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Encyclopedia > Vacuum fluorescent display
A full view of a typical vacuum fluorescent display used in a videocassette recorder
A full view of a typical vacuum fluorescent display used in a videocassette recorder
A close-up of the VFD highlighting the multiple filaments, tensioned by the sheet metal springs at the right of the image

A vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) is a type of display used commonly on consumer-electronics equipment such as video cassette recorders, car radios, and microwave ovens. Unlike liquid crystal displays, a VFD emits a very bright light with clear contrast and can easily support display elements of various colours. The technology is related to both the cathode ray tube and the nixie tube. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 419 pixelsFull resolution (1567 × 820 pixel, file size: 99 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A vacuum fluorescent display from an entirely-typical VCR (video cassette recorder). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 419 pixelsFull resolution (1567 × 820 pixel, file size: 99 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A vacuum fluorescent display from an entirely-typical VCR (video cassette recorder). ... The videocassette recorder (or VCR, more commonly known in the British Isles as the video recorder), is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable videotape cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 773 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1420 × 1102 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A vacuum fluorescent display from an entirely-typical VCR (video cassette recorder), highlighting the multiple filaments (electron emitters) of the display. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 773 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1420 × 1102 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A vacuum fluorescent display from an entirely-typical VCR (video cassette recorder), highlighting the multiple filaments (electron emitters) of the display. ... HEROW!!! A filament of a 60-watt light bulb at 75X magnification An electrical filament is a thread of metal, usually tungsten, which is used to convert electricity into heat and light for the incandescent light bulb as made in 1878 by Joseph Wilson Swan, among others. ... Helical or coil springs designed for tension A spring is a flexible elastic object used to store mechanical energy. ... Only meanings of encyclopedic scope are listed here for disambiguation purposes. ... The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... Radio transmition diagram and electromagnetic waves For other uses see: radio (disambiguation) Radio is a technology that allows the transmission of signals by modulation of electromagnetic waves with frequencies below those of light. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Microwave oven and Microwave heating. ... Reflective twisted nematic liquid crystal display. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... The ten digits of a Z560M Nixie tube. ...


The device consists of a hot cathode (filaments), anodes (phosphor) and grids encased in a glass envelope under a high vacuum condition. The cathode is made up of fine tungsten wires, coated by alkaline earth metal oxides, which emit electrons when heated by an electric current. These electrons are controlled and diffused by the grids, which are made up of thin metal. If electrons impinge on the phosphor-coated plates, they fluoresce, emitting light. Hot cathode is also a name for a hot filament ionization gauge, a vacuum measuring device. ... HEROW!!! A filament of a 60-watt light bulb at 75X magnification An electrical filament is a thread of metal, usually tungsten, which is used to convert electricity into heat and light for the incandescent light bulb as made in 1878 by Joseph Wilson Swan, among others. ... Diagram of a zinc anode in a galvanic cell. ... Green screen A phosphor is a substance that exhibits the phenomenon of phosphorescence (sustained glowing after exposure to light or energised particles such as electrons). ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... Look up Vacuum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... General Name, Symbol, Number tungsten, W, 74 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 6, 6, d Appearance grayish white, lustrous Standard atomic weight 183. ... A wire is a single, usually cylindrical, elongated strand of drawn metal. ... The common (Arrhenius) definition of a base is a chemical compound that either donates hydroxide ions or absorbs hydrogen ions when dissolved in water. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fluorescence induced by exposure to ultraviolet light in vials containing various sized Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots. ...


The principle of operation is identical to that of a vacuum tube triode. Electrons can only reach (and "illuminate") a given plate element if both the grid and the plate are at a positive potential with respect to the cathode. This allows the displays to be organized as multiplexed displays where the multiple grids and plates form a matrix, minimizing the number of signal pins required. In the example of the VCR display shown to the right, the grids are arranged so that only one digit is illuminated at a time. All of the similar plates in all of the digits (for example, all of the lower-left plates in all of the digits) are connected in parallel. One by one, the microprocessor driving the display enables a digit by placing a positive voltage on that digit's grid and then placing a positive voltage on the appropriate plates. Electrons flow through that digit's grid and strike those plates that are at a positive potential. The microprocessor cycles through illuminating the digits in this way at a rate high enough to create the illusion of all digits glowing at once. Simplified diagram of a triode. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A microprocessor is a programmable digital electronic component that incorporates the functions of a central processing unit (CPU) on a single semiconducting integrated circuit (IC). ...


