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Encyclopedia > Valparaiso University
Valparaiso University

Motto: In luce tua videmus lucem
(In Thy light we see light)
Established: 1859 (details)
Type: Private, Coeducational
Endowment: $143.1 million[1]
President: Dr. Alan Harre
Faculty: 220
Students: 3,874
Undergraduates: 2,917
Postgraduates: 957
Location: Valparaiso, IN, U.S.
( 41°27′49″N, 87°02′37″W)
Campus: Suburban, 310 acres (1.25 km²)
Athletics: 18 Division I NCAA teams
Colors: Brown and Gold
           
Nickname: Crusaders
Mascot:
Affiliations: Independent Lutheran
Website: www.valpo.edu

Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in the U.S. state of Indiana. Founded in 1859, it consists of five undergraduate colleges, a graduate school, and a law school. Valparaiso University is owned and operated by the Lutheran University Association, a non-profit corporation, and is the largest independent Lutheran university in the United States. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Motto: Vale of Paradise Location in Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Porter Government  - Mayor Jon Costas (R) Area  - City  11. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... NCAA redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Brown (disambiguation). ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The Valparaiso University Crusaders are the 18 intercollegiate teams that compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations Division I. Valparaiso University competes in the Mid-Continent Conference in all sports except for football, which is not sponsored by the conference. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Nickname: Motto: Vale of Paradise Location in Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Porter Government  - Mayor Jon Costas (R) Area  - City  11. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is something other than the generation of profit. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...

Contents

History

Methodist foundation

History at a glance
Valparaiso Male and Female College Established 1859 Affiliations Methodist
Closed 1871 to 1873
Northern Indiana Normal School and Business Institute Acquired 1873 Affiliations secular
Valparaiso College Renamed 1900
Valparaiso University Renamed 1906
Acquired 1925 Affiliations Lutheran
Valparaiso Male and Female College, circa 1870 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)
Valparaiso Male and Female College, circa 1870 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)


What is now Valparaiso University was founded by the Methodist Church in 1859 as Valparaiso Male and Female College, one of the first co-educational four-year institutions in the United States. The school was forced to close in 1871, due to the fallout of the Civil War. The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Intermediate growth

The school was reopened by Henry Baker Brown two years later as the Northern Indiana Normal School and Business Institute. The school was renamed Valparaiso College in 1900 and gained its current university status when rechartered in 1906. For the next two decades, Valpo gained a national reputation as an economical institution of higher learning, earning it the positive nickname The Poor Man's Harvard. At the height of enrollment, it was the second largest school in the nation, behind only Harvard University. However, the aftermath of another conflict, World War I, took its toll, and the school was forced into bankruptcy. Harvard redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Lutheran revival

In 1923, the Ku Klux Klan assembled a bid to purchase the university.[2] They pledged to offer the university's appraised value of $175,000, expand it to the size of Purdue University, and devote the institution to the instilling of Americanism.[3] However, in 1925 the Lutheran University Association outbid the Klan for the school's ownership. The association was a group of clergy and church laity that saw promise in the school and wished to create an academic institution not controlled by any church denomination. Valparaiso is still operated by the Lutheran University Association, and remains an independent Lutheran institution which enjoys close relations with the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Purdue redirects here. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... LCMS redirects here. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a North American religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. ...


Student activism

As a liberal arts institution, Valparaiso University has a detailed history of student activism. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ...


Kinsey Hall fire

While many colleges either amended or cancelled the remainder of the 1969-1970 school year following the Kent State shootings due to unrest, the Valparaiso administration ignored student calls for a series of seminars and forums about violence at other campuses. A large group of students then organized a protest march from the campus Victory Bell to the Porter County courthouse. Continued protests led to discussions between the administration and student leaders. When these talks failed, a group of still-unidentified students set fire to the empty Kinsey Hall administrative building in the early morning. The aftermath of the fire left Kinsey Hall destroyed. The Kent State shootings, also known as the May 4 massacre or Kent State massacre,[2][3][4] occurred at Kent State University in the city of Kent, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by members of the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4, 1970. ... Porter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


Burning of the shanty

During the 1988-89 school year, a mock shanty town was erected on campus to show solidarity with victims of apartheid in South Africa. Mike Weber and Phil Churilla, two columnists for VU's student newspaper The Torch, wrote a column critical of the protest due to student use of portable CD players, wool blankets and packaged food in the shanties. A few days later the shanty town burned down and a culprit was never found. Joe Slovo shanty town in Langa on the Cape Flats simmers after a fire (Cape Town, South Africa) Shanty town near Tijuana, Mexico. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...


