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Encyclopedia > Valkyrie
The Valkyrie's Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. Hughes down-plays the warrior aspect of the valkyrie, depicting instead a beautiful young woman in an ethereal dress. Her armor and weapons are present, but set aside and unused.
The Valkyrie's Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. Hughes down-plays the warrior aspect of the valkyrie, depicting instead a beautiful young woman in an ethereal dress. Her armor and weapons are present, but set aside and unused.

In Norse mythology the valkyries are dísir, minor female deities, who served Odin. The valkyries' purpose was to choose the most heroic of those who had died in battle and to carry them off to Valhalla where they became einherjar. This was necessary because Odin needed warriors to fight at his side at the preordained battle at the end of the world, Ragnarök. In Valhalla the valkyries also “serve drink and look after the tableware and drinking vessels” (Prose Edda Gylfaginning 36). Image File history File links The_Valkyrie's_Vigil. ... Image File history File links The_Valkyrie's_Vigil. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... Edward Robert Hughes (1851-1914) is a well known Pre-Raphaelite English painter. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Norse mythology, the dísir (sing. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... “Valhall” redirects here. ... In Norse religion the einherjar or einheriar were spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... Odin is depicted falling with his spear Gungnir while Surtr brandishes his sword. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ...


In Gylfaginning of the Prose Edda and the poem Grimnismál of the Poetic Edda, it is said that Freyja receives half of the slain heroes in her hall Fólkvangr, however there is no descriptions about life at Fólkvangr. Freyja is also called Vanadís, which suggests that she is related to the dísir. External links Original text English text Categories: Mythology stubs | Medieval literature | Sagas of Iceland | Norse mythology | Nordic folklore ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... The Grimnismál, also known as The Ballad of Grimnir, is an Old Norse poem in the Codex Regius, which is part of the Elder Edda. ... Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... In Norse mythology, Fólkvangr (folk-plain or host-plain) was the dwelling of Freya (Freyja) in Asgard (Ásgarðr), the world of the Æsir, where stood Sessrúmnir, her hall. ... In Norse mythology, Fólkvangr (folk-plain or host-plain) was the dwelling of Freya (Freyja) in Asgard (Ásgarðr), the world of the Æsir, where stood Sessrúmnir, her hall. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... In Norse mythology, the dísir (sing. ...


It appears, however, that there was no clear distinction between the valkyries and the norns. Skuld is for instance both a valkyrie and a norn, and in the Darraðarljóð (lines 1-52), the valkyries weave the web of war (see below). According to the Prose Edda (Gylfaginning 36), “Odin sends [the valkyries] to every battle. They allot death to men and govern victory. Gunnr and Róta [two valkyries] and the youngest norn, called Skuld, always ride to choose who shall be slain and to govern the killings”. The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... In Norse mythology, Skuld was one of the Norns, and she was also one of the Valkyries. ... Darraðarljóð is a skaldic poem in Old Norse found in Njáls saga Chap. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ...


Moreover, artistic licence permitted the name Valkyrie to be used for mortal women in Old Norse poetry, or to quote Snorri Sturluson's Skáldskaparmál on the various names used for women: The Death of General Wolfe (Benjamin West. ... Old Norse poetry encompasses a range of verse forms written in a number of Nordic languages, embraced by the term Old Norse, during the period from the 8th century to as late as the far end of the 13th century. ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ...

Woman is also metaphorically called by the names of the Asynjur or the Valkyrs or Norns or women of supernatural kind.[1]

Contents

The Aesir (Old Norse sir, singular ss, feminine synja, feminine plural synjur) are the principal pantheon of gods in Norse mythology. ...

