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Encyclopedia > Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave in Nip/Tuck, 2004
Born January 30, 1937 (age 70)
London, England, United Kingdom
Height 180 cm (5 ft 11 in)
Years active 1958 -
Spouse(s) Tony Richardson (1962-1967)
Academy Awards
Best Supporting Actress
1977 Julia
Emmy Awards
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
1981 Playing for Time
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
1995 If These Walls Could Talk 2
Tony Awards
Best Actress in a Play
2003 Long Day's Journey Into Night

Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. She is also a social activist for human rights.[1] Image File history File links VanessaRedgrave. ... Nip/Tuck is an American television drama series created by Ryan Murphy for FX Networks. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... // Events February 16- In the Money is released on this date. ... Tony Richardson (June 5, 1928 - November 14, 1991) was a British theatre and film director and producer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Julia is a 1977 dramatic film based on playwright Lillian Hellmans novel Pentimento, which tells the story of her relationship with her lifelong friend Julia, who worked as an anti-fascist in the years prior to World War II. The movie was adapted by Alvin Sargent from the novel. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... Playing for Time is a 1980 made-for-television film drama made by Szygzy Productions and broadcast by CBS. It was directed by Daniel Mann who replaced Tony Richardson and Joseph Sargent. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winners: 1979: Esther Rolle - Summer of My German Soldier 1980: Mare Winningham - Amber Waves 1981: Jane Alexander - Playing for Time 1982: Penny Fuller - The Elephant Man 1983: Jean Simmons - The Thorn Birds... If These Walls Could Talk 2 is a 2000 television movie in the United States, broadcast on HBO. It follows three lesbian stories in three different time periods. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire (Military division) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke while waiting between takes during location filming An actor is a person who acts, or plays a role, in a dramatic production. ... The Redgrave family is one of the enduring theatrical dynasties, which is now into its fifth generation. ... Social activists are people who act as the conscience and voice of many individuals within a society. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...

Contents

Ancestry and Family

Vanessa Redgrave was born in London, England to Sir Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson (Lady Redgrave). Her siblings, Lynn Redgrave and the equally outspoken Corin Redgrave, are also acclaimed actors. Redgrave's daughters, Natasha Richardson and Joely Richardson (by her 1962-1967 marriage to film director Tony Richardson) have also built respected acting careers. Redgrave's son Carlo Nero (né Carlo Sparanero), by her relationship with Italian actor Franco Nero (né Francesco Sparanero), is a writer and film director. She met Nero while filming Camelot in 1967. During the late 1970s and 1980s she had a long-term relationship with actor Timothy Dalton. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood in The Lady Vanishes (1938) Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, KBE (March 20, 1908 — March 21, 1985) was an English actor and the son of the Australian silent film star Roy Redgrave and the actress Margaret Scudamore. ... Rachel Kempson, Lady Redgrave (28 May 1910 – 24 May 2003) was an English actress, best known as the wife of Sir Michael Redgrave and mother of his actor children, Vanessa, Lynn and Corin. ... Lynn Rachel Redgrave OBE (born 8 March 1943 in London) is an English actress born into the famous acting Redgrave family. ... Corin William Redgrave (born 16 July 1939) is an English actor. ... Natasha Jane Richardson (born May 11, 1963 in London), is a Tony Award-winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, an enduring theatrical dynasty. ... Joely Richardson Joely Richardson (born January 9, 1965 in the U.K.) is a British actress, who was born into a theatrical family. ... Tony Richardson (June 5, 1928 - November 14, 1991) was a British theatre and film director and producer. ... Carlo Nero is a mostly European-based film screenwriter and director of British and Italian descent. ... Franco Nero Franco Nero (born November 23, 1941) is an Italian actor. ... The musical, Camelot, was written by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe and is loosely based on the King Arthur legend as adapted from the T.H. White novel The Once and Future King. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... Timothy Peter Dalton (born March 21, 1944) is a British actor of stage and screen, best known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989). ...


Stage career

Vanessa Redgrave entered the Central School of Speech and Drama in 1954. She first appeared in the West End theatre, playing opposite her father, in 1958. The Central School of Speech and Drama is a United Kingdom government funded higher education college in London. ... // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the...


