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Encyclopedia > Van Dyke Parks
Van Dyke Parks

On the cover of his 1968 debut album
Song Cycle
Background information
Born January 3, 1943 (1943-01-03) (age 65)
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
Genre(s) Americana
Occupation(s) Composer, Performer, Instrumentalist, Arranger, Producer, Lyricist
Instrument(s) Vocals, Piano, Harpsichord, Synthesizer, Accordion, Celeste, Organ
Label(s) Warner Bros., MGM
Website VanDykeParks.com

Van Dyke Parks (born January 3, 1943) is an American composer, arranger, producer, musician, singer, and actor. His work spans six decades, and he has worked with luminaries from Grace Kelly to the Beach Boys and the Byrds, and recently, Loudon Wainwright III and Joanna Newsom. From child actor to film composer, producer, and ethnomusicologist, Parks has created a distinct musical legacy and influence through his own albums, and through his work for other artists and behind the scenes in the music industry. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links SongCyclealbumcover. ... Song Cycle is an 1968 album by Van Dyke Parks, known for its high ambition, gigantic budget (it is still reputedly the most expensive album ever made allowing for inflation), and subsequent low sales. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hattiesburg is a city located in Forrest County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Americana is a loose subset of American roots music, that is perhaps best defined as classic American music—ranging in style from folk, country blues, bluegrass, alternative country, rockabilly, neotraditional and roots rock. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The performing arts include theater, motion pictures, drama, comedy, music, dance, opera, magic and the marching arts, such as brass bands, etc. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... In popular music an arrangement is a setting of a piece of music, which may have been composed by the arranger or by someone else. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... Synth redirects here. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... French type, four-octave Celesta The Celesta (IPA ) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Warner Bros. ... MGM Records was a record label started by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio in 1946, for the purpose of releasing soundtrack albums of their musical films. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Loudon Snowden Wainwright III (born September 5, 1946) is an American songwriter, folk singer, humorist, and actor. ... Joanna Newsom (born January 18, 1982) is an American harpist, pianist, harpsichordist, singer and songwriter from Nevada City, California. ... A musicologist is someone who studies musicology. ...

Contents

Early career

As a child, Parks attended the American Boychoir School. He began his career as a child actor. Between 1953 and 1958 he worked steadily in films and television, including the 1956 movie The Swan (which starred Grace Kelly). He appeared as Ezio Pinza's son Andrew Bonino on the NBC television show Bonino. Parks had a recurring role as Little Tommy Manacotti (the kid from upstairs) on Jackie Gleason's The Honeymooners. Members of the American Boychoir. ... The Swan is a 1956 remake, directed by Charles Vidor, of a 1925 movie about the daughter of a minor branch of a European royal house who is being considered as a wife for her cousin, the heir to the throne. ... Ezio Pinza The Italian bass Ezio Pinza (18 May 1892 - 9 May 1957) was one of the outstanding opera singers of the first half of the 20th century. ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... For the 2005 film, see The Honeymooners (film). ...


Parks originally studied the Clarinet, but had moved to the piano before enrolling (majoring in music) at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he studied from 1960 to 1963. In January 1963 Parks learned to play the guitar and soon relocated to Los Angeles to play with his older brother Carson Parks as The Steeltown Two (later enlarged to the steeltown three), which eventually became the folk group The Greenwood County Singers (Parks took a short hiatus from this group, moving to New England to be part of The Brandywine Singers). Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are operated by the Carnegie Institute and located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Folk song redirects here. ...