Valparaiso University Police Department

For campus security, Valparaiso University employs a police department with academy trained and certified officers that sometimes assist other local law enforcement as a result of reciprocal agreements. Valpo has long been a dry campus,[4] but enforcement was raised dramatically in recent years,[5] and in the spring of 2006, the VUPD began considering placing officers on the campus escort vans in an attempt to curb underage drinking. Days later a city police officer entered the Sigma Pi fraternity house with his gun drawn, believing he had witnessed drug use through a window.[6] Though university officers only responded to the scene later, these incidents strained student-police relations further, prompting mass resignations of student drivers from the escort service and a protest of over 500 students. [7] The protests centered around the VUPD's increased focus on alcohol consumption and new placement of police officers with student escort services. University police (or campus police) in the United States are sworn police officers employed by a college or university to protect the campus and surrounding areas and the people who live on, work on and visit it. ... Dry campus is the term used for the banning of alcohol at colleges and universities, no matter if the student who possesses the alcohol is above the legal age to consume it elsewhere. ...


Campus

Heritage Hall, Valparaiso University, 1905 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)
Heritage Hall, Valparaiso University, 1905 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)

Location

Valparaiso is located an hour southeast of Chicago, and sponsors numerous events in the metropolitan area. It is also 15 miles south of Lake Michigan and the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The 310-acre campus as well as its main entrance are located off U.S. Highway 30 on the south side of the city and is the site of over sixty buildings and a number of academic resources. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, a U.S. national lakeshore authorized by Congress in 1966, is located in Northwest Indiana. ... United States Highway 30 is an east-west United States highway that traverses the United States. ...


Old Campus

Old College Building, Valparaiso University, circa 1918 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)
Old College Building, Valparaiso University, circa 1918 (Photograph courtesy of the S. Shook Collection)

The Old Campus of Valparaiso University is both adjacent to and a part of the historic downtown district of the city. Old Campus is the site of the School of Law, which is made up of Wesemann Hall and Heritage Hall. Heritage is the oldest remaining building on the campus, and was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. The school's fraternities, the Martin Luther King Cultural Center, and the Kade-Duesenberg German House and Cultural Center are all also located here. The Valparaiso University School of Law (known colloquially as Valpo Law) is located on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Heritage Hall is the oldest building on the campus of Valparaiso University in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


New Campus

The city and the University have grown together over a century and a half. Beginning in the 1950s, the school expanded eastward to occupy what is now known as New Campus. It is part time home to thousands of students living in nine residence halls. The campus is not laid out in a vehicular grid as the rest of the city, but as a pedestrian campus of winding walkways and distinctly landscaped areas. At the center of campus is the Chapel of the Resurrection, a 98-foot high building which is the home of Valparaiso University's many worship services and convocations. Built on the highest elevation of land on the university's campus, it has been a Northwest Indiana landmark since 1959. The Neils Science Center was erected in 1974 and includes an astronomical observatory, greenhouse, and a sub-critical nuclear reactor which helped the facility receive an Atomic Energy Commission citation as a model undergraduate physics laboratory. The newly built Christopher Center Library houses over 350,000 books and numerous video and audio resources. The Valparaiso University Center for the Arts (VUCA) offers multiple performance facilities, which are most notably used by students to produce full scale theatrical performances every year. The performances and exhibits in the Center for the Arts are always open to the public, and the Center houses the nationally renowned Brauer Museum of Art. The school also hosts WVUR-FM, the university's student-run radio station. The new Kallay-Christopher Hall, adjoined to the Schnabel Hall communication building, is home to the Department of Geography and Meteorology. As of the summer of 2006, it has an observation deck and large weather lab facilities, and plans to complete installation of a Doppler weather radar by January 2007. The radar is currently operational. The School of Engineering has both a 16-inch computerized reflecting telescope to aid in NASA research and VisBox-X2, a virtual reality system used to immerse students in a visualized three dimensional image. The School of Nursing uses SIMMAN, a robotic patient simulator used to train students in real life treatment. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The Chapel of the Resurrection is the centerpiece structure on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Northwest Indiana, also known as The Calumet Region, or just The Region, is comprised of Lake, Porter, LaPorte, Newton, and Jasper counties in Indiana. ... The Christopher Center for Library and Information Resources is the newly constructed library on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... The Brauer Museum of Art is home to a nationally recognized collection of 19th- and 20th-century American art, world religious art, and Midwestern regional art. ... WVUR (The Source 95) is the student-run radio station of Valparaiso University. ... A source of waves moving to the left. ... Weather radar in Norman, Oklahoma with rainshaft (Source: NOAA) Environment Canada King City (CWKR) weather radar station. ... 24 inch convertible Newtonian/Cassegrain reflecting telescope on display at the Franklin Institute. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... This article is about the simulation technology. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ...


