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Encyclopedia > Valinor
Middle-earth Portal

Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. It was also known as the Undying Lands, as only immortal souls were allowed to reside there, with some exceptions when it came to the bearers of the One Ring, and, it is said, Gimli also accompanied his friend Legolas to these lands. Image File history File links Arda. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive fictional world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aman (blessed realm) is a continent that lies to the west of Middle-earth (although it lay in another dimension during the time of The Lord of the Rings), across the great ocean Belegaer. ... In the fictional writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Undying Lands are a realm inhabited by immortal beings. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, The Doom of Man, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ...

Contents

Geography and residents

Valinor is the home of the Valar (singular Vala), angelic beings sometimes mistakenly called "gods" by Men in the beginning of Middle-earth, their angelic servants the Maiar, and Elves. The sea to the west of the island was called Ekkaia, or the encircling sea; it surrounded both Valinor and Middle-earth. The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Vaiya, also called Ekkaia or the Encircling Sea, is the dark sea that surrounds the world of Arda before the cataclysm at the end of the Second Age. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ...


Each of the Valar has their own region of the land where they reside and alter things to their desire. The Mansions of Manwë and Varda upon the highest mountain of the Pelóri, Taniquetil. The two are the most powerful spirits, also married. Yavanna, the Vala of nature, growth, and harvest, resides in the Pastures of Yavanna in the south of the island. Nearby are the Mansions of Aulë the smith Vala who created the Dwarves, who is spouse of Yavanna. Oromë, the Vala of the hunt, lives in the Woods of Oromë to the north-east of the pastures. Nienna, the lonely Valie of sorrow and endurance, lives in the far west of the island where she spent her days crying about all the evil of the world, looking out to sea. Just south of Nienna's home and to the north of the pastures there are the Halls of Mandos. Mandos is the Vala of the afterlife. Also living in the Halls of Mandos is his spouse Vairë the weaver, who weaves the threads of time. To the east of the Halls of Mandos is the Isle of Estë, which is situated in the middle of the lake of Lórellin which is in turn to the north of the Gardens of Lórien (not to be confused with Lothlórien in Middle-earth). Estë and Lórien (also known as Irmo) are husband and wife. A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... A character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, Varda Elentári is a Vala, wife of Manwë. Varda is said to be too beautiful for words; within her face radiates the light of Iluvatar. ... The Pelóri Mountains, in the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, are a mountain range in Aman that separates the inner plains of Valinor from Eldamar and the wastelands of Araman and Avathar. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Taniquetil (from Valarin Dâhan-igwiš-telgûn) is the tallest mountain in Arda on the shores of Valinor. ... Yavanna Kementári is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Oromë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Nienna is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Vairë the Weaver is a Vala from the world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Estë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... Irmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


To the east of Valinor once stood the Two Trees of Valinor, Telperion and Laurelin, before the gates of Valimar, the capital of Valinor, where the Valar gather, and the Maiar spirits and the Vanyar elves live. Further east is the Calacirya, the only easy pass through the Pelóri, a huge mountain range fencing Valinor on three sides, created to keep out Morgoth. In the pass is the city Tirion, built on a hill, the city of the Noldor Elves. By the shore of the sea, north-east of Tirion, is the Teleri Elves' port Alqualondë. In the extreme northeast, beyond the Pelóri, was the Helcaraxë, a vast ice sheet that, in the beginning before Valinor was risen after the fall of Númenor into the sky to prevent people from travelling there, joined the two continents of Aman and Middle-earth. Also, for a time before the ruin of Númenor, a long chain of small islands called the Enchanted Isles ran the full length of the east coast to the continent. These were erected to prevent anyone, mortal or immortal, from reaching the land by sea. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Two Trees of Valinor are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Vanyar are the fairest and most noble of the High Elves. ... The Pelóri Mountains, in the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, are a mountain range in Aman that separates the inner plains of Valinor from Eldamar and the wastelands of Araman and Avathar. ... Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Tirion upon Túna was the city of the Ñoldor in Valinor. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... The main part of this article relates to the version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by most Tolkien fans who accept such labels (see: Middle-earth canon). ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Alqualondë (meaning Swanhaven) is the chief city of the Teleri on the shores of Valinor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Helcaraxë Helcaracsë or the Grinding Ice was an icy waste between the lands of Aman and Middle-earth. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aman (blessed realm) is a continent that lies to the west of Middle-earth (although it lay in another dimension during the time of The Lord of the Rings), across the great ocean Belegaer. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Enchanted Isles or Magic Isles are an archipelago in Belegaer, east of Tol Eressëa. ...