By 1964, Parks had an artist contract at MGM Records. In 1966 he was persuaded by producer Lenny Waronker to switch to Warner Bros. Records. During this time he worked frequently as a session musician, arranger and songwriter. Parks met Beach Boys leader Brian Wilson through Terry Melcher (who was then producing The Byrds). During 1966 Parks performed on The Byrds album Fifth Dimension (David Crosby later asked Parks to join the band, but Parks refused) as well as on the ill fated Beach Boys project Smile. Also during this period, Parks' compositions, such as the hit "High Coin" for Harpers Bizarre, were becoming known for their lyrical wordplay and sharp imagery. MGM Records was a record label started by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio in 1946, for the purpose of releasing soundtrack albums of their musical films. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Warner Bros. ... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... Album cover for Melchers eponymous album (1974) Terry Melcher (February 8, 1942 – November 19, 2004) was an American musician and record producer. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Fifth Dimension is the third album by The Byrds, released in the summer of 1966. ... David Van Cortlandt Crosby (born August 14, 1941) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... The Beach Boys, originally the Beech Boys, a small team of four brothers from the south of Poland, emigrated to America in the early 1950s in search of a fortune to be made in the Arizonian logging industry. When it soon became evident they had been the victims of... Smile (sometimes spelled with the idiosyncratic partial capitalization SMiLE) is an album by the Beach Boys, and perhaps the most famous unreleased rock and roll album of all time. ... Harpers Bizarre was an American pop-rock band of the 1960s, best known for their Broadway/choirboy sound and their remake of Simon & Garfunkels The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin Groovy). ...


SMiLE

In 1966 Brian Wilson commissioned Parks to write lyrics for the Beach Boys' next LP, the ambitious but ill-fated SMiLE. Parks and Wilson collaborated on songs for the album. Members of the Beach Boys strongly opposed SMiLE, notably Mike Love who negatively called Parks' lyrics "Acid Alliteration".[1] The combination of resistance from the group and their record company, and Wilson's growing mental health problems and spiraling drug use, led Parks to quit the project in early 1967. It was shelved a few months later. Several Wilson/Parks songs from the SMiLE sessions later appeared on the Beach Boys' replacement album Smiley Smile, including "Heroes and Villains" and "Wind Chimes." Other songs slated for SMiLE, including "Cabinessence" and "Surf's Up," were compiled by Carl Wilson and included on subsequent LPs. Smile (sometimes spelled with the idiosyncratic partial capitalization SMiLE) is an album by the Beach Boys, and perhaps the most famous unreleased rock and roll album of all time. ... This article is about The Beach Boys band member. ... Smiley Smile is an infamous album by The Beach Boys, issued in 1967. ... Cabinessence is a song written by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks for the American pop band The Beach Boys. ... Surfs Up is the title of a song written by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks. ... Carl Wilson on the cover of his eponymous 1981 album. ...


SMiLE acquired legendary status as one of the great lost works of the sixties. In 2004, Brian Wilson, made a surprise announcement that he was going to finish the mythical record using his current touring band. He contacted Parks, and the duo re-recorded the album. "SMiLE" won the Grammy award for the Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the piece "Mrs O'Leary's Cow" (aka "Fire"). Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


Solo music career

In 1968, Parks released his first solo album, Song Cycle, which an earlier author of this article called "a 'head trip' of orchestral textures and traditional Americana-meets-psychedelic pop song structure." Jason Ankeny has described the album as Song Cycle is an 1968 album by Van Dyke Parks, known for its high ambition, gigantic budget (it is still reputedly the most expensive album ever made allowing for inflation), and subsequent low sales. ... For other uses, see Americana (disambiguation). ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ...

an audacious and occasionally brilliant attempt to mount a fully orchestrated, classically minded work within the context of contemporary pop. As indicated by its title, Song Cycle is a thematically coherent work, one which attempts to embrace the breadth of American popular music; bluegrass, ragtime, show tunes -- nothing escapes Parks' radar, and the sheer eclecticism and individualism of his work is remarkable. ...[T]he album is both forward-thinking and backward-minded, a collision of bygone musical styles with the progressive sensibilities of the late '60s; while occasionally overambitious and at times insufferably coy, it's nevertheless a one-of-a-kind record, the product of true inspiration. [2]

Song Cycle established Parks' signature approach of mining and updating old American musical traditions, including ragtime and New Orleans-style jazz, with wry, literate and insightful lyrics, and is also notable for the inclusion of a cover of the Randy Newman song "Vine Street". Although widely praised by some critics, the album sold extremely poorly. Moreover, the album is named as #23 among the supposedly worst rock albums in the 1991 Jimmy Guterman-Owen O'Donnell book The Worst Rock 'n' Roll Records of All-Time.[3] The critical controversy may be due in part to a confusion about the category to which Parks' music belongs, for as the critic Brad Reno has declared, Parks is "an old master at landing work bearing no relation to rock music in the rock section of record stores."[4] Look up ragtime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For the boxer, see Randy Neumann. ...


