FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
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Encyclopedia > Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver skyline
Flag of Vancouver
Flag
Coat of arms of Vancouver
Coat of arms
Motto: "By Sea, Land, and Air We Prosper"
Location of Vancouver within the Metro Vancouver district in British Columbia, Canada
Coordinates: 49°15′N 123°6′W / 49.25, -123.1
Country Flag of Canada Canada
Province Flag of British Columbia British Columbia
Region Lower Mainland
Regional District Metro Vancouver
Incorporated 1886
Government
 - Mayor Sam Sullivan (NPA)
 - City Council
 - MPs (Fed.)
 - MLAs (Prov.)
Area
 - City 114.67 km² (44.3 sq mi)
 - Metro 2,878.52 km² (1,111.4 sq mi)
Elevation m (7 ft)
Population (2007)
 - City 611,869
 - Density 5,335/km² (13,817.6/sq mi)
 - Urban 2,524,113 Lower Mainland
 - Metro 2,249,725 Metro Vancouver
 - Demonym Vancouverite
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
Postal code span V5K to V6Z
Area code(s) 604, 778
NTS Map 092G03
GNBC Code JBRIK
Website: City of Vancouver

Vancouver (pronounced /vænˈkuːvɚ/) is a coastal city and major seaport, located on the mainland of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is bounded by the Strait of Georgia, the Fraser River, and the Coast Mountains. Vancouver is named after Captain George Vancouver, a British explorer. Look up Vancouver in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x262, 66 KB) Cropped version of: Image:Vancityskyline. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vancouver_(Canada). ... Flag of the City of Vancouver The Flag of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada was adopted by City Council on May 17, 1983. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Coat of Arms of Vancouver was granted by the College of Heralds on 31 March 1969. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (734x701, 71 KB) Summary Location of Vancouver, Greater Vancouver Area, British Columbia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Vancouver ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_British_Columbia. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... This is a list of regions of Canada that are not provinces or counties. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... The Canadian Province of British Columbia is divided into Regional Districts, analogous to counties in other jurisdictions. ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... Vancouver City Council is the governing body of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Suzanne Anton is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of Non-Partisan Association in 2005. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... Peter Ladner is a Vancouver City Councillor and elected since 2002. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... Kim Capri is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of Non-Partisan Association in 2005. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... Elizabeth Ball is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of Non-Partisan Association in 2005. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... B.C. Lee is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of Non-Partisan Association in 2005. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Vision Vancouver is one of two parties represented in Vancouver City Council. ... Tim Stevenson is a Canadian politician and United Church reverend. ... Vision Vancouver is one of two parties represented in Vancouver City Council. ... George Chow is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of the Vision Vancouver party in 2005. ... Vision Vancouver is one of two parties represented in Vancouver City Council. ... Heather Deal is a Vancouver city councillor who was elected as a member of the Vision Vancouver party in 2005. ... Vision Vancouver is one of two parties represented in Vancouver City Council. ... David Cadman MA is a Vancouver City Councillor since 2002 and social environment activist. ... The Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) is a municipal political party in the Canadian city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of November 10, 2005. ... Libby Davies (born February 27, 1953) is a Canadian Member of Parliament for the New Democratic Party, representing the riding of Vancouver East in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... Hon. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... David Lee Emerson, PC, Ph. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Hedy Fry, PC, MP, MD (born August 6, 1941) is a Canadian politician, physician, and best Queen Canada has ever had - although some poindexter at McGill may think otherwise. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Legislature Building in Victoria, BC The Legislative Assembly of British Columbia is located in Victoria. ... Gordon Muir Campbell, BA, MBA, MLA (born January 12, 1948) is the 34th Premier of British Columbia. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... David Chudnovsky is a Canadian politician. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Zoe 07:00, August 20, 2005 (UTC) . Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... The Honourable Colin Hansen, MLA was first elected to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in 1996 and re-elected in May 2001. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Jenny Kwan smiling elegantly Jenny Wai Ching Kwan (關慧貞)is a Chinese-born Canadian politician. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Lorne Mayencourt was first elected in the 2001 provincial general election. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Zoe 07:03, August 20, 2005 (UTC) . Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Gregor Robertson is the current MLA for Vancouver-Fairview in the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Libby Davies and Shane Simpson at the 2006 Canada Day celebrations in Hastings Park. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... The Honourable Carole Taylor, MLA, OC (born 1945) is a Canadian journalist and politician. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... PST is UTC-8 The Pacific Standard Time Zone (PST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) resulting in UTC-8. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 604 is the telephone area code in British Columbia, Canada, encompassing the Lower Mainland region around Vancouver. ... The National Topographic System or NTS is the topographic system used by Canada for providing general purpose maps of the country. ... Geographical Names Board of Canada a national committee of the Canadian Government Department of National Resources which authorizes the names used on official federal government maps of Canada since 1897. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Strait of Georgia at sunset The Strait of Georgia (also known as Georgia Strait and the Gulf of Georgia) is a 240 km (150 mi)-long strait between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. ... For other uses of this name see Fraser River (disambiguation). ... The Coast Mountains are the westernmost range of the Pacific Cordillera, running along the south western shore of the North American continent, extending south from the Alaska Panhandle and covering most of coastal British Columbia. ... Captain George Vancouver RN (June 22, 1757 – May 12, 1798) was an officer of the British Royal Navy, best known for his exploration of North America, including the Pacific coast along the modern day Canadian province of British Columbia and the American states of Alaska, Washington and Oregon. ...


The population of the city of Vancouver is 611,869[1] and the population of the Metro Vancouver region is 2,249,725 (2007 estimate).[2] This makes it the largest metropolitan area in Western Canada and the third largest in the country.[3] Vancouver is ethnically diverse, with 52% of city residents[4][5] and 43% of Metro residents[6] having a first language other than English. The population of Greater Vancouver is expected to grow by 450,000 during the next 10 years reaching over 3 million by 2021. [7] Population density is fourth highest for a major city on the continent after New York City, San Francisco, and Mexico City, and on track to being second by 2021.[8] Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal... This article is about the region in Canada. ... The table below lists the 100 largest metropolitan areas in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2001 Census[1] and the Canada 2006 Census. ... Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins of ancestors per census division. ... “Native Language” redirects here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Area: 2,878. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...


Vancouver was first settled in the 1860s as a result of immigration caused by the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush, particularly from the United States, although many immigrants did not remain after the rush. The city developed rapidly from a small lumber mill town into a metropolitan centre following the arrival of the transcontinental railway in 1887. The Port of Vancouver became internationally significant after the completion of the Panama Canal, which reduced freight rates in the 1920s and made it viable to ship export-bound prairie grain west through Vancouver.[9] It has since become the busiest seaport in Canada, and exports more cargo than any other port in North America.[10] The Gold Rush of British Columbia occurred after gold was discovered in the Fraser River Valley. ... For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... General information Founded Original shipment 1964 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 49°1637 N 123°0715 W Area  - Coastline  - Land  - Water 247 kilometres 4. ... The Panama Canal is a waterway in Central America which joins the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. ... Map of the Canadian Prairie provinces, which include boreal forests, taiga, and mountains as well as the prairies (proper). ... North American redirects here. ...


The economy of Vancouver has traditionally relied on British Columbia's resource sectors: forestry, mining, fishing and agriculture. It has diversified over time, however, and Vancouver today has a vibrant service industry, a growing tourism industry, and it has become the third-largest film production centre in North America after Los Angeles and New York City, earning it the nickname Hollywood North.[11][12][13][14][15] Vancouver has had an expansion in high-tech industries, most notably video game development. The economy of Vancouver one of the most vibrant in Canada due to Vancouvers situation as the nations gateway to the Pacific Rim, a major port, and the main western terminus of transcontinental highway and rail routes. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... A tour guide in the Centre Block of Parliament Hill. ... Principal Photography refers to the phase of film production during which the movie is actually shot, as distinct from pre-production and post-production. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Hollywood North, an allusion to Hollywood, California, the most notable film centre in the world, is a colloquialism used to describe film production locations and or film gatherings located north of its namesake. ... Neverwinter Nights, a popular modern computer role-playing game, features a powerful 3D graphics engine. ...


Vancouver is consistently ranked one of the three most livable cities in the world.[16][17][18][19] According to a 2007 report by Mercer Human Resource Consulting for example, Vancouver tied with Vienna as having the third highest quality of living in the world, after Zürich and Geneva.[20][21] In 2007, according to Forbes, Vancouver had the 6th most overpriced real estate market in the world and second in North America after Los Angeles.[22][23] In 2007, Vancouver was ranked Canada's second most expensive city to live after Toronto and the 89th most expensive globally, and, in 2006, the 56th most expensive city in which to live among 143 major cities in the world; in the same survey, Zurich and Geneva were ranked as the ninth and seventh most expensive, respectively.[24] In 2007, Vancouver was ranked as the 10th cleanest city in the world.[25] // The Mercer name first appeared in Canada in 1945, when William Manson Mercer founded the benefits consulting firm of William M. Mercer, Limited. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Location within Switzerland   Zürich[?] (German pronunciation IPA: ; usually spelled Zurich in English) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ...


The 2010 Winter Olympics will be held in Vancouver and nearby Whistler.[26][27][28] Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Location of Whistler within the Squamish-Lillooet District in British Columbia, Canada Coordinates: , Country Canada Province British Columbia Regional District Squamish-Lillooet Settled 1914 by Mrytle and Alex Philip Incorporated 1975 Government  - Mayor Ken Melamed  - Manager Bill Barratt  - Governing body Whistler Town Council  - MP Blair Wilson  - MLA Joan McIntyre Area...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Vancouver

Archaeological records indicate that the presence of Aboriginal peoples in the Vancouver area dates back 4,500–9,000 years.[29][30] The city is located in the traditional territories of Skwxwú7mesh, Xwméthkwyiem, Tseil-waututh peoples of the Coast Salish group.[31] They had villages where Vancouver is now in places like Stanley Park, False Creek, and many along the Burrard Inlet, which some still exist in North Vancouver and West Vancouver, and near Point Grey Vancouver is a city in British Columbia, Canada. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ... For details of the Indian Act government, see Squamish Nation. ... The Musqueam are the only Indian band whose reserve lies within the boundaries of the City of Vancouver. ... The Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, also known as the Burrard Band, are a Squamish-speaking people, and are closely related to but politically separate from the nearby reserves of the Squamish and Musqueam First Nations. ... The Coast Salish are a group of Salishan-speaking First Nations/Native American in British Columbia and Washington. ... Senakw (Snawq, Sneawq, or Snawkw) is a village site of the the Indigenous Sḵwxwú7mesh, located near what is now known as Kitsilano. ... Indian Arm extends north (to the upper right of the photo) from Burrard Inlet, in this view from the southeast at Burnaby Mountain. ... Generally North Vancouver is the suburb of Vancouver on the North Side of the Burrard Inlet except the area that is in West Vancouver. ... The westernmost end of West Vancouver. ...