Improvement

Building projects at Valparaiso University are funded entirely by donation. No student tuition dollars are used, which helps keep the school a highly rated value school. The university also receives no support for operation from the state or federal government.


The most notable construction project on campus is the construction of the 202,000 sq ft, $74 million new student Union, named in honor of University President Alan F. Harre, who is retiring in June 2008. It is more than 2/3 complete as of Spring 2008, with most of the exterior complete. It is anticipated to open during the 2008-2009 academic year, just in time for the university's 150th anniversary. The new union will be more than 3 times the size of the current union, and will consolidate all dining services on campus. It will have room for an ever growing number of student organizations, as well as a new bookstore, lounge areas, student mailboxes for every student on campus, entertainment areas, a large ballroom (capable of seating 500 for a dinner or 1000 for an auditorium setting), a career center, and an outdoor terrace overlooking the Chapel. The design architect is Sasaki Associates, Inc. and the architect of record is Design Organization. Mortenson Co. is the construction manager.


Along with the new Union, other construction projects have dominated the Valparaiso University landscape. Recently completed was a new Tennis Complex and a Parking Ramp for approximately 400 vehicles. New water and sewer lines, as well as a new duct bank for fiber optic cable and telecommunication lines was completed.


Furthermore, plans are being made to expand upon the south end of the Gellersen Hall, where the College of Engineering is located. However, nothing has yet been finalized.


Academics

Organization

Fireworks by the Chapel of the Resurrection during Homecoming Weekend, September 2007
Fireworks by the Chapel of the Resurrection during Homecoming Weekend, September 2007

Undergraduate

Valpo is organized into five undergraduate colleges:

College of Arts and Sciences
College of Business Administration
College of Engineering
College of Nursing
Christ College
The Christ College was chartered by President O.P. Kretzmann in 1967 as the honor college of Valparaiso University. Centered in Mueller Hall, it is the successor to the Directed Studies Program, which was established to better serve the influx of gifted students to the institution. Roughly 80 students, or ten percent of the class, are admitted each year. Along with concurrent enrollment in a fundamental college, the discourse provides immersion in the fields of history, literature, art, music, philosophy, religion and social science. A student steering committee composed of upperclassmen guides the development of the program and a multitude of annual events. The Student Scholarship Symposium features diverse, student selected research projects delivered in a critical and interactive environment. Students complete their study with either a major or minor in humanities to complement that received in their main field of study.

Areas of Studies-Majors, Minors, & Other Academic Programs For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ...

Accounting
Actuarial Science
American Indian Studies
American Studies
Applied Statistics
Art
Astronomy
Biology
Biochemistry
Biomedical Engineering
Business Administration
Business(Liberal Arts)
Chemistry
Chinese
Chinese & Japanese Studies
Civil Engineering
Classics(classical language and literature,
classic civilization)
Communication Law
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Criminology
Digital Systems Design
Economics
Economics & Computer Analysis
Electrical Engineering
Electronics
Elementary Education
Engineering
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Exercise Science
Film Studies
Finance
French
Gender Studies
Geography
Geology
German
Hebrew
History
Honors
Human Aging
Information & Decision Sciences
International Economics & Cultural Affairs
International Business
International Service
Japanese
Latin
Management
Manufacturing Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Mechanics and Materials
Meteorology
Middle Level Education
Modern European Studies
Music
Music Education
New Media-Journalism
Nursing
Peace & Social Justice Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Communication
Political Science
Pre-Law
Pre-Med
Pre-Seminary
Preparation for Secondary Education Certification
Professional Chemistry
Psychology
Public and Corporate Communication
Public Speaking & Debate
Public Relations
Secondary Education Certification
Special Education
Social Work
Sociology
Spanish
Television-Radio
Theatre
Theatre Design
Theatre Production
Theology
Undecided
Urban Studies
Writing
Youth, Family, & Education Ministry

