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Encyclopedia > Utopia
Left panel (The Earthly Paradise, Garden of Eden), from Hieronymus Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights.
Left panel (The Earthly Paradise, Garden of Eden), from Hieronymus Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights.

Utopia (from Greek: οὐ no, and τόπος, place, i.e. "no place" or "place that does not exist," as well as "perfect place") is a fictional island near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean written about by Sir Thomas More as the fictional character Raphael Hythloday (translated from the Greek as "knowing in trifles") recounts his experiences in his travels to the deliciously fictional island with a perfect social, legal, and political system. The name has come to mean, in popular parlance, an ideal society. As such, it has been used to describe both intentional communities that attempted to create an ideal society, and fictional societies portrayed in literature. The term is sometimes used pejoratively, in reference to an unrealistic ideal that is impossible to realize, and has spawned other concepts, most prominently "dystopia". Utopia is a philosophical concept coined after Sir Thomas Mores novel De Optimo Reipublicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia. ... Download high resolution version (511x1274, 184 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (511x1274, 184 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hieronymus Bosch, (latinized, actually Jheronimus Bosch; his real name Jeroen van Aken) (c. ... The Garden of Earthly Delights is the center panel of a triptych by Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch. ... Portrait of Sir Thomas More by Hans Holbein the Younger Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478–6 July 1535), posthumously known also as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and politician. ... An intentional community is a planned residential community designed to promote a much higher degree of social interaction than other communities. ... Utopian fiction is the creation of an ideal world as the setting for a novel. ...

Contents

Related terms

repressive world. Examples: George Orwell's 1984, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, Alan Moore's V for Vendetta, The Reality Bug, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Ayn Rand's Anthem, Lois Lowry's The Giver, Samuel Butler's "Erewhon" or Chuck Palahniuk's Rant . Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... For other uses, see Brave New World (disambiguation). ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic book series. ... The Reality Bug is the fourth book in the Pendragon series by D.J. MacHale. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... The Handmaids Tale is a dystopian novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, first published by McClelland and Stewart in 1985. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] known for creating a philosophy she named Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the... Anthem is a dystopian, science-fiction novella by philosopher Ayn Rand, first published in 1938. ... Lois Lowry (born March 20, 1937) is an author of childrens literature who has been awarded the Newbery Medal twice: first for Number the Stars in 1990, and again in 1994 for The Giver, her most famous and controversial work. ... This article is about the novel by Lois Lowry. ... Samuel Butler is the name of several notable persons: Samuel Butler (1612-1680), author of Hudibras Samuel Butler (1774-1839), classical scholar Samuel Butler (1835-1902), grandson of the scholar, author of Erewhon This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Erewhon Erewhon, or Over the Range is a novel by Samuel Butler, published anonymously in 1872. ... Charles Michael Chuck Palahniuk (IPA: )[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American satirical novelist and freelance journalist of Ukrainian ancestry born in Pasco, Washington. ... Rant: An Oral Biography of Buster Casey is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk released on May 1, 2007. ...

  • Eutopia is a positive utopia, different in that it means "perfect" but not "fictional". It has also been used to ironically describe the European Union[citation needed]
  • Outopia derived from the Greek 'ou' for "no" and '-topos' for "place," a fictional, non-realistic place. This is the other half from Eutopia, and the two together juxtapose to Utopia.
  • Heterotopia, the "other place", with its real and imagined possibilities (a mix of "utopian" escapism and turning virtual possibilities into reality) — example: cyberspace. Samuel R. Delany's novel Trouble on Triton is subtitled An Ambiguous Heterotopia to highlight that it is not strictly utopian (though not dystopian). The novel offers several conflicting perspectives on the concept of utopia.

More's Utopia is largely based on Plato's Republic. It is a perfect version of Republic wherein the beauties of society reign (eg: equalism and a general pacifist attitude), although its citizens are all ready to fight if need be. The evils of society, eg: poverty and misery, are all removed. It has few laws, no lawyers and rarely sends its citizens to war, but hires mercenaries from among its war-prone neighbors (these mercenaries were deliberately sent into dangerous situations in the hope that the more warlike populations of all surrounding countries will be weeded out, leaving peaceful peoples). The society encourages tolerance of all religions. Some readers have chosen to accept this imaginary society as the realistic blueprint for a working nation, while others have postulated More intended nothing of the sort. Some maintain the position that More's Utopia functions only on the level of a satire, a work intended to reveal more about the England of his time than about an idealistic society. This interpretation is bolstered by the title of the book and nation, and its apparent equivocation between the Greek for "no place" and "good place": "Utopia" is a compound of the syllable ou-, meaning "no", and topos, meaning place. But the homonymous prefix eu-, meaning "good," also resonates in the word, with the implication that the perfectly "good place" is really "no place." Escapism is mental diversion by means of entertainment or recreation, as an escape from the perceived unpleasant aspects of daily stress. ... It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... Samuel Ray Delany, Jr. ... Trouble on Triton - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The Republic (Greek: ) is an influential work of philosophy and political theory by the Greek philosopher Plato, written in approximately 360 BC. It is written in the format of a Socratic dialogue. ... Graffiti in Madrid promoting equality, reads todos somos iguales, or we are all equal. Equalism is a name often given to forms of egalitarianism (advocacy of equality) concerned with issues of gender or race. ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the specialised use of homonym in scientific nomenclature, see Homonym (botany) and Homonym (zoology). ...