The coastline of present-day Point Grey and part of Burrard Inlet was first explored by a European in 1791 by José María Narváez of Spain, followed by George Vancouver, who also explored the inner harbour of Burrard Inlet in 1792 and gave various places British names.[32] Location of West Point Grey in Vancouver. ... Indian Arm extends north (to the upper right of the photo) from Burrard Inlet, in this view from the southeast at Burnaby Mountain. ... José María Narváez was a Spanish explorer and navigator whose main field of action was the Pacific Northwest. ... Captain George Vancouver RN (June 22, 1757 – May 12, 1798) was an officer of the British Royal Navy, best known for his exploration of North America, including the Pacific coast along the modern day Canadian province of British Columbia and the American states of Alaska, Washington and Oregon. ...

The first Vancouver City Council meeting after the 1886 fire
The first Vancouver City Council meeting after the 1886 fire[33]

The explorer and North West Company trader Simon Fraser and his crew were the first Europeans known to have set foot on the site of the present-day city. In 1808, they descended the Fraser River perhaps as far as Point Grey, near the University of British Columbia.[34] Image File history File links First_Vancouver_Council_Meeting_after_fire. ... Image File history File links First_Vancouver_Council_Meeting_after_fire. ... For the grocery chain, see The North West Company The North West Company a fur trading business headquartered in the city of Montreal in British North America from 1779 to 1821. ... An undated drawing of Simon Fraser Simon Fraser (1776–18 August 1862) was a fur trader and an explorer who charted much of what is now the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... For other uses of this name see Fraser River (disambiguation). ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ...


The Cariboo Gold Rush of 1861 brought 25,000 men, mainly from California, to the mouth of the Fraser River and what would become Vancouver.[35] The first European settlement was established in 1862 at McLeery's Farm on the Fraser River, just east of the ancient village of Musqueam in what is now Marpole. A sawmill established at Moodyville (now the City of North Vancouver) in 1863 began the city's long relationship with lumbering, and was quickly followed by mills on the south shore of the inlet owned by Captain Edward Stamp. Stamp, who had begun lumbering in the Port Alberni area, first attempted to run a mill at Brockton Point, but difficult currents and reefs forced the relocation of the operation to a point near the foot of Gore Street, known as Hastings Mill. The mill formed the nucleus around which Vancouver formed. The mill's central role in the city waned after the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in the 1880s, but it nonetheless remained important to the local economy until it closed in the 1920s.[36] The Cariboo Gold Rush is the most famous of the gold rushes in British Columbia and is erroneously sometimes mentioned as the reason for the creation of the Colony of British Columbia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... (pronounced MUSS-quee-um) also spelled as XmuzkIum pronounced the same. ... Location of Marpole in Vancouver. ... This article is about the City of North Vancouver. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... Port Alberni is a city located in the province of British Columbia in Canada. ... Brockton Point is located in Vancouver harbor at the east end of Stanley Park. ... Hastings Mill was a saw-mill on the south shore of Burrard Inlet and was the first commercial operation around which the settlement that would become Vancouver developed. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ...


Vancouver is among British Columbia's youngest cities.[37] The settlement of Gastown grew up quickly around the original makeshift tavern established by “Gassy” Jack Deighton in 1867 on the edge of the Hastings Mill property.[38][37] In 1870, the colonial government surveyed the settlement and laid out a townsite, renamed “Granville,” in honour of the then British Secretary of State for the Colonies, Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville. This site, with its natural harbour, was eventually selected as the terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway to the disappointment of Port Moody, New Westminster and Victoria, all of which had vied to be the railhead. The building of the railway was among the preconditions for British Columbia joining Confederation in 1871. Map of Gastown Statue of Gassy Jack, Gastown. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Deighton (November 1830 – May 29, 1875), generally known as Gassy Jack, was a Canadian bar owner who was born in Hull, England. ... The Colony of British Columbia was a crown colony of British North America from 1858 until 1871. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... The Earl Granville Granville George Leveson Gower, 2nd Earl Granville KG , PC (11 May 1815 – 31 March 1891) was a British Liberal statesman. ... Port Moody, British Columbia is a small city forming a crescent at the east end of Burrard Inlet in British Columbia, Canada, and part of the Greater Vancouver Regional District. ... New Westminster redirects here. ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ...


The City of Vancouver was incorporated on 6 April 1886, the same year that the first transcontinental train arrived. The name, honouring George Vancouver, was chosen by CPR president William Van Horne, who arrived in Port Moody to establish the CPR terminus recommended by Henry John Cambie.[37] A massive "slash burn" (clearing fire) broke out of control on 13 June 1886, razing the entire city. It was quickly rebuilt, and the Vancouver Fire Department was established that same year.[36] From a settlement of 1,000 people in 1881, Vancouver's population grew to over 20,000 by the turn of the century and 100,000 by 1911.[39] is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Cornelius Van Horne William Cornelius Van Horne, born February 3, 1843 - died September 11, 1915, was a North American pioneer railway executive. ... Henry John Cambie (born October 25, 1836 in Tipperary, Ireland — died April 23, 1928 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) was a Canadian surveyor, civil engineer, and a notable figure in the completion of that countrys transcontinental railway. ... Map showing the course of the fire. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


During the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush, Vancouver merchants sold a great deal of equipment to prospectors.[35] One of those merchants, Charles Woodward, had opened the first Woodward's store at what is now Georgia and Main Streets in 1892 and, along with Spencer's and the Hudson's Bay Company department stores, formed the dominant core of the city's retail sector for decades.[40] Routes to the Klondike. ... Woodwards logo. ... David Spencer Limited (commonly known as Spencers) operated a department store chain in the province of British Columbia, Canada during the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. ... Hbc redirects here. ...


The economy of early Vancouver was dominated by large companies such as the CPR, which had the capital needed for the rapid development of the new city. Some manufacturing did develop, but the resource sector was the backbone of Vancouver's economy, initially with logging, and later with exports moved through the seaport, where commercial traffic constituted the largest economic sector in Vancouver by the 1930s.[41] General information Founded Original shipment 1964 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 49°1637 N 123°0715 W Area  - Coastline  - Land  - Water 247 kilometres 4. ...

Panorama of Vancouver, 1898
Panorama of Vancouver, 1898

The dominance of the economy by big business was accompanied by an often militant labour movement. The first major sympathy strike was in 1903 when railway employees struck against the CPR for union recognition. Labour leader Frank Rogers was killed while picketing at the docks by CPR police during that strike, becoming the British Columbia movement's first martyr.[42] Canada's first general strike occurred following the death of another labour leader, Ginger Goodwin, in 1918, at the Cumberland coal mines on Vancouver Island.[43] A lull in industrial tensions through the later 1920s came to an abrupt end with the Great Depression. Most of the 1930s strikes were led by Communist Party organizers.[44] That strike wave peaked in 1935 when unemployed men flooded the city to protest conditions in the relief camps run by the military in remote areas throughout the province. After two tense months of daily and disruptive protesting, the relief camp strikers decided to take their grievances to the federal government and embarked on the On-to-Ottawa Trek.[45] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (6506x4658, 4145 KB)Author: Vancouver World Printing and Publishing Company Limited McLean, J.C. Toronto Lithographing Co. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (6506x4658, 4145 KB)Author: Vancouver World Printing and Publishing Company Limited McLean, J.C. Toronto Lithographing Co. ... The Trades and Labour Congress of Canada was a Canada-wide central federation of trade unions from 1883 to 1956. ... Albert Ginger Goodwin [born Treeton, Yorkshire, England] May 10, 1887 inspired the first General Strike in Canada on August 2, 1918 in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Cumberland is a village in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ... The Relief Camp Workers Union (RCWU) was the union into which the inmates of the Canadian government relief camps were organized in the early 1930s. ... The On-to-Ottawa Trek was a 1935 social movement of unemployed men protesting the dismal conditions in federal relief camps scattered in remote areas across Western Canada. ...


Other social movements, such as the first-wave feminist, moral reform, and temperance movements were also influential in Vancouver's development. Mary Ellen Smith, a Vancouver suffragist and prohibitionist, became the first woman elected to a provincial legislature in Canada in 1918.[46] Alcohol prohibition began in the First World War and lasted until 1921, when the provincial government established its control over alcohol sales, which still persists today.[47] Canada's first drug law came about following an inquiry conducted by the federal Minister of Labour and future Prime Minister, William Lyon Mackenzie King. King was sent to investigate damages claims resulting from a riot when the Asiatic Exclusion League led a rampage through Chinatown and Japantown. Two of the claimants were opium manufacturers, and after further investigation, King found that white women were reportedly frequenting opium dens as well as Chinese men. A federal law banning the manufacture, sale, and importation of opium for non-medicinal purposes was soon passed based on these revelations.[48] First-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... Mary Ellen Spear Smith (October 11, 1861 or 1863 - May 3, 1933) was the first female MLA in the British Columbia legislative assembly and both the first female cabinet minister and the first female Speaker in the British Empire . ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Prohibition in Canada was a massive attempt to make illegal by law the distribution and selling of alcohol, beginning in the late 19th Century. ... This is a list of the Legislative Assemblies of Canadas provinces and territories. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For the general concept, see Prohibitionism. ... In the Cabinet of Canada, the Minister of Labour is responsible for setting national labour standards and federal labour dispute mechanisms. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Historical stubs ... Image:Millennium Gate. ... Japantown, Little Yokohama, or Little Tokyo was a neighbourhood in Vancouver British Columbia, north of Chinatown, that had a concentration of Japanese immigrants. ... This article is about the drug. ... An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked. ...


Amalgamation with Point Grey and South Vancouver gave the city its final contours not long before taking its place as the third largest metropolis in the country. As of 1 January 1929, the population of the enlarged Vancouver was 228,193 and it filled the entire peninsula between the Burrard Inlet and the Fraser River.[49] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Indian Arm extends north (to the upper right of the photo) from Burrard Inlet, in this view from the southeast at Burnaby Mountain. ...


Geography

Further information: Bodies of water in Vancouver
Further information: Climate of Vancouver

The original vegetation of most of Vancouver and its suburbs was dense temperate rain forest, consisting of conifers with scattered pockets of maple and alder, as well as large areas of swampland (even in upland areas, due to poor drainage).[50][51] Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada is home to several bodies of water within and around its boundaries. ... Stanley Park in Vancouver rain. ... Aerial view of mixed aspen-spruce forest in Alaska Vegetation is a general term for the plant life of a region; it refers to the ground cover life forms, structure, spatial extent or any other specific botanical or geographic characteristics. ... A map showing the areas where temperate rain forest can be found Temperate rain forest in the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, United States. ... Orders & Families Cordaitales † Pinales   Pinaceae - Pine family   Araucariaceae - Araucaria family   Podocarpaceae - Yellow-wood family   Sciadopityaceae - Umbrella-pine family   Cupressaceae - Cypress family   Cephalotaxaceae - Plum-yew family   Taxaceae - Yew family Vojnovskyales † Voltziales † “Conifer” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Maple (disambiguation). ... Species About 20-30 species, see text. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ...