The extra indicators (in our example, "VCR", "Hi-Fi", "STEREO", "SAP", etc.) are arranged as if they were segments of an additional digit or two or extra segments of existing digits and are scanned using the same multiplexed strategy as the real digits. Some of these extra indicators may use a phosphor that produces a different colour of light, for example, orange. The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... Label for 2. ... The abbreviation, acronym, or initialism SAP has several different meanings: SAP AG, a German software company, or its various products such as SAP R/3 or SAP Business Information Warehouse second audio program (television) Session Announcement Protocol Soritong audio player Simple As Possible Computer Architecture Structural Adjustment Program of the...


The light produced by most VFDs contains many colours and can often be filtered to produce a more-pure (saturated) colour such as a deep green or deep blue, depending on the whims of the product's designers.


Usage

Besides brightness, VFDs have the advantages of being rugged, inexpensive, and easily configured to display a wide variety of customized messages. Early on, the main disadvantage of this type of display was the consumption of significantly more power (0.2 watts) than a simple LCD. This was considered a significant drawback for battery-operated equipment like calculators, so VFDs ended up being used primarily in equipment powered by an AC supply or heavy-duty rechargeable batteries. Another advantage is that unlike LCDs, most VFDs continue to function normally in sub-zero temperatures, making them ideal for outdoor devices in cold climates.[citation needed] For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ...


During the 1980s, this display began to be used for automotive applications, especially where car makers were dabbling with digital displays for vehicle instruments like the speedometer and odometer. A good example of these were the high-end Subaru cars made in the early 1980s (referred to by Subaru enthusiasts as a digi-dash, or digital dashboard). The brightness of VFDs makes them well suited for use in the automotive industry. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Subaru (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A dashboard from a 1940s car The dashboard of a modern car, a Bentley Continental GT A Hayabusas dash A modern Formula 1 car has all its gauges mounted on the steering wheel A dashboard or dash board in an automobile is a panel located under the windscreen and...


This technology was also used from 1979 to the mid 1980s in portable electronic game units. These games featured bright, clear displays but the size of the largest vacuum tubes that could be manufactured inexpensively kept the size of the displays quite small, often requiring the use of magnifying Fresnel lenses. While later games had sophisticated multi-colour displays, early games achieved colour effects using transparent filters to change the colour of the (usually green) light emitted by the phosphors. High power consumption and high manufacturing cost contributed to the demise of the VFD as a videogame display. LCD games could be manufactured for a fraction of the price, did not require frequent changes of expensive batteries (or AC adapters) and were much more portable. Since the late 1990's, backlit colour active-matrix LCD displays have been able to cheaply reproduce arbitrary images in any colour, a marked advantage over fixed-colour, fixed-character VFDs. This is one of the main reasons for the decline in popularity of VFDs, although they continue to be produced. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Formally, a computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players may interact with in order to achieve a goal (or set of goals). ... Fresnel Lens displayed in the Musée national de la marine in Paris, France A Fresnel lens is a type of lens invented by Augustin-Jean Fresnel (pronounced fre-NELL in scientific and lighting applications, although often incorrectly pronounced FREZ-nell). ...


From the mid 1980s onwards, VFDs were used for applications requiring smaller displays with high brightness specifications, though now the adoption of high-brightness OLEDs is pushing VFDs out of these markets. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A 3. ...


External links

  • Vacuum Fluorescent Display (VFD) (including How to drive the filament)
  • VFD-Page of Futaba (widely known manufacturer of VFDs)
  • Noritake-Itron, another well known manufacturer of VFDs in Japan

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vacuum fluorescent display - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (829 words)
A vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) is a type of display used primarily on consumer-electronics equipment such as video cassette recorders and microwave ovens.
This allows the displays to be organized as "multiplexed displays" where the multiple grids and plates form a matrix, minimizing the number of signal pins required.
These games featured bright, clear displays but the size of the largest vacuum tubes that could reliably be manufactured kept the size of the displays quite small, often requiring the use of magnifying Fresnel lenses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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