Depictions

In modern art, the valkyries are sometimes depicted as beautiful shieldmaidens on winged horses, armed with helmets and spears. However, valkyrie horse was a kenning for wolf (see Rök Stone), so contrary to the stereotype, they did not ride winged horses. Their mounts were rather the packs of wolves that frequented the corpses of dead warriors. They were gruesome and war-like. Hervor dying after the battle with the Huns. ... Winged equines are popular legendary creatures, especially in the fantasy genre. ... In literature, a kenning is a compound poetic phrase, a figure of speech, substituted for the usual name of a person or thing. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... A black-and-white rendition of the text on one side of the Rök Stone. ...


Whereas the wolf was the valkyrie's mount, the valkyrie herself appears to be akin to the raven, flying over the battlefield and "choosing" corpses[2]. Thus, the packs of wolves and ravens that scavenged the aftermath of battles may have been seen as serving a higher purpose. Species See text. ...


According to Thomas Bulfinch's highly influential work Bulfinch's Mythology (1855), the armour of the valkyries "sheds a strange flickering light, which flashes up over the northern skies, making what men call the 'Aurora Borealis', or 'Northern Lights'.[3]" However, there is nothing in our sources which supports this claim[4], except for the arrival of the the Valkyries in Helgakviða Hundingsbana I: Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. ... Helgis army departs to fight for Sigrún. ...

15. Þá brá ljóma
af Logafjöllum,
en af þeim ljómum
leiftrir kómu,
-- -- --
-- -- --
hávar und hjalmum
á Himinvanga,
brynjur váru þeira
blóði stokknar,
en af geirum
geislar stóðu.[5]
15. Then glittered light
from Logafjoll,
And from the light
the flashes leaped;
-
-
High under helms
on heaven's field;
Their byrnies all
with blood were red,
And from their spears
the sparks flew forth.[6]
15. Then gleamed a ray
from Logafiöll,
and from that ray
lightnings issued;
then appeared,
in the field of air,
a helmed band
of Valkyriur:
their corslets were
with blood besprinkled,
and from their spears
shone beams of light.[7]

Origins

The origin of the valkyries as a whole is not reported in extant texts, but many of the well known valkyries are reported as having mortal parents. It is now believed that the original valkyries were the priestesses of Odin who officiated at sacrificial rites in which prisoners were executed (“given to Odin”). These priestesses sometimes carried out the sacrifices themselves, which involved the use of a ritual spear. By the time the Poetic Edda came to be compiled in the late 12th or early 13th century, these rituals had given rise to legends of supernatural battle-maidens who took an active part in human conflict, deciding who should live and who should die (Davidson 1964). For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda the valkyries are supernatural deities of unknown parentage; they are described as battle-maidens who ride in the ranks of the gods or serve the drinks in Valhalla; they are invariably given unworldly names like Skǫgul (“Raging”), Hlǫkk (“Shrieking”) and Gjǫll (“Screaming”). Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In the Heroic lays, however, the valkyries are described as bands of warrior-women only the leader of whom is ever named. She is invariably a human woman, the beautiful daughter of a great king, though she shares some of the supernatural abilities of her anonymous companions. In the first of the three Helgi Lays, Helgi Hjörvarðsson is accosted by a band of nine valkyries the leader of whom, Svava, is the daughter of a king called Eylimi. In the second and third lays, the valkyries are led by Sigrun, who is the daughter of King Hogni; she marries the hero Helgi Hundingsbani and bears him sons. The most famous of the valkyries, Brynhildr, is also a human princess. In the Sigrdrífumál (The Ballad of the Victory-Bringer) she is never named, being called simply Sigrdrífa (“Victory-Bringer”), and there are only hints that she is not a deity; what's more, we are told nothing of her parentage. In the corresponding passage in the Volsunga saga, however, she is identified as Brynhildr, the daughter of King Budli. (Sigrdrífa is also identified with Brynhildr in another heroic lay, Helreið Brynhildar, or Bryndhildr's Ride to Hel.) Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Helgakviða Hjörvarðssonar (Lay of Helgi Hjörvarðsson) is an Eddic poem, found in the Codex Regius manuscript where it follows Helgakviða Hundingsbana I and precedes Helgakviða Hundingsbana II. The portion of text which constitutes the poem is unnamed in the manuscript and may never... Helgi Hundingsbane/Hundingsbani was a hero in the Norse sagas. ... Sigurd and Brynhilds funeral In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... Budli is the name of one or two legendary kings from the Scandinavian Legendary sagas. ... Sigurd and Brynhilds funeral In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ...