Four years later, Parks' travels to the West Indies inspired his second solo album Discover America. Discover America was a rich tribute to the islands of Trinidad and Tobago and to Calypso music. Parks re-arranged and re-produced obscure songs and calypso classics. This direction was continued in the 1976 release Clang of the Yankee Reaper. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Discover America is a 1972 album by Van Dyke Parks, featuring Parks take on Calypso music (notably through the inclusion of performers The Esso Trinidad Tripoli Steelband). ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... Clang of the Yankee Reaper is a 1976 album by Van Dyke Parks, containing only one original Parks composition. ...


Parks' 1984 album Jump! featured songs adapted from the stories of Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit. The album features a Broadway-style reduced orchestra plus Americana additions like banjo, mandolin, and steel drums. Parks composed the album but did not arrange or produce it. Martin Kibbee contributes to the lyrics. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Uncle Remus was a fictional character, the title character and fictional narrator of a collection of African American folktales adapted and compiled by Joel Chandler Harris, published in book form from 1881. ... Brer Rabbit is the hero of the Uncle Remus stories derived from African-American folktales of the US South. ...


Following Jump!, in 1989 Warner Brothers released Tokyo Rose. This concept album focuses on the history of Japanese / U.S. relations from the 19th century to the "trade war" of the time of its release. The songs are pop tunes with an orchestral treatment including Japanese instruments and old Parks Caribbean favorites like steel drums. The listener journeys from old Tokyo to the Wild Wild west on songs such as "Tokyo Rose", "Cowboy", "Manzanar" and "White Chrysanthemum". The album did not sell well and was not widely critically noticed. 1989 album by American musician Van Dyke Parks. ...


In 1995 Parks teamed up again with Brian Wilson to create the album Orange Crate Art. Parks wrote all of the songs on the album, except "This Town Goes Down At Sunset" and George Gershwin instrumental "Lullaby", and the vocals were done by Brian Wilson. Orange Crate Art is a tribute to the Southern California of the early 1900s, and a lyrical tribute to the beauty of Northern California. The songs are rich and lavishly orchestrated by Parks. For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... For the use of the term orchestration in computer science, see orchestration (computers) Orchestration or arrangement is the study and practice of arranging music for an orchestra or musical ensemble. ...


1998 saw the release of Parks' first live album, Moonlighting: Live at the Ash Grove, which shows a love of the work of nineteenth century American pianist Louis Moreau Gottschalk. The live ensemble features an all-star cast including Sid Page as concertmaster. Louis Moreau Gottschalk pictured on a 1864 Publication of The Dying Poet for piano Louis Moreau Gottschalk (May 8, 1829 – December 18, 1869) was an American composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano pieces. ...


