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very high frequency (VHF)
Cycles per second: 30 MHz to 300 MHz

Wavelength: 10m to 1 m metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) A metre or meter[1] (symbol: m) is a unit of length and the current base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI). ...

Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz to 300 MHz. Frequencies immediately below VHF is HF, and the next higher frequencies are known as Ultra high frequency (UHF). Rough plot of Earths atmospheric transmittance (or opacity) to various wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, including radio waves. ... MegaHertz (MHz) is the name given to one million (106) Hertz, a measure of frequency. ... MegaHertz (MHz) is the name given to one million (106) Hertz, a measure of frequency. ... High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ...


Common uses for VHF are FM radio broadcast at 88–108 MHz and television broadcast (together with UHF). VHF is also commonly used for terrestrial navigation systems (VOR in particular), Marine Communication, and aircraft communications. FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... D-VOR (Doppler VOR) ground station, co-located with DME. VOR, short for VHF Omni-directional Radio Range, is a type of radio navigation system for aircraft. ...


VHF frequencies' propagation characteristics are ideal for short-distance terrestrial communication, with a range generally somewhat farther than line-of-sight from the transmitter (see formula below). Unlike high frequencies (HF), the ionosphere does not usually reflect VHF radio and thus transmissions are restricted to the local area (and don't interfere with transmissions thousands of kilometres away). VHF is also less affected by atmospheric noise and interference from electrical equipment than low frequencies. Whilst it is more easily blocked by land features than HF and lower frequencies, it is less bothered by buildings and other less substantial objects than higher frequencies.


Two unusual propagation conditions can allow much farther range than normal. The first, tropospheric ducting, can occur in front of and parallel to an advancing cold weather front, especially if there is a marked difference in humidities between the cold and warm air masses. A duct can form approximately 150 miles (240 km.) in advance of the cold front, much like a ventilation duct in a building, and VHF radio frequencies can travel along inside the duct, bending or refracting, for hundreds of miles. For example, a 50 watt Amateur FM transmitter at 146 MHz can talk from Chicago, Illinois, to Joplin, Missouri, directly, and to Austin, Texas, through a repeater. In a July 2006 incident, a Weatheradio station in north central Wisconsin was blocking out local stations in west central Michigan, quite far out of its normal range. The second type, much more rare, is called Sporadic-E, referring to the E-layer of the ionosphere. A sunspot eruption can pelt the Earth's upper atmosphere with charged particles, which may allow the formation of an ionized "patch" dense enough to reflect back VHF frequencies the same way HF frequencies are usually reflected (skywave). For example, TV channel 2 (54–60 MHz) from Midland, Texas was seen in Chicagoland, pushing out Chicago's own TV channel 2. These patches may last for seconds, or extend into hours. FM stations from Miami, Florida; New Orleans, Louisiana; Houston, Texas and even Mexico were heard for hours in central Illinois during one such event. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Main Street in Joplin in 2005 Joplin is a city located in parts of southern Jasper County and northern Newton County in the southwestern corner of Missouri. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Live Music Capital of the World Location Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Government County Travis County Mayor Will Wynn Geographical characteristics Area 669. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ionosphere. ... Sand storm that passed over Midland, Texas, February 20, 1894 at 6:00 p. ... Chicagoland is an informal name for the Chicago metropolitan area, used by local residents, businesses, governments, and planning agencies. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Nickname: The Magic City, Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Houston redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


It was also easier to construct efficient transmitters, receivers, and antennas for it in the earlier days of radio, as compared to UHF. In most countries, the VHF spectrum is used for broadcast audio and television, as well as commercial two-way radios (such as those operated by taxis and police), marine two-way audio communications, and aircraft radios.


The large technically and commercially valuable slice of the VHF spectrum taken up by television transmission has attracted the attention of many companies and governments recently, with the development of more efficient digital television broadcasting standards. In some countries much of this spectrum will likely become available (probably for sale) in the next decade or so (currently scheduled for 2008 in the United States). Digital television (DTV) is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound by means of digital signals, in contrast to analog signals in analog (traditional) TV. It uses digital modulation data, which is digitally compressed and requires decoding by a specially designed television set or a standard... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Line of Sight Formula

VHF transmission range is a function of transmitter power, receiver sensitivity, and distance to the horizon, since VHF signals propagate under normal conditions as a line-of-sight phenomenon. Radio signals, like all electromagnetic radiation, usually travel in straight lines. ...