Types of Utopia

Economic Utopia

These utopias are based on economics. Most intentional communities attempting to create an economic utopia were formed in response to the harsh economic conditions of the 19th century. An intentional community is a planned residential community designed to promote a much higher degree of social interaction than other communities. ...


Particularly in the early nineteenth century, several utopian ideas arose, often in response to the social disruption created by the development of commercialism and capitalism. These are often grouped in a greater "utopian socialist" movement, due to their shared characteristics: an egalitarian distribution of goods, frequently with the total abolition of money, and citizens only doing work which they enjoy and which is for the common good, leaving them with ample time for the cultivation of the arts and sciences. One classic example of such a utopia was Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward. Another socialist utopia is William Morris' News from Nowhere, written partially in response to the top-down (bureaucratic) nature of Bellamy's utopia, which Morris criticized. However, as the socialist movement developed it moved away from utopianism; Marx in particular became a harsh critic of earlier socialisms he described as utopian. (For more information see the History of Socialism article.) Commercialism, in its original meaning, is the practices, methods, aims, and spirit of commerce or business. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Utopian socialism is a term used to define the first currents of modern Socialist thought. ... Egalitarianism is the moral doctrine that equality ought to prevail among some group along some dimension. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... In classical economics and all micro-economics labour is a measure of the work done by human beings and is one of three factors of production, the others being land and capital. ... The common good is a term that can refer to several different concepts. ... Edward Bellamy, circa 1889. ... Looking Backward: 2000-1887 is a utopian novel by Edward Bellamy, a lawyer and writer from western Massachusetts, and was first published in 1888. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... News from Nowhere is a classic work of utopian fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. ... In sociological theories, bureaucracy is an organizational structure characterized by regularized procedure, division of responsibility, hierarchy, and impersonal relationships. ... Marx is a common German surname. ... The history of socialism, sometimes termed modern socialism,[1] finds its origins in the French Revolution of 1789 and the changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution, although it has precedents in earlier movements and ideas. ...


Utopias have also been imagined by the opposite side of the political spectrum. For example, Robert A. Heinlein's The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress portrays an individualistic and libertarian utopia. Capitalist utopias of this sort are generally based on perfect market economies, in which there is no market failure—or the issue of market failure is never addressed, any more than socialist utopias address the issue of planning failures. Also consider Eric Frank Russell's book The Great Explosion (1963) whose last section details an economic and social utopia. This forms the first mention of the idea of Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS). Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress cover The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress is a 1966 science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein about a lunar penal colonys revolt against rule from Earth. ... Individualism is a term used to describe a moral, political, or social outlook that stresses human independence and the importance of individual self-reliance and liberty. ... For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Market failure is a term used by economists to describe the condition where the allocation of goods and services by a market is not efficient. ... Eric Frank Russell (January 6, 1905 - February 28, 1978) was an English science fiction author, producing some of the best humorous science fiction of his time. ... The Great Explosion is a satirical science-fiction novel by Eric Frank Russell, first published in 1962. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


A blend of socialism and capitalism is seen by few as the type of economy in a utopia. It talks about the idea of small community owned enterprises working under the capitalist model of economy. Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ...


Political and historical utopia

Political utopias are ones in which the government establishes a society that is striving toward perfection. Many such governments tend to be harsh in their execution of laws and allow little individualism if it conflicts with their primary goals. Many strive for a controlled society where the state or government replaces religious and family values (and loyalties for that matter). An example of this kind of society is one based on dictatorship. At the time of Hitler's reign, some Germans may have considered Germany to be doing very well before it started World War II. For many Germans, this was a Utopia. Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


A global utopia of world peace is often seen as one of the possible inevitable endings of history. World peace is an ideal of freedom, peace, and happiness among and within all nations. ... The End of History and the Last Man is a 1992 book by Francis Fukuyama, expanding on his 1989 essay The End of History?, in which he argues the controversial thesis that the end of the Cold War signals the end of the progression of human history: What we may...