Work for other artists

Parks has produced, arranged, or played on albums by artists including Tim Buckley, U2, Silverchair, Randy Newman, Harry Nilsson, The Byrds, Cher, Rufus Wainwright, Sam Phillips, Ringo Starr, Frank Black, Keith Moon, Carly Simon, T-Bone Burnett, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Victoria Williams, Bonnie Raitt, Peter Case, Gordon Lightfoot, Fiona Apple, Sheryl Crow, Ry Cooder, Joanna Newsom, The Everly Brothers, The Thrills, Arthur Goldstein and Archie Blue, Kevin Hearn and Thin Buckle, Scissor Sisters, Laurie Anderson, The Mighty Sparrow, The Esso Trinidad Tripoli Steelband, and Susanna Hoffs/Matthew Sweet's covers collection. In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... For other persons named Tim Buckley, see Tim Buckley (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... This article is about the band. ... For the boxer, see Randy Neumann. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Rufus McGarrigle Wainwright (born July 22, 1973) is a Canadian-American singer-songwriter. ... Leslie Ann Phillips, aka Sam Phillips, (born January 28, 1962) is an American singer and a songwriter. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... For other persons named Frank Black, see Frank Black (disambiguation). ... Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ... Members of Toad the Wet Sprocket on the cover of Acoustic Dance Party. ... Victoria Williams (born December 23, 1958) is a singer/songwriter, originally from Shreveport, Louisiana but for the length of her career a resident of Southern California. ... Bonnie Raitt, (born November 8, 1949) is an American Blues-R&B singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was born in Burbank, California, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt. ... Peter Case (born April 5, 1954) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, who has had a wide-ranging career ranging from new wave music to folk rock to solo acoustic performance. ... Gordon Meredith Lightfoot Jr. ... Fiona Apple (born September 13, 1977) is a Grammy-winning American singer-songwriter. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American singer-songwriter and musician. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... Joanna Newsom (born January 18, 1982) is an American harpist, pianist, harpsichordist, singer and songwriter from Nevada City, California. ... The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel-string guitar playing and close harmony... The Thrills are an Irish indie/rock band, formed in 2001 in Dublin. ... Kevin Hearn and Thin Buckle are a Canadian band consisting of Barenaked Ladies keyboardist Kevin Hearn as the front man, and several friends and fellow bandmates from the The Look People. ... The Scissor Sisters are an American alternative band who formed in 2001. ... For the author, see Laurie Halse Anderson. ... Mighty Sparrow or Birdie (born Slinger Francisco, July 9, 1935, in Grandroy Bay, Grenada, West Indies) is a Calypso singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Susanna Hoffs of the Bangles (2003 promo photo) Susanna Lee Hoffs (born January 17, 1959) is a vocalist and rhythm guitarist for the Bangles. ... Sidney Matthew Sweet (born c. ...


In 2006 he collaborated with singer Joanna Newsom on the orchestral arrangements for her second album, Ys. He and David Mansfield are co-credited with the music for the 2006 mini-series Broken Trail. He has additionally contributed orchestrations to the Danger Mouse produced second album by UK psychedelic three piece The Shortwave Set due for release early in 2008. Joanna Newsom (born January 18, 1982) is an American harpist, pianist, harpsichordist, singer and songwriter from Nevada City, California. ... Ys is an album by Joanna Newsom. ... David Mansfield (born c. ... Broken Trail is a 2006 revisionist Western miniseries based on a true story that originally aired on American Movie Classics as their first original movie. ... This article is about the music producer. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


He also composed orchestral arrangements for the fifth Silverchair album, Young Modern, on three songs, "If You Keep Losing Sleep", "Those Thieving Birds/Strange Behavior", and "All Across The World". Johns and Parks traveled to Prague to have the orchestral arrangements recorded by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. The album's title "Young Modern" is a reference to a nickname Parks has for Silverchair frontman Daniel Johns. This follows his work on Silverchair's 4th album, Diorama, to which he contributed orchestral arrangements on "Across The Night", "Tuna In The Brine", and "Luv Your Life". This article is about the band. ... Singles from Young Modern Released: March 10, 2007 Released: July 14, 2007 Released: October 6, 2007 Young Modern is the fifth album by the Australian band Silverchair, which was released on March 31, 2007. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Czech Philharmonic Orchestra at Rudolfinum Hall in Prague The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (Česká filharmonie in Czech language) is based in Prague and is probably the most famous and most internationally respected Czech orchestra. ... Diorama is the fourth album by the Australian band Silverchair, released in 2002. ... Across The Night is the fourth single by rock band Silverchair from their fourth album, Diorama . ... Luv Your Life is a song by rock band Silverchair from their ground breaking forth album Diorama. ...


Music in film and television

Parks has also scored a number of motion pictures, including Sesame Street's Follow That Bird, Jack Nicholson's The Two Jakes and Goin' South, Casual Sex?, Private Parts, Popeye (with Harry Nilsson), and The Company. Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sesame Street presents Follow That Bird. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ... The Two Jakes is the sequel to the 1974 movie Chinatown. ... Goin South is an American western-comedy film, directed by Jack Nicholson. ... Casual Sex? is a 1988 comedy film about two female friends who go to a holiday resort in search of the perfect man. ... Private Parts, a 1997 movie about Howard Stern. ... Popeye was a 1980 live-action movie directed by Robert Altman, based on the comic strip and cartoon character Popeye the Sailor. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Company is a film about the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago. ...