After the destruction of Númenor, the Undying Lands were removed from Arda so that Men could not reach them and only the Elves could go there by the Straight Road and in ships capable of passing out of the Spheres of the earth. By special permission of the Valar, the Hobbits Frodo Baggins and Bilbo Baggins were also permitted to go to Valinor. Some believe that Samwise Gamgee and Gimli the Dwarf were also permitted to go there. Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Straight Road is the route that leaves the earths curvature through sky and space to the ethereal land of Aman. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, a Hobbit is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ...


History

Valinor was established on the western continent Aman when Melkor, later Morgoth, destroyed their original home on the island Almaren. To defend this land from attack, they raised the Pelóri Mountains. They also established Valimar, the Two Trees, and their abiding places. Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Later, the Valar heard of the awakening of the Elves in Middle-earth, where Melkor was unopposed. They proposed to bring the Elves to the safety of Valinor. However, to get Elves to Valinor, they needed to get Melkor out of the way. A war was fought, and Melkor's stronghold Utumno was completely destroyed. Then many Elves came to Valinor, and established their cities, beginning Valinor's age of glory.


There was a problem, however. Melkor had come back to Valinor as a prisoner, and after three Ages, was released on the mistaken theory that the evil had been forced out of him. After being released, he started planting seeds of dissent in the minds of the elves in Valinor, saying that the Valar had brought them here so that they would control them and claim their lands in Middle-Earth as their own and that they were prisoner of the Valar. He also secretly told each of the different Elven kinds that they were superior to the other kinds and, believing his lies, the elves eventually openly spoke out against each other. Spoiler warning: (From J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe Middle-earth) Ages of the World The time of Arda is typically rendered in Ages. ...


The Valar learned of this and saw what Melkor had done, but it was too late to stop Melkor. Melkor himself, knowing that he was discovered, had gone to the home of the Noldorin elves' High King Finwë and stolen the Noldorin elves' prized jewels, the Silmarils while killing the king in the process. As the Valar sat thinking of what measures to take to hinder the elves from fighting amongst eachother and how to stop Melkor, Melkor destroyed the Two Trees of Valinor with the help of Ungoliant (bringing an endless night to Valinor), and fled back to Middle-earth, to his other stronghold, Angband. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Finwë, sometimes surnamed Noldóran, is a fictional character who was the first High King of the Elven Noldor to led his people on the journey from Middle-earth to Valinor in the blessed realm of Aman. ... The Silmarils are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Two Trees of Valinor are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ... In the fictional world of Middle-earth, Ungoliant was an evil spirit in the form of a spider who dwelt in Avathar in the First Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Angband (Sindarin for Hells of Iron, although the literal meaning is iron prison) is the name of the fortress of Melkor, constructed before the First Age, located in the Iron Mountains in the enemys realm Dor Daedeloth north...

The Two Trees, from which all light both in Valinor and in Middle-earth came, were dead. The last flowers of the Trees were given to two Maiar each in their own ship to sail around the world forever at different times of the day so that neither Valinor nor Middle-earth would forever be in darkness. One was called the Sun, and it shined a bright yellow. The other was called Moon and it shone with a pale white light. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 900 pixel, file size: 231 KB, MIME type: image/gif) my idea of the geography of Valinor I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ...


