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Encyclopedia > V for Vendetta
V for Vendetta
Image:V-for-vendetta.jpg
V for Vendetta collected edition cover, art by David Lloyd
Publisher Quality Comics (UK)
Vertigo/DC Comics (USA)
Publication date 1982-1988
Number of issues 10
Main character(s) V
Evey Hammond
Eric Finch
Creative team
Writer(s) Alan Moore
Artist(s) David Lloyd
Colorist(s) Steve Whitaker, Siobhan Dodds, David Lloyd

V for Vendetta is a ten-issue comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated mostly by David Lloyd, set in a dystopian future United Kingdom imagined from the 1980s about the 1990s. A mysterious anarchist named "V" works to destroy the totalitarian government, profoundly affecting the people he encounters. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ... Quality Communications is the company formed by Dez Skinn in 1982 to publish Warrior, an anthology comic book title. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ... Chief Inspector Eric Finch is a fictional character from the graphic novel V for Vendetta. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ... This article is about the film. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... Totalitarianism is a term employed by some political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ...


The series is set in a near-future Britain after a limited nuclear war, which has left much of the world destroyed. In this future, an extreme fascist party called Norsefire has arisen and is now the ruling power. "V", an anarchist revolutionary dressed in a Guy Fawkes mask, begins an elaborate, violent and theatrical campaign to bring down the government. Norsefire is the fictional right-wing political party currently ruling the United Kingdom in Alan Moore and David Lloyds V for Vendetta comic book series. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Background

The first episodes of V for Vendetta were originally published in black-and-white between 1982 and 1985, in Warrior, a British anthology comic published by Quality Comics. The strip was one of the most popular in the title and featured on several covers during the 26 issues of Warrior. Warrior #1 (March 1982), featuring an image of Axel Pressbutton by Steve Dillon. ... Quality Communications is the company formed by Dez Skinn in 1982 to publish Warrior, an anthology comic book title. ...


Internally, V for Vendetta is divided into three "books". Warrior was cancelled at the end of the second book. Three years later, DC Comics reunited Alan Moore and David Lloyd to finish the series, which was published in ten monthly issues, then collected in hardback and trade paperback. David Lloyd's artwork for V for Vendetta in Warrior was originally published in black-and-white, giving it a harsh chiaroscuro effect that worked very well with the grim subject matter. In the DC Comics version, the artwork has been "colourised" in pastels, which some fans feel compromises its effectiveness. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other use of the term, see Chiaroscuro (disambiguation). ...

Cover of Warrior #19, highlighting the comic's conflict between anarchist and fascist philosophies.
Cover of Warrior #19, highlighting the comic's conflict between anarchist and fascist philosophies.

In writing V for Vendetta, Moore drew upon an idea for a strip titled The Doll he had submitted to DC Thomson when he was twenty-two years old. In "Behind the Painted Smile",[1] Moore revealed that the idea was rejected as DC Thomson balked at the idea of a "transsexual terrorist". Years later, Warrior editor Dez Skinn invited Moore to create a dark mystery strip with artist David Lloyd.[2] Lloyd and Moore considered several proposals, including one titled Vendetta that set the story in 1930s United States. The setting developed through their discussions, moving from 1930s United States to near-future Britain. As the setting progressed, so did the character's development; once conceived as a "realistic" gangster-age American, he became, first, a policeman rebelling against the totalitarian state he served, then became a heroic anarchist. Image File history File links Warrior19. ... Image File history File links Warrior19. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For the electronic music EP by Mr. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Dez Skinn Dez Skinn is a British comic book and magazine editor born in Yorkshire in 1951. ...


Moore and Lloyd conceived the series as a dark adventure strip influenced by British comic characters of the 1960s, as well as Night Raven, a Marvel UK strip which Lloyd had previously worked on with writer Steve Parkhouse. Editors Dez Skinn and Graham Marsh came up with the name V for Vendetta. David Lloyd developed the idea of dressing V as Guy Fawkes after previous designs followed the conventional superhero look. A British comic is a periodical published in the United Kingdom that contains comic strips. ... Night-Raven was a character created by Dez Skinn and Richard Burton and assigned to Steve Parkhouse as writer and David Lloyd for Hulk Weekly, a Marvel UK title in 1979. ... The Mighty World of Marvel #1: The very first Marvel UK title published in 1972. ... Steve Parkhouse is a writer/artist/letterer who has been working in comics since 1969 when he worked on Marvel Comics Nick Fury character. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ...


During the preparation of the story Moore made a list of what he wanted to bring into the plot, which he reproduced in "Behind the Painted Smile":

"Orwell. Huxley. Thomas Disch. Judge Dredd. Harlan Ellison's "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman, Catman and The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World by the same author. Vincent Price's Dr. Phibes and Theatre of Blood. David Bowie. The Shadow. Night Raven. Batman. Fahrenheit 451. The writings of the New Worlds school of science fiction. Max Ernst's painting " Europe After the Rain". Thomas Pynchon. The atmosphere of British Second World War films. The Prisoner. Robin Hood. Dick Turpin...[1]" George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 – ) is an American science fiction author. ... For the 1995 film, see Judge Dredd (film). ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Repent, Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman is a short story by speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison. ... In Harlan Ellisons 1969 anthology, Dangerous Visions, he presents a collection of several different views of science fiction and fantasy, through 34 authors (himself included). ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) is a horror film starring Vincent Price. ... DVD cover of Theatre of Blood Theatre of Blood was a 1973 horror film starring Vincent Price as vengeful actor Edward Lionheart and Diana Rigg as his daughter Edwina Lionheart. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Night-Raven was a character created by Dez Skinn and Richard Burton and assigned to Steve Parkhouse as writer and David Lloyd for Hulk Weekly, a Marvel UK title in 1979. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article is about the novel. ... First issue cover New Worlds was a British science fiction magazine which was first published professionally in 1946. ... Max Ernst (2 April 1891 - 1 April 1976) was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet, considered one of the chief representatives of Dadaism and Surrealism. ... Image File history File links Europe_After_the_Rain. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... For other uses, see The Prisoner (disambiguation) and Prisoner. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... For the British television series, see Dick Turpin (TV series). ...

The political climate of Britain in the early 1980s has also been cited as an influence on the work,[3] with Moore positing that Margaret Thatcher's Conservative government would "obviously lose the 1983 elections", and that the Michael Foot-led Labour government that replaced it, being committed to complete nuclear disarmament, would allow the United Kingdom to escape relatively unscathed after a limited nuclear war. However, Moore felt a post-holocaust Britain would be quickly subverted by fascists.[1] Moore's predictions were perceived to be unlikely and, addressing this when DC reissued the work, he noted: The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... For other persons named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... CND redirects here. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ...

Naïveté can also be detected in my supposition that it would take something as melodramatic as a near-miss nuclear conflict to nudge England towards fascism... The simple fact that much of the historical background of the story proceeds from a predicted Conservative defeat in the 1982 General Election should tell you how reliable we were in our roles as Cassandras.[4] For other uses, see Cassandra (disambiguation). ...

