FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Urban areas
The city of San Luis Obispo, an example of an urban area.
The city of San Luis Obispo, an example of an urban area.

An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. This term is at one end of the spectrum of suburban and rural areas. An urban area is more frequently called a city or town. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 891 KB) Summary San Luis Obispo looking east from the top of Bishop Peak. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 891 KB) Summary San Luis Obispo looking east from the top of Bishop Peak. ... San Luis Obispo, San Luis, or SLO (Spanish for ) is a city in California. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... Night view of Taipei City. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ...


Urban areas are created and further developed by the process of urbanization. Measuring the extent of an urbanized area helps in analyzing population density and urban sprawl, and in determining urban and rural populations. Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl) is a term for the rapid and expansive growth of a greater metropolitan area, traditionally suburbs (or exurbs) over a large area. ...


Unlike an urban area, a metropolitan area includes not only the urban area, but also satellite cities plus intervening rural land that is socio-economically connected to the urban core city, typically by employment ties through commuting, because it is the labor market. This makes metropolitan areas a less relevant statistic for determining per capita land usage and densities. A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ... Satellite cities are smaller municipalities that are adjacent to a major city which is the core of a metropolitan area. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ...

Contents


Definitions

Definitions vary somewhat in other nations. The minimum density requirement is generally 400 persons per square kilometer. In Australia, the minimum density is 200 people per square kilometer. In Japan urbanized areas are defined as contiguous areas of densely inhabited districts (DIDs) using census enumeration districts as units with a density requirement of 4,000 people per square kilometer. European countries define urbanized areas on the basis of urban-type land use, not allowing any gaps of typically more than 200 meters, and use satellite photos instead of census blocks to determine the boundaries of the urban area. In less developed countries, in addition to land use and density requirements, a requirement that a large majority of the population, typically 75%, is not engaged in agriculture and/or fishing is sometimes used. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Land use is the pattern of construction and activity land is used for. ... In the broadest sense, remote sensing is the measurement or acquisition of information of an object or phenomenon, by a recording device that is not in physical or intimate contact with the object. ...


In France, urban areas are referred to as unit├ęs urbaines which literally mean "urban units" in the French language. In Australia, urban areas are referred to as "urban centres." Statistics New Zealand defines New Zealand urban areas for statistical purposes as a settlement with a population of a thousand people or more. In France an unité urbaine (literally: urban unit) is a statistical area defined by INSEE, the French national statistics office, for the measurement of contiguously built-up areas. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Statistics New Zealand (Te Tari Tatau) is a New Zealand government department, and the source of the countrys official statistics. ... Statistics New Zealand defines New Zealand urban areas for statistical purposes. ...


United States

In the United States there are two categories of urban area. The term urbanized area denotes an urban area of 50,000 or more. Urban areas under 50,000 are called urban clusters. Urbanized areas were first delineated in the United States in the 1950 census, while urban clusters were added in the 2000 census. There are 1371 United States Urban Areas & Urban Clusters with more than 10,000 people. All Urban Areas (UAs) and Urban Clusters (UCs) over 10,000 in the United States ...


The US Census Bureau defines an urban area as: "Core census block groups or blocks that have a population density of at least 1,000 people per square mile (386 per square kilometer) and surrounding census blocks that have an overall density of at least 500 people per square mile (193 per square kilometer)."


See also

Ranked by population Figures are estimates for the usually resident population at 30 June 2005. ... This is a list of all the urban areas of the European Union which have more than 750,000 inhabitants in 2005. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Urban area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (550 words)
An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it.
Urban areas are created and further developed by the process of urbanization.
Unlike an urban area, a metropolitan area includes not only the urban area, but also satellite cities plus intervening rural land that is socio-economically connected to the urban core city, typically by employment ties through commuting, because it is the labor market.
FHWA - FAPG G 4063.0, Chapter 4, Urban Area Boundaries (777 words)
In areas where paragraph 3b(1) is applicable, the boundaries of the area shall encompass theentire urban place as designated by the Bureau of the Census plus that adjacent area as agreed upon by local officials in cooperation with theState.
In areas where paragraph 3b(2) is applicable, the boundaries of the area shall encompass the entire urbanized area within a State as designated by the Bureau of the Census plus that adjacent area as agreed upon by local officials in cooperation with the State.
Urban area boundaries are fixed primarily for capital project funding and are not to be con fused with boundaries established for the com prehensive, cooperative and continuing urban transportation planning process.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m