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Encyclopedia > Ursula K. Le Guin
Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin at an informal bookstore Q&A session, July 2004
Born: October 21, 1929
Berkeley, California, United States
Occupation: Novelist
Nationality: American
Genres: Science fiction, fantasy
Influenced: Neil Gaiman, Susanna Clarke
Website: http://www.ursulakleguin.com

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. She has written novels, poetry, children's books, essays, and short stories, most notably in the fantasy and science fiction genres. Download high resolution version (480x640, 57 KB)Ursula K. Le Guin Meet-the-author Q&A session; Bookworks bookstore, Albuquerque, NM, USA; July 2004. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 with a Hugo award Susanna Clarke (b. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, a making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


She was first published in the 1960s. Her works explore Taoist, anarchist, feminist, psychological and sociological themes. She has received several Hugo and Nebula awards, and was awarded the Gandalf Grand Master award in 1979 and the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Grand Master Award in 2003. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... Anarchism is a political philosophy or group of philosophies and attitudes centered on rejection of any form of compulsory authority[1] and government[2] (cf. ... Feminism comprises a number of social, cultural and political movements, theories and moral philosophies that are concerned with the impact of cultural, political, and economic practices and inequalities on discrimination against women. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhē, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Gandalf Grand Master Award for life achievement in fantasy writing was awarded annually by the World Science Fiction Society from 1974 to 1980. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced // or //), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ... The Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award is an award given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. ...

Contents

Biography

Le Guin was born and raised in Berkeley, California, the daughter of the anthropologist Alfred L. Kroeber and the writer Theodora Kroeber. Her father was granted the first Ph.D. in Anthropology in the United States in 1901 (Columbia University). She became interested in literature when she was very young. At the age of eleven she submitted her first story to the magazine Astounding Science Fiction (it was rejected). Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the comparative study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... Alfred Louis Kroeber Alfred Louis Kroeber (June 11, 1876–October 5, 1960) was one of the most influential figures in American anthropology in the first half of the twentieth century. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Theodora Kracaw Kroeber (1897-1979) was a writer and anthropologist best known for her interpretations of the oral traditions of several native Californian cultures. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ...


She received her B.A. (Phi Beta Kappa) from Radcliffe College in 1951, and M.A. from Columbia University in 1952. She later studied in France, where she met her husband, historian Charles Le Guin. They were married in 1953. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Her earliest writings (little published at the time, but some appeared in adapted form much later in Orsinian Tales and Malafrena), were non-fantastic stories of imaginary countries. Searching for a publishable way to express her interests, she returned to her early interest in science fiction and began to be published regularly in the early 1960s. She became famous after the publication of her 1969 novel The Left Hand of Darkness, which won the Hugo and Nebula awards. Orsinian Tales is a collection of short stories by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Malafrena is a novel published in 1979 by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Map of the Land of Oz, the fictional country in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Map of the fictional island of Sodor used in the Thomas the Tank Engine stories Fictitious countries used in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four A guidebook produced about the fictional country Molvanîa... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ...


Le Guin has lived in Portland, Oregon since 1958. She has three children and four grandchildren. Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Themes

Much of Le Guin's science fiction places a strong emphasis on the social sciences, including sociology and anthropology, thus placing it in the subcategory known as soft science fiction. Her writing often makes use of unusual alien cultures to convey a message about our own culture; one example is the exploration of sexual identity through the hermaphroditic race in The Left Hand of Darkness, which forms an important plank in the canon of feminist science fiction. The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the comparative study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... Soft science fiction, or soft SF, like its complementary opposite hard science fiction, is a descriptive term that points to the role and nature of the science content in a science fiction story. ... “Green people” redirects here. ... Sexual identity is the sex with which a person identifies, or is identified. ... The 1st-century BC sculpture The Reclining Hermaphrodite, in the Museo Nazionale Romano, Palazzo Massimo Alle Terme in Rome A hermaphrodite is an organism that possesses both male and female sex organs during its life. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... LeGuins Left Hand Of Darkness Feminist science fiction is a subgenre of science fiction that focuses on the examination of womens roles in society. ...


