanaland; Snorri Sturluson calls their land Tanakvísl or Vanakvísl (Tanakvísl eða Vanakvísl) etymologizing Vanir as the "Don-people". Vanaheim, along with Asgard, is the home of the gods in the tree of life Yggdrasil. In Norse mythology Vanaheim is the home of the Vanir. ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 â€“ September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... Length 1950 km Elevation of the source - m Average discharge - m³/s Area watershed 425,600 km² Origin Russia, Ukraine Mouth Sea of Azov Basin countries Russia The Don (Дон) is one of the major rivers of Russia. ... Asgard (Old Norse: Ásgarðr) is the realm of the gods, the Æsir, in Norse mythology, thought to be separate from the realm of the mortals, Midgard. ... This article contains nonstandard pronunciation information which should be rewritten using the International Phonetic Alphabet. ...


Vanir and Elves

The Eddas possibly identify the Vanir with the elves (Alfar), frequently interchanging "Æsir and Vanir" and "Æsir and Alfar" to mean "all the gods". As both the Vanir and the Alfar were fertility powers, the interchangeability suggest that the Vanir may have been synonymous with the elves. It may also be that the two names reflected a difference in status where the elves were minor fertility gods whereas the Vanir were major fertility gods. Freyr would thus be a natural Van ruler of the elves in Álfheim. In Norse mythology, the lfar, or Elves, are usually considered to be the height of humans or just above. ... A small forest elf (älva) rescuing an egg, from Solägget (1932), by Elsa Beskow An elf is a mythical creature of Germanic mythology which survived in northern European folklore. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion; not so much in Norse mythology as one might suppose, for there he actually appears in only one surviving story, but very much in the cult. ... Álfheim (Old Norse Álfheimr Elf-home) is the abode of the Álfar Elves in Norse mythology and appears also in northern English ballads under the forms Elfhame and Elphame. ...


Contemporary reconstruction of Norse religion focussing on the Vanir is sometimes known as Vanatrú.


Cult of the Vanir

The vanir are associated with bringing an understanding of celestial bodies to the Norse. Niord, god of the sea, brought understanding of the stars, sun, and moon which is evident in carvings, cave paintings, and runes throughout Scandinavia. Although debatable, this understanding of celestial bodies was what allowed boaters, and later Vikings, the ability to cross vast streches of ocean. It was not the primary source of navigation. It is also understood that the Vanir were responsible for sexual practices and healing.


Misconceptions

Many misconstrue the groupings of the gods with the Pantheons of Greek and Roman mythologies. The gods did not reside in one area. They were dispersed along the branches of Yggdrasil, the tree of life. Another major misconception, brought on by Christian bias, is that the early Norse saw the gods as something to emulate in character and emotion. Although the gods were respected for their powers, people did not emulate the gods the way some Christians try to emulate and celebrate Jesus.


Vanir and their Guests


There is a possible connection between Heimdall and the Vanir, noted by H.R. Ellis Davidson. Freyja in Wagners operas See Freya radar for German World War II radar. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion; not so much in Norse mythology as one might suppose, for there he actually appears in only one surviving story, but very much in the cult. ... In Norse mythology, Gullveig (seemingly gold drink or gold might) is a mysterious goddess or giantess who is said have been burned three times in Odins hall, to have been three times born, and to live yet as a seeress performing dark magic. ... In Norse mythology, Hönir was a very indecisive god and a member of the Aesir. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... In Norse mythology, Kvasir was created from the saliva of all the gods, making him the wisest of the Vanir. ... Njord (Old Norse Njǫrðr) is one of the Vanir and the god of seamanship and sailing in Norse mythology. ... This article is about the Scandanavian goddess. ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the gods in Norse mythology. ...


Links

  • Vanic Vé

Norse mythology Variant of Image:Mjollnir. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology refers to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ...

List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns
Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freya | Loki | Baldr | Tyr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök

Sources:
Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle
Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society:
Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers Norse gods Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including the jotnar (giants), the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... The Æsir (pron. ... The giants seize Freya. ... A small forest elf (älva) rescuing an egg, from Solägget (1932), by Elsa Beskow An elf is a mythical creature of Germanic mythology which survived in northern European folklore. ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar) are highly significant entities associated with stones, the underground and forging. ... A statue from 1908 by Stephan Sinding located in Copenhagen, presents an active image of a valkyrie. ... In Norse mythology, Einherjar (or Einheriar) referred to the spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... The Norns The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) of Norse mythology are three old crones by the names of Urd (those who were), Verdandi (those who are) and Skuld (those who will). ... Odin is considered to be the supreme god of late Germanic and Norse mythology. ... Thor carries his hammer and wears his belt of strength in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion; not so much in Norse mythology as one might suppose, for there he actually appears in only one surviving story, but very much in the cult. ... This article uses English names. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript, shows Loki with his invention - the fishing net. ... Baldr. ... Týr is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This article contains nonstandard pronunciation information which should be rewritten using the International Phonetic Alphabet. ... Ginnungagap (seeming emptiness) was the vast chasm that existed between Niflheim and Muspelheim before creation in Norse mythology. ... Look up Ragnarok on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Norse mythology, Ragnarok (fate of the gods1) is the battle at the end of the world. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... This colourful front page of the Prose Edda in an 18th century Icelandic manuscript shows Odin, Heimdallr, Sleipnir and other figures from Norse mythology. ... The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: sögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... The Volsung Cycle is the name of a series of Germanic legends based on the same matter as Niebelungenlied, and which were recorded in medieval Iceland. ... The Tyrfing Cycle is a collection of legends united by the magic sword Tyrfing. ... A rune stone Rune stones are standing stones with runic inscriptions dating from the Iron Age (Viking Age) and early Middle Ages. ... This is the approximate extent of Old Norse and related languages in the early 10th century. ... The orthography of the Old Norse language since the introduction of the Latin alphabet in Iceland is a thorny subject. ... Norse mythology provides a rich and diverse source which many later writers have borrowed from or built upon. ... The Viking Age is the name of the period between 793 A.D. and 1066 A.D. in Scandinavia, following the Germanic Iron Age and the Vendel Age in Sweden. ... The skald was a member of a group of courtly poets, whose poetry is associated with the courts of Scandinavian and Icelandic leaders during the Viking age, who composed and performed renditions of aspects of what we now characterise as Old Norse poetry. ... This article is about kenning as a poetic notion. ... The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... Seid (Old Norse: seiðr, sometimes anglicized as seidhr, seidh, seidr, seithr or seith) was a form of shamanism practised by pre-Christian Norse and arguably other Germanic cultures and continued in modern times by people who practice the reconstructionist beliefs of Ásatrú or heathenry. ... Numbers are significant in Norse mythology although not to the extent which they are in some traditions e. ...

The nine worlds of Norse mythology | People, places and things

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vanir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (812 words)
Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir.
The Eddas possibly identify the Vanir with the elves (Alfar), frequently interchanging "Æsir and Vanir" and "Æsir and Alfar" to mean "all the gods".
As both the Vanir and the Alfar were fertility powers, the interchangeability suggest that the Vanir may have been synonymous with the elves.
Vanir (251 words)
In Norse myth, the Vanir are originally a group of wild nature and fertility gods and goddesses, the sworn enemies of the warrior gods of the Aesir.
To ensure this peace they traded hostages: the Vanir sent their most renowned gods, the wealthy Njord and his children Freya and Freyr.
He was accompanied by Mimir, the wisest man of the Aesir and in return the Vanir sent their wisest man Kvasir.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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