Etymology

The word "valkyrie" comes from the Old Norse valkyrja (plural "valkyrur"), from the words "val" (slain) and "kyrja" (choose). Literally the term means choosers of the slain. It is cognate to the Old English "wælcyrige". The German form "Walküre" was coined by Richard Wagner from Old Norse.[8] Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ...


Notable valkyries

Various individual valkyries are mentioned in numerous forms of Germanic literature.


Major valkyries

Several valkyries appear as major characters in extant myths.

  • Brynhildr appears in the Völsunga saga. Her name means "Byrnie of battle."
  • Hildr appears in the legend of the Hjaðningavíg, which has survived in several sources. Her name means "Battle."
  • Sigrdrífa appears in Sigrdrífumál. Her name means "She who Drives Victory."
  • Sigrún appears in Helgakviða Hundingsbana I and Helgakviða Hundingsbana II. Her name means "Knower of Mysteries (or spells) of Victory."
  • Sváva appears in Helgakviða Hjörvarðssonar. Her name means "Suebian".
  • Ölrún, Svanhvít, and Alvitr appear in Völundarkviða. "Ölrún" means "Knower of the Mysteries (or spells) of Ale."
  • Þrúðr is a daughter of Thor. Her name means "strength".

Other sources indicate that some other valkyries were notable characters in Norse mythology, such as Gunnr who appears on the Rök Runestone, and Skögul who still appeared on a runic inscription in 13th century Bergen. Sigurd and Brynhilds funeral In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. ... The Ramsund carving depicting the Saga of the Völsungs The Volsunga saga is a late 13th century Icelandic prose rendition of the story of Sigurd and Brynhild, and the destruction of the Burgundians. ... In Norse mythology, Hildr was one of the Valkyries. ... A detail from the Stora Hammar stone, an image stone on Gotland Hjaðningavíg (the battle of the Heodenings[1]), the legend of Heðinn and Högni or the Saga of Hild is a Scandinavian legend from Norse mythology about a never-ending battle which is documented in... Sigrdrífa gives Sigurðr a horn to drink from. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In Norse mythology, Sigrún was a valkyrie. ... Helgis army departs to fight for Sigrún. ... Helgi returns to Valhalla Helgi Hundingsbane was a hero in the Norse sagas, who appears in the Volsunga saga and in two lays in the Poetic Edda named Helgakviða Hundingsbana I and II. // Earning his name and meeting a Valkyrie He appears to be the son of Sigmund and... In Norse mythology, Sváva was a valkyrie. ... Helgakviða Hjörvarðssonar (Lay of Helgi Hjörvarðsson) is an Eddic poem, found in the Codex Regius manuscript where it follows Helgakviða Hundingsbana I and precedes Helgakviða Hundingsbana II. The portion of text which constitutes the poem is unnamed in the manuscript and may never... Suebi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Old Norse Ölrún, Old High German Ailrun, Modern German Alruna, Alraune is a Germanic female personal name, from Proto Germanic *aliruna, from ali- strange and runa secret. In German, Alruna was also used as a short form of Adelruna, a different name with a first element *athal- noble. In... Völundr and his brothers marry valkyries who dress in swan skins. ... In Norse mythology, Þrúðr was the daughter of Thor and Sif. ... Thors battle against the giants, by MÃ¥rten Eskil Winge, 1872 Thor (Old Norse: Þórr) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder and war in Norse Mythology and more generally Germanic mythology (Old English: Þunor, Old Dutch and Old High German: Donar, from Proto-Germanic *Þunraz). ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Norse mythology, Gunnr or Guðr is one of the valkyries. ... A black-and-white rendition of the text on one side of the Rök Stone. ... In Norse mythology, Skögul or Geirskögul is one of the valkyries. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... County Hordaland District Midhordland Municipality NO-1201 Administrative centre Bergen Mayor (2004) Herman Friele (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 215 465 km² 445 km² 0. ...