Sparta was a militaristic utopia founded by Lycurgus (though some, especially Athenians, may have considered it a dystopia). It was a Greek power until its defeat by the Thebans at the battle of Leuctra. For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ... In Ancient Greece and/or Greek mythology, the name Lycurgus/Lykurgus can refer to: An alternate name for Lycomedes. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... Combatants Thebes Sparta Commanders Epaminondas Cleombrotus I † Strength 6,000–7,000 10,000–11,000 Casualties Unknown About 2,000 The Battle of Leuctra is a battle fought between the Thebans and the Spartans and their allies in the neighbourhood of Leuctra, a village in Boeotia in the territory...


Religious utopia

New Harmony, a utopian attempt; depicted as proposed by Robert Owen
New Harmony, a utopian attempt; depicted as proposed by Robert Owen

These utopias are based on religious ideals, and are to date those most commonly found in human society. Their members are usually required to follow and believe in the particular religious tradition that established the utopia. Some permit non-believers or non-adherents to take up residence within them; others (such as the Community at Qumran) do not. Image File history File links New_Harmony_by_F._Bate_(View_of_a_Community,_as_proposed_by_Robert_Owen)_printed_1838. ... Image File history File links New_Harmony_by_F._Bate_(View_of_a_Community,_as_proposed_by_Robert_Owen)_printed_1838. ... New Harmony is a town located in Posey County, Indiana, 15 miles (24 km) north of Mount Vernon, Indiana, the county seat, on the Wabash River. ... For other uses, see Robert Owen (disambiguation). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... Qumran (Hebrew:חירבת קומראן Khirbet Qumran) is located on a dry plateau about a mile inland from the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel. ...


The Jewish, Christian and Islamic ideas of the Garden of Eden and Heaven may be interpreted as forms of utopianism, especially in their folk-religious forms. Such religious "utopias" are often described as "gardens of delight", implying an existence free from worry in a state of bliss or enlightenment. They postulate existences free from sin, pain, poverty and death, and often assume communion with beings such as angels or the houri. In a similar sense the Hindu concept of Moksha and the Buddhist concept of Nirvana may be thought of as a kind of utopia. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into utopia. ... Folk religion consists of beliefs, superstitions and rituals transmitted from generation to generation of a specific culture. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... In Islam, the ḥūr or ḥūrÄ«yah (Arabic: ) are described as (splendid)[1] companions of equal age (well-matched)[2], lovely eyed[3], of modest gaze[4], voluptuous,[5] pure beings or companions pure of paradise, denoting humans and jinns who enter paradise after being recreated anew in... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Moksha (disambiguation). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... This article is about the Buddhist concept. ...


However, the usual idea of Utopia, which is normally created by human effort, is more clearly evident in the use of these ideas as the bases for religious utopias, as members attempt to establish/reestablish on Earth a society which reflects the virtues and values they believe have been lost or which await them in the Afterlife. For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ...


In the United States and Europe during the Second Great Awakening of the nineteenth century and thereafter, many radical religious groups formed utopian societies. They sought to form communities where all aspects of people's lives could be governed by their faith. Among the best-known of these utopian societies was the Shaker movement, which originated in England in the 18th century but moved to America shortly after its founding. Other good examples are Fountain Grove, Riker's Holy City and 15 other Californian utopian colonies between 1855 and 1955 (Hine), as well as SointulaPDF (198 KiB) in B.C., Canada and 15 other socialist and religious communities round the world, including Finnish "kolkhozes"in the largest utopian society ever, the Soviet Union (Peltoniemi). For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Second Great Awakening  (1800–1830s) was the second great religious revival in United States  history and consisted of renewed personal salvation experienced in revival meetings. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

See also: End of the world (religion), Eschatology, Millennialism, and Utopianism

Many religious faiths teach that the end of the world will occur at some point in the future. ... For the eschatological beliefs of various religions, see End Times. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into utopia. ...