Redgrave continues to work regularly in the theatre. In 2003 she won a Tony Award for "Best Actress in a Play" for her performance in the Broadway revival of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night. In January 2006, Redgrave was presented the Ibsen Centennial Award for her "outstanding work in interpreting many of Henrik Ibsen's works over the last decades."[2] Previous recipients of the award include Liv Ullmann, Glenda Jackson, and Claire Bloom. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... A revival is a restaging of a former hit play at a later date. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ... Photo of Henrik Ibsen in his older days Henrik Johan Ibsen (March 20, 1828 – May 23, 1906) was a major Norwegian playwright who was largely responsible for the rise of the modern realistic drama. ... Liv Ullmann at Cannes in 2000 Liv Johanne Ullmann (born December 16, 1938) is a Norwegian actress, author and film director. ... Glenda Jackson Glenda May Jackson, CBE, (born 9 May 1936) is a two-time Academy Award-winning British actress and politician, currently Labour Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hampstead and Highgate in the London Borough of Camden. ... Claire Bloom (born Patricia Claire Blume on February 15, 1931) is a British film and stage actress. ...


Redgrave will play Joan Didion in Didion's upcoming New York stage adaptation of her recent book, The Year of Magical Thinking. Photo of Joan Didion by Robert Birnbaum Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. ... The Year of Magical Thinking (2005), by Joan Didion (b. ...


Film career

Early film career

Redgrave in Michelangelo Antonioni's Blowup, 1966
Redgrave in Michelangelo Antonioni's Blowup, 1966

Highlights of Vanessa Redgrave's early film career include her first starring role in Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (for which she earned an Oscar nomination, a Cannes award, a Golden Globe nomination and a BAFTA Film Award); her portrayal of the cool London swinger, Jane, in 1966’s Blowup; her spirited portrayal of dancer Isadora Duncan in Isadora (for which she won a National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress, along with a Golden Globe and Oscar nomination in 1969); and various portrayals of historical figures - ranging from Andromache in The Trojan Women, to Mary of Scotland in Mary, Queen of Scots. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Michelangelo Antonioni (born September 29, 1912) is an Italian modernist film director whose films are widely considered as some of the most influential in film aesthetics. ... Blowup is a 1966 British-Italian art film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, his first to feature an English language screenplay and also the first British film to feature full frontal female nudity (although expurgated in the VHS videotape release[citation needed]). The film featured David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles... Morgan! (also known as Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment) is a 1966 film which tells the story of a man, obsessed with Karl Marx and gorillas, who tries to stop his ex-wife from remarrying. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Blowup is a 1966 British-Italian art film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, his first to feature an English language screenplay and also the first British film to feature full frontal female nudity (although expurgated in the VHS videotape release[citation needed]). The film featured David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Isadora (also known as The Loves of Isadora) is a 1968 biographical film which tells the story of dancer Isadora Duncan. ... The Trojan Women (in Greek, Troiades) is a tragedy by the Greek playwright Euripides. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Mary, Queen of Scrots is a 1971 biographical film which tells the story of the life of Queen Mary I of Scotland. ...

Julia

In 1977, Redgrave funded and narrated a documentary film "The Palestinian", which focused on the plight of the Palestinian people. That same year she starred in the film Julia, about a woman murdered by the Nazi regime in the years prior to World War II for her anti-Fascist activism. Her co-star in the film was Jane Fonda who, in her 2005 autobiography, noted that "there is a quality about Vanessa that makes me feel as if she resides in a netherworld of mystery that eludes the rest of us mortals. Her voice seems to come from some deep place that knows all suffering and all secrets. Watching her work is like seeing through layers of glass, each layer painted in mythic watercolor images, layer after layer, until it becomes dark - but even then you know you haven't come to the bottom of it . . . The only other time I had experienced this with an actor was with Marlon Brando . . . Like Vanessa, he always seemed to be in another reality, working off some secret, magnetic, inner rhythm." Julia is a 1977 dramatic film based on playwright Lillian Hellmans novel Pentimento, which tells the story of her relationship with her lifelong friend Julia, who worked as an anti-fascist in the years prior to World War II. The movie was adapted by Alvin Sargent from the novel. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ...