A number of Le Guin's science fiction works, including her award-winning novels The Dispossessed and The Left Hand of Darkness, are set in a future, post-Imperial galactic civilization loosely connected by a co-operative body known as the Ekumen. The Ekumen is very specifically not in any sense a governing body, but rather a conduit for the exchange of information, goods, and mutual cultural understanding. Novels such as The Left Hand of Darkness and The Telling deal with the consequences of the arrival of Ekumen envoys (known as "mobiles") on remote planets and the culture shock that ensues. The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia is a 1974 utopian science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, set in the same fictional universe as that of The Left Hand of Darkness (the Ekumen universe). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Hainish Cycle is the setting for a number of science fiction novels and stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Telling is a 2000 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin in her Ekumen. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Le Guin creates believable worlds populated by strongly sympathetic characters (regardless of whether they are technically 'human'). Le Guin's worlds are made believable by the attention she pays to the ordinary actions and transactions of everyday life. For example in 'Tehanu' it is central to the story that the main characters are concerned with the everyday business of looking after animals, tending gardens and doing domestic chores. Her works often explore political and cultural themes from an "un-Earthly" perspective. Le Guin has also written fiction set much closer to home; many of her short stories are set in our world in the present or the near future. Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ...


A notable feature of her conception that sets her work apart from much of mainstream 'hard' science fiction is that neither the old Empire nor the Ekumen possesses traditional faster-than-light travel (the Ekumen are developing "churten" technology, a form of instantaneous travel), although the politically progressive Ekumen thrives where the old Empire has failed mainly because it possesses a means of instantaneous interstellar communication, through a device called the ansible, the invention and consequences of which form the main plot of The Dispossessed. Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel refer to the propagation of information or matter faster than the speed of light. ... An ansible is a hypothetical machine, capable of superluminal communication, and used as a plot device in science fiction literature. ... The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia is a 1974 utopian science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, set in the same fictional universe as that of The Left Hand of Darkness (the Ekumen universe). ...


In this loose background scenario, the human species originated on the planet Hain in the distant past, near the galactic center. A Galactic Empire had expanded far across the galaxy over many millennia but, because it lacked faster-than-light (FTL) travel or communication, the Empire was finally stretched beyond its limits by the vast distances involved and it collapsed catastrophically. Thousands of years passed, during which time the populations of many outlying planets became so isolated from the central galactic civilization that they lost all knowledge of their origins, reverting to more archaic forms of civilization and technology. Hain is a fictional planet that plays an important background role in the science fiction novels of Ursula K. Le Guins Hainish Cycle. ... The Galactic Center is the rotational center of the Milky Way galaxy. ... Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel are staples of the science fiction genre. ...


Fiction

Earthsea (fantasy)

Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story The Word of Unbinding, published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of...

The Earthsea novels

Note: The story Dragonfly from Tales from Earthsea fits between Tehanu and The Other Wind and is "an important bridge in the series as a whole" according to Le Guin in this note on her website. Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story The Word of Unbinding, published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of... A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... The Tombs of Atuan is the second of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... The Farthest Shore is the third of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Tales from Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 2001, is a collection of short stories from Le Guins Earthsea universe. ... Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ... The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ...


The Earthsea short stories

Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story The Word of Unbinding, published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of... The Word of Unbinding (1964) is a short story by Ursula K. LeGuin. ... The Winds Twelve Quarters is a collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin first published by Harper & Row in 1975. ... The Rule of Names (1964) is a short story by Ursula K. LeGuin, set in the world of Earthsea. ... The Winds Twelve Quarters is a collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin first published by Harper & Row in 1975. ... Tales from Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 2001, is a collection of short stories from Le Guins Earthsea universe. ... The Endeavour Award announced annually at OryCon in Portland, Oregon is awarded to a distinguished SCIENCE FICTION or FANTASY BOOK written by a Pacific Northwest author or authors and published in the previous year. ...