Scientific and technological utopia

See also: hedonistic imperative, transhumanism, technological singularity, abolitionist society, techno-utopia, and Technocracy movement

These are set in the future, when it is believed that advanced science and technology will allow utopian living standards; for example, the absence of death and suffering; changes in human nature and the human condition. These utopian societies tend to change what "human" is all about. Technology has affected the way humans have lived to such an extent that normal functions, like sleep, eating or even reproduction, has been replaced by an artificial means. Other kinds of this utopia envisioned, include a society where humans have struck a balance with technology and it is merely used to enhance the human living condition (e.g. Star Trek). In place of the static perfection of a utopia, libertarian transhumanists envision an "extropia", an open, evolving society allowing individuals and voluntary groupings to form the institutions and social forms they prefer. The Hedonistic Imperative is a manifesto by David Pearce outlining the goals of an endeavor to use genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and neuroscience to eliminate suffering in all sentient life. ... Posthuman Future, an illustration by Michael Gibbs for The Chronicle of Higher Educations look at how biotechnology will change the human experience, has become one of the secular icons representing transhumanism. ... When plotted on a logarithmic graph, 15 separate lists of paradigm shifts for key events in human history show an exponential trend. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A techno-utopia is an ideal but imaginary community, in which laws, government, and social conditions are solely operating for the benefit and well-being of all its inhabitants, set in the near- or far-future, when advanced science and technology will allow these ideal living standards to exist; for... The Technocracy Monad, representing balance, is the official symbol of The Technocracy movement is a social movement that started in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s and advocates a form of society where the welfare of human beings is optimized by means of scientific analysis and widespread use... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... The Standard of living refers to the quality and quantity of goods and services available to people. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation), Dead (disambiguation), Death (band) or Deceased (band). ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... For other uses, see Human nature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Human condition (disambiguation). ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Libertarian transhumanism is a political philosophy synthesizing libertarianism and transhumanism. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Garrett Jones published "Ourtopia" in 2004, arguing that, instead of a 'no place' we need to use all the resources at our command to make 'our place' proof against climate change and obsolete tribalisms. Buckminster Fuller presented a theoretical basis for technological utopianism and set out to develop a variety of technologies ranging from maps to designs for cars and houses which might lead to the development of such a utopia. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... OURTOPIA The term coined by Garrett Jones in his 2004 book of that name. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American visionary, designer, architect, poet, author, and inventor. ...


One notable example of a technological and libertarian socialist utopia is Scottish author Iain M. Bank's Culture. Libertarian socialism is a political philosophy dedicated to opposing coercive forms of authority and social hierarchy, in particular the institutions of capitalism and the state. ... Iain Menzies Banks (officially Iain Banks, born on 16 February 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife) is a Scottish writer. ... The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ...


A variation on this theme was found earlier in the theories of Eugenics. Believing that many traits were hereditary in nature, the eugenists believed that not only healthier, more intelligent race could be bred, but many other traits could be selected for, including "talent", or against, including drunkness and criminality. This called for "positive eugenics" encouraging those with good genes to have children, and "negative eugenics" discouraging those with bad genes, or preventing them altogether by confinement or forcible sterilization. Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Eugenics Conference [7], 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ...


Opposing this optimism is the prediction that advanced science and technology will, through deliberate misuse or accident, cause environmental damage or even humanity's extinction. Critics advocate precautions against the premature embrace of new technologies. “Positive Attitude” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Extinction (disambiguation). ... The precautionary principle is a moral and political principle which states that if an action or policy might cause severe or irreversible harm to the public, in the absence of a scientific consensus that harm would not ensue, the burden of proof falls on those who would advocate taking the...


Utopianism

Utopianism refers to the various social and political movements, and a significant body of upheld.


In many cultures, societies, religions, and cosmogonies, there is some myth or memory of a distant past when humankind lived in a primitive and simple state, but at the same time one of perfect happiness and fulfillment. In those days, the various myths tell us, there was an instinctive harmony between man and nature. Men's needs were few and their desires limited. Both were easily satisfied by the abundance provided by nature. Accordingly, there were no motives whatsoever for war or oppression. Nor was there any need for hard and painful work. Humans were simple and pious, and felt themselves close to the gods. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... In spiritual terminology, piety is a virtue. ...


These mythical or religious archetypes are inscribed in all the cultures and resurge with special vitality when people are in difficult and critical times. However, the projection of the myth does not take place towards the remote past, but either towards the future or towards distant and fictional places (for example, The Land of Cockaygne, a straightforward parody of a paradise), imagining that at some time of the future, at some point of the space or beyond the death must exist the possibility of living happily. Pieter Bruegel the Elders The Land of Cockaigne, painted in 1567. ...


These myths of the earliest stage of humankind have been referred to by various names, as the following examples will demonstrate:


Golden Age

The Golden Age by Lucas Cranach the Elder.
The Golden Age by Lucas Cranach the Elder.