Redgrave's performance in Julia garnered an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. However, members of the Jewish Defense League (JDL), led by Rabbi Meir Kahane, chose to picket the awards ceremony in the spring of 1978 to protest against both Redgrave and her support of the Palestinian cause. JDL logo. ... Rabbi, in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word רַב, rav, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished (in knowledge). Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word רִבִּי ribbī; the modern Israeli pronunciation רַבִּי rabbī is derived from a recent (18th... Rabbi Meir Kahane. ...


Aware of the JDL's presence outside, Redgrave, in her acceptance speech, denounced all forms of totalitarianism, noting neither she nor the Academy (who had received death threats if she won) would be intimidated by “a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums whose behavior is an insult to the stature to Jews all over the world.” Her statement was greeted by both applause and boos from the audience. The 50th Academy Awards were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California on April 3, 1978. ... Totalitarianism is a term employed by political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


Later in the broadcast, veteran screenwriter and Oscar presenter Paddy Chayefsky announced to the audience, “there's a little matter I'd like to tidy up…at least if I expect to live with myself tomorrow morning. I would like to say that I'm sick and tired of people exploiting the Academy Awards for the propagation of their own personal propaganda. I would like to suggest to Miss Redgrave that her winning an Academy Award is not a pivotal moment in history, does not require a proclamation and a simple ‘Thank you' would have sufficed.” He received thunderous applause. Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Sidney Aaron Chayefsky (January 29, 1923 – August 1, 1981) known as Paddy Chayefsky was an acclaimed dramatist who transitioned from the golden age of American live television in the 1950s to have a successful career as a playwright and screenwriter for Hollywood. ... An Australian anti-conscription propaganda poster from World War One Propaganda is a type of message aimed at influencing the opinions or behavior of people. ...


In 1978 Rabbi Meir Kahane published a book entitled Listen Vanessa, I am a Zionist, which was later renamed Listen World, Listen Jew in direct response to Redgrave's comments at the Academy Awards. To this day many right-wing Jewish groups, such as the JDL, consider Redgrave a supporter of terrorism. The JDL itself, however, has been described by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in Congressional testimony as a “violent” and “extremist” group. In a sidebar in its “Terrorism 2000/2001” report, the Bureau notes, “The Jewish Defense League has been deemed a right-wing terrorist group.”[3] The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


In June 2005 Redgrave was asked on Larry King Live: “Regardless of distinctions about policy, do you support Israel's right to exist?” “Yes, I do,” she replied.[4] Larry King Live is a nightly CNN interview program hosted by broadcaster and writer Larry King. ...


Later film career

Redgrave in Mrs Dalloway, 1997
Redgrave in Mrs Dalloway, 1997

Later film roles of note include those of suffragette Olive Chancellor in The Bostonians (1984, a fourth Best Actress Academy Award nomination), transsexual Renee Richards in Second Serve (1986); Mrs. Wilcox in Howards End (1992, her sixth Academy Award nomination, this time in a supporting role); crime boss Max in Mission: Impossible (1996, when discussing the role of Max, DePalma and Cruise thought it would be fun to cast an actor like Redgrave, luckily they decided to go with the real thing); Oscar Wilde’s mother in Wilde (1997); Clarissa Dalloway in Mrs. Dalloway (1997); and Dr. Wick in Girl, Interrupted (1999). Many of these roles and others, garnered various accolades for Redgrave. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Vanessa Redgrave as Clarissa Dalloway Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing one day in Clarissa Dalloways life about post-World War I England. ... The Bostonians is 1984s Merchant Ivory Film, based on Henry James novel. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Renee Richards (born Richard Raskind 1934) is a physician and professional tennis player. ... Howards End is a 1991 (released in 1992) film adaptation of E.M. Forsters 1910 novel Howards End, a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-20th-century England. ... Vanessa Redgrave as Clarissa Dalloway Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing one day in Clarissa Dalloways life about post-World War I England. ... Girl, Interrupted book cover Girl, Interrupted is an Academy Award-winning film adapted by the memoir by Susanna Kaysen. ...