Disney hired Parks to arrange Terry Gilkyson's Academy Award nominated song "The Bare Necessities" for the 1967 feature The Jungle Book. Parks had 4 songs featured in the 1986 direct-to-video Disney film, The Brave Little Toaster. He worked closely with David Newman on the film's score as well. In 1987 he provided several complete songs for the direct-to-video Disney film The Brave Little Toaster Goes to Mars. He composed the theme song for Rudy Maxa's Savvy Traveler radio program on NPR. Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Postdlf 19:23, 9 Jun 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... Embossed cover from the original MacMillan edition of The Jungle Book, 1894, based on art by John Lockwood Kipling (Rudyards father) For other uses, see The Jungle Book (disambiguation). ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... The Brave Little Toaster is an animated film from 1987, directed by Jerry Rees, written by Thomas M. Disch, and produced by Hyperion Pictures. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ...


The HBO Family series Harold and the Purple Crayon, is narrated by Sharon Stone with music and lyrics written and sung by Parks. HBO Family is a multiplex channel of HBO. HBO Family shows safe and non-violent shows and movies for familes, and especially for children. ... Harold and the Purple Crayon cover Harold and the Purple Crayon is a 1955 childrens book by Crockett Johnson. ... Sharon Vonne Stone (born March 10, 1958) is an American actress, producer, and former fashion model. ...


Parks composed the faux-psychedelic song "Black Sheep" (a parody of SMiLE and Brian Wilson's style in general) for Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, sung by John C. Reilly, who portrays the titular character. For other uses, see Smile (disambiguation). ... John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


Other career

Parks has taken small TV and film roles including appearances in Popeye, The Two Jakes, and the Twin Peaks TV series. For the hills in San Francisco, see Twin Peaks, San Francisco, California. ...


Parks wrote a series of children's books (Jump (with Malcolm Jones), Jump Again and Jump on Over), based around the Br'er rabbit tales, illustrated by Barry Moser, and loosely accompanied by Parks' own album Jump!. The books contain sheet music for selected songs from the album. Brer Rabbit is a fictional character, the hero of the Uncle Remus stories derived from African American folktales of the Southern United States. ... Barry Moser is a renowned artist, most famous as a printmaker and illustrator of numerous works of literature. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Parks set up the pioneering audio/visual department Warner Bros. records in 1971. This department was the earliest of its kind to record videos to promote records.[citation needed] “WB” redirects here. ...


New projects

Van Dyke Parks has completed work with Brian Wilson on a new narrative song cycle entitled That Lucky Old Sun (A Narrative). That Lucky Old Sun (A Narrative) is an upcoming album by musician, Brian Wilson. ...


He also contributed to the new record by The Shortwave Set, tentatively titled Replica Sun Machine, which features a 24-piece orchestra and further input from John Cale. That disc is set for release early 2008. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Not to be confused with J. J. Cale. ...


Parks worked with Inara George on a project for 2008, and they performed two songs together on 8 January 2008 at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, as part of the program Concrete Frequency: Songs of the City. Inara George is an L.A. based singer/songwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Discography

Singles

  • "Number Nine / Do What You Wanta", 1966, single 45
  • "Come to the Sunshine / Farther Along", 1966, single 45
  • "Donovan's Colours, Pt. 1 / Donovan's Colours, Pt. 2" 1968" single 45 (under the pseudonym George Washington Brown)
  • "The Eagle and Me / On The Rolling Sea When Jesus Speak to Me" 1970, single 45
  • "Occapella / Ode to Tobago" 1972, single 45

Solo Albums

Song Cycle is an 1968 album by Van Dyke Parks, known for its high ambition, gigantic budget (it is still reputedly the most expensive album ever made allowing for inflation), and subsequent low sales. ... Discover America is a 1972 album by Van Dyke Parks, featuring Parks take on Calypso music (notably through the inclusion of performers The Esso Trinidad Tripoli Steelband). ... Clang of the Yankee Reaper is a 1976 album by Van Dyke Parks, containing only one original Parks composition. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1989 album by American musician Van Dyke Parks. ...