When Warrior was cancelled in 1985 (with one completed episode unpublished due to the cancellation), several companies attempted to convince Moore and Lloyd to let them publish and complete the story. In 1988 DC Comics published a ten-issue series that reprinted the Warrior stories in colour, then continued the series to completion. The first new material appeared in issue #7, which included the unpublished episode that would have appeared in Warrior #27. Tony Weare drew one chapter ("Vincent") and contributed additional art to two others ("Valerie", "The Vacation"); Steve Whitaker and Siobhan Dodds worked as colourists on the entire series. The series, including Moore's "Behind the Painted Smile" essay and two "interludes" outside the central continuity, was then collected as a graphic novel, published in the US by DC's Vertigo imprint (ISBN 0-930289-52-8) and in the UK by Titan Books (ISBN 1-85286-291-2). Tony Weare (January 1, 1912 - December 2, 1994) was a comics artist best known for drawing Matt Marriott, a daily western strip written by Jim Edgar, which ran in the London Evening News from 1955 to 1977. ... A colorist is an artist who colors comic art reading it for production as a comic book. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... Titan Books is a UK publisher of graphic novels. ...


Plot

November 5, 1997, London. The vigilante known as V rescues a young woman, Evey Hammond, from a gang of police agents (known as "Fingermen") who are about to rape her after arresting her for prostitution. After dispatching the Fingermen, V heads to a local rooftop with Evey and detonates the Palace of Westminster, the building where the old Parliament met. He models this after the failed Gunpowder Plot that Guy Fawkes and several others orchestrated in 1605. As people notice the blast and the fireworks, V takes Evey to his secret lair, which he calls "The Shadow Gallery". There, Evey tells V her life story, describing the nuclear war of the late 1980s that led to anomie, and then of the fascist coup d'état in which her father became a political prisoner. A new government under the name of the old has risen. is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ... Whore redirects here. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... A contemporary sketch of the conspirators. ... Anomie, in contemporary English, means a condition or malaise in individuals, characterized by an absence or diminution of standards or values. ... Coup redirects here. ...


Investigation of V's bombing is assigned to Eric Finch, head of "The Nose" (the name by which the regular police are commonly known) and an experienced investigator who serves the government out of a love of order rather than political conviction. Through him are met other figures in the Party, including the Leader, Adam James Susan, a recluse who is fixated on the police state's computer system "Fate"; Commander Derek Almond, the leader of "The Finger", the secret police; Rose, Almond's emotionally and physically abused wife; Dominic Stone, Finch's partner; Conrad Heyer, head of "The Eye", the visual surveillance branch; Helen, Heyer's extremely ambitious and ruthless wife; Brian Etheridge, head of "The Ear", the audio surveillance branch and Roger Dascomb, in charge of "The Mouth", the branch in charge of broadcasting propaganda. For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ...


V next blows up the Old Bailey after pretending that he and the Madame Justice statue on the Old Bailey are conversing (which begins with V politely saying hello to Justice, and ends with him giving her a present with a bomb in it and calling her a whore, saying he has met a new woman named Madame Anarchy) and confronts three Party figures to accuse them of past crimes: Lewis Prothero, the propaganda broadcaster who serves as the "Voice of Fate"; Bishop Anthony Lilliman, a paedophile who represents the Party in the clergy and Delia Surridge, a seemingly apolitical doctor who had a personal relationship with Finch. V attacks each of them in an ironic fashion, derived from previous encounters. Prothero is driven to insanity after V destroys his collection of priceless dolls in a reproduced death camp oven while having Prothero dressed up in a Commander's uniform (Prothero was Commander of Larkhill); Lilliman is killed by being forced to consume a cyanide-laced communion wafer just as he is about to rape Evey dressed up in a little girl costume (Lilliman was a priest who was hired to give spiritual support to camp prisoners taking the Batch 5 drug) and Dr. Surridge dies from a lethal injection (she was the doctor in charge of criminal medical experiments at the camp and who had studied V) -- however, as she was the only worker at Larkhill that expressed remorse for her actions, the injection and her death are painless. Upon leaving Delia's home, V is surprised by Derek Almond, who was warned by Finch that V was after Surridge and tries to capture him. Unfortunately for Almond, he had forgotten to reload his gun after having cleaned it earlier that same night, and he is quickly killed by V. The Old Bailey. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ...


Finch begins his research upon his discovery of Dr. Surridge's diary. It reveals that all three victims were officers at the Larkhill Resettlement Camp, and that over the previous years, every other staff member from the camp has died, apparently killed by V -- the vendetta of the title. Finch later discovers that this apparent "vendetta" served as a diversion from the true cause of action. V, the only prisoner to have survived the death camp, chose to eliminate its surviving officers to prevent the government from discovering his true identity. It could also be said that they were killed as retribution for the prisoners' pain and death due to the Larkhill officers' adherence to the fascist administration. With no records of his real name or personage existing, V can operate covertly. All that is known to the reader is that he was subjected to medical experiments involving hormonal injections of a substance called "Batch 5", which presumably triggered V's transformation into an obsessive and brilliant (though possibly psychotic) avenger. Larkhill is a village in Wiltshire, England, on the edge of Salisbury Plain. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Four months later (February 23, 1998), V breaks into Jordan Tower, the broadcast centre for the Party, to broadcast an anarchist speech that calls on the people to take charge of their own lives. He escapes by tying up Dascombe, placing a copy of V's own costume and mask on him, and standing him up in the control room where he is shot by police who storm the room. Eric Finch, in going over the crime scene, is provoked by and punches Peter Creedy, a petty criminal promoted to Head of the Finger after Almond's death, for a personal remark related to Delia Surridge (with whom Finch was romantically involved) and is sent by The Leader on a forced vacation. is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Evey has developed a strong attachment to V, but he has begun to challenge her morality. After a confrontation in the Shadow Gallery, she finds herself abandoned on a street, unable to find V. She is taken in by Gordon Deitrich, a petty criminal with whom she becomes romantically involved, and they cross paths unknowingly with Derek Almond's widow Rose; after the deaths of her husband and Dascombe (with whom she had been forced by circumstances into having a relationship with), Rose is forced to work as a burlesque dancer, and consequently develops a strong hatred for the Party. Creedy begins organizing a private militia, hoping to use V's destabilization of the Party to mount a coup against the Leader. V, maintaining surveillance on all of these various factions, appears to be manipulating them against each other.


When Gordon is murdered by Scottish gangster Alistair Harper, whom he was dealing with, Evey attempts to kill Harper in revenge but is seized, arrested, detained, and accused of attempting to murder Peter Creedy as he was meeting with Harper. In her cell between multiple bouts of interrogation and torture, Evey finds a letter from an inmate named Valerie, an actress who was imprisoned for being a lesbian. Evey's interrogator finally gives her a choice of collaboration or death; inspired by Valerie's courage and quiet defiance, she refuses to give in and is told that she is free. To her shock, Evey learns that her imprisonment was a hoax constructed by V, designed to put her through an ordeal similar to the one that shaped him. He reveals that Valerie was another Larkhill prisoner who died in the cell next to his; the letter that Evey read is the same one that Valerie had passed on to V to read. Evey's anger finally gives way to acceptance of her identity and freedom.