An approximation to calculate the line-of-sight horizon distance is:

  • distance in miles = sqrt{1.5 times A_f} where Af is the height of the antenna in feet
  • distance in kilometres = sqrt{12.7 times A_m} where Am is the height of the antenna in metres

Australia

The VHF TV band in Australia was originally allocated channels 1 to 10 - with the 2, 7 and 9 frequencies assigned for the initial services in Sydney and Melbourne, and later the same frequencies would be assigned in Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth. Other capital cities and regional areas would utilise a combination of these and other frequencies as available.


By the early 1960s it was apparent that the 10-channel spectrum was not going to be sufficient to support the growth of television services. This was rectified by the addition of three additional frequencies - channels 0, 5A and 11. Older television sets would require adjustment to enable tuning to the new frequencies.


Several TV stations were allocated to VHF channels 3, 4 and 5A, which were within the FM radio bands although not yet used for that purpose. A couple of notable examples were NBN-3 Newcastle, WIN-4 Wollongong and ABC Illawarra on channel 5A. Most TVs of that era were not equipped to receive these broadcasts, and so were modified at the owners' expense to be able to tune into these bands; otherwise the owner had to buy a new TV. Beginning in the 1990s, the Australian Broadcasting Authority began a process to move these stations to UHF bands to free up valuable VHF spectrum for its original purpose of FM radio. In addition, by 1985 the federal government decided new TV stations are to be broadcast on the UHF band. A view of Newcastle from Stockton Newcastle is Australias sixth largest city and the second largest in the state of New South Wales. ... WIN Television or WIN is an Australian regional television network. ... Wollongong (IPA: ) is an industrial city located on the eastern coast of Australia in the state of New South Wales. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) [1] is Australias national non-commercial public broadcaster. ... The Illawarra is the name given to a coastal region of New South Wales immediately south of Sydney. ... See also 1990s, the band The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive, sometimes informally including popular culture from the very late 1980s and from 2000 and beyond. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ...


Two new VHF frequencies, 9A and 12, have since been made available and are being utilised primarily for digital services (eg. ABC in capital cities) but also for some new analogue services in regional areas. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) [1] is Australias national non-commercial public broadcaster. ...


New Zealand

  • 44–51, 54–68 MHz: Band I Television (channels 1–3)
  • 87.5–108 MHz: Band II Radio
  • 174–230 MHz: Band III Television (channels 4–11)

In New Zealand, the four main Free-to-Air TV stations still use the VHF Television bands (Band I and Band III) to transmit their programmes to New Zealand households. Other stations, including a variety of pay and regional free-to-air stations, broadcast their programmes using the UHF band since the VHF band is very overloaded with four stations sharing a very small frequency band. This article is about the radio frequency. ...


United Kingdom

British television originally used VHF bands I and III. Television on VHF was in black and white with 405-line display. British colour television was broadcast on UHF (channels 21–69), beginning in the late 1960s. TV from then on was broadcast on both VHF and UHF, with the exception of BBC2 (which had always broadcast solely on UHF). The last British VHF TV transmitters closed down on January 3, 1985. VHF band III is now used in the UK for digital audio broadcasting. 405 line is the name of a monochrome analogue television broadcasting system in operation in the UK between 1936 and 1985, and also used for some time in Ireland and Hong Kong. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Digital Audio Broadcasting or DAB is a technology for broadcasting audio programming in digital form that was designed in the late 1980s. ...


Unusually, the UK has an amateur radio allocation at 4 metres, 70-70.5 MHz. Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is a hobby and public service enjoyed by about 3 million people[1] throughout the world. ... // Summary 4 metres is an Amateur Radio frequency band in the lower Very High Frequency spectrum. ...