Other valkyries

Apart from the well known valkyries above, many more valkyrie names occur in our sources. In the nafnaþulur addition to Snorri's Edda the following strophes are found. Nafnaþulur is a listing of various categories, such as gods, giants, people and objects, in Snorri Sturlussons Prose Edda. ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... The Edda are collections of poetically narrated folk-tales relating to Norse Mythology or Norse heroes. ...

Valkyrie from 1971 by Russian artist Konstantin Vasiliev
Valkyrie from 1971 by Russian artist Konstantin Vasiliev
A statue from 1908 by Stephan Sinding located in Copenhagen, presents an active image of a valkyrie.
The inclination towards romantic depictions of valkyries is evident in Valkyries by Peter Nicolai Arbo, 1869.
Mank valkyrjur
Viðris nefna.
Hrist, Mist, Herja,
Hlökk, Geiravör,
Göll, Hjörþrimul,
Gunnr, Herfjötur,
Skuld, Geirönul,
Skögul ok Randgníð.
Ráðgríðr, Göndul,
Svipul, Geirskögul,
Hildr ok Skeggöld,
Hrund, Geirdriful,
Randgríðr ok Þrúðr,
Reginleif ok Sveið,
Þögn, Hjalmþrimul,
Þrima ok Skalmöld.
I will recite the names
of the valkyries of Viðrir (Odin).
Hrist, Mist, Herja,
Hlökk, Geiravör
Göll, Hjörþrimul
Gunnr, Herfjötur
Skuld, Geirönul
Skögul and Randgníð.
Ráðgríðr, Göndul,
Svipul, Geirskögul,
Hildr and Skeggöld,
Hrund, Geirdriful,
Randgríðr and Þrúðr,
Reginleif and Sveið,
Þögn, Hjalmþrimul,
Þrima and Skalmöld.

In Grímnismál we have Odin reciting the following stanza. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Konstantín Alekséevich Vasíliev (Russian: born September 3, 1942, in Maikop, deceased tragically in 1976) - Russian artist, leaved more then 400 works of art, both paintings and drawings. ... Download high resolution version (1024x1024, 912 KB)Statue of a warlike valkyrie, riding a horse and carrying a spear. ... Download high resolution version (1024x1024, 912 KB)Statue of a warlike valkyrie, riding a horse and carrying a spear. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Stephan Sinding (1846–1922), was a Norwegian-Danish sculptor. ... Copenhagen (IPA: or ; Danish: IPA: ) is the capital of Denmark and the countrys largest city. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1704x2088, 823 KB) Artist: Peter Nicolai Arbo (Norway 1831-1892) Title: Valkyrien Painted 1869. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1704x2088, 823 KB) Artist: Peter Nicolai Arbo (Norway 1831-1892) Title: Valkyrien Painted 1869. ... Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831–1892) was a Norwegian painter, who specialized in painting historical motifs and images from Norse mythology. ... Grímnismál (Sayings of Grímnir) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ...

Hrist ok Mist
vil ek at mér horn beri,
Skeggjöld ok Skögul,
Hildr ok Þrúðr,
Hlökk ok Herfjötur,
Göll ok Geirahöð,
Randgríð ok Ráðgríð
ok Reginleif.
Þær bera einherjum öl.
I want Hrist and Mist
to bring me a horn,
Skeggjöld and Skögul,
Hildr and Þrúðr,
Hlökk and Herfjötur,
Göll and Geirahöð,
Randgríð and Ráðgríð
and Reginleif.
They carry ale to the einherjar.