As a result of the killing of king Finwë the majority of the Noldor lead by the maker of the Silmarils and King Finwë's son, Fëanor, declared their rebellion and decided to pursue Melkor, ever after known as Morgoth, to Middle Earth to win back their jewels and avenge their king. The Noldor would not listen to Manwë, the king of the Valar, telling them that they had themselves come to Valinor of their own free will and that the Valar had no desire to rule or control any of them. But Manwë's messanger said also that if they choose to leave and to fight Melkor on their own, the Valar would not help them and that they would suffer great pain and grief on their journey. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Fëanor is a fictional character who is central to Tolkiens mythology as told in The Silmarillion. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ...


Valinor took no part in the struggle between the Noldor and Morgoth, but when the Noldor were in total defeat, the mariner Eärendil convinced the Valar to make a last blow to Morgoth. A mighty host of Maiar, Vanyar and the remaining Noldor in Valinor destroyed Morgoth's gigantic army, destroyed Angband completely and threw Morgoth into The Void. For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ... The Void can refer to a number of things: The 2001 motion picture starring Amanda Tapping and Adrian Paul — see The Void (movie) An abstract term that refers to the unhabited parts of Tolkiens Middle Earth — see The Void (Middle-earth). ...


During the Second Age, Valinor made a single action: the building of the island Andor as a reward to the Edain (who had fought with the Noldor), where they established Númenor. Soon the kingdom of Númenor grew powerful, and even invaded Valinor. Then Eru Ilúvatar was called upon by the Valar and the island was destroyed, and Aman was lifted into the sky as the rest of the world was made round. For information about the fictional nation in Robert Jordans The Wheel of Time novels, see Andor (Wheel of Time). ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Eru, also called Ilúvatar (the All High or the Father of All as defined in the index of name elements in The Silmarillion), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ...


During the Third Age, recognizing that an outright confrontation with Sauron would be disastrous, The Valar sent the Istari to Middle-earth with the intent of giving counsel to Men in their resistance to the growing power of the Dark Lord. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ...


Precursors

It has been suggested that the concept may be based on Hy Brasil, a mythical land that can reputedly be seen off the coast of Ireland for one day in every seven years, as well as other paradise islands like Avalon, St. Brendan's Island etc. Brazil, also known as Hy-Brazil or several other variants, is a phantom island which features in many Irish Celtic myths. ... The Last Sleep of Arthur by Sir Edward Burne-Jones Avalon (probably from the Celtic word abal: apple; see Etymology below) is a legendary island somewhere in the British Isles, famous for its beautiful apples. ... Situated somewhere west of Europe, St. ...


Other fantasy uses of the word

In the Arcanis Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting the word "Valinor" also refers to celestial servants of the Gods. Their names often are in the style of the god, such as the Mercy of Neroth or the Judgement of Nier. Arcanis is an award-winning campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons game, created and supported by Paradigm Concepts. ... Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) currently published by Wizards of the Coast. ... A campaign setting is a fictional fantasy world which serves as a setting for a role-playing game or wargame. ...


In the 2003 pinball game (by Stern Pinball), Valinor is the game's final "Wizard Mode". It is achieved by achieving all of the game's requirements to meet that mode. The Lord of the Rings is a 2003 pinball game designed by George Gomez and distributed by Stern Pinball. ... Stern is the name of two different but related arcade gaming companies: Stern Electronics, Inc. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia of Arda: Valinor (142 words)
The land founded by the Valar after Melkor's destruction of their ancient dwelling of Almaren.
Originally part of the World, Valinor could be reached by ship from Middle-earth.
After the rebellion of King Ar-Pharazôn of Númenor in 3319 (Second Age), Valinor and the lands of Aman were removed from the circles of the World, and could only be reached by the Elves, following the straight road that was kept open to them.
Valinor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (715 words)
Tolkien's legendarium, Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is the realm of the Valar in Aman, the place to which they moved after being driven from Almaren by Melkor.
The sea to the west of the island was called Ekkaia, or the encircling sea; it surrounded both Valinor and Middle-earth.
In the extreme north-east, past the mountain range was the pass of Helcaraxe, a vast ice sheet which in the beginning, before Valinor was risen after the fall of Númenor in to the sky to prevent people from travelling there, joined the two continents of Valinor and Middle-earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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