Stanley Park, with the Coal Harbour residential area in the background
Stanley Park, with the Coal Harbour residential area in the background

The conifers were a typical coastal British Columbia mix of Douglas-fir, Western red cedar and Western Hemlock;[52] thought to have been the greatest concentration of the largest of these trees on the entire British Columbia Coast. Only in Seattle's Elliott Bay did the trees rival those of Burrard Inlet and English Bay in size. The largest trees in Vancouver's old-growth forest were in the Gastown area, where the first logging occurred, and on the south slopes of False Creek and English Bay, especially around Jericho Beach. The forest in Stanley Park is mostly second and third growth, and evidence of old-fashioned logging techniques such as springboard notches can still be seen there. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1003x571, 637 KB) Summary Vancouvers crystaline skyline as seen from Stanley Park. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1003x571, 637 KB) Summary Vancouvers crystaline skyline as seen from Stanley Park. ... Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... Coal Harbour is the name for a section of Burrard Inlet lying between Vancouvers downtown peninsula and the Brockton Peninsula of Stanley Park. ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Thuja plicata Donn ex D.Don Thuja plicata (Western Redcedar) is a species of thuja, an evergreen coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae, native to the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada, from southern Alaska and British Columbia south to northwest California and inland to western Montana. ... Binomial name Tsuga heterophylla (Raf. ... The British Columbia Coast is one of Canadas two continental coastlines; the other being the coastline from the Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean via the Northwest Passage and Hudson Bay to the Ungava Peninsula and Labrador and the Gulf of St. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Elliott Bay as viewed from Queen Anne Hill. ... Indian Arm extends north (to the upper right of the photo) from Burrard Inlet, in this view from the southeast at Burnaby Mountain. ... Hundreds of thousands of people crowd the beaches around English Bay for the Celebration of Light fireworks competition each summer. ... Map of Gastown Statue of Gassy Jack, Gastown. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... False Creek is a short inlet in the heart of Vancouver. ... English Bay at Jericho Beach Jericho Beach is located in the Kitsalino of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... The forest in Stanley Park, Vancouver, Canada is generally considered to have second and third growth characteristics. ...


A diverse collection of plants and trees were imported from other parts of the continent and from points across the Pacific, and can be found growing throughout Vancouver and the Lower Mainland. Various species of palm trees have proven hardy in this climate and are a common sight, as are large numbers of other exotic trees such as the monkey puzzle tree, the Japanese Maple, and various flowering exotics such as magnolias, azaleas, and rhododendrons. Many rhododendrons have grown to immense sizes, as have other species imported from harsher climates in Eastern Canada or Europe. The native Douglas Maple can also attain a tremendous size. Many streets in the city are lined with flowering varieties of Japanese cherry trees that were donated by Japan, starting in the 1930s.[53] Certain areas of West Vancouver that have the right soil requirements are home to the Arbutus menziesii tree. For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Pacific redirects here. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae or Palmae (also known by the name Palmaceae, which is taxonomically invalid. ... Binomial name (Molina) K. Koch Araucaria araucana (Pehuén or Monkey-puzzle) is the hardiest species in the conifer genus Araucaria. ... Momiji redirects here. ... This article is about the plant. ... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ... Subgenera Azaleastrum Candidastrum Hymenanthes Mumeazalea Pentanthera (Azaleas) Rhododendron Therorhodion Tsutsusi (Azaleas) Vireya Source: RBG, Edinburgh Rhododendron (from the Greek: rhodos, rose, and dendron, tree) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Ericaceae. ... Eastern Canada, defined politically. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Torr. ... This article is about cherry blossoms and their cultural significance to the Japanese. ... West Vancouver is a district municipality in the province of British Columbia. ... Binomial name Arbutus menziesii Pursh The Pacific Madrone (Arbutus menziesii), is a species of arbutus found on the west coast of North America, from British Columbia (chiefly Vancouver Island) to California, mainly in the Pacific Coast Ranges but also scattered on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada mountains. ...

Vancouver has an area of 114 square kilometres (44 sq mi), including both flat and hilly ground. Vancouver is adjacent to the Strait of Georgia, a body of water that is shielded from the Pacific Ocean by Vancouver Island. It is in the Pacific Time Zone (UTC-8) and the Pacific Maritime Ecozone.[54] The city itself forms part of the Burrard Peninsula, lying between Burrard Inlet to the north and the Fraser River to the south. Vancouver is not on nearby Vancouver Island. However, both the island and the city (as well as Vancouver, Washington) are named after Royal Navy Captain George Vancouver. Image File history File links Strait_of_Georgia. ... Image File history File links Strait_of_Georgia. ... Strait of Georgia at sunset The Strait of Georgia (also known as Georgia Strait and the Gulf of Georgia) is a 240 km (150 mi)-long strait between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Strait of Georgia at sunset The Strait of Georgia (also known as Georgia Strait and the Gulf of Georgia) is a 240 km (150 mi)-long strait between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... PST is UTC-8, highlighted in red. ... The Burrard Peninsula (left to right across upper middle of photo) sits north of the Fraser River, shown here. ... Indian Arm extends north (to the upper right of the photo) from Burrard Inlet, in this view from the southeast at Burnaby Mountain. ... For other uses of this name see Fraser River (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ...


Vancouver is renowned for its scenery and has one of the largest urban parks in North America, Stanley Park.[55] The North Shore Mountains dominate the cityscape, and on a clear day scenic vistas include the snow-capped volcano Mount Baker in the State of Washington to the southeast, Vancouver Island across the Strait of Georgia to the west and southwest, and the Sunshine Coast to the northwest.[56] Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... The North Shore Mountains are a subrange of the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains overlooking the Greater Vancouver Regional District to the south. ... Mount Baker (elevation 10,778 feet, 3,285 m) is a glaciated andesitic stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc and the Cascades of Washington State in the United States about 30 miles (50km) due east of the city of Bellingham, Whatcom County. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sunshine Coast. ...

A rainy day at Third Beach and Siwash Rock in Stanley Park
A rainy day at Third Beach and Siwash Rock in Stanley Park

Vancouver's climate is unusually temperate by Canadian standards; its winters are the fourth warmest of Canadian cities monitored by Environment Canada after nearby Victoria, Nanaimo, and Duncan, all of which are on Vancouver Island.[57] Vancouver has daily minimum temperatures falling below 0 °C (32 °F) on an average of 46 days per year and below -10 °C (14 °F) on only two days per year. The average annual precipitation is about 1,219 millimetres (48 in), though this varies dramatically throughout the city due to the topography.[56] Summer months are quite sunny with moderate temperatures, tempered by sea breezes. The daily maximum averages 22 °C (72 °F) in July and August, although temperatures sometimes rise above 26 °C (78 °F).[58] The summer months are often very dry, resulting in moderate drought conditions a few months of the year. In contrast, more than half of all winter days receive measurable precipitation. On average, snow falls on only eleven days per year, with only three days receiving six or more centimetres (2.5 in or more). Download high resolution version (1477x830, 151 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1477x830, 151 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Siwash rock in 2005 Siwash rock is a famous rock outcropping in Vancouver, British Columbias Stanley Park. ... Environment Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and conservation of wildlife. ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... There are several federal and provincial electoral districts with the name Nanaimo. ... Duncan, The City of Totems (pop. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...

Neighbourhoods of Vancouver
Neighbourhoods of Vancouver

While the number of cars in Vancouver proper has been steadily rising with population growth, the rate of car ownership and the average distance driven by daily commuters have fallen since the early 1990s.[59][60] Vancouver is the only major Canadian city with these trends. Despite the fact that the journey time per vehicle has increased by one third and growing traffic mass, there are 7% fewer cars making trips into the downtown core.[59] Residents have been more inclined to live in areas closer to their interests, or use more energy-efficient means of travel, such as mass transit and cycling. This is, in part, the result of a push by city planners for a solution to traffic problems and pro-environment campaigns. Transportation demand management policies have imposed restrictions on drivers making it more difficult and expensive to commute while introducing more benefits for non-drivers.[59] Transportation Demand Management or TDM is changing or reducing demand for car use by encouraging the behavioural change of household choices of travel. ...


Demographics

In 2001, 49% of the Vancouver population were visible minorities
In 2001, 49% of the Vancouver population were visible minorities

City planners in the late 1950s and 1960s deliberately encouraged the development of high-rise residential towers in Vancouver's West End of downtown, resulting in a compact urban core amenable to public transit, cycling, and pedestrian traffic. Vancouver's population density on the downtown peninsula is 121 people per hectare (or 49 people per acre), according to the 2001 census.[61] The city continues to pursue policies intended to increase density as an alternative to sprawl, such as Mayor Sam Sullivan's EcoDensity — an initiative to create quality and high density areas in the city, while making property ownership more economical. The plan also calls for the increased construction of community centres, parks, and cultural facilities.[62] In 2001, 49% of the Vancouver population were visible minorities. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (860x636, 14 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (860x636, 14 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... Location of the West End in Vancouver. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... Urban sprawl, also known as suburban sprawl, is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ... Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


Vancouver has been called a "city of neighbourhoods", each with a distinct character and ethnic mix.[63] People of British and Irish origins were historically the largest ethnic groups in the city,[64] and elements of British society and culture are still highly visible in some areas, particularly South Granville and Kerrisdale. The Chinese are by far the largest visible ethnic group in the city, and Vancouver has one of the most diverse Chinese-speaking communities, with several Chinese dialects being represented.[65][36] There are also some neighbourhoods with high concentrations of single ethnic groups, such as the Punjabi Market, Little Italy, Greektown, and Japantown. Bilingual street signs can be seen in various neighbourhoods, including Chinatown and the Punjabi Market. The Punjabi Market or Little India is a small commercial district in Vancouver, British Columbia officially recognized by the city as being primarily Indo-Canadian businesses. ... Little Italy in Vancouver, Canada is a neighborhood primarily located on Commercial Drive in the eastern part of the city. ... Greektown in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada is an area in the Kitsilano neighborhood which was historically an enclave of Greek immigrants and their descendants. ... Japantown or Little Tokyo was a neighbourhood in Vancouver, North of Chinatown, that had a concentration of Japanese immigrants. ...


In the 1990s, an influx of immigrants from Hong Kong in anticipation of the transfer of that former colony's sovereignty from the United Kingdom to China combined with an increasing number of immigrants from mainland China and previous immigrants from Taiwan to create one of the largest concentrations of ethnic Chinese residents in North America. The transfer of the sovereignty of Hong Kong from the United Kingdom to China, often referred to as The Handover, occurred on July 1, 1997. ...


This influx of Asian immigrants continued a tradition of immigration from around the world that had already established Vancouver as the second most popular destination for immigrants in Canada (after Toronto).[66] Other significant Asian ethnic groups in Vancouver are South Asian (mostly Punjabi, usually referred to as Indo-Canadian), Vietnamese, Filipino, Indonesian, Korean, Cambodian, and Japanese. It has a growing Latin American population, many from Peru, Ecuador and more recently, Mexico. An Asian Canadian is a Canadian of Asian ancestry. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The Punjabi people (Punjabi: ਪੰਜਾਬੀ, پنجابی, also Panjabi people) are an Indo-Aryan ethnic group from South Asia. ... // Indo-Canadians are Canadians whose origin traces back to the nation of India. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cambodian people - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Languages Spanish Related languages include Quechua Religions Traditionally Catholic. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Prior to the Hong Kong influx of the 1990s, the largest non-British ethnic groups in the city were Irish and German, followed by Scandinavian, Italians, Ukrainians and the historical Chinese population. Less numerous minorities, such as newly-arrived Eastern Europeans (in addition to the aforementioned Ukrainians), are also a feature of the city's ethnic landscape. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR...


There is also a sizable aboriginal community in Vancouver as well as in the surrounding metropolitan region, with the result that Vancouver constitutes the largest native community in the province.[67] Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ...