United States

The general services in the VHF band are:

  • 30–46 MHz: Licensed 2-way land mobile communication
  • 30–88 MHz: Military VHF-FM, including SINCGARS
  • 43–50 MHz: Cordless telephones, "49 MHz" FM walkie-talkies, and mixed 2-way mobile communication
  • 50–54 MHz: Amateur radio 6 meter band
  • 54–72 MHz: TV channels 2-4
  • 72–74 MHz: Remote Control devices
  • 74–80 MHz: TV channel 5
  • 81.5–87.5 MHz: TV channel 6
  • 87.5–108 MHz: FM radio broadcasting (88–92 non-commercial, 92–108 commercial)
  • 108–118 MHz: Air navigation beacons VOR
  • 118–132 MHz: Airband for Air Traffic Control, AM, 121.5 MHz is emergency frequency
  • 132–144 MHz: Auxiliary civil services, satellite, space research, and other miscellaneous services
  • 144–148 MHz: Amateur band 2 Meters
  • 148–174 MHz: "VHF Business band," the unlicensed Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS), and other 2-way land mobile, FM
  • 156–174 MHz VHF Marine Radio; narrow band FM, 156.8 MHz (Channel 16) is the maritime emergency and contact frequency
  • 162.40–162.55: NOAA Weather Stations, narrowband FM
  • 174–216 MHz: TV channels 7 through 13, and professional wireless microphones (low power, certain exact frequencies only)
  • 216–222 MHz: reserved for future use
  • 222–225 MHz: Amateur "1¼ Meter" band (really closer to 1.33M)
  • above 225 MHz: Federal services, notably military aircraft radio (225–400 MHz) AM, including HAVE QUICK, dGPS RTCM-104

When used in supervisory signaling in telephony, the term frequency-change signaling has been used to describe frequency modulation. ... SINCGARS stands for Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is a hobby and public service enjoyed by about 3 million people[1] throughout the world. ... 6 Meters is a popular ham radio band. ... Braun HF 1, Germany, 1958. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... D-VOR (Doppler VOR) ground station, co-located with DME. VOR, short for VHF Omni-directional Radio Range, is a type of radio navigation system for aircraft. ... Note: This article title may be easily confused with AirBand The airband or air band is the band of frequencies used for radio communication in aviation. ... Air Traffic Control Towers (ATCTs) at Schiphol Airport Air Traffic Control (ATC) is a service provided by ground-based controllers who direct aircraft on the ground and in the air. ... Amplitude modulation (AM) is a form of modulation in which the amplitude of a carrier wave is varied in direct proportion to that of a modulating signal. ... 2 Meters is a popular amateur radio band. ... The business band is the name used by US scanner hobbyists who listen to Federal Communications Commission licensees using Industrial/Business pool frequencies. ... The Multi-Use Radio Service, MURS for short, is a small two-way radio service consisting of five frequencies in the VHF spectrum. ... VHF radio is radio transmission in the 30-300 MHz frequency range, as a means of short-range, line-of-sight verbal communication. ... Weatheradio is a special radio service available over much of North America that transmits weather warnings and forecasts 24 hours a day. ... 1. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Unlicensed operation

In some countries, particularly the United States and Canada, limited low-power license-free operation is available in the FM broadcast band for purposes such as microbroadcasting and sending output from CD or digital media players to radios without auxiliary-in jacks, though this is illegal in some other countries, most notably the United Kingdom. CD redirects here; see Cd for other meanings of CD. Image of a compact disc (pencil included for scale) A compact disc (or CD) is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ...


87.5-87.9 MHz

87.5-87.9 MHz is a radio frequency which, in most of the world, is used for FM broadcasting. In the United States, however, this bandwidth is allocated to VHF channel 6 (81.5-87.5MHz). The audio for TV channel 6 is broadcast at 87.25 MHz. FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz (wavelength 10 m) to 300 MHz (wavelength 1 m). ...


87.9 MHz is normally is off-limits except for displaced class D stations which have no other frequencies in the normal 88.1-107.9 MHz subband on which to move. So far, only 2 stations have qualified to operate on 87.9 MHz: 10-Watt KSFH in Mountain View, California and 34-Watt translator K200AA in Sun Valley, Nevada. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Mountain View is a city in Santa Clara County, in the U.S. state of California, USA. The city gets its name from the views of the Santa Cruz Mountains. ... Sun Valley is a census-designated place located in Washoe County, Nevada. ...