Her performance as a lesbian grieving the loss of her longtime partner in the HBO series If These Walls Could Talk 2 earned her a Golden Globe for “Best TV Series Supporting Actress” in 2000. This same performance also led to an “Excellence in Media Award” by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD). The award honors “a member of the entertainment community who has made a significant difference in promoting equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people”.[5] For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... If These Walls Could Talk 2 is a 2000 television movie in the United States, broadcast on HBO. It follows three lesbian stories in three different time periods. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) is an organization that promotes and ensures inclusive representation of self-identifying gay and lesbian people and events in the media as a means of de-stigmatizing homosexuality, thus eliminating discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation. ...


Political activism

Since the 1960s Redgrave has supported a range of human rights causes, including opposition to the Vietnam War, nuclear disarmament, independence for northern Ireland, freedom for Soviet Jews (she was awarded the Sakharov medal by Sakharov's widow, Yelena Bonner, in 1993 for her efforts), and aid for Bosnian Muslims and other victims of war. She serves as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and was a co-founding member of Artists Against Racism. Theres something happening here What it is aint exactly clear Theres a man with a gun over there Telling me I got to beware I think its time we stop, children, whats that sound Everybody look whats going down Theres battle lines being... Andrei Sakharov, 1943 Dr. Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov (Russian: , May 21, 1921 – December 14, 1989), was an eminent Soviet nuclear physicist, dissident and human rights activist. ... Yelena Georgiyevna Bonner (Russian language: Елена Георгиевна Боннер, born February 15, 1923) is a human rights activist in the former Soviet Union and wife of late Andrei Sakharov. ... UNICEF Logo The United Nations Childrens Fund or UNICEF (Arabic: ; French: ; Spanish: ) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ...


Redgrave identifies as a socialist, but her opposition to Soviet oppression led her, early in her career, to join the anti-Stalinist Workers' Revolutionary Party (UK) (WRP), on whose ticket she twice ran for Parliament. Redgrave's Trotskyist political views have been a cause of controversy for some, as has her membership in the WRP. She remained loyal to WRP founder Gerry Healy when he was expelled from the WRP in the mid-1980s. She and other Healy loyalists founded the short-lived Marxist Party in the 1990s. Since 2004 she has been a member of the Peace and Progress Party. Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ... Logo of the current Workers Revolutionary Party The Workers Revolutionary Party is a small Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Trotskyism is the theory of Marxism as advocated by Leon Trotsky. ... Gerry Healy (December 3, 1913 - December 14, 1989) was a Trotskyist activist. ... The Marxist Party was a tiny Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Peace and Progress Party A British political party founded by Vanessa Redgrave to campaign for human rights, Peace and Progress has been seen as an-anti SWP version of RESPECT. Combining members like the Redgraves from the traditional Trotskyist mileau with others from the media and legal fields, the party...


In 1980 Redgrave made her first American TV debut as concentration-camp survivor Fania Fénelon in the Arthur Miller-scripted TV movie Playing for Time – a part for which she won an Emmy as Outstanding Lead Actress in 1981. The decision to cast Redgrave as Fenelon was, however, a source of controversy for some Jewish individuals and organizations. In light of Redgrave's support for the Palestinian cause, even Fenelon objected to her casting. Redgrave was perplexed by such hostility, stating in her 1991 autobiography her long-held belief that "the struggle against anti-Semitism and for the self-determination of the Palestinians form a single whole." (p. 306) Fania Fénelon (born September 2, 1922 as Fania Goldstein; died December 19, 1983 in Paris) was a cabaret singer. ... Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright, essayist and author. ...