November 1998. V destroys the Party's communication and surveillance centres (housed in Jordan Tower and the Post Office Tower), causing the death of Etheridge, effectively shutting down both The Eye and The Ear and spurring a wave of wanton violence and hedonism which is violently suppressed by Creedy and Harper's street gangs. Meanwhile, V notes to Evey that this is not The Land of Do-As-You-Please end result he wants but rather the mere chaos in The Land of Take What You Want — an interim period that he intends to follow up with the establishment of true anarchy, a voluntarily orderly society. Finch's assistant Dominic realizes that V has had access to the Fate computer since the very beginning, explaining his foresight; this news accelerates the mental collapse of the Leader. BT Tower from the Euston Road, looking south. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Anarchist redirects here. ...


Finch travels to the abandoned site of Larkhill, on the Wiltshire Downs, where he takes LSD. His hallucinations lead him to an intuitive understanding of V, and returning to London, he deduces that V is hidden somewhere in Victoria Station, part of the abandoned London Underground, and goes to find him. V, who knows his time has come to an end, confronts Finch and lets Finch shoot him. The bleeding V returns to the Shadow Gallery and dies in Evey's arms. Evey considers unmasking V, but decides not to learn his identity; instead, she assumes it, donning one of his spare costumes. Meanwhile, Rose Almond's private vendetta has led her to assassinate the Leader and she is last seen being violently arrested by the Finger. In the ensuing chaos, Creedy's own men kill him, while Finch reports the news that V is dead. When Evey appears to the crowd as V, a general insurrection begins. Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... A hallucination is a perception in the absence of a stimulus that the person may or may not believe is real. ... Victoria station in London is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of Westminster. ... The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... “Insurrection” redirects here. ...


Evey completes V's final act of subversion. As requested by V, she performs the destruction of 10 Downing Street by giving her mentor a "Viking funeral" with an explosive-laden Underground carriage containing his body sent to detonate at the desired location. She rescues Dominic from the mob and takes him back to the Shadow Gallery, implying that she intends to train him as her successor, having vowed to help the people to create the society the original V dreamed of creating. Having removed the totalitarian old regime, there is no longer a need for destruction. Finch observes the chaos raging in the city before heading to the countryside. All forms of authority in Britain are now gone; its future is left uncertain. Thus, V has created chaos, which will allow voluntary order to occur. It is to be assumed that Evey will do her best to prevent another fascist government from arising from this order. Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ship burial. ...


Characters

Major characters

  • V: A masked revolutionary who seeks to systematically kill the leaders of Norsefire, a fascist dictatorship ruling post-apocalyptic England. He is well-versed in the arts of explosives, subterfuge, and computer hacking, and has a vast literary, cultural and philosophical intelligence. V is the only survivor of an experiment in which four dozen prisoners were given injections of a pituarin/pinearin compound called "Batch 5". The compound caused vast cellular anomalies that eventually killed all of the subjects except V, on whom many people believe granted him enhanced strength, reflexes, endurance and pain tolerance. But there is no comment on this in the book. V maintains that he is just a man. Although Dr. Surridge believes V was driven insane by the injection, the possibility that feigning insanity to some degree was the first step in V's plan for freedom is left open. Throughout the novel V almost always wears his trademark Guy Fawkes mask, a shoulder-length wig of straight dark-brown hair and an outfit consisting of black gloves, tunic, trousers and boots. When not wearing the mask, his face is not shown. When outside the Shadow Gallery, he completes this ensemble with a circa-1600's conical hat and floor-length cloak. His weapons of choice include daggers, explosives and tear gas. He is supposed to have taken his name from the Roman numeral "V", the number of the room he was held in during the experiment. This is the main explanation of the origin of his name, as it is stated in the book. However, other theories may explain his nom de guerre. For instance, there is a clear echo in his name of the rallying cry used by Winston Churchill in the struggle of the Allies in World War II to overcome the Axis Powers: "V for Victory!". Here it is simply transformed into "V for Vendetta". It should also be noticed that the V within a circle is merely an upside-down anarchy sign without the slash marking an A symbol. At the end of the book, V lets Chief Inspector Eric Finch shoot him, and dies in Evey's arms. Evey then assumes V's identity and gives V himself a Viking funeral by placing V inside a bomb-laden train whose eventual destination is 10 Downing Street. V is the only character whose speech bubbles look "distorted and twisted", instead of being perfectly oval, possibly to show that the mask distorts his voice. Whenever V quotes another author, the quotation marks are perfectly visible.
  • Evey Hammond: The main character of the story, a teenage girl who is saved by V from the "Fingermen". She is taken under V's wing, learns of his past, his current battle against the government and eventually becomes his successor, as well as finding a future successor in Chief Inspector Eric Finch's partner, Dominic Stone.
  • Eric Finch: Chief of New Scotland Yard and Minister of Investigations, which has become the "Nose", Finch is a pragmatist who sides with the government because he would rather serve in a world of order than one of chaos. He is nevertheless honorable and decent, and trusted by the Leader because he is reliable and without ambition. He eventually achieves his own catharsis and self-knowledge, expressing sorrow over his complicity with Norsefire's atrocities; nevertheless, he is the one who kills V. He is at one point referred to as Edward Finch (an error on the part of Helen Heyer).
  • Adam J. Susan: Also known as "The Leader", he is the head of the Norsefire Party and the official Leader of the country, although his power is largely ceremonial. Susan is in love with the Fate computer system and prefers its companionship to that of his fellow human beings. Susan, as his own mind slips, also expresses a solipsist belief that the only existing beings are him and 'God' (referring to the Fate computer). He is adherent of fascism and racist notions of "purity", and genuinely believes that civil liberties are dangerous and unnecessary. He appears to truly care for his people, however, and it is implied that his embrace of fascism was a response to his own loneliness.

In the end of the novel, he is assassinated by Rose Almond, the widow of one of his former lieutenants. V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... Revolutionary, when used as a noun, is a person who either advocates or actively engages in some kind of revolution. ... Norsefire is the fictional right-wing political party currently ruling the United Kingdom in Alan Moore and David Lloyds V for Vendetta comic book series. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A dictatorship is an autocratic form of government in which the government is ruled by a dictator. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Hacker is a term used to describe different types of computer experts. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... Churchill redirects here. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... For other uses, see Anarchy (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ship burial. ... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ... Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, it blowwsssss often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ... Catharsis is the Greek Katharsis word meaning purification or cleansing derived from the ancient Greek gerund καθαίρειν transliterated as kathairein to purify, purge, and adjective katharos pure or clean (ancient and modern Greek: καθαρός). // The term in drama refers to a sudden emotional breakdown or climax that constitutes overwhelming feelings of great... Adam James Susan is a fictional character in the comic book series (later graphic novel) V for Vendetta, created by writer Alan Moore and illustrator David Lloyd. ... Solipsism (Latin: solus, alone + ipse, self) is the philosophical idea that My mind is the only thing that I know exists. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ...