While not completely free of racial tension, Vancouver has relatively harmonious race relations.[68] One result is a relatively high rate of intermarriage[citation needed].


Vancouver has a substantial gay community, and British Columbia was the second Canadian jurisdiction to legalize same-sex marriage as a constitutional right, shortly after Ontario.[69] The downtown area around Davie Street is home to most of the city's gay clubs and bars and is known as Davie Village. Every year Vancouver holds one of the country's largest gay pride parades.[70] The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA) Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Argentina (C, R, VCP) Australia (TAS, VIC eff. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Davie Village (also Davie District or simply Davie Street) is a gay village or gaybourhood in the West End of Vancouver, Canada. ... 2004 Gay Pride Parade in São Paulo, Brazil. ...


Population growth

The following table and graph show the population growth of the City of Vancouver (not including Point Grey and South Vancouver before 1929) and the metropolitan area using census data of Statistics Canada.[71] Canada Census Records Census of Canada. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...

Population growth, 1886 to 2006.
Population growth, 1886 to 2006.
Year Vancouver Metro
1891 13,709 21,887
1901 26,133 42,926
1911 100,401 164,020
1921 117,217 232,597
1931 246,593 347,709
1941 275,353 393,898
1951 344,833 562,462
1956 365,844 665,564
1961 384,522 790,741
1966 410,375 892,853
1971 426,256 1,028,334
1976 410,188 1,085,242
1981 414,281 1,169,831
1986 431,147 1,266,152
1991 471,644 1,602,590
1996 514,008 1,831,665
2001 545,671 1,986,965
2006 578,041 2,116,581

Image File history File links Vancouver_Population_Growth. ... Image File history File links Vancouver_Population_Growth. ...

Economy

Main article: Economy of Vancouver

With its location on the Pacific Rim and at the western terminus of Canada's transcontinental highway and rail routes, Vancouver is one of the nation's largest industrial centres.[56] The economy of Vancouver one of the most vibrant in Canada due to Vancouvers situation as the nations gateway to the Pacific Rim, a major port, and the main western terminus of transcontinental highway and rail routes. ... English Bay - located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada English Bay - located in Rodrigues Island Categories: Disambiguation ... The Burrard Street Bridge viewed from the east. ... The USS Abraham Lincoln Battle Group along with ships from Australia, Chile, Japan, Canada, and Korea speed towards Honolulu in RIMPAC 2000. ... For the Boards of Canada record, see Trans Canada Highway (EP). ...


The Port of Vancouver, Canada's largest and most diversified, does more than C$43 billion in trade with over 90 countries annually. Port activities generate $4 billion in gross domestic product and $8.9 billion in economic output.[72] Vancouver is also the headquarters of forest product and mining companies. In recent years, Vancouver has become an increasingly important centre for software development, biotechnology and a vibrant film industry. General information Founded Original shipment 1964 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 49°1637 N 123°0715 W Area  - Coastline  - Land  - Water 247 kilometres 4. ... C$ redirects here. ... GDP redirects here. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... “Software development” redirects here. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... The cinema of Canada has produced many people who have made an impact in the cinema of the world, despite the small scale of the Canadian film industry. ...


The city's scenic location makes it a major tourist destination. Visitors come for the city's gardens, Stanley Park, Queen Elizabeth Park, and the mountains, ocean, forest and parklands surrounding the city. The numerous beaches, parks, waterfronts, and mountain backdrop, combined with its cultural and multi-ethnic character, all contribute to its unique appeal and style for tourists. Over a million people annually pass through Vancouver en route to a cruise ship vacation, usually to Alaska.[73] Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... Queen Elizabeth Park is a municipal park located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...


The city's popularity comes with a price. Vancouver can be an expensive city, with the highest housing prices in Canada. Several 2006 studies rank Vancouver as having the least affordable housing in Canada, ranking 13th least affordable in the world, up from 15th in 2005.[74][75][76] The city has adopted various strategies to reduce housing costs, including cooperative housing, legalized secondary suites, increased density and smart growth. A significant number of the city's residents are affluent, a perception reinforced by the number of luxury vehicles on city streets and cost of real estate. The average two-storey home in Vancouver sells for $757,750, compared with $467,742 in Toronto and $322,853 in Calgary, the next most expensive major cities in Canada.[77] A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Secondary Suite is an urban planning term for an additional separate dwelling unit on a property that would normally accommodate only one dwelling unit. ... Smart growth is a concept and term used by those who seek to identify a set of policies governing transportation and land use planning policy for urban areas that benefits communities and preserves the natural environment. ... A contemporary Lincoln Town Car, an example of the traditional luxury car design. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ...


A major and ongoing downtown condominium construction boom began in the late 1990s, financed in large part by a huge flow of capital from Hong Kong immigrants prior to the 1997 hand-over to China.[78] High-rise residential developments from this period now dominate the Yaletown and Coal Harbour districts of the downtown peninsula, and also cluster around some of the SkyTrain stations on the east side of the city. This article is about the form of housing. ... Yaletown is an area of downtown Vancouver approximately bordered by False Creek, Smithe, Davie and Homer Streets. ... Coal Harbour is the name for a section of Burrard Inlet lying between Vancouvers downtown peninsula and the Brockton Peninsula of Stanley Park. ... The SkyTrain is a two-line urban mass transit system in Metro Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


The city has been selected to co-host the 2010 Winter Olympics, which is influencing economic development. Concern has been expressed that Vancouver's increasing homelessness problem may be exacerbated by the Olympics because owners of single room occupancy hotels, which house many of the city's lowest income residents, have begun converting their properties in order to attract higher income residents and tourists.[79] Another significant international event, the 1986 World Exposition, was held in Vancouver. It was the last World's Fair held in North America and was considered a success, receiving 20,111,578 visits. Several Vancouver landmarks date from that period, including the SkyTrain public transit system, the Plaza of Nations, and Canada Place.[80] Bag lady redirects here. ... (Redirected from 1986 World Exposition) Expo 86 logo The 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication, or simply Expo 86, was a Worlds Fair held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada during the summer of 1986. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... Plaza of Nations from False Creek. ... Canada Place and a visiting cruise ship (left) Canada Place is a building situated on the Burrard Inlet waterfront of Vancouver, British Columbia. ...

Aerial of Downtown Vancouver

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Government

Vancouver, unlike other British Columbia municipalities, is incorporated under a unique provincial statute, the Vancouver Charter.[81] The legislation, passed in 1953, supersedes the Vancouver Incorporation Act, 1921 and grants the city more and different powers than other communities possess under BC's Municipalities Act. Vancouver is governed by the ten-member Vancouver City Council, a nine-member School Board, and a seven-member Parks Board, all elected for three-year terms through an at-large system. ...


The civic government has been dominated by the centre-right Non-Partisan Association (NPA) since the Second World War, albeit with some significant centre-left interludes.[82] The NPA's Sam Sullivan was elected mayor of Vancouver in November 2005, signaling the party's return to power after a social democratic slate swept the previous election. The NPA fractured over the issue of drug policy in 2002, facilitating a landslide victory for the Coalition of Progressive Electors on a harm reduction platform. Subsequently, North America's first safe injection site was opened for the significant number of intravenous heroin users in the city. The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... The Non-Partisan Association - the NPA - is a civic-level political party operating in Vancouver, Canada. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ... The Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) is a municipal political party in the Canadian city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Harm reduction is a philosophy of public health, intended to be a progressive alternative to the prohibition of certain potentially dangerous lifestyle choices. ... Logo of Insite. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ...


Vancouver is governed by the ten-member Vancouver City Council, a nine-member School Board, and a seven-member Parks Board, all elected for three-year terms through an at-large system. Historically, in all levels of government, the more affluent west side of Vancouver has voted along conservative or liberal lines while the eastern side of the city has voted along left-wing lines.[83] This was reaffirmed with the results of the 2005 provincial election and the 2006 federal election. Vancouver City Council is the governing body of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single multimember constituency. ... In Canada, political conservatism is generally considered to be primarily represented by the Conservative Party of Canada at the federal level, and by the various right-leaning parties at the provincial levels. ... Liberalism has been a strong force in Canadian politics since the late 18th Century. ... Left wing redirects here. ... Popular vote map by riding. ... This is page shows results of Canadian federal elections in the city of Vancouver and suburban areas north of the Fraser River. ...

Vancouver City Hall with the 2010 Winter Olympics Flag
Vancouver City Hall with the 2010 Winter Olympics Flag

Though polarized, a political consensus has emerged in Vancouver around a number of issues. Protection of urban parks, a focus on the development of rapid transit as opposed to a freeway system, a harm reduction approach to illegal drug use, and a general concern about community-based development are examples of policies that have come to have broad support across the political spectrum in Vancouver. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (959x533, 91 KB) Summary Vancouver City Hall with the Olympics flag. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (959x533, 91 KB) Summary Vancouver City Hall with the Olympics flag. ... The statue of George Vancouver outside of Vancouver City Hall. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political spectrum is a way of visualizing different political positions. ...


Larry Campbell's election as mayor in 2002 was in part due to his willingness to champion alternative interventions for drug issues, such as supervised injection sites. The city has adopted a Four Pillars Drug Strategy, which combines harm reduction (e.g. needle exchanges, supervised injection sites) with treatment, enforcement, and prevention.[84] The strategy is largely a response to the endemic HIV and hepatitis C among injection drug users in the city's Downtown Eastside neighbourhood. The area is characterized by entrenched poverty, and consequently is home to the "low track" street sex trade and a bustling "open air" street drug market, which gave rise to a significant AIDS epidemic in the 1990s. Some community and professional groups — such as From Grief to Action and Keeping the Door Open — are fostering public dialogue in the city about further alternatives to current drug policies.[85][86] The Honourable Larry W. Campbell, MBA (born February 28, 1948, in Brantford, Ontario) is the outgoing Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and a Member of the Canadian Senate. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... This page is for the disease. ... Location of the Downtown Eastside (in red) in Vancouver. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Campbell chose not to run for re-election, and was subsequently appointed to the Senate of Canada. In the 2005 Municipal Election, the City Council swung back to the right after a term dominated by the leftist Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE). NPA mayoral candidate Sam Sullivan narrowly defeated Jim Green for the position of mayor and was joined by five of his party's members on Council. The centrist Vision Vancouver (VVN) brought four members to Council, with the final seat going to COPE. The NPA also won six of nine School Board seats and five of seven Parks Board seats, while the remaining Board seats were won by COPE.[87] Type Upper House Speaker Noël Kinsella, Conservative since February 8, 2006 Leader of the Government in the Senate Marjory LeBreton, Conservative since February 6, 2006 Leader of the Opposition in the Senate Céline Hervieux-Payette, Liberal since January 18, 2007 Members 105 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party... The City of Vancouver, along with the rest of British Columbia, held its triannual municipal elections on November 19, 2005. ... The Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) is a municipal political party in the Canadian city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Jim Green MA, BA is a university professor of anthropology. ... Vision Vancouver is one of two parties represented in Vancouver City Council. ...


Provincial representation

In the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia, Vancouver is represented by ten Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs), which includes Gordon Campbell, the current Premier. In the 2005 provincial election, the BC Liberal Party and the BC New Democratic Party each won five seats. Legislature Building in Victoria, BC The Legislative Assembly of British Columbia is located in Victoria. ... A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... Gordon Muir Campbell, BA, MBA, MLA (born January 12, 1948) is the 34th Premier of British Columbia. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... The British Columbia Liberal Party (usually referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of British Columbia is a democratic socialist political party in British Columbia, Canada. ...