Graduate Division

Masters Programs

Business
Master of Business Administration
Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Nursing
Master of Engineering Management
JD(Law)/Master of Business Administration
Chinese Studies
MA in Chinese Studies
MA in Chinese Studies-Specialized track for K-12 Teachers
JD(Law)/MA in Chinese Studies
Education
MED in Initial Licensure
MED in Initial Licensure(LEAPs Program)
MED in Teaching and Learning
MED/Education Specialist in School Psychology
English Studies & Communication
MA in English Studies & Communication
Information Technology
MS in Information Technology
International Commerce & Policy
MS in International Commerce & Policy
JD(Law)/MS in International Commerce & Policy
Liberal Studies
MALS in Deaconess
MALS in English
MALS in Ethics & Values
MALS in Gerontology
MALS in History
MALS in Human Behavior and Society
MALS in Individualized
MALS in Theology, Theology & Ministry
JD(Law)/MALS
Nursing
MS in Nursing
Psychology/Counseling
MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
MA in Community Counseling
MED/Education Specialist in School Psychology
JD(Law)/Clinical Mental Health Counseling
JD(Law)/Psychology
Sports Administration
MS in Sports Administration
JD(Law)/Sports Administration

School of Law

The Valparaiso University School of Law (known colloquially as Valpo Law) is located on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ...

College of Adult Scholars

The College of Adult Scholars is a unique program geared toward non-traditional students. Through it, adult students can pursue degrees, certificates, or further training and specialization in other areas.


Reputation

U.S. News & World Report named Valparaiso University as #3 in the Universities-Master's category for the Midwest in its annual rankings of "America's Best Colleges."[8] It also ranked Valparaiso among the "Best College Values" based on a ratio of price to quality, and placed the College of Engineering in the nation's top 25 undergraduate-only engineering schools.[9] Over ninety-five percent of graduates secure employment or further education (twenty-three percent) within six months. More than ninety percent of students receive financial aid totaling over fifty-two million dollars annually. Charity Navigator also gave the institution four out of four stars based on its organizational efficiency and capacity.[10] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Charity Navigator is an independent, non-profit organization that evaluates American charities. ...


Faculty

Valparaiso University faculty work with governments, communities, colleagues, and students. Ninety percent of the faculty members hold a doctorate or the highest degree in their field. Valparaiso is a teaching school where each professor lectures and every class is led by a professor. Thus, there are very few teaching assistants at Valpo and in nearly every class professors are on a first name basis with their students. The student-to-faculty ratio is 13 to 1, and there is an average of 22 students per class. A teaching assistant (TA) is a junior scholar employed on a temporary contract by a college or university for the purpose of assisting a professor by teaching students in recitation or discussion sessions, holding office hours, grading homework or exams, supervising labs (in science and engineering courses), and other duties. ...


Culture

Valparaiso is a growing school that works to uphold the benefits of an intimate education. Most first-year undergraduate students take a year of Core, a common interdisciplinary course rooted in liberal arts and focused on the understanding the purpose and fulfillment of human life. About a tenth of incoming freshman alternatively participate in the freshman program of Christ College, Valparaiso University's honor college. Students are also subject to an honor system originally implemented by the students themselves in 1943 which remains in effect today. The school also puts a heavy focus on diversity. Each January, the school holds a weekend of Martin Luther King, Jr. events as its major annual event, as well as offering study-abroad programs in fourteen nations including sites in Cambridge, England (Anglia Ruskin University), Osaka, Japan, Reutlingen, Germany, Puebla, Mexico, Namibia and Hangzhou, China (Zhejiang University). The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia Universitys Columbia College. ... An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Anglia Ruskin University, formerly Anglia Polytechnic, is a university in England, with campuses in Cambridge and Chelmsford. ... For other uses, see Osaka (disambiguation). ... Reutlingen is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Nickname: Location of Puebla in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico State Puebla Founded 1531 Government  - Mayor Enrique Doger (PRI) Area  - City 546 km²  (211 sq mi) Elevation 2,175 m (7,136 ft) Population (2005)  - City 1,485,941  - Density 5,741/km² (14,869. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Hangchow) is a sub-provincial city located in the Yangtze River Delta in the Peoples Republic of China, and the capital of Zhejiang province. ... Zhejiang University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China. ...