Vanessa Redgrave and Akhmed Zakayev
Vanessa Redgrave and Akhmed Zakayev

In December 2002 Redgrave paid £50,000 bail for Chechen separatist Deputy Premier and special envoy Akhmed Zakayev, who had sought political asylum in the United Kingdom and was accused by the Russian government of aiding and abetting hostage-takings in the Moscow Hostage Crisis of 2002--in which 128 hostages lost their lives due to Russian special forces (OMON) action --and guerrilla warfare against Russia. Redgrave and Zakayev File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Redgrave and Zakayev File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Vanessa Redgrave and Akhmed Zakayev Akhmed Zakayev (Ахмед Закаев; born April 26, 1956) is the Foreign Minister of Chechen republic government-in-exile, appointed by the President Aslan Maskhadov shortly after his 1997 election, and again in 2006 by Abdul Halim Sadulayev. ... Capital Grozny Area - total - % water Ranked 78th - 15,300 km² - negligible Population - Total - Density Ranked 49th - est. ... Vanessa Redgrave and Akhmed Zakayev Akhmed Zakayev (Ахмед Закаев; born April 26, 1956) is the Foreign Minister of Chechen republic government-in-exile, appointed by the President Aslan Maskhadov shortly after his 1997 election, and again in 2006 by Abdul Halim Sadulayev. ... On Wednesday, October 23, 2002, 40 Chechen terrorists seized a crowded Moscow theatre, taking over 700 hostages and demanding the withdrawal of Russian forces from Chechenya. ... The OMON insignia OMON (Russian: Отряд милиции особого назначения; Otryad Militsii Osobogo Naznacheniya, Special Purpose Detachment of Militsiya) is a generic name for the system of special units of militsiya within the Russian and earlier the Soviet, Ministerstvo Vnutrennih Del (MVD; Ministry of Internal Affairs). ... Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


At a press conference Redgrave said she feared for the life of Zakayev if he were to be extradited to Russia on terrorism charges. He would "die of a heart attack" or some other mysterious explanation which would be offered by Russia, she said.[6] On 13 November 2003, a London court rejected the Russian government's request for Zakayev's extradition. Instead, the court accepted a plea by lawyers for Mr Zakayev that he would not get a fair trial - and could even face torture - in Russia. "It would be unjust and oppressive to return Mr Zakayev to Russia," Judge Timothy Workman ruled.[7] November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2004, Vanessa Redgrave and her brother Corin Redgrave announced the launch of the Peace and Progress Party which would campaign against the Iraq War and for human rights. Corin William Redgrave (born 16 July 1939) is an English actor. ... Peace and Progress Party A British political party founded by Vanessa Redgrave to campaign for human rights, Peace and Progress has been seen as an-anti SWP version of RESPECT. Combining members like the Redgraves from the traditional Trotskyist mileau with others from the media and legal fields, the party... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Redgrave has been an outspoken critic of the "War on Terror" - the US and British governments' response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11.[8][9] During a June 2005 interview on Larry King Live, Redgrave was challenged on this criticism and on her "far left" political views. In response she questioned if there can be true democracy if the political leadership of the United States and Britain doesn't "uphold the values for which my father's generation fought the Nazis, [and] millions of people gave their lives against the Soviet Union's regime. [Such sacrifice was made] because of democracy and what democracy meant: no torture, no camps, no detention forever or without trial...[Such] techniques are not just alleged [against the governments of the U.S. and Britain], they have actually been written about by the FBI. I don't think it's being 'far left'...to uphold the rule of law."[4] Larry King Live is a nightly CNN interview program hosted by broadcaster and writer Larry King. ...


In March 2006, Redgrave remarked in an interview with US broadcast journalist Amy Goodman, that “I don't know of a single government that actually abides by international human rights law, not one, including my own. In fact, [they] violate these laws in the most despicable and obscene way, I would say.” Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! Amy Goodman (b. ...


Goodman’s interview of Redgrave took place in the actress’s West London home on the evening of 7 March, and covered a range of subjects – though in particular, the cancellation of the Alan Rickman production, My Name is Rachel Corrie, by the New York Theater Workshop. Such a development, said Redgrave, was an "act of catastrophic cowardice" as "the essence of life and the essence of theater is to communicate about lives, either lives that have ended or lives that are still alive, [and about] beliefs, and what is in those beliefs."[10] Alan Sidney Patrick Rickman (born February 21, 1946) is an English stage and screen actor. ... My Name is Rachel Corrie is a controversial play based on the diaries and emails of Rachel Corrie. ...