See also

Radio spectrum
ELF SLF ULF VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF
3 Hz 30 Hz 300 Hz 3 kHz 30 kHz 300 kHz 3 MHz 30 MHz 300 MHz 3 GHz 30 GHz
30 Hz 300 Hz 3 kHz 30 kHz 300 kHz 3 MHz 30 MHz 300 MHz 3 GHz 30 GHz 300 GHz


In North America, channel 1 is a former broadcast (over-the-air) television channel. ... A list of television stations that broadcast at VHF channel 2 in the United States KACV-TV in Amarillo, Texas KASA-TV in Albuquerque, New Mexico KATN-TV in Fairbanks, Alaska KATU-TV in Portland, Oregon KBCI-TV in Boise, Idaho KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, California KCWX-TV in... A list of television stations that broadcast at VHF channel 3 in the United States KATC-TV in Lafayette, Louisiana KBTX-TV in Bryan, Texas KCRA-TV in Sacramento, California KDLH-TV in Duluth, Minnesota KENW-TV in Portales, New Mexico KEYT-TV in Santa Barbara, California KFDX-TV in... A list of television stations that broadcast at VHF channel 4 (66-72MHz) in the United States KAMR-TV in Amarillo, Texas KARK-TV in Little Rock, Arkansas KBTV-TV in Port Arthur, Texas KCNC-TV in Denver, Colorado KDBC-TV in El Paso, Texas KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas... A list of television stations that broadcast at VHF channel 5 in the United States KALB-TV in Alexandria, Louisiana KCTV-TV in Kansas City, Missouri KDLT-TV in Sioux Falls, South Dakota KENS-TV in San Antonio, Texas KFBB-TV in Great Falls, Montana KFSM-TV in Fort Smith... A list of television stations that broadcast at VHF channel 6 have radio feeds at FM 87. ... The following television stations in the United States broadcast on either VHF or cable channel 7: KABC-TV in Los Angeles, California KAKM-TV in Anchorage, Alaska KATV-TV in Little Rock, Arkansas KAZT-TV in Prescott, Arizona KETV-TV in Omaha, Nebraska KEVN-TV in Rapid City, South Dakota... The following is a list of television stations in the United States that advertise as being on channel 8, either on VHF or cable: KAET-TV in Phoenix, Arizona KAIT-TV in Jonesboro, Arkansas KCCI-TV in Des Moines, Iowa KFMB-TV in San Diego, California KGNS-TV in Laredo... The following is a list of television stations in the United States that advertise as being on channel 9, either VHF or cable: KCAL-TV in Los Angeles, California KCAU-TV in Sioux City, Iowa KCFW-TV in Kalispell, Montana KCRG-TV in Cedar Rapids, Iowa KCTS-TV in Seattle... The following is a list of television stations in the United States that advertise as being on channel 10, either VHF or cable: WIS in Columbia, South Carolina WBIR in Knoxville, Tennessee WSLS in Roanoke, Virginia WALA in Mobile, Alabama WAVY in Portsmouth, Virginia (Norfolk/Newport News/Virginia Beach) WCAU... The following is a list of television stations in the United States that advertise as being on channel 11, either VHF or cable: KARE in Minneapolis, Minnesota KHOU-TV in Houston, Texas KMVT in Twin Falls, Idaho KNTV in San Jose, California (San Francisco) KPLR-TV in St. ... Pages in category Channel 12 TV stations in the United States There are 56 pages in this section of this category. ... The following is a list of television stations in the United States that advertise as being on channel 13, either VHF or cable: WMAZ-TV in Macon, Georgia WBTW-TV in Florence, South Carolina WLOS-TV in Asheville, North Carolina WNYT-TV in Albany, New York (formerly WAST-TV) WHAM... Radio frequency, or RF, refers to that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic waves can be generated by alternating current fed to an antenna. ... Extremely low frequency (ELF) is the band of radio frequencies from 3 to 30 Hz. ... Super Low Frequency (SLF) is the frequency range between 30 hertz and 300 hertz. ... Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) is the frequency range between 300 hertz and 3000 hertz. ... Very low frequency or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kHz. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... Microwave Slang for small waves, like at a beach, often used by surfers. ... Extremely high frequency is the highest radio frequency band. ...