In the film adaptation, he is renamed "Adam Sutler".


Minor characters

  • Lewis Prothero: He was the Commander of "Larkhill", the concentration camp that once held V. Later, he becomes "The Voice of Fate", the government radio broadcaster who daily transmits "information" to the public. He is driven insane by a combination of an overdose of Batch 5 drugs and the shock of seeing his prized doll collection burned in a mock recreation of Camp Larkhill. He remains incapacitated for the rest of the story.
  • Bishop Anthony Lilliman: As the voice of the Party in the Church, Lilliman is a corrupt priest who sexually abuses the young girls in his various parishes. Like Prothero, he worked at Larkhill before being given a higher employment by the state. Lilliman was a priest who was hired to give spiritual support to the prisoners being given Batch 5 drugs. He is killed after he almost rapes Evey Hammond (who is dressed up as a young girl) when V forces him to take communion with a cyanide-laced wafer.
  • Delia Surridge: Larkhill camp doctor whom V kills by lethal injection. Because of the government's destruction of all files about Larkhill and V's vendetta, Surridge is is also the only one of V's former tormentors who feels remorse for her actions, and apologizes to him in her final moments of life.
  • Derek Almond: High-ranking official of the Norsefire government. He ran the government's secret police, known as the Finger, before he was killed by the novel's protagonist, V. Almond was replaced by Peter Creedy. While Almond himself did not figure heavily in the story, his death sets in motion one of the novel's major story arcs; that of his widow, Rose, who is left penniless and traumatized by the loss of her husband, who was cold and abusive toward her but whom she nevertheless loved. In her grief and desperation, she blames her plight on Norsefire's leader, Adam Susan, and assassinates him at the novel's climax.
  • Rose Almond: The abused wife of Derek Almond, the head of the Finger who hunted for V following the destruction of the Old Bailey and the murder of Dr. Delia Surridge. When he too is murdered, Rose becomes depressed and turns to Roger Dascombe (the broadcaster) for company. She is forced to become a showgirl as a means of supporting herself after Dascombe's death at the hands of V. After V shuts down the surveillance systems, she uses the opportunity to buy a gun and then uses it to assassinate Adam J. Susan.
  • Helen Heyer: The ruthless, scheming wife of Conrad Heyer. She uses sex and her superior intellect to keep her husband (for whom she feels nothing but contempt and only sees as a means to an end) in line, and to further her own goal of ultimately controlling the country after he becomes Leader. Ultimately, her master plan collapses and she is last seen offering her body in exchange for protection and food to a semi-drunken gang after being rejected by Finch (whom she hoped would join her in taking over what was left of the Party after her husband, Peter Creedy and Alistair Harper are all killed) and after anarchy has spilled into London.
  • Peter Creedy: A coarse, petty man who replaces Derek Almond as Security Minister of "the Finger" after the latter's death. His ambition is to replace the weakening Susan as Leader, but as part of Mrs. Heyer's plot, he is killed by Alistair Harper's thugs shortly after seizing power.
  • Conrad Heyer: In charge of the "Eye", the agency that controls the country's CCTV system. He is subservient to his wife Helen, and she intends for him to become leader, leaving her as the power behind the throne. In the end, V sends Conrad a videotape of Helen being unfaithful and he snaps, killing her lover Alistair Harper but sustaining a fatal wound from Harper's straight-edge razor in the process. When Helen learns what he has done, she is enraged at the destruction of her plans and leaves him to bleed to death, setting up a video camera connected to their TV so that he can watch himself die.
  • Dominic Stone: Younger policeman who is Inspector Finch's assistant. Dominic is the one who figures out the connection between V and the former Larkhill camp staff and V's hacking into the "Fate" computer system. At the end, Dominic is rescued from a mob by Evey and recruited to be her apprentice now that she is V - much as V did with her.
  • Valerie Page: A critically acclaimed actress who was imprisoned at Larkhill when the government found out she was a lesbian. Her tragic fate at the hands of the regime motivated V to become a freedom fighter and revolutionary, or so he says.
  • Roger Dascombe: The technical supervisor for The Party's media division and the Propaganda Minister of "the Mouth". During V's elaborate attack on Jordan Tower, he is set up as a dummy "V" and killed by the police whilst the real V makes his escape.
  • Alistair Harper: Scottish organized crime boss who kills Evey's lover Gordon. Initially he and some of his men are hired by Creedy to temporarily bolster the police force after V destroys the government's surveillance equipment, but Helen Heyer recruits him to her side to ensure Creedy's downfall by offering to place him in charge of the Finger after Conrad comes to power. He temporarily becomes Helen's lover. After Creedy's takeover, Harper fulfills his end of the bargain with Helen and kills Creedy with a straight razor. He is himself beaten to death by Conrad Heyer, but inflicts a fatal wound on him in the process.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ... This article is about the country. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Larkhill is a village in Wiltshire, England, on the edge of Salisbury Plain. ... Child sexual abuse is an umbrella term describing criminal and civil offenses in which an adult engages in sexual activity with a minor or exploits a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... Norsefire is the fictional right-wing political party currently ruling the United Kingdom in Alan Moore and David Lloyds V for Vendetta comic book series. ... This article is about secret police as organizations. ... V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Domestic disturbance redirects here. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... The climax (or turning point) of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. ... The Old Bailey. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... assassin, see Assassin (disambiguation) Jack Ruby assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald in a very public manner. ... For other uses, see Anarchy (disambiguation). ... Image:Valerie Vendetta. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ...

Themes

The series was Moore's first use of the densely detailed narrative and multiple plot lines that would feature heavily in Watchmen. Panel backgrounds are often crammed with clues and red herrings; literary allusions and wordplay are prominent in the chapter titles and in V's speech (which almost always takes the form of iambic pentameter, a poetic meter reliant on five pairs of syllables, the second syllable of each pair being more stressed than the first; its most famous usage has been in the many works of Shakespeare). For other uses, see Watchman. ... In literature, a red herring is a plot device intended to distract the reader from a more important event in the plot, usually a twist ending. ... Insert non-formatted text hereIambic pentameter is a meter in poetry. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ...


The structure of the book has several direct parallels with Gaston Leroux's Phantom of the Opera: the Shadow Gallery doubles for the Phantom's Lair, and Evey's abduction and re-education mirrors Christine Daae's. Gaston Leroux. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Christine Daae is the main female character in Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera (1910), the young singer with whom the main character Erik falls in love. ...


V reads Evey to sleep with The Magic Faraway Tree. This series is the source of "The Land of Do-As-You-Please" and "The Land of Take-What-You-Want" alluded to throughout the series. The Faraway Tree series is a popular series of childrens books written by Enid Blyton. ...