Hainish Cycle (science fiction)

The Hainish Cycle is the setting for a number of science fiction novels and stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ...

Novels

Rocannons World was Ursula K. Le Guins first novel. ... Planet of Exile is a 1966 science-fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin in her Ekumen series. ... City of Illusions is a 1967 novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, set on Earth in the distant future in her Ekumen series. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia is a 1974 utopian science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, set in the same fictional universe as that of The Left Hand of Darkness (the Ekumen universe). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Word for World is Forest is a science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1976 and based on a 1972 novella. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Four Ways to Forgiveness is a collection of four short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Worlds of Exile and Illusion is a combined reissue of three novels by science fiction author Ursula K. Le Guin: Rocannons World, Planet of Exile, and City of Illusions. ... Rocannons World was Ursula K. Le Guins first novel. ... Planet of Exile is a 1966 science-fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin in her Ekumen series. ... City of Illusions is a 1967 novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, set on Earth in the distant future in her Ekumen series. ... The Telling is a 2000 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin in her Ekumen. ... The Endeavour Award announced annually at OryCon in Portland, Oregon is awarded to a distinguished SCIENCE FICTION or FANTASY BOOK written by a Pacific Northwest author or authors and published in the previous year. ...

Short stories from the Hainish Cycle

  • Dowry of the Angyar (1964) - appears as Semley's Necklace in The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975)
  • Winter's King (1969) - in The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975)
  • Vaster Than Empires and More Slow (1971) - in The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975)
  • The Day Before the Revolution (1974) - in The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975) (winner of the Nebula Award and Locus Award)
  • The Shobies' Story (1990) - in A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)
  • Dancing to Ganam (1993) - in A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)
  • Another Story OR A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994) - in A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)
  • The Matter of Seggri (1994) - in The Birthday of the World (2002) (winner of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award)
  • Unchosen Love (1994) - in The Birthday of the World (2002)
  • Solitude (1994) - in The Birthday of the World (2002) (winner of the Nebula Award)
  • Coming of Age in Karhide (1995) - in The Birthday of the World (2002)
  • Mountain Ways (1996) - in The Birthday of the World (2002) (winner of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award)
  • Old Music and the Slave Women (1999) - in The Birthday of the World (2002)

The Hainish Cycle is the setting for a number of science fiction novels and stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... The James Tiptree, Jr. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The James Tiptree, Jr. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...

Miscellaneous novels and story cycles

The Lathe of Heaven is a 1971 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Eye of the Heron is a 1978 science fiction novel by U.S. author Ursula K. Le Guin which was first published in the science fiction anthology Millennial Women. ... Millennial Women is a 1978 science fiction anthology, edited by Virginia Kidd, in which all the stories are written by women and have a female character as the primary protagonist. ... Malafrena is a novel published in 1979 by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Always Coming Home is a novel by Ursula K. Le Guin published in 1985. ...

Short story collections

The Winds Twelve Quarters is a collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin first published by Harper & Row in 1975. ... Orsinian Tales is a collection of short stories by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Compass Rose is a 1982 collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... A Fisherman of the Inland Sea is a 1994 collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Unlocking the Air and Other Stories is a 1996 collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Birthday of the World is a collection of short fiction by Ursula K. Le Guin, and first published in 2003 by Gollancz (Britain) an imprint of the Orion Publishing Group, with ISBN 0575075392. ... Changing Planes (ISBN 0151009716) is a collection of short stories in the best tradition of Ursula LeGuin. ...

Books for children and young adults

The Catwings Collection

  • Catwings, 1988
  • Catwings Return, 1989
  • Wonderful Alexander and the Catwings, 1994
  • Jane on her Own, 1999

The Catwings Collection is a childrens book series by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Catwings is a childrens book written by American author Ursula K. Le Guin, who is better known for her Earthsea fantasy novels, and illustrated by S. D. Schindler. ...