Compilation Albums

  • Arranged and conducted three instrumental pieces on the Hal Willner-produced Lost in the Stars: The Music of Kurt Weill, 1985
  • "On the Rolling Sea When Jesus Speaks to Me" on On the Rolling Sea: A Tribute to Joseph Spence, charity tribute album 1994 (song previously released)
  • "Keep Me In Your Heart" on Enjoy Every Sandwich: Songs of Warren Zevon, tribute album 2004
  • "Greenland Whale Fisheries" on Rogue's Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys (2006)
  • "Sail Away Lady" on Hal Willner's The Harry Smith Project: Anthology of American Folk Music Revisited, tribute album 2006
  • "Yellow Magic Carnival" on a Japanese release Tribute to Haruomi Hosono, 2007
  • Ice Capades Commercials, Sire Warner Record Show, 1969

Hal Willner (born 1957, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a music producer working in recording, Films, TV and live events. ... Greenland Whale Fisheries is a traditional sea shanty. ... Haruomi Hosono (細野 晴臣 Hosono Haruomi, born July 9, 1947 in Minato, Tokyo) is a Japanese popular musician, best known internationally as a member of Yellow Magic Orchestra. ...

With Brian Wilson

For other uses, see Smile (disambiguation). ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... Smile is a solo album by Brian Wilson, with lyrics by Van Dyke Parks. ... That Lucky Old Sun (A Narrative) is an upcoming album by musician, Brian Wilson. ...

Other albums

Replica Sun Machine by The Shortwave Set with Danger Mouse and John Cale.
So Damn Happy by Loudon Wainwright III
Strange Weirdos by Loudon Wainwright III There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... So Damn Happy is the third live album by Loudon Wainwright III. It was recorded at Largo in West Hollywood, California and released in 2003. ... Loudon Snowden Wainwright III (born September 5, 1946) is an American songwriter, folk singer, humorist, and actor. ... Strange Weirdos: Music From And Inspired By The Film Knocked Up[1] is the upcoming soundtrack album to the 2007 Judd Apatow film Knocked Up. ... Loudon Snowden Wainwright III (born September 5, 1946) is an American songwriter, folk singer, humorist, and actor. ...


As Producer

  • Steve Young, Switchblade of Love
  • The Mighty Sparrow, Warner Brothers

As Arranger

  • Rufus Wainwright
  • Kristian Hoffman, &

Filmography

Goin' South (1978)


Books

  • Jump
  • Jump Again

References

  1. ^ cit. Barney Hoskyns, "All But Done." http://www.gadflyonline.com/05-06-02/ftr-hoskyns.html
  2. ^ Jason Ankeny, Review: Van Dyke Parks, "Song Cycle." AllMusic website. 3 April 2008. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:ywapqj3bojfa
  3. ^ The Worst Rock n' Roll Records of All Time: A Fan's Guide to the Stuff You Love to Hate. Jimmy Guterman and Owen O'Donnell. Secausus, NJ: Carol Publishing Group, June 1991 ISBN-10 0806512318
  4. ^ Brad Reno, "Joanna Newsom" (omnibus review). Trouser Press website. http://www.trouserpress.com/entry.php?a=joanna_newsom

Sources

  • Pirore, Dominic, SMiLE, Omnibus Press

External links

is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
TV Single Dads: Van Dyke Parks Interview (4588 words)
Van Dyke, having no money in his pocket and no experience in eating Italian food, was reluctant to try any of the meals being brought to the sizeable table.
Van Dyke - There were others - I worked with an actor named Royal Dano, it was called Elisha and the Long Knives - - it was about a boy who was captured on an Indian raid of a wagon train, and he teaches them Shakespeare.
Van Dyke felt that his memories of Bonino were a bit vague, and suggested talking to another cast member about the show.
Van Dyke Parks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1175 words)
Van Dyke Parks (born January 3, 1943) is an American composer, arranger, producer, musician, singer and actor noted for his collaborations with Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys on the song "Heroes and Villains" and the recently released cult-legend album, Smile.
He contacted Parks, the duo finished the uncompleted parts of the album, and it was then recorded by Wilson and his band and released to enormous critical acclaim, earning Wilson a Grammy award for the Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the piece "Mrs O'Leary's Cow" (aka "Fire").
Parks wrote all of the songs on the album, save "This Town Goes Down At Sunset" and George Gershwin instrumental "Lullaby", and the vocals were done by Brian Wilson.
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