Anarchism versus fascism

The two conflicting political viewpoints of anarchism and fascism permeate the story. [5] The Norsefire regime shares every facet of fascist ideology: it is highly xenophobic, rules the nation through both fear and force, and worships strong leadership (e.g. the führerprinzip). As in most fascist regimes, there are several different types of state organisations which engage in power struggles with each other yet obey the same leader. Anarchist redirects here. ... Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ... Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Might makes right is an aphorism with several potential meanings: First, it can describe a morality which dictates that those who are the strongest will rule — and should rule — others and have the power to determine right and wrong. ... Adolf Hitler made believe he was the incarnation of the Führerprinzip The Führerprinzip, the German name for the leader principle, refers to a system with a hierarchy of leaders that resembles a military structure. ...


The fascist regime embraces total corporatism. An important aspect of corporatism is the total identification of society with state, and to think of society as a body where the different institutions are organs. This is reflected by institutions named after parts of the body: the detective branch of the police is The Nose; the surveillance organizations are The Ear and The Eye; the uniform branch of the police is The Finger (and those who work for them are called Fingermen); and the state-controlled media is known as The Mouth. Historically, corporatism or corporativism (Italian: corporativismo) refers to a political or economic system in which power is given to civic assemblies that represent economic, industrial, agrarian, social, cultural, and professional groups. ... Charles Vincent, founder of the Metropolitan Police CID The Criminal Investigation Department (CID) is the branch of all British Police and many other Commonwealth police forces to which plain clothes detectives belong. ...


In creating this system of control, Moore provocatively evokes mainstream English political thought, namely Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan, which imagined the state as one vast corporate gestalt, with its legitimacy founded on the need to maintain order and prevent indiscriminate violence (as was hinted at in the Norsefire backstory). The sovereign formed the natural 'head' of the society, which perhaps explains the anatomical nomenclature of the various arms of state government. Hobbes redirects here. ... For other uses, see Leviathan (disambiguation). ... Look up gestalt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


To keep this body healthy, fascist ideology prescribes cleansing it of unhealthy elements (i.e. the motto Strength Through Purity), thus, the totalitarianism and concentration camps. In issue #5 (see below), Delia Surridge recapitulates the Milgram experiment as explanation of why ordinary people, such as she, engage in such obedience. The connection to Anglican Christianity and Purity Through Faith is a typical feature of clerical fascism in Roman Catholic countries (i.e. southern France of the Vichy regime 1940-44, Spain under Francisco Franco 1939-75, the Independent State of Croatia under Ante Pavelić 1941-45, and Austria under Dollfuss and Schuschnigg 1933-38); such a form has taken hold specifically in England where, in reality, the Church of England (The Anglican Church) is 'established' with the Queen at its head and the state. This explains why, in story continuity, violent anti-Norsefire rebellion engulfs the non-Anglican parts of the United Kingdom (e.g. Scotland). Totalitarianism is a term employed by some political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... For the 2006 film, see V for Vendetta (film). ... The experimenter (V) orders the subject (L) to give what the subject believes are painful electric shocks to another subject (S), who is actually an actor. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... Clerical fascism is an ideological construct that combines the political and economic doctrines of fascism with theology or religious tradition. ... Motto Travail, famille, patrie French: Unoccupied zone of Vichy France (until November 1942) Capital Vichy Capital-in-exile Sigmaringen (1944-1945) Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholic Government Dictatorship Chief of state  - 1940 — 1944 Philippe Pétain President of the Council  - 1940 — 1942 Philippe Pétain  - 1942 — 1944 Pierre Laval... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), commonly known as Francisco Franco (pronounced ) or Francisco Franco y Bahamonde was leader of Spain from October 1936, as regent of Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975. ... Engelbert Dollfuss Engelbert Dollfuss (German: Dollfuß) (October 4, 1892 - July 25, 1934) was an Austrian politician and dictator. ... Kurt Schuschnigg (14 December 1897 in Riva del Garda, Austria-Hungary – 18 November 1977 in Mutters, Austria; Kurt von Schuschnigg until 1919) was an Austrian politician who in 1934 succeeded the assassinated Engelbert Dollfuss as dictator of Austria, as leader of the regime often called Austrofascism. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... This article is about the country. ...


The anarchism proposed by V is classic and built specifically around the ideas of Mikhail Bakunin, who is often associated with the idea that the old society has to be torn down before a new one can be built upon its ruins. In issue #2, V has a fictional dialogue with Madame Justice and concludes that anarchy has taught him that "justice is meaningless without freedom", a phrase which closely parallels similar statements by Bakunin: Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian: Михаил Александрович Бакунин, Michel Bakunin on the grave in Bern), (May 18 (30 N.S.), 1814 – June 19 (July 1 N.S.), 1876) was a well-known Russian revolutionary, and often considered one of the “fathers of modern anarchism. Born in the Russian Empire to a family of Russian...

Freedom without Socialism is privilege and injustice and Socialism without freedom is slavery and brutality.[6]

Several anarchist (or similar) traits encountered are related to 1960s counterculture. V's tactic of humiliating and ridiculing the fascist regime to destabilize it is like the ideas of the Situationists. In issue #8, the phase between fascism and anarchy is called Verwirrung, a German word meaning "confusion", but used here as reference to The Illuminatus! Trilogy (Book One of the trilogy is so titled). It also may be a direct reference to Discordian philosophy in general, as many other aspects of the series (chaos, the creative arts, anarchism, and the obsession with the number "5") draw similar parallels. An aspect of 1960s counterculture was the idea that domestic partnership and its legal forms can constitute a power imbalance between two people where one controls and dominates the other. This is exemplified by the relationships of Mr. and Mrs. Almond as well as Mr. and Mrs. Heyer, but this aspect is not developed theoretically. When Mr. Finch eventually uses LSD to clear his mind and uncover V's hideout, this is probably a reference to Timothy Leary who repeatedly claimed that this particular drug could be used for loosening stiff thinking in general. The Situationist International (SI) was a small group of international political and artistic agitators with roots in Marxism, Lettrism and the early 20th century European artistic and political avant-gardes. ... “Illuminatus” redirects here. ... Discordianism is a modern religion centered on the idea that chaos is as important as order. ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      A domestic partnership is a legal or personal relationship between individuals who live... For the American baseball player, see Tim Leary (baseball player). ...


Identity

V himself is something of an enigma whose history is only hinted at. The bulk of the story is told from the viewpoints of other characters: V's admirer and apprentice Evey, a sixteen-year-old factory worker; Eric Finch, a world-weary and pragmatic policeman who is hunting V; and several contenders for power within the fascist party. V's destructive acts are morally ambiguous, and a central theme of the series is the rationalisation of atrocities in the name of a higher goal, whether it is stability or freedom. The character is a mixture of an actual advocate of anarchism and the traditional stereotype of the anarchist as a terrorist. Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ...