Federal representation

In the Canadian House of Commons, Vancouver is represented by five Members of Parliament. In the 2004 federal elections, the Liberal Party of Canada won four seats and the federal New Democratic Party (NDP) one. In the 2006 federal elections, all the same Members of Parliament were re-elected. However, on 6 February 2006, David Emerson of Vancouver Kingsway defected to the Conservative Party, giving the Conservatives one seat in Vancouver. As of February 2006, the Liberals hold three seats, and the NDP and the Conservatives hold one each. Type Lower House Speaker Peter Milliken, Liberal since January 29, 2001 Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Peter Van Loan, Conservative since January 4, 2007 Opposition House Leader Ralph Goodale, Liberal since January 23, 2006 Members 308 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party Bloc Québécois... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Lee Emerson, PC, Ph. ... Vancouver Kingsway is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


Policing

Crime rate in Vancouver, 1984–2005.
Crime rate in Vancouver, 1984–2005.[88]

While most of the Lower Mainland is policed by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's "E" Division, Vancouver has its own city police force (as do New Westminster, West Vancouver, Delta, and Port Moody), with a strength of 1,174 sworn members and an operating budget of almost $150 million (in 2005 figures).[89][90][91] Over 16% of the city's budget was spent on police protection in 2005.[92] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 410 pixelsFull resolution (1205 × 617 pixel, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 410 pixelsFull resolution (1205 × 617 pixel, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... RCMP redirects here. ... Vancouver Police Department Coat Of Arms VPD Patch The Vancouver Police Department is the police force for the City of Vancouver. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... West Vancouver Police Department is a police force for the city of West Vancouver. ... The Delta Police Department is the police force for the district municipality of Delta, British Columbia. ... The Port Moody Police Department is the police force for the City of Port Moody, British Columbia. ...


The Vancouver Police has numerous operational divisions, including a bicycle squad, a marine squad, and a dog squad. It also has a mounted squad, used primarily to patrol Stanley Park and occasionally the Downtown Eastside and West End, as well as for crowd control.[93] The police work in conjunction with civilian and volunteer run Community Police Centres.[94] In 2006, the police department established its own Counter Terrorism Unit, which led to speculation of a rift between the Vancouver Police and the RCMP because the latter normally handles national security matters.[95][96] In 2005, a new transit police force, the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority Police Service (now South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority Police Service), was established with full police powers. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An NYPD boat on patrol in New York Harbor A Metropolitan Police launch on the River Thames in London A Chicago Police Department boat on Lake Michigan Water police, also called harbour patrols, port police, marine police, or river police, are police officers, usually a department of a larger police... Police dog getting ready to search a vehicle for drugs A policemans dog is a dog that is trained specifically to assist police and similar law-enforcement personnel with their work. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Musical Ride Mounted police are police who patrol on horseback. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ...

Vancouver police constables from the bicycle and motorcycle squads, on the streets of Gastown.
Vancouver police constables from the bicycle and motorcycle squads, on the streets of Gastown.

Although it is technically illegal, Vancouver police generally do not arrest people for possessing small amounts of marijuana.[97] In 2000 the Vancouver Police Department established a specialized drug squad, "Growbusters," to carry out an aggressive campaign against the city's estimated 4,000 hydroponic marijuana growing operations (or grow-ops) in residential areas.[98] As with other law enforcement campaigns targeting marijuana this initiative has been sharply criticized.[99] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x1152, 1410 KB) Vancouver Police on bikes. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x1152, 1410 KB) Vancouver Police on bikes. ... Map of Gastown Statue of Gassy Jack, Gastown. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... Plants grown in a hydroponics grow box made to look like a computer NASA researcher checking hydroponic onions with Bibb lettuce to his left and radishes to the right Example of autotrophic metabolism Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions instead of soil. ...


As of 2005, Vancouver had the fourth highest crime rate among Canada's 27 census metropolitan areas.[100] However, as with other Canadian cities, the over-all crime rate has been falling "dramatically."[101][100] Vancouver's property crime rate is particularly high, ranking among the highest for major North American cities.[102] But even property crime dropped 10.5% between 2004 and 2005, according the Vancouver Police.[103] Crime in Canada has occurred throughout its history, and has experienced wide swings in its prevalence. ... Property crime is a category of crime that includes burglary, larceny, theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, shoplifting, and vandalism. ...


Vancouver plays host to special events such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference, the Clinton-Yeltsin Summit or the Symphony of Fire fireworks show that require significant policing. The 1994 Stanley Cup riot overwhelmed police and injured more than 200 people. APEC redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Transportation

See also: List of Vancouver roads.

Vancouver's streetcar system began on 28 June 1890 and ran from the (first) Granville Street Bridge to Westminster Avenue (now Main Street). Less than a year later, the Westminster and Vancouver Tramway Company began operating Canada's first interurban line between the two cities, which encouraged residential neighbourhoods outside the central core to develop.[104] The British Columbia Electric Railway became the company that operated the urban and interurban rail system, until 1958 when its last vestiges were dismantled in favour of "trackless" trolley and gasoline/diesel buses.[105] Vancouver currently has the second largest trolley bus fleet in North America after San Francisco. Transportation in Vancouver has many of the features of modern cities worldwide and some interesting differences. ... The following is a list of major and secondary roads and streets in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... The Granville Street Bridge is a six lane bridge in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Carnegie Centre at the corner of Main and Hastings Street is the former central library of Vancouver. ... The British Columbia Electric Railway provided electricity to and operated public transportation in southwestern British Columbia from its establishment in the mid 1890s. ... Autobus redirects here. ...


City councils, as part of a long term plan, prohibited the construction of freeways in the 1980s.[106] The only major freeway within city limits is Highway 1, which passes through the north-eastern corner of the city. For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... For the Boards of Canada record, see Trans Canada Highway (EP). ...


South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority (TransLink), the Metro Vancouver transportation authority, is responsible for roads and public transportation within region. It provides a bus service, B-Line Rapid Bus Service (two of the three B-Lines run in Vancouver with two more B-Lines by 2008), a foot passenger and bicycle ferry service (known as SeaBus), a two-line automated metro called SkyTrain, and West Coast Express commuter rail.[107] Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority is responsible for public transit in Greater Vancouver area. ... TransLink, officially known as the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority, is a transportation organization which services transportation needs of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD). ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal... Coast Mountain Bus Company (CMBC) is the contract operator for bus transit services in Greater Vancouver and is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority known locally as TransLink, the entity responsible for transit. ... The SeaBus heading toward downtown Vancouver. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... The SkyTrain is a two-line urban mass transit system in Metro Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The West Coast Express at Waterfront Station. ...


New improvements are being made to the regional transportation network as part of the Gateway Program. Current projects include the Canada Line, a rapid-transit line that will connect Vancouver International Airport and the neighbouring city of Richmond with the existing Skytrain system. There is also planning going forward to extend the SkyTrain Millennium Line west to UBC as a subway under Broadway and capacity upgrades and an extension to the Expo Line. Many other road projects will be completed within the next few years, including the Golden Ears Bridge. The Gateway Program is a $3. ... RAV redirects here. ... Vancouver International Airport (IATA: YVR, ICAO: CYVR) is located on Sea Island in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, about 15 kilometres from downtown Vancouver. ... Richmond is an incorporated city on the Pacific coast of the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... Concept rendering of the Golden Ears Bridge. ...

Vancouver's SkyTrain metro.
Vancouver's SkyTrain metro.

Inter-city passenger rail service is operated from Pacific Central Station by VIA Rail to points east; Amtrak Cascades to Seattle, Washington; and Rocky Mountaineer rail tour routes. The front of Pacific Central Station, as seen from Thornton Park. ... VIA Rails trains travelling by Highway 401 near Brockville, Ontario. ... Amtrak Cascades consist in Portland, Oregon. ... Seattle redirects here. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Small passenger ferries operating in False Creek provide commuter service to Granville Island, Downtown Vancouver and Kitsilano.


Vancouver is served by Vancouver International Airport (YVR), located on Sea Island in the City of Richmond, immediately south of Vancouver. Vancouver's airport is Canada's second busiest airport, and the second largest gateway on the west coast of North America for international passengers. HeliJet and three float plane companies Salt Spring Air, Harbour Air and West Coast Air operate scheduled air service from Vancouver harbour and YVR south terminal. The city is also served by two BC Ferry terminals. One is to the northwest at Horseshoe Bay, West Vancouver, and the other is to the south, at Tsawwassen (in Delta). Vancouver International Airport (IATA: YVR, ICAO: CYVR) is located on Sea Island in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, about 15 kilometres from downtown Vancouver. ... Sea Island is located in the city of Richmond, British Columbia, directly across the river from Vancouver and fifteen kilometres from Vancouvers downtown core. ... S-76A in Helijet livery. ... A DeHavilland Single Otter floatplane in Harbour Air livery A seaplane is an aircraft designed to take off and land on water. ... DeHavilland Single Otter in Harbour Air livery Harbour Air is an airline based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... West Coast Air is a scheduled and charter airline based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... British Columbia Ferry Services Inc. ... Horseshoe Bay is a small village area within the city of West Vancouver. ... West Vancouver is a district municipality in the province of British Columbia. ... , Tsawwassens BC Ferry terminal. ... Delta is a district municipality in British Columbia, Canada. ...


Education

Grade schools

Vancouver is served by School District 39 Vancouver, the second largest school district in British Columbia.[108] As in other parts of the province, numerous independent schools are also eligible for partial provincial funding — this includes religious schools, non-denominational schools, and special-needs schools, most of which also charge tuition. Vancouver also includes three schools that are part of the province-wide Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique (CSF), the Francophone public school district. Vancouver School Board (School District #39) is a school district based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... A parochial school (or faith school) is a type of private school which engages in religious education in addition to conventional education. ... This article is about secularism. ... This article is about educating students with disabilities or behavioral problems. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... The Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britanique (also known as Francophone Education Authority or school district 93) is the French-language school board for all French schools located in British Columbia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Universities and colleges

The two major public universities in the Lower Mainland, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU), have satellite campuses within the city, as does the British Columbia Institute of Technology, which provides polytechnic education and grants degrees in several fields. Vancouver Community College and Langara College, along with other colleges in surrounding communities, provide career, trade, and university-transfer programs for Vancouver residents. Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design grants certificates, diplomas, and degrees in art and design. Other arts schools include the Vancouver Film School and Studio 58, a program of Langara. The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ... Simon Fraser University (SFU) is a Canadian university in British Columbia with campuses located on Burnaby Mountain, and in Vancouver and Surrey. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... The British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) is an institute of technology in Burnaby, British Columbia. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... VCC Broadway Campus sign Vancouver Community College (VCC), is a vocational training institute in Vancouver. ... Langara College programs were first offered in 1965 at King Edward Centre as part of Vancouver City College. ... Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design is a university in Vancouver, BC, Canada. ... There are other articles with similar names; see Vancouver Film Studios. ... Studio 58 Studio 58 is an intensive theatre school located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ...