The Electromagnetic Spectrum
(Sorted by wavelength, short to long)
Gamma ray | X-ray | Ultraviolet | Visible spectrum | Infrared | Terahertz radiation | Microwave | Radio waves
Visible (optical) spectrum: Violet | Blue | Green | Yellow | Orange | Red
Microwave spectrum: W band | V band | K band: Ka band, Ku band | X band | C band | S band | L band
Radio spectrum: EHF | SHF | UHF | VHF | HF | MF | LF | VLF | ULF | SLF | ELF
Wavelength designations: Microwave | Shortwave | Mediumwave | Longwave

Legend: γ = Gamma rays HX = Hard X-rays SX = Soft X-Rays EUV = Extreme ultraviolet NUV = Near ultraviolet Visible light NIR = Near infrared MIR = Moderate infrared FIR = Far infrared Radio waves: EHF = Extremely high frequency (Microwaves) SHF = Super high frequency (Microwaves) UHF = Ultrahigh frequency VHF = Very high frequency HF = High frequency... This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than soft X-rays. ... The visible spectrum (or sometimes optical spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... Image of a small dog taken in mid-infrared (thermal) light (false color) Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength longer than that of visible light, but shorter than that of radio waves. ... Radio waves sent at terahertz frequencies, known as terahertz radiation, terahertz waves, T-rays, T-light, T-lux and THz, are in the region of the light spectrum between 300 gigahertz (3x1011 Hz) and 3 terahertz (3x1012 Hz), corresponding to the wavelength range starting at submillimeter (<1 millimeter) and 100... Microwave image of 3C353 galaxy at 8. ... Rough plot of Earths atmospheric transmittance (or opacity) to various wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, including radio waves. ... The visible spectrum (or sometimes optical spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... Violet (named after the flower violet) is used in two senses: first, to the color of light at the short-wavelength end of the visible spectrum, approximately 420-380 nanometres (this is a spectral color). ... Blue is any of a number of similar colors. ... See Green for the color. ... Yellow is any color of light that stimulates both the red and green cone cells of the retina, but not the blue cone cells. ... The colour orange occurs between red and yellow in the visible spectrum at a wavelength of about 585–620 nanometres. ... Red is any of a number of similar colors at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... The W band of the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges from 75 to 111 GHz. ... The V band (vee-band) of the electromagnetic spectrum ranges from 50 to 75 GHz. ... K band is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging between 12 to 63 GHz. ... The Ka band (kurz-above band) is a portion of the K band of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... The Ku band (kay-yoo kurz-under band) is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 11 to 18 GHz. ... The X band (3-cm radar spot-band) of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum roughly ranges from 5. ... C band (compromise band) is a portion of electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 4 to 6 GHz. ... The S band ranges from 2. ... L band (20-cm radar long-band) is a portion of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging roughly from 0. ... Radio frequency, or RF, refers to that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic waves can be generated by alternating current fed to an antenna. ... Extremely high frequency is the highest radio frequency band. ... Microwave Slang for small waves, like at a beach, often used by surfers. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Very low frequency or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kHz. ... Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) is the frequency range between 300 hertz and 3000 hertz. ... Super Low Frequency (SLF) is the frequency range between 30 hertz and 300 hertz. ... Extremely low frequency (ELF) is the band of radio frequencies from 3 to 30 Hz. ... Microwave image of 3C353 galaxy at 8. ... A Grundig shortwave receiver Shortwave radio operates between the frequencies of 2,310 kHz and 25. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions serves as the most common band for broadcasting. ... Longwave radio frequencies are those below 500 kHz, which correspond to wavelengths longer than 600 meters. ...

External articles

  • Tomislav Stimac, "Definition of frequency bands (VLF, ELF... etc.)". IK1QFK Home Page (vlf.it).

  Results from FactBites:
 
Very high frequency - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1481 words)
Common uses for VHF are FM radio broadcast at 88–108 MHz and television broadcast (together with UHF).
VHF range is a function of transmitter power, receiver sensitivity, and the distance to the horizon, since VHF signals propagate under normal conditions as a line-of-sight phenomenon.
The VHF TV band in Australia was originally allocated channels 1 to 10 - with the 2, 7 and 9 frequencies assigned for the initial services in Sydney and Melbourne, and later the same frequencies would be assigned in Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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