In Völuspá there are still more names. Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ...

Sá hon valkyrjur
vítt um komnar,
görvar at ríða
til Goðþjóðar.
Skuld helt skildi,
en Skögul önnur,
Gunnr, Hildr, Göndul
ok Geirskögul.
She saw valkyries
come from far and wide,
ready to ride
to Goðþjóð.
Skuld held a shield,
and Skögul was another,
Gunnr, Hildr, Göndul
and Geirskögul.

More are mentioned in Darraðarljóð (lines 1-52), a poem where their connection with the Norns is evident: Darraðarljóð is a skaldic poem in Old Norse found in Njáls saga Chap. ... Look up Norns in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Vítt er orpit
fyrir valfalli
rifs reiðiský,
rignir blóði ;
nú er fyrir geirum
grár upp kominn
vefr verþjóðar,
er þær vinur fylla
rauðum vepti
Randvés bana.
See! warp is stretched
For warriors' fall,
Lo! weft in loom
'Tis wet with blood;
Now fight foreboding,
'Neath friends' swift fingers,
Our grey woof waxeth
With war's alarms,
Our warp bloodred,
Our weft corseblue.
Sjá er orpinn vefr
ýta þörmum
ok harðkléaðr
höfðum manna ;
eru dreyrrekin
dörr at sköptum,
járnvarðr yllir,
en örum hrælaðr ;
skulum slá sverðum
sigrvef þenna.
This woof is y-woven
With entrails of men,
This warp is hardweighted
With heads of the slain,
Spears blood-besprinkled
For spindles we use,
Our loom ironbound,
And arrows our reels;
With swords for our shuttles
This war-woof we work;
Gengr Hildr vefa
ok Hjörþrimul,
Sanngríðr, Svipul
sverðum tognum ;
skapt mun gnesta,
skjöldr mun bresta,
mun hjálmgagarr
í hlíf koma.
So weave we, weird sisters,
Our warwinning woof.
Now Warwinner walketh
To weave in her turn,
Now Swordswinger steppeth,
Now Swiftstroke, now Storm;
When they speed the shuttle
How spearheads shall flash!
Shields crash, and helmgnawer
On harness bite hard!
Vindum, vindum
vef darraðar,
þann er ungr konungr
átti fyrri!
Fram skulum ganga
ok í fólk vaða,
þar er vinir várir
vápnum skipta.
Wind we, wind swiftly
Our warwinning woof
Woof erst for king youthful
Foredoomed as his own,
Forth now we will ride,
Then through the ranks rushing
Be busy where friends
Blows blithe give and take.
Vindum, vindum
vef darraðar
ok siklingi
síðan fylgjum!
Þar sjá bragna
blóðgar randir
Guðr ok Göndul,
er grami hlífðu.
Wind we, wind swiftly
Our warwinning woof,
After that let us steadfastly
Stand by the brave king;
Then men shall mark mournful
Their shields red with gore,
How Swordstroke and Spearthrust
Stood stout by the prince.
Vindum, vindum
vef darraðar,
þars er vé vaða
vígra manna!
Látum eigi
líf hans farask ;
eigu valkyrjur
vals of kosti.
Wind we, wind swiftly
Our warwinning woof.
When sword-bearing rovers
To banners rush on,
Mind, maidens, we spare not
One life in the fray!
We corse-choosing sisters
Have charge of the slain.

As can be seen from the above, several of the names exist in different versions. Many of them have a readily apparent warlike meaning - Hjörþrimul, for example, means "battle of swords" while Geirahöð means "battle of spears".


To what an extent this multitude of names ever represented individual mythological beings with separate characteristics is debatable. It is likely that many of them were never more than names and in any case only a few occur in extant myths.