In June 2006 she was awarded a 'lifetime achievement' award from the International Transylvanian Film Festival, one of whose sponsors is a mining company named Gabriel Resources. She dedicated the award to a community organisation from Roşia Montană, Romania, which is campaigning against a gold mine that Gabriel Resources are seeking to build near the village. Gabriel Resources placed an 'open letter' in The Guardian on 23 June 2006, attacking Redgrave, arguing the case for the mine, and exhibiting support for it among the inhabitants: the open letter is signed by 77 villagers.[11] Gabriel Resources (TSX: GBU) is a multi-national mining firm based in Toronto. ... RoÅŸia Montană (German Goldbach; Hungarian: Verespatak) is a commune in the Apuseni Mountains, in the Alba County, in the west-central Romania. ... Gold mining consists of the processes and techniques employed in the removal of gold from the ground. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


Quotes

"I've come to see through the course of my life that people understand what I've tried to do, however inadequately I do it. I've just found people have come to understand me and be glad that I tried to do what I tried to do. And I do feel very inadequate about it, but I feel I must try . . . I think that any citizen can understand that you must raise your voice and do the best you can to speak out."[4]


"I've been to Sarajevo a few times and have gotten to know a lot of people there who put on plays during the siege. I wanted to share in that because I knew it was important to them . . . I began to see something of what was going on there in terms of actually keeping up people's spirit to resist - the resistance that causes change - even in the worst imaginable circumstances. And I realized that it paralleled the same spirit that existed during the Holocaust and in the gulag. Theater and poetry were what helped people stay alive and want to go on living. That experience changed me, because I realized that if, as actors or writers or directors or designers, we can keep the will to resist alive in as many people as possible, then that's what we are about, and that's what we can do. It's more and more important because of the terrible things that are happening in our cities and the political and economic agendas that various governments have."[12]


"As a mother you have got to have a view for now and a view for the future."[13]


Awards

Theatre

The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... The Seagull is the first of what are generally considered to be Anton Chekhovs four major plays. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ... Photo of Henrik Ibsen in his older days Henrik Johan Ibsen (March 20, 1828 – May 23, 1906) was a major Norwegian playwright who was largely responsible for the rise of the modern realistic drama. ...

Academy Awards and Nominations

The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses, or female actors, working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Morgan! (also known as Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment) is a 1966 film which tells the story of a man, obsessed with Karl Marx and gorillas, who tries to stop his ex-wife from remarrying. ... Isadora (also known as The Loves of Isadora) is a 1968 biographical film which tells the story of dancer Isadora Duncan. ... Mary, Queen of Scrots is a 1971 biographical film which tells the story of the life of Queen Mary I of Scotland. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses, or female actors, working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Julia is a 1977 dramatic film based on playwright Lillian Hellmans novel Pentimento, which tells the story of her relationship with her lifelong friend Julia, who worked as an anti-fascist in the years prior to World War II. The movie was adapted by Alvin Sargent from the novel. ... The Bostonians is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Century Magazine in 1885-1886 and then as a book in 1886. ... Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. ...