Moore stated in an interview:

...the central question is, is this guy right? Or is he mad? What do you, the reader, think about this? Which struck me as a properly anarchist solution. I didn't want to tell people what to think, I just wanted to tell people to think and consider some of these admittedly extreme little elements, which nevertheless do recur fairly regularly throughout human history.[7]

Moore has never clarified who V supposedly was, beyond stating that V is not Evey's father; he does point out that V's identity is never revealed in the book. The ambiguity of the V character is a running theme through the work; it is left for the reader to determine for himself whether V is sane or psychotic, hero or villain. Before donning the Guy Fawkes mask herself, Evey comes to the conclusion that V's identity is unimportant compared to the role he plays, making his identity itself the idea he embodies.


This lack of personification through a fixed identity has also been construed as a way of creating an "Everyman" character, reinforcing the examples of personal responsibility taken throughout the book. This "Everyman" character is further illustrated through the use of Evey, a young, insecure, uneducated person, slowly evolving into "V".


Number 5 and letter V

There are numerous references throughout V for Vendetta (both potentially intentional or unintentional) to the number 5 and letter V, which is itself "5" in Roman numerals: Look up five in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up V, v in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ...

  • Valerie's letter has 5 pages.
  • The title "V for Vendetta" contains 5 syllables.
  • The title of each chapter begins with the letter V.
  • Beethoven's fifth symphony is used by V and noted for the prominent use of three short notes and one long, which is the Morse Code identifier for the letter V (this code was used as a call sign by the BBC during World War II, most famously in the sense of V for Victory).
  • Evey's name is composed of "E" (the fifth letter of the alphabet), "V" (5 in Roman numerals, and the fifth letter from the end of the alphabet), and "Y" (25th letter of the alphabet, or 5 squared).
  • The woman who dies in the cell next to that of V at Larkhill is named Valerie Page.
  • V is eventually identified as the prisoner from Room 5 at Larkhill Internment Camp. The five doors are labeled with Roman numerals, so Room 5 is emblazoned with a "V".
  • Valerie's room number at Larkhill Internment Camp was 4, in Roman numerals "IV", which is also the phonetic form of Evey.
  • V's hideout is accessed from the closed Victoria tube station, the damaged sign of which resembles a sideways V when Finch locates it.
  • V's personal motto consists of the Latin phrase Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici (By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe), which in turn consists of five words that begin with the letter V - V mentions the origin of the phrase is Faust.
  • Guy Fawkes Day happens on November 5. November is also the only month in the Gregorian calendar with the letter V in it.
  • As Evey appears to give her speech to the public after she has assumed the identity of V, the visual angle of the frame causes a V to be formed between the edges of the building she is standing on and the building behind her.
  • The government consists of the five branches which are identified with the five senses.
  • At Larkhill, V is injected with Batch "5".
  • V's last word, at the end of the series, starts with a V.

Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The coversheet to Beethovens 5th Symphony. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Larkhill is a village in Wiltshire, England, on the edge of Salisbury Plain. ... The Violet Carson variety of roses is an uncommon hybrid of the Mme Leon Cuny and Spartan varieties, created between 1963 and 1964. ... Front cover of Faust, Leipzig 1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethes Faust is a tragic play and the best known version of the Faust story. ... The Gunpowder Plot of 1605 involved a desperate but failed attempt by a group of provincial English Catholic extremists to kill King James I of England, his family, and most of the Protestant aristocracy in one fell swoop by blowing up the Houses of Parliament during the State Opening. ... Insert non-formatted text hereIambic pentameter is a meter in poetry. ...

Adaptations

Music

David J of the band Bauhaus and Love and Rockets, who has collaborated with Moore on other projects, recorded a version of V's song This Vicious Cabaret and other music inspired by the book, which appeared on an EP titled V for Vendetta. According to David, Moore proposed the idea for him to compose music for a set of lyrics that made up an entire chapter of the novel. Within an hour of receiving the lyrics, David had composed the music for the entire chapter. David J in concert in 2006. ... Bauhaus were an English rock band formed in Northampton in 1978. ... Love and Rockets were an alternative rock band formed in 1985 by former Bauhaus members Daniel Ash (guitars, saxophone, and vocals), David J (bass and vocals) and Kevin Haskins (drums, synthesizers). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into V For Vendetta. ... This article is about the audio format. ...


Pop Will Eat Itself also included several references to V for Vendetta on their 1989 album This is the Day...This is the Hour...This is This! - the song Can U Dig It? includes the lyric "we dig V for Vendetta" and the chorus finishes with the line "Alan Moore knows the score". Another track, The Fuses Have Been Lit, includes references to "the voice of Fate" and "The Land of Do-As-You-Please". Pop Will Eat Itself (also known as PWEI or the Poppies) were an English band formed in Stourbridge, with band members from Birmingham, Coventry and the Black Country. ...


The progressive metal band, Shadow Gallery took its name from V's hideout, as admitted in their website's FAQ. They also have an album named Room V, another obvious reference. Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Shadow Gallery is a six-piece American progressive metal band formed in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania during the early 1980s, originally under the name Sorcerer. ... Room V is the fifth album by the progressive metal group Shadow Gallery, released in 2005 (see 2005 in music). ...


Progressive nineties Brit-pop band Jocasta wrote the song "The Land of Do-As-You-Please" on their 1997 album release, "No Coincidence," released by Epic/VP music. Referenced throughout the song is V's television speech to the British population, and the book he reads to Evey. Jocasta were Tim Arnold (Vocals, Guitar, Piano ), Jack Reynolds ( Lead Guitar ), Adrian Meehan ( Drums ) and Andy Lewis ( Bass ). They formed whilst Arnold and Reynolds were still at school in the early nineties, but became what you might call professional in 1995 when all four members of the band moved to...


The Spanish metal and hip hop band Def Con Dos has a song titled "V de Vendetta" included in their 1991 album "Tercer Asalto".


7th Son, a Las Vegas based metal band, wrote a song called "V" or "V for Vendetta" and used to have an alternate logo that was an adaptation of a V for Vendetta movie poster.


Now-defunct Raleigh, NC based punk band The Trepanators had a song called "V", whose lyrics were mostly comprised of the famous nursery rhyme repeated throughout the graphic novel and film ("Remember, remember, the fifth of November..."). Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ...


British rock band Vicious Cabaret took its name from V's song This Vicious Cabaret. Vicious Cabaret Vicious Cabaret is a British rock band. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into V For Vendetta. ...


Theatre

The Swedish production company Stockholms Blodbad staged a live theatrical adaptation of the graphic novel in 2000 under the title Landet där man gör som man vill, which translates into The Land where you do as you please.


Film

The first adaptation of V for Vendetta ever filmed for the screen is one of the scenes in the documentary feature film The Mindscape of Alan Moore and was shot in early 2002. The dramatization contains no dialogue by the main character, while the Voice of Fate is used as an introduction. The Mindscape of Alan Moore is a documentary which chronicles the life and work of Alan Moore, author of acclaimed graphic novels such as From Hell and V for Vendetta. ...