The Western Shore

  • Gifts, 2004
  • Voices, 2006
  • Powers, (September 1, 2007)

Other books for children and young adults

  • A Very Long Way from Anywhere Else, 1976, ISBN 0-15-205208-9
  • Leese Webster, 1979, ISBN 0-689-30715-2
  • The Beginning Place, 1980, 0553262823
  • Solomon Leviathan's Nine Hundred and Thirty-First Trip Around the World, 1984, ISBN 0-399-21491-7
  • A Visit from Dr. Katz, 1988, ISBN 0-689-31332-2
  • Fire and Stone, 1989, ISBN 0-689-31408-6
  • Fish Soup, 1992, ISBN 0-689-31733-6
  • A Ride on the Red Mare's Back, 1992, ISBN 0-531-07079-4
  • Tom Mouse, 2002, ISBN 0-7613-1599-3

Nonfiction

Prose

  • The Language of the Night, 1979, revised edition 1992
  • Dancing at the Edge of the World, 1989
  • Revisioning Earthsea, 1992 (a published lecture)
  • Steering the Craft, 1998 (about writing)
  • The Wave in the Mind, 2004

Dancing at the Edge of the World is a 1989 nonfiction collection by Ursula K. Le Guin. ...

Poetry

  • Wild Angels, 1975
  • Hard Words and Other Poems, 1981
  • Wild Oats and Fireweed, 1988
  • Going Out with Peacocks and Other Poems, 1994
  • Sixty Odd: New Poems, 1999
  • Incredible Good Fortune, 2006

Translations and Renditions

  • Lao Tzu : Tao Te Ching, a Book about the Way & the Power of the Way, 1997 (a rendition and commentary) ISBN 1-57062-333-3
  • Kalpa Imperial, 2003, from Angélica Gorodischer's Spanish original.
  • Selected Poems of Gabriela Mistral, from Gabriela Mistral's Spanish originals.
See also: "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas"

Le Guin is a prolific author and has published many works that are not listed here. Many works were originally published in science fiction literary magazines. Those that have not since been anthologized have fallen into obscurity. Lao Zi (also spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tse) was a famous Chinese philosopher who is believed to have lived in approximately the 4th century BC, during the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Periods. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is... Angélica Gorodischer is a writer known for comic and fantasy fiction. ... Gabriela Mistral Gabriela Mistral (April 7, 1889 – January 10, 1957) was the pseudonym of Lucila de María del Perpetuo Socorro Godoy Alcayaga, a Chilean poet, educator, diplomat and feminist who was the first Latin American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, in 1945. ... The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas is a story by Ursula K. Le Guin. ...


Adaptations to film and television

Despite her many awards and her considerable popularity, Le Guin's major SF and Fantasy works have not as yet been widely adapted for film or television. For television, The Lathe of Heaven has been adapted twice, in 1980 by thirteen/WNET New York, with her own participation, and in 2002 by the A&E Network; while the first two books of the Earthsea trilogy were adapted into the miniseries Legend of Earthsea in 2004 by the Sci Fi Channel. This "adaptation" was extremely poorly received by both readers of the books and LeGuin herself, who reports that she was "cut out of the process". The Lathe of Heaven is a 1971 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Earthsea DVD Cover The Legend of Earthsea miniseries (later shortened to Earthsea), adapted quite loosely from the award-winning Earthsea novels by Ursula K. Le Guin, premiered as a two-night television event on the Sci-Fi Channel in December 2004. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... SCI FI (originally Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ...