Students

Profile

Valparaiso University students are some of the most geographically diverse in the nation. Of the 4,000 students, only one-third are from the school's home state of Indiana. The remaining two-thirds come from almost every other state of the United States and over 40 foreign countries. Over two-thirds graduate in the top quarter of their high school class and nearly ninety percent return to Valparaiso after their freshman year. Annually, more than 26 million dollars are awarded by the university to over eighty percent of the student body, which is admitted based on factors such as community involvement, interests, recommendations, and personality as well as grade point average, class ranking, and standardized test scores. For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Community

Sixty-four percent of Valparaiso University students live on the school's city campus, mainly because University regulations require almost all students who do not have senior status to live in dorms. Forty percent of students are Lutheran, but over twenty percent are Catholic and seventy-five percent participate in faith-related activities. Valpo supports over 100 student administered organizations, clubs, and activities. Fifty percent of students participate in intramural athletics, and over 1,000 students give over 45,000 hours of community service to the region annually. The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ... Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ...


Greek life

More than thirty percent of Valpo students are members of one of the school's nine national fraternities or seven national sororities. The entire Greek Life community is coordinated by the fraternities' Interfraternity Council and sororities in the Panhellenic Council. Valparaiso also hosts chapters of all major honors fraternities. Many of the fraternities were local until the 1950s when they were accepted as chapters into national and international fraternities. However, the sororities were local and had no national affiliation until 1998. While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words frater and soror, meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, or the Shriners. ...

Fraternities Sororities Honor Societies

                Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America having initiated more than 235,000 members[1] and held chapters at more than 190 universities[2]. It was founded by Warren A. Cole, while he was a student at Boston... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... The ΦΜΑ Sinfonia (usually referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity or Sig Tau is a U.S. all-male college social fraternity founded on June 28, 1920 at University of Central Missouri (then known as Central Missouri State Teachers College). ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ...

                Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Xi Phi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) was the first sorority founded at the State Female Normal School (now Longwood University), in Farmville, Virginia. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ...

The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Phi Alpha Theta is an American honor society for undergraduate students, graduate students, and professors of history. ... GTU Key Gamma Theta Upsilon (GTU) is an international honor society in geography. ... Lambda Pi Eta is the official communication studies honor society of the National Communication Association (NCA). ... // Pi Sigma Alpha (Π Σ Α), National Political Science Honor Society, was founded in 1920 at the University of Texas for the purpose of bringing together students and faculty interested in the study of government and politics. ... Sigma Theta Tau is the international nursing honor society. ... Sigma Tau Delta is an international honor society for collegiate students of English. ... The bent at Iowa Alpha (Iowa State University) Tau Beta Pi (ΤΒΠ or TBP) is the national engineering honor society in the United States and the second oldest collegiate honor society in the US. It honors students who have shown a history of academic achievement as well as a commitment to... Alpha Lambda Delta is an honor society for students who have achieved a 3. ... Chi Epsilon Pi, often denoted XEP, is a national honor society for outstanding students in the field of meteorology/atmospheric sciences. ... Eta Sigma Phi (ΗΣΦ) (ESP) is a College honor society which grew out of a local undergraduate classical club founded by a group of students in the Department of Greek at the University of Chicago in 1914. ...

Athletics

Main article: Valparaiso Crusaders

Valpo's colors are brown and gold and the school's mascot is the Crusader. Most athletic events are held in the Athletics-Recreation Center (ARC), which is the primary sporting facility on campus. Valparaiso's eighteen teams and nearly 600 student athletes participate in NCAA Division I (I-AA for football) in the Horizon League, except for football, in which they compete in the Pioneer Football League (the Horizon League does not sponsor football) and play at Brown Field. The school is known for its well rounded athletes as 98% successfully graduate, which ties Valparaiso with the University of Notre Dame for the third highest graduation rate in the country.[1] Valpo is well-known for its men's basketball head coach Homer Drew and his son Bryce Drew, who led the team to its improbable Sweet Sixteen appearance in the 1998 NCAA basketball tournament by making "The Shot", a three-point shot as time expired to beat favored Ole Miss by one point. Bryce Drew is now the team's associate coach. The Valparaiso University Crusaders are the 18 intercollegiate teams that compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations Division I. Valparaiso University competes in the Mid-Continent Conference in all sports except for football, which is not sponsored by the conference. ... For other uses, see Brown (disambiguation). ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Athletics-Recreation Center is a 5,000 -seat multi-purpose arena in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... NCAA redirects here. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... The Pioneer Football League is a college athletic conference which operates literally from coast to coast in the United States. ... Brown Field is a 5,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Homer Drew Homer Drew is the head coach of the Valparaiso University Crusader mens basketball team. ... Bryce Drew Bryce Homer Drew (born September 21, 1974 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is the assistant coach, and former member, of the Valparaiso University Crusader mens basketball team. ... // Stock car racing: Dale Earnhardt won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Jeff Gordon NASCAR celebrates its 50th anniversary Indy Racing League - Indianapolis 500 - Eddie Cheever CART Racing - Alex Zanardi won the season championship Formula One Championship - Mika Häkkinen of Finland 24 hours of Le Mans: won by the team... Bryce Drew hitting The Shot For supporters of Valparaiso University in Indiana, USA, The Shot refers to a play that happened in the first round of the 1998 NCAA Tournament. ... The Lyceum The University of Mississippi (also known as Ole Miss) is public, coeducational research university located near Oxford, Mississippi. ...