International students

Foreign students, particularly from the Pacific Rim, have grown in importance for Vancouver's public and private post-secondary educational facilities. International undergraduate enrolment at UBC has grown to nine per cent, or 2,800 students, from two per cent since 1996. Some private schools have been closed or sanctioned for improperly advertising to international students.[109]


Architecture and cityscape

Clock tower of the Vancouver Block on Granville Street, constructed by Dominic Burns of the Burns Meat family
Clock tower of the Vancouver Block on Granville Street, constructed by Dominic Burns of the Burns Meat family

Notable buildings within the city include Christ Church Cathedral, the Hotel Vancouver, the Museum of Anthropology (Arthur Erickson, architect) at the University of British Columbia, and the Vancouver Art Gallery. There are several striking modern buildings in the downtown area, including the Harbour Centre, Vancouver Law Courts and surrounding plaza known as Robson Square (Arthur Erickson) and the Vancouver Library Square (Moshe Safdie, architect), reminiscent of the Colosseum in Rome. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1952x2937, 1171 KB) Vancouver From: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1952x2937, 1171 KB) Vancouver From: http://www. ... Christ Church Cathedral is the Anglican cathedral in Vancouver, British Columbia; one of two cathedrals in the Diocese of New Westminster. ... Hotel Vancouver The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver (generally known as the Hotel Vancouver) is located on West Georgia Street and Burrard Street, in the heart of downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Museum of Anthropology. ... Arthur Charles Erickson OC (born June 14, 1924, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian architect of Swedish descent. ... The Vancouver Art Gallery, the fifth-largest art gallery in Canada, is located at 750 Hornby Street in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Harbour Centre at night. ... Robson Square. ... The Library Square Building in Vancouver, British Columbia is the home to the Vancouver Public Library. ... Moshe Safdie, C.C., B.Arch. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...

View of the Financial District from Harbour Centre

The original BC Hydro headquarters building at Nelson and Burrard Streets is a modernist high-rise, now converted into the Electra condominiums. Also notable is the "concrete waffle" of the MacMillan-Bloedel building on the north-east corner of the Georgia and Thurlow intersection. A prominent addition to the city's landscape is the giant tent-frame Canada Place, the former Canada Pavilion from Expo '86, which includes the Trade and Convention Centre as well as a Cruise Ship Terminal and the Pan-Pacific Hotel. Two modern skyscrapers that define the skyline looking south are the city hall and the Centennial Pavilion of Vancouver Hospital, both by Townley and Matheson (1936 and 1958 respectively).[110][111] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Harbour Centre at night. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Canada Place and a visiting cruise ship (left) Canada Place is a building situated on the Burrard Inlet waterfront of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Expo 86 logo The 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication, or simply Expo 86, was a Worlds Fair held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada during the summer of 1986. ... Canada Place with a rendering of the expansion currently under construction. ...


A collection of Edwardian buildings in the city's old downtown core were, in their day, the tallest buildings in the British Empire. These were, in succession, the Province Building, the Dominion Building (1907, both at Cambie and Hastings Streets), and the Sun Tower (1911) at Beatty and Pender Streets. The Sun Tower's cupola was finally exceeded as the Empire's tallest by the elaborate Art Deco Marine Building in the 1920s.[112] Inspired by New York's Chrysler Building, the Marine Building is known for its elaborate ceramic tile facings and brass-gilt doors and elevators, which make it a favourite location for movie shoots.[113] Another notable Edwardian building in the city is the Vancouver Art Gallery building, designed by Francis Mawson Rattenbury, who also designed the provincial Legislature and the original and highly decorative Hotel Vancouver (torn down after WWII as a condition of the completion of the new Hotel Vancouver a block away This is all owned by Jon Smith).[114] The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Dominion Building in 1915. ... The Sun Tower is a Beaux-Arts, 17 storey (82 metres/270 feet) tall building in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and provide ventilation. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Marine Building is a skyscraper located at 355 Burrard Street in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, located on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... This article is about ceramic materials. ...


Topping the list of tallest buildings in Vancouver as of March 2008 is One Wall Centre at 150 metres (491 ft)[115] and 48 storeys, followed closely by the Shaw Tower at 149 metres (489 ft)[115] and 41 storeys.[116] This is a list of the 10 tallest buildings or skyscrapers in the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... One Wall Centre is the tallest building in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada as of 2005. ... Shaw Tower in Vancouver Shaw Tower located at 1067 W. Cordova St is home to Shaw Communications Vancouver operations. ...

Vancouver Public Library on Georgia Street
Vancouver Public Library on Georgia Street

Vancouver's "View Protection Guidelines" were approved in 1989 and amended in 1990, establishing view corridors in the downtown with height limits to protect views of the North Shore Mountains. These guidelines have succeeded in preserving mountain views, although some find Vancouver's skyline flat and lacking in visual interest. Many agree that there is a need for some taller buildings to reflect Vancouver's contemporary image, but others are concerned about proposals for much higher buildings. Many believe that the natural setting, and in particular, views of the North Shore Mountains, may be hindered as tall buildings grow in number. In response to these concerns, Council commissioned a "Skyline Study" in 1997.[117] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The North Shore Mountains are a subrange of the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains overlooking the Greater Vancouver Regional District to the south. ... Vancouver City Council is the governing body of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


The Skyline Study concluded that Vancouver's skyline would benefit from the addition of a handful of buildings exceeding current height limits, to add visual interest to Vancouver's skyline. This led to the General Policy on Higher Buildings. The study noted that the opportunities for such buildings were restricted due to a limited number of large development sites in the downtown. There were at least five sites identified where buildings exceeding the 137 metres (450 ft) height limit are possible, and at least two sites in the northwest corner of the central business district where heights up to 122 metres (400 ft) (exceeding the 91 metre/300 foot limit) might be considered.[118] Eight years later, five of the seven identified sites for higher buildings have been developed or are in the development application process. The tallest of these new buildings is the Living Shangri-La hotel/residential tower, which when completed in 2008 will stand 201 metres (659 ft)[115] tall (62 storeys).[119] Living Shangri-la is to be a a mixed-use building in downtown Vancouver and will be the tallest building when completed in 2008. ...

Downtown Vancouver panorama, as seen from Spanish Banks
Downtown Vancouver panorama, as seen from Spanish Banks

The process of constructing high-rise residential and mixed-use development in urban centres has been referred to as "Vancouverism" after the apparent success of such development in the city.[120] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x262, 66 KB) Cropped version of: Image:Vancityskyline. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x262, 66 KB) Cropped version of: Image:Vancityskyline. ...



Arts and culture

Further information: Music of Vancouver

Prominent theatre companies in Vancouver include the Arts Club Theatre Company on Granville Island, the Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company, and Bard on the Beach. Smaller companies include Touchstone Theatre, Studio 58, Carousel Theatre, and the United Players of Vancouver. Theatre Under the Stars produces shows in the summer at Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park. In addition, Vancouver holds an annual Fringe Festival and International Film Festival. Vancouver is a city in British Columbia, and is one of the major cultural centers of Canada. ... The Arts Club Theatre is a professional theatre company in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Granville Island in 2005. ... The Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company is a professional theatre company in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada founded in October, 1962. ... Bard on the Beach is Western Canadas largest professional Shakespeare festival, which is held every year in open-ended tents on the waterfront in Vanier Park in Kitsilano, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Touchstone Theatre Touchstone Theatre is a professional theatre company in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, led by Artistic Director Katrina Dunn. ... Studio 58 Studio 58 is an intensive theatre school located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Theatre Under the Stars, commonly refered to as TUTS, is one of Vancouvers largest musical theatre companies. ... The Marion Malkin Memorial Bowl, or Malkin Bowl, is an outdoor theatre in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... The Vancouver Fringe Festival is an annual alternative theater festival held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada since 1985. ... The Vancouver International Film Festival is a film festival held in Vancouver, Canada for two weeks in late September and early October. ...

The Vogue Theatre on Granville Street.
The Vogue Theatre on Granville Street.
Vancouver Art Gallery on Robson Street.

Vancouver is the home to museums and galleries. The Vancouver Art Gallery has a permanent collection of over 7,900 items valued at over $100 million and is the home of a significant number of works by Emily Carr.[121] In the Kitsilano district are the Vancouver Maritime Museum, and the H. R. MacMillan Space Centre. The Museum of Anthropology at UBC is a leading museum of Pacific Northwest Coast First Nations culture, and the Vancouver Museum is the largest civic museum in Canada. A more interactive museum is Science World. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1530 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vancouver Wikipedia:WikiProject Vancouver User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/vancouver Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1530 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vancouver Wikipedia:WikiProject Vancouver User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/vancouver Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Vancouver Art Gallery, the fifth-largest art gallery in Canada, is located at 750 Hornby Street in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Emily Carr Emily Carr (December 13, 1871 – March 2, 1945) was a Canadian artist and writer. ... Location of Kitsilano in Vancouver. ... The Vancouver Maritime Musuem is a nautical museum on the Vancouver waterfront, just west of False Creek. ... The Space Centre shares one of the most distinctive buildings in the city with the Vancouver Museum H.R. MacMillan Space Centre The H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, founded 1968, is an astronomy museum in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, that is located at Vanier Park in Vancouver. ... The Museum of Anthropology. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ... The Vancouver Museum is housed in the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre The Vancouver Museum is a local museum located in Vanier Park, Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Science World At night For other uses, see Science World (disambiguation) TELUS World of Science, Vancouver is a science centre run by a non-profit organization in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


In 1986, Greater Vancouver's cultural community created the Alliance for Arts and Culture to provide a strong voice for the sector and an avenue to work together. This coalition now numbers more than 320 arts groups and individuals. The Alliance's mission is to "strive towards an environment that recognizes, respects, and responds to the contribution our sector makes to society's well-being."[122]


Vancouver is a major regional centre for the development of Canadian music. The city's musical contributions include performers of classical, folk and popular music. The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra is the professional orchestra based in the city. It is also home to a major opera company, the Vancouver Opera, and numerous regional opera companies throughout the metropolitan area. The history of music of Canada has mirrored the history and evolution of the country. ... The logo of Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. ... The Vancouver Opera is an opera company in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


The city produced a number of notable punk rock bands, the most famous example being pioneering hardcore band D.O.A., whose enduring prominence in the city was such that Mayor Larry Campbell declared December 21, 2003 "D.O.A. Day" in honour of the band's 25th anniversary.[123] Other notable early punk bands from Vancouver included the Subhumans, the Young Canadians, the Pointed Sticks, Active Dog, The Modernettes, UJ3RK5, I, Braineater, and Nomeansno (originally from Victoria). The punk film Terminal City Ricochet was filmed in Vancouver; its title comes from an ice hockey team called the Terminal City Ricochets.[124] Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Hardcore Punk is a subgenre of Punk Rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... D.O.A. is a hardcore punk band from Vancouver. ... The Honourable Larry W. Campbell, MBA (born February 28, 1948, in Brantford, Ontario) is the outgoing Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and a Member of the Canadian Senate. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is about the Canadian band called The Subhumans. ... Young Canadians were a Canadian punk rock band in the late 1970s. ... Pointed Sticks were a Canadian punk rock band from Vancouver, active from 1978 to 1981. ... Although in reality pronounced you jerks, UJ3RK5s arcane typography easily betrays the bands roots in Vancouvers vibrant late seventies arts scene. ... Nomeansno is a rock music group originally from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada and now located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... Terminal City Ricochet is a 1990 film by Philipino director Zale Dalen. ...