Main article: V for Vendetta (film)

A film adaptation was released on 17 March 2006, directed by James McTeigue (first assistant director on The Matrix films) from a screenplay by the Wachowski brothers. Natalie Portman stars as Evey Hammond and Hugo Weaving as V together with Stephen Rea, John Hurt and Stephen Fry. John Hurt, who played the renamed High Chancellor Adam Sutler in the film V for Vendetta, also played Winston Smith in the 1984 film adaptation of George Orwell's novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four. Originally slated for a 5 November 2005 release, to coincide with Guy Fawkes Night and the 400th anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot, it was postponed until March, possibly due to the 7 July 2005 London bombings, although producers denied this was the reason.[8] This article is about the film. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James McTeigue is a film director born in Australia. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Laurence Larry Wachowski (born June 21, 1965) and Andrew Andy Wachowski (born December 29, 1967) are American film directors and writers most famous for creating The Matrix series. ... Natalie Portman (‎; born June 9, 1981) is a Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated Israeli-American actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stephen Rea (born October 31, 1946) is an Irish actor. ... For the singer, see Mississippi John Hurt. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... For the singer, see Mississippi John Hurt. ... This article is about the character in Nineteen Eighty-Four. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Guy Fawkes Night (more commonly known as Bonfire Night, Cracker Night and sometimes Fireworks Night) is an annual celebration on the evening of the 5th of November. ... A contemporary sketch of the conspirators. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ...


Alan Moore, however, distanced himself from the film, as he has with every screen adaptation of his works to date. He ended cooperation with his publisher, DC Comics, after its corporate parent, Warner Bros., failed to retract statements about Moore's supposed endorsement of the movie.[9] After reading the script, Moore remarked: For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... “WB” redirects here. ...

"[The movie] has been "turned into a Bush-era parable by people too timid to set a political satire in their own country… It's a thwarted and frustrated and largely impotent American liberal fantasy of someone with American liberal values standing up against a state run by neoconservatives—which is not what the comic V for Vendetta was about. It was about fascism, it was about anarchy, it was about England."[10] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

He later adds that if the Wachowskis had wanted to protest what was going on in the United States, then they should have used a political narrative that spoke directly at the USA's issues, similar to what Moore had done before with Britain. The film changes the original message by arguably having changed "V" into a freedom fighter instead of an anarchist. An interview with producer Joel Silver suggests that the change may not have been conscious; he identifies the V of the graphic novel as a clear-cut "superhero… a masked avenger who pretty much saves the world," a simplification that goes against Moore's own statements about V's role in the story.[11] Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Hollywood film producer. ...


Co-author and illustrator David Lloyd, by contrast, embraced the adaptation.[12] In an interview with Newsrama.com, he states: "It's a terrific film. The most extraordinary thing about it for me was seeing scenes that I'd worked on and crafted for maximum effect in the book translated to film with the same degree of care and effect. The "transformation" scene between Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving is just great. If you happen to be one of those people who admires the original so much that changes to it will automatically turn you off, then you may dislike the film—but if you enjoyed the original and can accept an adaptation that is different to its source material but equally as powerful, then you'll be as impressed as I was with it."[13]


A novelization of the film's screenplay was created by comic writer Steve Moore. V for Vendetta is a novelization of the film of the same name. ... Steve Moore is a prolific British comics writer. ...


Collections

The entire story is collected in paperback (ISBN 0-930289-52-8) and hardback (ISBN 1-401-20792-8) form.


Interviews

The DVD of the documentary feature film The Mindscape of Alan Moore contains an exclusive bonus interview with the artist David Lloyd. The Mindscape of Alan Moore is a documentary which chronicles the life and work of Alan Moore, author of acclaimed graphic novels such as From Hell and V for Vendetta. ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c Moore, Alan (1983). "Behind the Painted Smile". Warrior (17). 
  2. ^ Brown, Adrian (2004). Headspace: Inside The Mindscape Of Alan Moore (http). Ninth Art. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  3. ^ Bourdeaux, Madelyn (1994). Introduction. An Annotation of Literary, Historic and Artistic References in Alan Moore's Graphic Novel, V for Vendetta'. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  4. ^ Moore, Alan, Introduction. V for Vendetta. New York: DC Comics, 1990.
  5. ^ Authors on Anarchism - an Interview with Alan Moore. Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness. Infoshop.org. Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  6. ^ http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Mikhail_Bakunin
  7. ^ MacDonald, Heidi (2006). A FOR ALAN, Pt. 1: The Alan Moore interview (html). The Beat. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  8. ^ Griepp, Milton (2005). 'Vendetta' Delayed. ICv2.com. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  9. ^ MOORE SLAMS V FOR VENDETTA MOVIE, PULLS LoEG FROM DC COMICS. Comicbookresources (April 22 2006).
  10. ^ MTV (2006). "Alan Moore: The last angry man". MTV.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-30.
  11. ^ Douglas, Edward (2006). V for Vendetta's Silver Lining. Comingsoon.net. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  12. ^ V At Comic Con. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  13. ^ David Lloyd: A Conversation. Retrieved on 2006-07-14.