The Greek poet Hesiod, around the 8th century BC, in his compilation of the mythological tradition (the poem Works and Days), explained that, prior to the present era, there were other four progressively most perfect ones, the oldest of which was called the Golden age. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x693, 167 KB) Das goldene Zeitalter um 1530 Holz 73,5 x 105,5 in München Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlung File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Golden... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x693, 167 KB) Das goldene Zeitalter um 1530 Holz 73,5 x 105,5 in München Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlung File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Golden... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia, Greece. ... The book Works and Days Works and Days (in ancient Greek , which sometimes goes by the Latin name Opera et Dies, as in the OCT) is a Greek poem of some 800 verses written by Hesiod (around 700 BC). ... The Ages of Man are the stages of human existence on the Earth according to Classical mythology. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Also Plutarch, the Greek historian and biographer of the 1st century, dealt with the blissful and mythic past of the humanity. Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ...


Arcadia Arcadia, e g in Sir Philip Sidney's prose romance The Old Arcadia (1580). Originally a region in the Peloponnesus, Arcadia became a synonym for any rural area that serves as a pastoral setting, as a locus amoenus ("delightful place"): Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... Philip Sidney Sir Philip Sidney (November 30, 1554 - October 17, 1586) became one of the Elizabethan Ages most prominent figures. ... The Countess of Pembrokes Arcadia, also known simply as The Arcadia is by far Sir Philip Sidneys most ambitious work. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... For other uses, see Pastoral (disambiguation). ...


The Biblical Garden of Eden


The Biblical Garden of Eden as depicted in Genesis 2 (Authorized Version of 1611): 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ...

And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil. [...]
And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. [...]
And the Lord God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; [...] And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof; and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made he a woman, and brought her unto the man.

The Land of Cokaygne


The Land of Cokaygne [also spelled Cockaygne or Cockaigne] (in the German tradition referred to as "Schlaraffenland"[1]) has been aptly called the "poor man's heaven", being a popular fantasy of pure hedonism and thus a foil for the innocent and instinctively virtuous life that is depicted in all the other accounts mentioned above. Cockaygne is a land of extravagance and excess rather than simplicity and piety. There is freedom from work, and every material thing is free and available. Cooked larks fly straight into one's mouth; the rivers run with wine; sexual promiscuity is the norm; and there is a fountain of youth which keeps everyone young and active. Pieter Bruegel the Elders „Das Schlaraffenland“ (The Land of Cockaigne), painted in 1567. ... This article does not cite any sources. ... Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... In spiritual terminology, piety is a virtue. ... “Promiscuous” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fountain of Youth (disambiguation). ...


There is a medieval poem (c. 1315) written in rhyming couplets which is entitled "The Land of Cokaygne": For the Angel episode, see Couplet (Angel episode). ...

Far in the sea, to the west of Spain,
Is a country called Cokaygne.
There's no land not anywhere,
In goods or riches to compare.
Though Paradise be merry and bright
Cokaygne is of far fairer sight....

Finding utopia

All these myths also express some hope that the idyllic state of affairs they describe is not irretrievably and irrevocably lost to mankind, that it can be regained in some way or other. An idyll is a short poem, descriptive of rustic life, written in the style of Theocrituss short pastoral poems, the Idylls. ...


One way would be to look for the earthly paradise -- for a place like Shangri-La, hidden in the Tibetan mountains and described by James Hilton in his Utopian novel Lost Horizon (1933). Such paradise on earth must be somewhere if only man were able to find it. Christopher Columbus followed directly in this tradition in his belief that he had found the Garden of Eden when, towards the end of the 15th century, he first encountered the New World and its peoples. Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the novel, Lost Horizon, written by British writer James Hilton in 1933. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... James Hilton (September 9, 1900 - December 20, 1954) was a popular English novelist of the first half of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Lost Horizon. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ...


Another way of regaining the lost paradise (or Paradise Lost, as 17th century English poet John Milton calls it) would be to wait for the future, for the return of the Golden Age. According to Christian theology, man's Fall from Paradise, caused by man alone when he disobeyed God ("but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it"), has resulted in the wickedness of character that all human beings have been born with since ("Original Sin") such as Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four became the primary method of Utopian expression and rejection. (Kumar 1987) For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... “Original Sin” redirects here. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ...


Still, post-war era also found some Utopianist fiction for some future harmonic state of humanity (e.g. Demolition Man (film)). Demolition Man is an American science fiction-action film released in 1993. ...


In a scientific approach to finding utopia, The Global scenario group, an international group of scientists founded by Paul Raskin, used scenario analysis and backcasting to map out a path to an environmentally sustainable and socially equitable future. Its findings suggest that a global citizens movement is necessary to steer political, economic, and corporate entities toward this new sustainability paradigm. The Global Scenario Group (GSG) was a team of environmental scholars, headed by Paul Raskin, who used scenario analysis to analyze future paths for world development in the face of environmental pressures and crises. ... Dr. Paul Raskin is President of the Tellus Institute where he directs a team of professionals in environmental, resource, and development policy research. ... Scenario analysis is a process of analyzing possible future events by considering alternative possible outcomes (scenarios). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Examples of utopia

See also utopian and dystopian fiction Utopian fiction is the creation of an ideal world as the setting for a novel. ...