Notable faculty

Current faculty members

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Notable alumni

Over 50,000 alumni currently serve in their respective fields across the world. An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ...

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References

  1. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2006-11-25.
  2. ^ The Ku Klux Klan’s invasion of Indiana in the 1920s. The Rochester Sentinel. Retrieved on 2006-01-25.
  3. ^ http://www.lowellpl.lib.in.us/kuklux.htm
  4. ^ Student Guide to University Life
  5. ^ Valparaiso University Police Department
  6. ^ VU fraternity house incident outrages students / nwi.com
  7. ^ http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/news/local/14443307.htm
  8. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2006-09-12.
  9. ^ Magazine again cites Valpo for excellence, value. Valparaiso University. Retrieved on 2006-05-01.
  10. ^ Valparaiso University. Charity Navigator. Retrieved on 2007-06-02.

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External links

  • Valparaiso University website
  • Official VU Athletics Website
  • Campus maps, directions, and virtual tour
  • Admissions
  • Alumni Association
  • Valparaiso University News and Events
The Valparaiso University School of Law (known colloquially as Valpo Law) is located on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... The Chapel of the Resurrection is the centerpiece structure on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... The Christopher Center for Library and Information Resources is the newly constructed library on the campus of Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Heritage Hall is the oldest building on the campus of Valparaiso University in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The Brauer Museum of Art is home to a nationally recognized collection of 19th- and 20th-century American art, world religious art, and Midwestern regional art. ... WVUR (The Source 95) is the student-run radio station of Valparaiso University. ... The Valparaiso University Crusaders are the 18 intercollegiate teams that compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations Division I. Valparaiso University competes in the Mid-Continent Conference in all sports except for football, which is not sponsored by the conference. ... Brown Field is a 5,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Athletics-Recreation Center is a 5,000 -seat multi-purpose arena in Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Bryce Drew hitting The Shot For supporters of Valparaiso University in Indiana, USA, The Shot refers to a play that happened in the first round of the 1998 NCAA Tournament. ... The Midwestern Undergraduate Private Engineering Colleges (MUPEC) constitute a group of 11 universities. ... Cedarville University is a private, nonprofit university sited on a 400-acre campus in Cedarville, Ohio in the United States. ... Indiana Institute of Technology The Indiana Institute of Technology (Indiana Tech) is a small, private college located in Fort Wayne, Indiana. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
College Profiles - Valparaiso University (1384 words)
Valparaiso University has a long tradition of combining professional colleges and vocational programs with a strong commitment to the values and broadening experiences of the liberal arts.
Valparaiso University is a residential community in which activities outside the classroom form an important part of campus life; more than 85 percent of its students live on campus.
Valparaiso operates on the semester system; the fall semester begins in late August and ends before Christmas, and the spring semester starts in early January and ends during the second week in May. VU also has two summer terms that further extend opportunities for study on campus or at various off-campus locations.
Valparaiso University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1380 words)
Valparaiso University is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in Northwest Indiana.
Valparaiso University's campus security is interesting in that it has a police force that is a fully functional and recognized police department.
Valparaiso University has a long history as a dry campus [1], but has seen a large increase in VUPD's focus on this aspect of student life recently as noted by a 54% increase in alcohol-related arrests (from 35 in 2002 to 54 in 2004) in just two years [2].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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