For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Infoshop. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article is about the film. ... V for Vendetta is a novelization of the film of the same name. ... V for Vendetta is the soundtrack from the 2006 film V for Vendetta, released by Astralwerks Records on March 21, 2006. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Cover art for the collected edition of V for Vendetta by David Lloyd David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore. ... V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... Evey Hammond is a fictional character in the V for Vendetta graphic novel (created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd) who becomes involved in Vs life when he rescues her from a gang of Londons secret police. ... Chief Inspector Eric Finch is a fictional character from the graphic novel V for Vendetta. ... Image:Valerie Vendetta. ... Adam James Susan is a fictional character in the comic book series (later graphic novel) V for Vendetta, created by writer Alan Moore and illustrator David Lloyd. ... Adam James Susan is a fictional character in the comic book series (later graphic novel) V for Vendetta, created by writer Alan Moore and illustrator David Lloyd. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... Norsefire is the fictional right-wing political party currently ruling the United Kingdom in Alan Moore and David Lloyds V for Vendetta comic book series. ... Storm Saxon and Heidi from DC #4 Storm Saxon is the fictional Aryan hero of a science fiction television show that forms an occasional backdrop in the Alan Moore and David Lloyd comic book (later graphic novel) V for Vendetta. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Melinda Gebbie is a comic book artist, partner of Alan Moore. ... Leah Moore (born February 4, 1978, in Northampton, England) is a British writer. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... Maxwell the Magic Cat was a comic strip written and drawn by Alan Moore under the pseudonym Jill de Ray (in parody of Gilles de Rais, a French murderer). ... Miracleman, originally known as Marvelman in his native United Kingdom, is a fictional character, a comic book superhero created in 1954 by writer-artist Mick Anglo for publisher L. Miller & Son. ... The Bojeffries Saga is a series of stories written by Alan Moore and drawn by Steve Parkhouse which started life in 1983 in Warrior. ... Skizz was a comic book strip in 2000 AD which ran from issues 308-330. ... Halo Jones, drawn by Ian Gibson The Ballad of Halo Jones is a science fiction comic strip written by Alan Moore and drawn by Ian Gibson, with lettering by Steve Potter (Books 1 & 2) and Richard Starkings (Book 3). ... Captain Britain (Brian Braddock), briefly known as Britannic, is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Jaspers Warp, also known as Crooked World, was a Marvel UK storyline featuring primarily the character Captain Britain. ... Doctor Who Weekly #1, cover dated October 17, 1979 Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a periodical devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Special Executive are a fictional group of time-travelling mercenaries, appearing in Marvel Comics. ... Cover of . ... Cover to Alan Moores Shocking Futures. ... Alan Moores Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths is a collection of some of Alan Moores previously unpublished work, as well as adaptations of his performance work by Antony Johnston. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... Sodam Yat is a fictional character, an extraterrestrial superhero published by DC Comics. ... Mogo is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a superhero and member of the Green Lantern Corps. ... For other uses, see Swamp Thing (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Cover to Batman: The Killing Joke. ... For the Man Who Has Everything is both a comic book story and a Justice League Unlimited episode // For the Man Who Has Everything is a story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons published in Superman Annual #11. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... 1963 is a six-issue comic book limited series written by Alan Moore in 1993, with art by his frequent collaborators Steve Bissette, John Totleben, and Rick Veitch; other contributors included Dave Gibbons, Don Simpson, and Jim Valentino, published by Image Comics. ... Glory is a fictional character from the Image Comics comic book series created by Rob Liefeld. ... Judgment Day was a limited series published by Awesome Comics from June to October 1997 written by acclaimed comic book writer Alan Moore. ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ... Violator is the true form of the Clown, an antagonist in Todd McFarlanes Spawn comic series. ... It has been suggested that Wildcats v2 be merged into this article or section. ... Voodoo is the name of a comic book character from DC Comics/Wildstorm. ... Supreme is a fictional superhero created by Rob Liefeld. ... Youngblood is a superhero team, and eponymous comic book, created by Rob(The shitty Artist) Liefeld. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... For the film adaptation, see The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (film). ... Promethea is a comic book series created by Alan Moore and J.H. Williams III with Mick Gray, published by Americas Best Comics/Wildstorm. ... Tom Strong was a bi-monthly comic book created by writer Alan Moore and artist Chris Sprouse published by Americas Best Comics, an imprint of DC Comics Wildstorm division. ... Terra Obscura, Volume 2, Issue #4s cover Terra Obscura is a spin-off comic book from Alan Moores Tom Strong series, written by Peter Hogan and drawn by Yanick Paquette and Karl Story. ... Tomorrow Stories was a comicbook series created by the legendary Alan Moore, for his Americas Best Comics (ABC) line, published by Wildstorm (now a subsidiary of DC Comics). ... Top 10 is a superhero comic book series published by the Americas Best Comics imprint of Wildstorm, itself an imprint of DC Comics. ... Smax is the name of a character from the comic book series Top 10 written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Gene Ha, and published by the Americas Best Comics imprint of DC Comics/Wildstorm. ... Cover to Albion issue 1, by Dave Gibbons. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... The cover of Brought To Light, art by Bill Sienkiewicz. ... For information on how large numbers are named in English, see names of large numbers. ... A Small Killing is a graphic novel by Alan Moore, published in 1991. ... From Hell is a graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell speculating upon the identity and motives of Jack the Ripper. ... Lost Girls is an erotic graphic novel depicting the sexual adventures of three important female fictional characters of the late 19th and early 20th Century, namely Alice from Alices Adventures in Wonderland, Dorothy Gale from The Wizard of Oz, and Wendy Darling from Peter Pan. ... Alan Moore This is a list of published materials by British author Alan Moore. ... Alan Moores The Courtyard is a 2003 comic book adaptation of a 1994 prose story written by Alan Moore. ... A Disease of Language is the 2005 collection of two adaptations by Eddie Campbell of two of Alan Moores performances, The Birth Caul (1999) and Snakes and Ladders (2001). ... Alan Moores Hypothetical Lizard is fictional story written by Alan Moore (story), Antony Johnston (sequential adaption), Lorenzo Lorente (art) and Sebastian Fiumara (covers) in 2005. ... Alan Moores Magic Words is a book containing some of comic creator Alan Moores songs, poems and writings turned into comics or with added art. ... The hardcover version Voice of the Fire is the title of the first novel from Alan Moore, acclaimed comic book writer. ... Alan Moores Writing for Comics was a book published in 2003 by Avatar press, containing an essay by Alan Moore, originally written in 1985, on how to write about comics successfully. ... The Thackery T Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases (2003) is an anthology of fantasy medical conditions edited by Jeff VanderMeer and Mark Roberts, and published by Night Shade Books. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a 2003 film adaption of the comic book limited series. ... Constantine is a 2005 American film loosely based on the Hellblazer comic book, with some plot elements being taken from the Dangerous Habits arc (issues #41-46). ... This article is about the film. ... Watchmen is a 2009 film adaptation of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons twelve-issue Hugo Award-winning comic book limited series Watchmen, directed by Zack Snyder. ... A Disease of Language is the 2005 collection of two adaptations by Eddie Campbell of two of Alan Moores performances, The Birth Caul (1999) and Snakes and Ladders (2001). ... The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels was a spoken word CD by Alan Moore, David J and Tim Perkins. ... The cover of Brought To Light, art by Bill Sienkiewicz. ... A Disease of Language is the 2005 collection of two adaptations by Eddie Campbell of two of Alan Moores performances, The Birth Caul (1999) and Snakes and Ladders (2001). ... The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels is the name of a trio of occultists containing writer and occultic magician Alan Moore, Bauhaus member David J, and musician Tim Perkins, who perform occultic workings. Several of these workings have been released onto CD. It was also the name... The Mindscape of Alan Moore is a documentary which chronicles the life and work of Alan Moore, author of acclaimed graphic novels such as From Hell and V for Vendetta. ... Husbands and Knives is the seventh episode of The Simpsons nineteenth season, and first aired on November 18, 2007. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
V for Vendetta (2006): Reviews (1841 words)
V for Vendetta, directed by James McTeigue, almost always has something going on that is actually interesting, inviting us to decode the character and plot and apply the message where we will.
Even if V for Vendetta isn't nearly as incendiary as it's been made out to be by some alarmist critics, there's still something enjoyably subversive about it, beginning with the way it tramples over the conventions of the contemporary action film.
V for Vendetta is a dud - far too long at nearly two and a half hours, with flat, grungy visuals, choppy editing and no sense of urgency.
V for Vendetta (456 words)
V finds a potential ally and friend in Evey (Natalie Portman), an everyday working girl at the country's only news station when he saves her from attack by the Finger Men police, and again from arrest by the police and possible torture.
V's plan is to start a revolution by blowing up Parliament on November 5th, with all of London and anyone else in Britain showing up for the fireworks.
Despite these shortcomings, V for Vendetta raises the bar for action films in direction, story, and style, and will surely have viewers talking for some time to come.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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