Recent cultural reference

Richard Wagner incorporated Norse tales that included the valkyrie Brünnhilde (Brynhildr) and her punishment and subsequent love for the warrior Siegfried (Sigurðr). These works included his opera Die Walküre, which contains the well known Ride of the Valkyries, as well as others of his oeuvre, Siegfried and Götterdämmerung. These depictions and others have subsequently led to modern representations of valkyries less as figures of death and warfare and more commonly as romanticized, pristine white and gold clad figures riding winged horses. Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... In Norse mythology, Brünnehilde was a shieldmaiden and a Valkyrie. ... Sigurd sculpture in Bremen Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Arthur Rackhams illustration to the Ride of the Valkyries The Ride of the Valkyries (German: Walkürenritt) is the popular term for the beginning of Act III of Die Walküre by Richard Wagner. ... Siegfried could refer to: The opera by Richard Wagner; see Siegfried (opera). ...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...


See also

In Norse mythology, the dísir (sing. ... A fylgja (literally: she, who follows) was, according to Scandinavian mythology, a supernatural creature which accompanied a person. ... Grendels mother (Old English: Grendles modor) is one of three antagonists (along with Grendel and the dragon) in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (c. ... The Mórrígan (Morrígan, Morrigu, Mór-Rhioghain) (great queen or phantom queen), is an Irish goddess of war and destruction. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... Hervor dying after the battle with the Huns. ... The Swan May or Swan Maiden is a legend in which a young, unmarried man steals a magic robe made of swan feathers from a swan maiden so that she will not fly away and winds up marrying her. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Skáldskaparmál in translation by Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur (1916), at Northvegr.
  2. ^ http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/valkyrie.htm
  3. ^ http://www.mythome.org/bxxxviii.html
  4. ^ http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/njordrljos.htm
  5. ^ Helgakviða Hundingsbana I at «Norrøne Tekster og Kvad», Norway.
  6. ^ Bellow's translation.
  7. ^ Thorpe's translation.
  8. ^ "Valkyrie". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved on 9 August 2006.

Northvegr (Northern way) is the website of the Northvegr Foundation, a nonprofit uneducational foundation. ...

References

  • Damico, Helen. Beowulf's Wealhtheow and the Valkyrie Tradition. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984.
  • ---. "The Valkyrie Reflex in Old English Literature." New Readings on Women in Old English Literature. Eds. Helen Damico and Alexandra Hennessey Olsen. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. 176-89.
  • Davidson, H. R. Ellis (1964). Gods and Myths of Northern Europe. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-013627-4. 
Norse mythology
List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Troll | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns | Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freyja | Loki | Baldr | Týr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök
Sources: Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle | Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society: Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers
People, places and things

  Results from FactBites:
 
Valkyrie , Norse Mythology (1002 words)
Many ancient mythological heroes, some of whom may have been derived from real persons, were believed to be descendants of the gods; among them were Sigurd the Dragon-slayer; Helgi Thrice-Born, Harald Wartooth, Hadding, Starkad, and the Valkyries.
The Valkyries rode through the air in brilliant armor, directed battles, distributed death lots among the warriors, and conducted the souls of slain heroes to Valhalla, the great hall of Odin.
Freya or Freyja, goddess of love, fertility, and beauty, sometimes identified as the goddess of battle and death.
Valkyrie Profile: Lenneth for PSP Review - PSP Valkyrie Profile: Lenneth Review (2119 words)
Valkyrie Profile: Lenneth is a solid port of a one-of-a-kind role-playing game that is endlessly appealing to genre fans who are looking for something different, but it's a bit too dense for everyone else.
Valkyrie Profile certainly has an interesting take on the standard character-recruitment and party-management concepts you'll find in most role-playing games, but the game does a poor job of presenting these mechanics to newcomers.
Valkyrie Profile is a complex, ambitious, and gorgeous title that offers much to like: beautiful aesthetics, an entertaining battle system, engaging characters, and a creatively balanced "dual" scenario.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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