The animated feature film Tales from Earthsea (ゲド戦記 Gedo Senki?), based on characters and events from the 3rd and 4th Earthsea books, was produced by Studio Ghibli (スタジオジブリ?) in 2005 under the direction of Gorō Miyazaki. Le Guin was generally disappointed with the film, if not as outrightly disapproving as she been of the Sci Fi miniseries, as both adaptations added major characters and events which she felt were unfaithful to her work in terms of both content and spirit. Most of all, she was saddened that Goro's father Hayao Miyazaki missed his chance to direct an Earthsea film. (The elder Miyazaki had asked permission to create an Earthsea adaptation back in the early 1980s, but Le Guin, not knowing his work, or indeed anime in general, turned him down. After viewing My Neighbour Totoro, she then came to the idea that if anyone should be allowed to direct an Earthsea film, it should be Miyazaki Hayao.)[1] Tales from Earthsea , loosely Geds War Chronicles) is a feature anime film from Studio Ghibli, released in Japan on July 29, 2006,[1] to be distributed in the USA by Walt Disney Pictures and in Australia by Madman Entertainment. ... Studio Ghibli, Inc. ... Studio Ghibli, Inc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gorō Miyazaki during a TV interview Gorō Miyazaki (宮崎吾朗, Miyazaki Gorō) was born on January 21, 1967 in Tokyo, Japan, the son of Japanese animation director Hayao Miyazaki. ... Hayao Miyazaki ) (Born January 5, 1941 in Tokyo, Japan) is a director of animated films and a co-founder of the animation studio and production company Studio Ghibli. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... My Neighbor Totoro (となりのトトロ - Tonari no Totoro) is a 1988 Japanese animated movie directed by Hayao Miyazaki and produced by Studio Ghibli. ...


Additional awards

Le Guin received the Library of Congress Living Legends award in the "Writers and Artists" category in April 2000 for her significant contributions to America's cultural heritage. The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... A Library of Congress Living Legend is someone recognized by the Library of Congress for his or her creative contributions to American life. ...


Le Guin was honored by The Washington Center for the Book for her distinguished body of work with the Maxine Cushing Gray Fellowship for Writers October of 2006.


Scholarship

  • Brown, Joanne, & St. Clair, Nancy, Declarations of Independence: Empowered Girls in Young Adult Literature, 1990–2001 (Lanham, MD, & London: The Scarecrow Press, 2002 [Scarecrow Studies in Young Adult Literature, No. 7])
  • Cart, Michael, From Romance to Realism: 50 Years of Growth and Change in Young Adult Literature (New York: HarperCollins, 1996)
  • Egoff, Sheila, Stubbs, G. T., & Ashley, L. F., eds, Only Connect: Readings on Children’s Literature (Toronto & New York: Oxford University Press, 1969; 2nd ed., 1980; 3rd ed., 1996)
  • Egoff, Sheila A., Worlds Within: Children’s Fantasy from the Middle Ages to Today (Chicago & London: American Library Association, 1988)
  • Lehr, Susan, ed., Battling Dragons: Issues and Controversy in Children’s Literature (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1995)
  • Lennard, John, Of Modern Dragons and other essays on Genre Fiction (Tirril: Humanities-Ebooks, 2007)
  • Reginald, Robert, & Slusser, George, eds, Zephyr and Boreas: Winds of Change in the Fictions of Ursula K. Le Guin (San Bernadino, CA: Borgo Press, 1997)
  • Rochelle, Warren G., Communities of the Heart: The Rhetoric of Myth in the Fiction of Ursula K. Le Guin (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2001)
  • Sullivan III, C. W., ed., Young Adult Science Fiction (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999 [Contributions to the Study of Science Fiction and Fantasy 79])
  • Trites, Roberta Seelinger, Disturbing the Universe: Power and Repression in Adolescent Literature (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2000)
  • Wayne, Kathryn Ross, Redefining Moral Education: Life, Le Guin, and Language (Lanham, MD: Austin & Winfield, 1995)
  • White, Donna R., Dancing with Dragons: Ursula K. Le Guin and the Critics (Ontario: Camden House, 1998 [Literary Criticism in Perspective])

References

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Le Guin, Ursula K.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Le Guin, Ursula Kroeber
SHORT DESCRIPTION American novelist
DATE OF BIRTH October 21, 1929
PLACE OF BIRTH Berkeley, California, United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

 
 

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