When alternative rock hit the mainstream in the 1990s, several Vancouver groups rose to prominence, including 54-40, Odds, Moist, the Matthew Good Band and Econoline Crush, while recent successes include Gob and Stabilo. Today, Vancouver is home to a lively independent music scene, including bands such as The New Pornographers, Destroyer, Frog Eyes, The Organ, Veda Hille and Black Mountain; notable independent labels based in the city include Nettwerk and Mint. Vancouver also produced influential metal band Strapping Young Lad and pioneering electro-industrial bands Skinny Puppy and Front Line Assembly; the latter's Bill Leeb is better known for founding ambient pop super-group Delerium. Other popular musical artists who made their mark from Vancouver include Bryan Adams, Sarah McLachlan, Michael Buble, Nickelback, Heart (band), Diana Krall, Prism, Trooper, Chilliwack, Loverboy, Payola$, Images In Vogue, The Grapes of Wrath and Spirit of the West.[125] Notable hip hop artists from Vancouver include the Rascalz, Swollen Members, and Sweatshop Union. Alternative music redirects here. ... 54-40 is a Canadian alternative rock group from Vancouver, British Columbia, whose literate and melodic music is frequently compared to that of R.E.M. The band takes their name from the slogan Fifty-Four Forty or Fight, coined to express the expansionist agenda of James K. Polks... Odds were a Canadian alternative rock band in the 1990s. ... This article is about the band and not to be confused with the Moist, fellowers of Moism. ... Matthew Good (born June 29, 1971, Burnaby, British Columbia) is a Canadian rock musician. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Gob is a pop punk band from Burnaby, British Columbia formed in 1994. ... Stabilo (originally Stabilo Boss) are an acoustic rock band from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The New Pornographers is a Juno Award-winning Canadian indie rock group formed in 1997 in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Daniel Bejar (pronounced beːhaɹ) (b. ... Frog Eyes are an Indie Rock band from Canada. ... From left: Ashley, Debbie, Katie, Jenny, Shelby The Organ are a Canadian indie rock band formed in 2001 in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Veda Hille (born August 11, 1968 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a Canadian singer-songwriter. ... Black Mountain is an indie-rock band led by Stephen McBean. ... Nettwerk is a large Vancouver, British Columbia based record label and music management firm. ... Mint Records is a Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada-based independent record label founded in January 1991. ... Strapping Young Lad is an influential progressive extreme metal band from Canada, started by Devin Townsend in 1994. ... Electronic body music (EBM) is a musical genre combining elements of industrial music and electronic dance music. ... Skinny Puppy is a prominent industrial band, formed in Vancouver, BC, Canada in 1982. ... Front Line Assembly (sometimes written as Frontline Assembly, also known by the acronym FLA) is a Canadian electro-industrial band formed in 1986 by Bill Leeb and Michael Balch after Leeb left Skinny Puppy. ... Bill Leeb is a musician, born Wilhelm Anton Leeb on September 21, 1966 [1] in Vienna (Austria). ... Delerium is a band from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, formed in 1987, originally as a side project of the influential industrial music act, Front Line Assembly. ... For other persons of the same name, see Brian Adams. ... Sarah Ann McLachlan, OC,[2] OBC[2] (born January 28, 1968) is a Grammy-winning Canadian musician, singer and songwriter. ... Michael Bublé Michael Bublé (born 9 September 1975) is a Canadian crooner jazz singer and actor. ... This article is about the Canadian rock band. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... Diana Jean Krall, OC, OBC (born November 16, 1964) is a Grammy award-winning Canadian jazz pianist and singer. ... Prisms Armageddon album, 1979 (re-released in 2004) Prism is a Canadian rock band formed in Vancouver in 1976. ... Trooper is a Juno Award winning[1] Canadian rock band that developed from a group formed by vocalist Ramon McGuire and guitarist Brian Smith in 1965. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Loverboy (disambiguation). ... Payola$ were a New Wave band active in the Canadian music scene for a decade from the late 1970s. ... Images in Vogue was a Canadian New Wave group in the 1980s. ... The Grapes of Wrath are a Canadian folk rock band, who were one of Canadas most successful pop bands in the late 1980s and early 1990s before disbanding in 1992. ... Spirit of the West are a Canadian folk rock band, who were popular on the Canadian folk music scene in the 1980s before evolving a blend of hard rock, pop and Celtic folk influences which made them one of Canadas most successful alternative rock acts in the 1990s. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Rascalz are a hip hop group from Vancouver, British Columbia, who played a crucial role in the artistic and commercial development of Canadian hip hop. ... Swollen Members is a Canadian hip hop hip/hop group hailing from Vancouver, British Columbia, consisting principally of the duo Mad Child and Prevail. ... Sweatshop Union is a Canadian hip hop collective. ...

Chinese New Year Parade, 2007.
Chinese New Year Parade, 2007.

Larger performances are usually held at venues such as GM Place, Queen Elizabeth Theatre, BC Place Stadium or the Pacific Coliseum, while smaller acts are held at places such as the Plaza of Nations, the Commodore Ballroom, the Orpheum Theatre and the Vogue Theatre (currently closed). The Vancouver Folk Music Festival and the Vancouver International Jazz Festival showcase music in their respective genres from around the world. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 381 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chinese New Year parade, Vancouver, BC, 2007 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 381 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chinese New Year parade, Vancouver, BC, 2007 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Inside GM Place before a Canucks game General Motors Place, also known as GM Place and The Garage, is an indoor arena at 800 Griffiths Way in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Queen Elizabeth Theatre The Queen Elizabeth Theatre is located in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. ... A view of the deflated roof A view of the deflation of the roof An inside view of the deflated roof BC Place Stadium is Canadas first domed stadium and is the largest air-supported stadium in the world[1]. It is located on the north side of False... The Pacific Coliseum. ... Plaza of Nations from False Creek. ... The Commodore Ballroom (also known as The Fabulous Commodore) is a nightclub and music venue located on Granville Street in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Orpheum Theatre with advertising for the movie Lady Luck. ... The Vancouver Folk Music Festival takes place in the third weekend of July. ... The Vancouver International Jazz Festival is an annual summer event in Vancouver, Canada. ...

Vancouver Nightlife - Nelson and Granville St.
Vancouver Nightlife - Nelson and Granville St.

Vancouver's large Chinese population has a significant music scene, which has produced several Cantopop stars. Similarly, various Indo-Canadian artists and actors have a profile in Bollywood or other aspects of India's entertainment industry. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cantopop (Chinese: 粵語流行曲) is a colloquial portmanteau for Cantonese popular music. It is also referred to as HK-pop, short for Hong Kong popular music. It is categorized as a subgenre of Chinese popular music within C-pop. ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal term popularly used for Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ...


Nightlife in Vancouver had, for years, been seen as restricted in comparison to other cities, with early closing times for bars and night clubs, and a reluctance by authorities to allow for further development. However, since 2003 Vancouver has experimented with later closing hours and relaxed regulations, and an effort has been made to develop the Downtown core even further as an entertainment district, especially on and around Granville Street.[126] The Granville Entertainment District is an area in downtown Vancouver known for its vast assortments of bars and nightclubs. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Sports and recreation

Main article: Sports in Vancouver

The mild climate of the city and close proximity to ocean, mountains, rivers and lakes make the area a popular destination for outdoor recreation. Indeed, Vancouver has a low adult obesity rate of 12% compared to the Canadian average, 23%; however, while 51% of Vancouverites are considered overweight, it is the fourth thinnest city in Canada after Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax.[127][128] The city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada has had a long tradition of sports. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Motto: E Mari Merces(Latin) From the Sea, Wealth Coordinates: , Country Province Established April 1, 1996 Government  - Type Regional Municipality  - Mayor Peter Kelly  - Governing body Halifax Regional Council  - MPs List of MPs Alexa McDonough Geoff Regan Michael Savage Peter Stoffer (Bill Casey) (Gerald Keddy) (Peter MacKay)  - MLAs List of MLAs...

BC Place Stadium, home of the BC Lions. The dome on the lower right is GM Place.
BC Place Stadium, home of the BC Lions. The dome on the lower right is GM Place.
The clock counting down to the opening of the 2010 Olympics in downtown Vancouver, Georgia and Howe Streets
The clock counting down to the opening of the 2010 Olympics in downtown Vancouver, Georgia and Howe Streets

Vancouver has over 1,298 hectares (3,200 acres) of parks, with Stanley Park being the largest at 404 hectares (1,000 acres).[129] The municipality also has several large beaches, many adjacent to one another, with the largest groups extending from the coast of Stanley Park before reaching False Creek, and on the other side of English Bay, starting in the Kitsilano neighbourhood all the way to the University Endowment Lands, which are separate from Vancouver. The 18 kilometres (11 miles) of beaches that surround Vancouver include English Bay (First Beach), Jericho, Kitsilano Beach, Locarno, Second Beach (Stanley Park), Spanish Bank East, Spanish Bank Extension, Spanish Bank West, Sunset, and Third Beach (Stanley Park).[130] The coastline provides for many types of water sport, and the city is a popular destination for boating enthusiasts. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 330 pixelsFull resolution (1665 × 687 pixel, file size: 959 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 330 pixelsFull resolution (1665 × 687 pixel, file size: 959 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A view of the deflated roof A view of the deflation of the roof An inside view of the deflated roof BC Place Stadium is Canadas first domed stadium and is the largest air-supported stadium in the world[1]. It is located on the north side of False... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... This article is about the unincorporated area west of Vancouver. ... Fish-eye view of Kitsilano Beach Kitsilano Beach is one of the most popular beaches in Vancouver, especially in the warm summer months. ... // About Spanish Bank beach Spanish Bank beach is located west of Tolmie Street on Northwest Marine Drive in Vancouver , British Columbia , Canada . ...


The nearby North Shore Mountains are home to three ski areas, Cypress Mountain, Grouse Mountain, and Mount Seymour. Each are within 20 to 30 minutes (driving time) of downtown Vancouver. Mountain bikers have created world-renowned trails across the North Shore. The Capilano River, Lynn Creek, Seymour River, within 20 minutes (driving time) of downtown, provide opportunities to whitewater enthusiasts during periods of rain and spring melt. The North Shore Mountains are a subrange of the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains overlooking the Greater Vancouver Regional District to the south. ... Cypress Provincial Park is a provincial park in West Vancouver on the North Shore of Greater Vancouver. ... Grouse Mountain is a ski area and tourist attraction located in the District of North Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Mount Seymour is a mountain located in Mount Seymour Provincial Park in the District of North Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... Capilano River. ... Whitewater is formed in a rapid, when a rivers gradient drops enough to form a bubbly, or aerated and unstable current; the frothy water appears white. ...


Running races include the Vancouver Sun Run (a 10 km race) every April; the Vancouver Marathon is held every May and Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon held every June. Vancouver Sun Run Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Vancouver Sun Run The Vancouver Sun Run, sponsored by The Vancouver Sun newspaper, is a 10. ... The Vancouver Marathon is an annual race held in Vancouver, Canada every May. ...