Filmography

Running With Scissors is a 2006 film directed by Ryan Murphy. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Venus is a 2006 film staring Peter OToole, Leslie Phillips, Vanessa Redgrave and Jodie Whittaker. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Thief Lord is a 2006 family movie directed by Richard Claus. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The White Countess is a 2005 Merchant/Ivory film set in Shanghai in the 1930s. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “The Fever” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Good Boy! movie cover Good Boy! was a moderately successful movie produced by Jim Henson Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, starring talking alien dogs. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 Merchant Ivory film directed by Andrew Litvack. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступление и наказание) is a novel written by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Promotional poster for The Pledge The Pledge (2001) is a drama/thriller movie, directed by Sean Penn. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... American movie (2001) by director Peter OFallon, starring Vanessa Redgrave as Maddy Bennett and Ray Liotta as Nathan Neubauer. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Girl, Interrupted is a film that was adapted from the original memoir Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Uninvited can refer to: Uninvited, the Alanis Morisette song; or Uninvited, the Nintendo Entertainment System game. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... For the original 1937 musical, see The Cradle Will Rock. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Lulu on the Bridge (1998) is the directorial debut of acclaimed author Paul Auster. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Deep Impact is a 1998 disaster film/science fiction film released by Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... This article is about d vu, the psychological phenomenon. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vanessa Redgrave as Clarissa Dalloway Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing one day in Clarissa Dalloways life about post-World War I England. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Smillas Sense of Snow (also published as Miss Smillas Feeling for Snow), is a book by Danish author Peter Høeg. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 documentary directed by and starring Al Pacino, both a staging of William Shakespeares Richard III and a broader examination of Shakespeares continuing role and relevance in popular culture. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Little Odessa is a film realised in 1994 by James Gray, featuring Tim Roth and Edward Furlong. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Genera Passer Petronia Carpospiza Montifringilla This article is about true sparrows, the Old World sparrows in the family Passeridae. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Howards End is a 1991 (released in 1992) film adaptation of E.M. Forsters 1910 novel Howards End, a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-20th-century England. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The House of the Spirits (Spanish: La Casa de los Espíritus) is the debut novel of Isabel Allende. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Ballad of the Sad Cafe is a 1991 Merchant Ivory film, produced by Ismail Merchant and directed by Simon Callow, starring Vanessa Redgrave and Keith Carradine. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Breath Of Life is one of the most recent Adventist broadcast ministries to hit the airwaves. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Romeo y Julieta is also a brand of Cuban cigars. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Consuming Passions is a 1988 black comedy film concieved - though not actually written by - Michael Palin and Terry Jones. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prick Up Your Ears is a 1986 film about the gay playwright Joe Orton and his lover Kenneth Halliwell. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wetherby is an historic market town in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bostonians is 1984s Merchant Ivory Film, based on Henry James novel. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative meaning: Sing Sing (band) Sing Sing Correctional Facility is a prison in Ossining, New York. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bear Island is the name of several places and a novel: Bjørnøya in Svalbard, also known as Bear Island Bear Island, Antarctica Bear Island (Connecticut) is one of the Thimble Islands Bear Island, County Cork is located in Ireland Bear Island, Maine is located in Northeast Harbor, Maine. ... For the Smashing Pumpkins song, see 1979 (song). ... Yanks is a 1979 John Schlesinger film, set in World War II in the village of Dobcross, Oldham, England. ... For the Smashing Pumpkins song, see 1979 (song). ... Agatha is a 1979 film starring Vanessa Redgrave and Dustin Hoffman, which recounts a fictionalized version of the events surrounding the 1926 disappearence of mystery writer Agatha Christie. ... For the Smashing Pumpkins song, see 1979 (song). ... Julia is a 1977 dramatic film based on playwright Lillian Hellmans novel Pentimento, which tells the story of her relationship with her lifelong friend Julia, who worked as an anti-fascist in the years prior to World War II. The movie was adapted by Alvin Sargent from the novel. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976) is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche by Nicholas Meyer. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Murder on the Orient Express is a 1974 feature film, based on the 1934 novel by Agatha Christie and featuring Hercule Poirot. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Trojan Women (in Greek, Troiades) is a tragedy by the Greek playwright Euripides. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Vacation is a term used in English speaking North America to describe time away from work or school, a trip abroad, or simply a pleasure trip away from home. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Mary, Queen of Scrots is a 1971 biographical film which tells the story of the life of Queen Mary I of Scotland. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... The Body can refer to multiple topics: The Body is a short story written by Stephen King. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Oh! What A Lovely War began life in 1963 as a stage musical by Joan Littlewood and her London Theatre Workshop based on a book by the historian Alan Clark. ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Charge of the Light Brigade is the name of several movies that cover the disastrous attack known as the Charge of the Light Brigade that occurred during the Crimean War. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Camelot is the 1967 film version of the successful musical of the same name. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the swinging London. It features live perfomance by Pink Floyd and footage of John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsburg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine, and many... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Blowup is a 1966 British-Italian art film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, his first to feature an English language screenplay and also the first British film to feature full frontal female nudity (although expurgated in the VHS videotape release[citation needed]). The film featured David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... A Man for All Seasons is a 1966 film directed by Fred Zinnemann and starring Paul Scofield. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Morgan! (also known as Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment) is a 1966 film which tells the story of a man, obsessed with Karl Marx and gorillas, who tries to stop his ex-wife from remarrying. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ “Vanessa Redgrave, Goodwill Ambassador”, UNICEF UK. accessed 17 December 2006
  2. ^ “Vanessa Redgrave honoured at UK Ibsen Year opening”, Norway - the official site in the UK. accessed 17 December 2006
  3. ^ FBI Pub #0308, “Terrorism 2000/2001”, U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. accessed 17 December 2006
  4. ^ a b c CNN Larry King Live interview with Vanessa Redgrave transcript, (Aired 18 June 2005), CNN.com. accessed 17 December 2006
  5. ^ “Vanessa Redgrave...If These Walls Could Talk 2 Honored at 12th Annual GLAAD Media Awards...”, (16 April 2001), GLAAD.com. accessed 17 December 2006
  6. ^ “UK actress defends Chechen rebel”, (6 December 2002), BBC News. accessed 17 December 2006
  7. ^ “Court rejects Chechen extradition”, (13 November 2003), BBC News. accessed 17 December 2006
  8. ^ Redgrave, Vanessa (30 September 2001), “We Need Justice. Bombs Will Only Create More Martyrs”, CommonDreams.org. accessed 17 December 2006
  9. ^ “Oscar-Winning Actress, Activist Vanessa Redgrave Calls For Justice, Legal and Human Rights For Guantanamo Prisoners” audio, (9 March 2004), Democracy Now!. accessed 17 December 2006
  10. ^ “Legendary Actor Vanessa Redgrave Calls Cancellation of Rachel Corrie Play an ‘Act of Catastrophic Cowardice’” audio, (8 March 2004), Democracy Now!. accessed 17 December 2006
  11. ^ Vasagar, Jeevan (23 June 2006), “Redgrave centre stage in campaign to halt Romanian gold mine that has split village”, The Guardian. accessed 17 December 2006
  12. ^ Shawn, Wallace (April 1997), “Mission: possible - interview with actress Vanessa Redgrave”, Interview
  13. ^ Redgrave: Actress and campaigner, (6 December 2002), BBC News. accessed 17 December 2006