*Sheri S. Tepper's Beauty, Grass Observe & Control was created by Tom Cohen (aka Gnuth) in 2002, in Tel-Aviv, Israel. ... Map of Paraguay, drawn by John Lane, brother of William Lane. ... The Republic is an influential dialogue by Plato, written in the first half of the 4th century BC. This Socratic dialogue mainly is about political philosophy and ethics. ... Philosopher-kings are the hypothetical rulers of Platos utopian Kallipolis. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The Laws is Platos last and longest dialogue. ... The City of God, opening text, created c. ... Events May 8 - Honorius signs an edict providing tax relief for the provinces of Italy that have been plundered by the Visigoths. ... Events Saint Augustine of Hippo publishes the City of God. ... Augustinus redirects here. ... De Optimo Reipublicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. ... // Events March - With the death of Ferdinand II of Aragon, his grandson Charles of Ghent becomes King of Spain as Carlos I. July - Selim I of the Ottoman Empire declares war on the Mameluks and invades Syria. ... For the Elizabethan play, see Sir Thomas More (play). ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Johannes Valentinus Andreae (1586-1654), a. ... Front page of The Anatomy of Melancholy The Anatomy of Melancholy (Full title The Anatomy of Melancholy, What it is: With all the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostickes, and Several Cures of it. ... 1621 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Burton Robert Burton (February 8, 1577 – January 25, 1640) was an English scholar and vicar at Oxford University, best known for writing The Anatomy of Melancholy. ... The City of the Sun (Italian: La città del Sole; Latin: Civitas Solis) is a philosophical work by the Italian Dominican philosopher Tommaso Campanella. ... Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tommaso Campanella (September 5, 1568–May 21, 1639), baptized Giovanni Domenico Campanella, was an Italian philosopher, theologian and poet. ... Columbus Santa Maria, by Eertvelt The New Atlantis is a utopian novel written by Francis Bacon in 1626. ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ... Zwaanendael was a settlement established in 1631 by Dutch settlers in the area of present-day Lewes, Delaware. ... Pieter Corneliszoon Plockhoy (also Pieter Cornelisz Plockhoy van Zierikzee or Peter Cornelius van Zurick-zee, born c. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... For other uses, see Brave New World (disambiguation). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the novel, Lost Horizon, written by British writer James Hilton in 1933. ... For other uses, see Lost Horizon. ... James Hilton (September 9, 1900 - December 20, 1954) was a popular English novelist of the first half of the 20th century. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Islandia could refer to: The community of Islandia, Florida The community of Islandia, New York The book Islandia by Austin Tappan Wright This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Austin Tappan Wright (1883-1931) was an American legal scholar and author, best remembered for his major work of Utopian fiction, Islandia. ... Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... Burrhus Frederic Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990), Ph. ... Walden Two (1948) is a novel by B.F. Skinner which described a fictional utopia in which a thousand people have obtained a good life modeled after Thoreaus experiment in living near Walden pond. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Magellanic Cloud (Polish title: ObÅ‚ok Magellana) is a science fiction novel by Stanislav Lem (1955). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... StanisÅ‚aw Lem ( , September 12, 1921 – March 27, 2006) was a Polish science fiction, philosophical and satirical writer. ... Andromeda: A Space-Age Tale a. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Ivan Antonovich Efremov (Иван Антонович Ефремов) (1907-1972) was a Russian science fiction author. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... For other uses, see Brave New World (disambiguation). ... The Great Explosion is a satirical science-fiction novel by Eric Frank Russell, first published in 1962. ... Eric Frank Russell (January 6, 1905 - February 28, 1978) was an English science fiction author, producing some of the best humorous science fiction of his time. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926–July 31, 2001) was an American science fiction author of the genres Golden Age. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Imagine is a utopian-themed song performed by John Lennon, which appears on his 1971 album, Imagine. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas is a story by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsÉ™lÉ™ ËŒkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... For the late American actress, see Kim Stanley. ... Always Coming Home is a novel by Ursula K. Le Guin published in 1985. ... This article is about the year. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsÉ™lÉ™ ËŒkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... The Kingdom of Zeal. ... Chrono Trigger ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Hedonistic Imperative is a manifesto by David Pearce outlining the goals of an endeavor to use genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and neuroscience to eliminate suffering in all sentient life. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Online means being connected to the Internet or another similar electronic network, like a bulletin board system. ... Look up manifesto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... David Pearce is a British philosopher who promotes the abolition of suffering in all sentient life. ... Kenyans examining insect-resistant transgenic Bt corn. ... Nanotechnology refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale, normally 1 to 100 nanometres, and the fabrication of devices within that size range. ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Not to be confused with sapience. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... This article is about the year. ... Laurence Larry Wachowski (born June 21, 1965) and Andrew Andy Wachowski (born December 29, 1967) are American film directors and writers most famous for creating The Matrix series. ... This article is about the simulation technology. ... AI redirects here. ... Movie poster for The Matrix Revolutions, featuring the various copies of Agent Smith. ... K-PAX (2001) is a mystery and/or sci-fi drama about a mental patient who claims he is an alien. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Matriarchy is a gynocentric form of society, in which power is with the female and especially with the mothers of a community. ... OURTOPIA The term coined by Garrett Jones in his 2004 book of that name. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The word seeing can mean more than one thing: In common usage, the word means visual perception In astronomy, seeing is a technical term related to the blurring effects of air turbulence in the atmosphere In the occult seeing refers to the sight or the ability to see auras or... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Globus Cassus is a utopian project for the transformation of Planet Earth into a much bigger, hollow, artificial world with an ecosphere on its inner surface. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Celebration, Florida is a census-designated place and an unincorporated master-planned community in Osceola County in the U.S. state of Florida, near Walt Disney World Resort. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dramedy, a portmanteau of drama and comedy, is a genre of movies and television in which the lines between these very different genres were blurred. ... For other uses, see charm. ... Hermann Hesse (pronounced ) (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. ... The Glass Bead Game (German: Das Glasperlenspiel) is the last work and magnum opus of the German author Hermann Hesse. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... News from Nowhere is a classic work of utopian fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Lois Lowry (born March 20, 1937) is an author of childrens literature who has been awarded the Newbery Medal twice: first for Number the Stars in 1990, and again in 1994 for The Giver, her most famous and controversial work. ... This article is about the novel by Lois Lowry. ... Doris Lessing CH OBE (born Doris May Tayler in Kermanshah, Persia (now Iran),[1] on 22 October 1919[2]) is a British writer, author of works such as the novels The Grass is Singing and The Golden Notebook. ... Shikasta is the title of a science fiction novel by author Doris Lessing and also the name of a fictional planet in this book. ... Memoirs of a survivor is a novel by Doris Lessing. ... Elisabeth Vonarburg (born August 5, 1947 in Paris, France) is a Canadian science fiction author who writes in French. ... Octavia Estelle Butler (June 22, 1947 — February 24, 2006) was an American science fiction writer, one of very few African-American women in the field. ... The Xenogenesis trilogy (currently published as the one volume novel, Liliths Brood, which was released in 2000) was written by Octavia Butler. ... Sheri Stewart Tepper (born July 16, 1929) is a prolific American author of science fiction, horror and mystery novels; she is particularly known as a feminist science fiction writer, often with an ecofeminist slant. ...