Vancouver will be the host city for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games and the 2009 World Police and Fire Games. Swangard Stadium, in nearby Burnaby, hosted some games for the 2007 FIFA U-20 World Cup. Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... See also: 2010 Winter Olympics The 2010 Winter Paralympics will be held in the area surrounding Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, including the towns of Burnaby and Whistler. ... The World Police and Fire Games (WPFG) are an annual athletic event open to active and retired law enforcement and fire service personnel throughout the world. ... Swangard Stadium is a 6,868 seat stadium in Burnaby, British Columbia. ... “Burnaby” redirects here. ... 2007 FIFA U-20 World Cup final rankings. ...


Vancouver is exploring a joint bid for Vancouver and Seattle to host the 2028 Summer Olympics. A multi-national bid would be a first for the Olympics as an International Olympic Committee rule currently requires that the Olympics be awarded to a single city. Vancouver and Seattle both believe that the logistics can be overcome and have cited that the travel time between Seattle and Vancouver is similar to the travel time between Whistler, British Columbia and Vancouver.[citation needed] City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Location of Whistler within the Squamish-Lillooet District in British Columbia, Canada Coordinates: , Country Canada Province British Columbia Regional District Squamish-Lillooet Settled 1914 by Mrytle and Alex Philip Incorporated 1975 Government  - Mayor Ken Melamed  - Manager Bill Barratt  - Governing body Whistler Town Council  - MP Blair Wilson  - MLA Joan McIntyre Area...


Professional sports teams

GM Place, home of the Vancouver Canucks.
GM Place, home of the Vancouver Canucks.
Club Sport League Venue
Vancouver Canucks Ice hockey National Hockey League General Motors Place
Vancouver Giants Ice hockey Western Hockey League Pacific Coliseum
British Columbia Lions Football Canadian Football League BC Place Stadium
Vancouver Canadians Baseball (Single A Short Season) Northwest League Nat Bailey Stadium
Whitecaps FC Soccer USL First Division (men's)
W-League (women's)
Swangard Stadium

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2000x1152, 1775 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vancouver General Motors Place ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2000x1152, 1775 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vancouver General Motors Place ... Inside GM Place before a Canucks game General Motors Place, also known as GM Place and The Garage, is an indoor arena at 800 Griffiths Way in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Vancouver Canucks are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... General Motors Place (nicknamed The Garage and GM Place), sponsored by General Motors Canada, is an indoor arena at 800 Griffiths Way in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Vancouver Giants are a junior ice hockey team playing in the Western Hockey League (WHL). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... The Pacific Coliseum. ... The British Columbia Lions (commonly known and identified as the BC Lions) are a Canadian Football League (CFL) team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Diagram of a Canadian football field. ... Lions Stampeders Eskimos Roughriders Blue Bombers Tiger-Cats Argonauts Alouettes The Canadian Football League (CFL) (Ligue canadienne de football (LCF) in French), is a professional sports league located in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... A view of the deflated roof A view of the deflation of the roof An inside view of the deflated roof BC Place Stadium is Canadas first domed stadium and is the largest air-supported stadium in the world[1]. It is located on the north side of False... Class-Level Single-A (2000-present) Minor League affiliations Northwest League (2000-present) Western Division Major League affiliations Oakland Athletics (2000-present) Name Vancouver Canadians (2000-present) Ballpark Nat Bailey Stadium (2000-present) Minor League titles League titles Division titles 2004, 2005 Owner(s)/Operated by: Vancouver Professional Baseball Partnership... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Northwest League is a class A minor league. ... Nat Bailey Stadium (known affectionately as The Nat) is home to the Vancouver Canadians of the Northwest League and also plays host to the University of British Columbia baseball team. ... The Whitecaps (officially Whitecaps F.C.) are a Canadian professional football team. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... The W-League is the first modern womens soccer league in the United States pyramid. ... Swangard Stadium is a 6,868 seat stadium in Burnaby, British Columbia. ...

Media

Main article: Media of Vancouver
Further information: List of Vancouver media outlets

Vancouver is the centre of the province's news media, with most national media chains having an office in the city. This is an overview of media in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This is a list of media outlets in the Canadian city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ...


English-language media

Both of the city's major daily newspapers, The Vancouver Sun and The Province, are published by the Pacific Newspaper Group Inc. In recent years, The Globe and Mail, a national newspaper based in Toronto, has added a section for local content in an effort to improve its circulation in Vancouver. The Vancouver Sun is a daily newspaper first published in the Canadian province of British Columbia on February 12, 1912. ... The Province is a daily newspaper published in British Columbia by the Pacific Newspaper Group Inc, a CanWest Global Communications Company. ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. ...


Other mainstream newspapers include the free 24 Hours, Metro, the twice-a-week Vancouver Courier, and the Westender. Independent newspapers include The Georgia Straight (a weekly), The Republic and Only. For other newspapers with the same name, see Metro (newspaper). ... The Vancouver Courier is a Canadian semiweekly local newspaper published in Vancouver, British Columbia by CanWest Global Communications. ... The Georgia Straight is a free Canadian weekly news and entertainment newspaper published in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Republic is a local paper, published fortnightly since 2000, in the East Van Neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. ... Image:Christiecover. ...


Television stations include CBC, Citytv, CTV and Global TV. Radio stations with news departments include CBC Radio One, CKNW and CKWX. CBUT is the CBCs television station in Vancouver, British Columbia, and the flagship CBC-TV station for the Pacific Time zone. ... CKVU (Citytv Vancouver) is a Canadian television station based in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... CIVT-TV (also known internally as CTV British Columbia or CTV 9) is a Canadian television station in Vancouver, British Columbia which broadcasts on channel 32 (cable channel 9 in most areas). ... CHAN-TV is a television station in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, broadcasting over-the-air on channel 8, and available via cable providers in the area on channel 11. ... CBU is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts the programming of the CBC Radio One network in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... CKNW is the leading talk radio station in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... CKWX News1130 is a 24-hour all-news station broadcasting to residents of Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, British Columbia. ...


Multicultural media

The diverse ethnic make-up of Vancouver's population supports a rich range of multicultural media.


There are three Chinese-language dailies: Ming Pao, Sing Tao and World Journal. Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... Ming Pao (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Jyutping ming4 bou3; Hanyu Pinyin: míngbào), a Chinese language newspaper, is a publication by the Ming Pao Group in Hong Kong. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... World Journal (Chinese: 世界日報; pinyin: shì jiè rì bào) is a daily Chinese language newspaper serving overseas Chinese in North America. ...


Television station Channel M produces daily newscasts in Cantonese, Mandarin, Punjabi and Korean, and weekly newscasts in Tagalog. Channel M also produces programs aimed at other cultural groups. Fairchild Group also has two television stations: Fairchild TV and Talentvision, serving Cantonese and Mandarin speaking audiences respectively. CHNM is an independent television station based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... This article is on all of the Northern and Southwestern Chinese dialects. ... Punjabi redirects here. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Fairchild TV (新時代電視) or FTV is a Canadian Cantonese cable television specialty channel. ...


The Franco-Columbian community is served by Radio-Canada outlets CBUFT channel 26 (Télévision de Radio-Canada), CBUF-FM 97.7 (Première Chaîne) and CBUX-FM 90.9 (Espace musique). Franco-Columbians or Franco-Colombiens are French speaking Canadians living in the Pacific province of British Columbia. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... CBUFT is Radio-Canadas television station in Vancouver, serving franco-colombians in British Columbia. ... Télévision de Radio-Canada[1] is a Canadian French language television network. ... CBUF is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts the programming of Radio-Canadas La Première Chaîne network in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... La Première Chaîne is a Canadian French language news and information service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada, the public broadcaster in Canada. ... CBUX-FM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts SRCs Espace musique network at 90. ... Espace musique is the French language musical radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada, the national public broadcaster in Canada. ...


Vancouver is also home to British Columbia's longest running Ukrainian radio program, Nash Holos. Nash Holos (Ukrainian: ; Our Voice) is British Columbias longest-running Ukrainian radio program, based in Vancouver. ...


Affiliated cities and municipalities

The City of Vancouver was one of the first cities in Canada to enter into an international twinning arrangement.[131] Special arrangements for cultural, social and economic benefits have been created with these sister cities.[56] These sister cities are: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm Town twinning or sister cities is a concept whereby towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

There are 21 municipalities in Metro Vancouver. While each of these has a separate municipal government, the Metro government oversees common services within the metropolitan area such as water, sewage, transportation, and regional parks. Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For the town of Yokohama in Aomori Prefecture, see Yokohama, Aomori. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... CITIC Plaza Guangzhou (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin:  ; jyutping : Gwong²zau¹) is the capital and a sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Location of Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia Coordinates: , Country Province Region Lower Mainland Seat Burnaby Established 1967 Government [1]  - Board GVRD Board of Directors  - Chair Lois Jackson  - MPs List of MPs Don Bell Dawn Black Raymond Chan John Cummins Libby Davies Sukh Dhaliwal...


See also

Vancouver Portal
British Columbia Portal


Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Bryan Adams, Rock singer Pamela Anderson, Hollywood actress, sex symbol Danny Antonucci, Cartoonist, Writer Michael Bublé, crooner/pop jazz singer Douglas Coupland, author Nelly Furtado, singer William_Gibson_(novelist), cyberpunk author Kate Ground, internet model Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell and Kett Turton, Hollywood actors Kristen Kreuk, Actress, Spokesmodel Sarah McLachlan, singer...


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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Forbes magazine is an American business and financial magazine founded in 1917 by B.C. Forbes. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Forbes magazine is an American business and financial magazine founded in 1917 by B.C. Forbes. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Forbes magazine is an American business and financial magazine founded in 1917 by B.C. Forbes. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... HTML, an initialism of HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Find more about Vancouver on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
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  • Official website - City of Vancouver
  • Official Travel Information - Tourism Vancouver
  • Vancouver 2010 - Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, Official Web Site
  • Vancouver in the BC Geographical Names Information System
  • Vancouver is at coordinates 49°15′N 123°06′W / 49.25, -123.1 (Vancouver)Coordinates: 49°15′N 123°06′W / 49.25, -123.1 (Vancouver)
  • Arts and Culture - Alliance for Arts and Culture
  • Vancouver History Site - Chuck Davis
  • Vancouver travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Vancouver's Mountain Playground — Illustrated Historical Essay and movie clip (McCord Museum, Montreal)


  Results from FactBites:
 
Vancouver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6181 words)
Vancouver is adjacent to the Strait of Georgia, a body of water that is shielded from the Pacific Ocean by Vancouver Island.
Vancouver has a wet climate and is surrounded by water; while early records show that there may have been as many as fifty creeks and streams in the area, currently only four are left.
Vancouver's property-crime rate (partially a consequence of drug addiction centred in the Downtown Eastside) is particularly high; ranking among the highest rates of property crime for major cities in all of North America.
Vancouver, Washington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1522 words)
Vancouver, Washington is a city on the north shore of the Columbia River, in the state of Washington, USA.
Some residents of Vancouver jokingly refer to the city as 'The Couve' (pronounced in the same way that the second syllable in Vancouver is pronounced).
Because many Vancouver residents work in Portland, Oregon there is typically significant rush hour traffic congestion on the I-5 interstate freeway and the I-205 interstate freeway using only 2 bridges, the Interstate Bridge and the Glenn Jackson bridge, crossing the Columbia River connecting Vancouver to Portland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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