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Beatrice Straight
for Network
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
1977
for Julia
Succeeded by
Maggie Smith
for California Suite
Preceded by
Patty Duke
The Miracle Worker
Emmy Award Outstanding Lead Actress - Miniseries or a Movie
1981
Playing for Time
Succeeded by
Ingrid Bergman
A Woman Called Golda
Preceded by
Anne Bancroft
Deep in My Heart
Emmy Award Outstanding Supporting Actress - Miniseries or a Movie
2000
If These Walls Could Talk 2
Succeeded by
Tammy Blanchard
Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vanessa Redgrave - MSN Encarta (278 words)
Vanessa Redgrave, born in 1937, leading British stage and motion-picture actor, acclaimed for her sensitive and intelligent portrayals of strong-willed, independent women.
Redgrave was born in London to a family of distinguished British actors.
Early in her career, Redgrave was mostly associated with her father's prominent name, but she quickly established herself as a formidable actor with performances in The Tiger and the Horse (1960) and in As You Like It (1961), produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company.
Vanessa Redgrave: Information from Answers.com (3006 words)
Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January, 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties.
Redgrave was perplexed by such hostility, stating in her 1991 autobiography her long-held belief that "the struggle against anti-Semitism and for the self-determination of the Palestinians form a single whole." (p.
In December 2002 Redgrave paid £50,000 bail for Chechen separatist Deputy Premier and special envoy Akhmed Zakayev, who had sought political asylum in the United Kingdom and was accused by the Russian government of aiding and abetting hostage-takings in the Moscow Hostage Crisis of 2002--in which 128 hostages lost their lives--and guerrilla warfare against Russia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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