  • Joanna Russ's The Female Man
  • Suzette Haden Elgin's Native Tongue
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland
  • Scott Westerfeld's Uglies shows a futuristic society where one transforms greatly aesthetically at the age of 16, through intense plastic surgery, to live in a society where all is peaceful and beautiful.
  • Skinny Utopia, a fantasy of a barbed enclosure containing only subjects with underweight BMIs. Popular among the Melbourne fashion scene.
  • Rapture, a failed attempt to create an underwater utopia from the video game BioShock.
  • German power metal band Domain's concept album Last Days of Utopia tells the story of a man who, after finding his life ruined due to an incident we are not told about, goes across the sea to seek a perfect life, and finds an island called Utopia, where all his dreams are answered. Unfortunately, after telling the people of Utopia his tragic past, they begin to question and even rebel against their gods, ultimately resulting in the destruction of the perfect land.
  • Doctor Who has had an episode titled Utopia, involving the concept of escaping to Utopia, during the the Doctor's final showdown with the Master. Uptopia is a perfet society.Bold text'

Joanna Russ (born February 22, 1937), American writer and feminist, is the author of a number of works of Science Fiction (among other types of writing), including The Female Man, an aclaimed SF novel and pioneering meditation on how differing societies might produce very different versions of the same person... The Female Man is a feminist science fiction novel by Joanna Russ. ... Suzette Haden Elgin is an American science fiction author. ... Charlotte Perkins Gilman (July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935) was a prominent American poet, non-fiction writer, short story writer, novelist, lecturer, and social reformer. ... Herland is a utopian novel from 1915, written by feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman. ... Scott Westerfeld (born May 5, 1963) is a New York Times bestselling author of science fiction and young adult literature. ... Uglies is the first book in The Uglies Trilogy, written by Scott Westerfeld about a young girl named Tally Youngblood. ... BioShock is a first-person shooter[10] video game by 2K Boston/2K Australia (previously Irrational Games),[11] designed by Ken Levine. ... This article is about the television series. ... Look up master in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Related terms and concepts

Abolitionism is a bioethical school and movement which proposes the use of biotechnology to maximize happiness and minimize suffering while working towards the abolition of involuntary suffering. ... Bioregional democracy (or the Bioregional State) is a set of environment concerns, e. ... Christian anarchism is any of several traditions which combine anarchism with Christianity. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Eco-Communalism is an environmental philosophy based on ideals of simple living, local economies, and self-sufficiency (often associated with the ideologies of socialism, communalism, and sustainability). ... Ecotopia: The Notebooks and Reports of William Weston is the title of a seminal book by Ernest Callenbach, published in 1975. ... El Dorado (Spanish for the gilded one) is a legend that began with the story of a South American tribal chief who covered himself with gold dust. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... An intentional community is a planned residential community designed to promote a much higher degree of social interaction than other communities. ... Kibbutz Dan, near Qiryat Shemona, in the Upper Galilee, 1990s A kibbutz (Hebrew: ; plural: kibbutzim: קיבוצים; gathering or together) is an Israeli collective intentional community. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... Paradise, Jan Bruegel Paradise is an English word from Persian roots that is generally identified with the Garden of Eden or with Heaven. ... A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ... A phalanstère was a type of building designed for an utopian community and developed in the early 1800s by Charles Fourier. ... Regional planning is a branch of land use planning and deals with the efficient placement of land use activities, infrastructure and settlement growth across a significantly larger area of land than an individual city or town. ... Simple living (or voluntary simplicity) is a lifestyle individuals may pursue for a variety of motivations, such as spirituality, health, or ecology. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Techno-utopianism refers to any ideology based on the belief that advanced science and technology will eventually bring about a techno-utopia, a future society with ideal living conditions for all its citizens. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... PIA00571: Ice on Mars Utopia Planitia Again (NASA/JPL) Utopia Planitia is the Martian location where the Viking 2 Mars lander arrived and first explored on September 3, 1976. ... Utopian fiction is the creation of an ideal world as the setting for a novel. ...

References

  • Kumar, Krishan (1991) Utopianism (Milton Keynes: Open University Press) ISBN 0-335-15361-5
  • Manuel, Frank & Manuel, Fritzie (1979) Utopian Thought in the Western World (Oxford: Blackwell) ISBN 0-674-93185-8
  • Hine, Robert V. (1983) California's Utopian Colonies (University of California Press) ISBN 0-520-04885-7
  • Kumar, K (1987) Utopia and Anti-utopia in Modern Times (Oxford: Blackwell) ISBN 0-631-16714-5

External links

  • Full text of Thomas More's Utopia from Project Gutenberg (English)
  • Full Latin text of Thomas More's Utopia from The Latin Library
  • Utopia - The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition, 2001
  • Society for Utopian Studies is the Main Page for the Society for Utopian Studies, an international, interdisciplinary association devoted to the study of utopianism in all its forms, with a particular emphasis on literary and experimental utopias.
  • www.utopias.info History of the 15 Finnish utopian settlements in Africa, Americas, Asia, Australia and Europe.
  • achievingutopia.org provides a guide to how we might achieve utopia.
  • Island Foundation
  • Towards Another Utopia of The City [2]PDF (1.46 MiB) Institut of Urban Design Bremen, Germany
  • Utopias - a learning resource from the British Library
  • ShangrilaTimes.com SHANGRILA TIMES - Post Deliverance Utopian Digital Publication Running Live Now - A Global Community Service
  • Utopia and Utopianism is an academic journal specialising in Utopian Studies.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Utopia by Swirve.com (91 words)
Utopia is a medieval fantasy game played on the web directly through your browser - no downloads necessary.
Join today and get involved in one of the most unique and exciting experiences on the internet.
Learn about each of the Utopia Gaming Servers HERE.
Utopia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (822 words)
The description of a utopia enables an author not only to set down criticisms of evils in the contemporary social scene but also to outline vast and revolutionary reforms without the necessity of describing how they will be effected.
With the Renaissance the ideal of a utopia became more worldly, but the religious element in utopian thinking is often present thereafter, such as in the politico-religious ideals of 17th-century English social philosophers and political experimenters.
The device of describing a utopia in satire or for the exercise of wit is almost as old as the serious utopia.
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