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Encyclopedia > Upton Sinclair
Upton Beall Sinclair Jr.

Born September 20, 1878(1878-09-20)
Baltimore, Maryland
Died November 25, 1968 (aged 90)
Bound Brook, New Jersey
Occupation Novelist, writer, journalist, political activist
Nationality Flag of the United States American

Upton Sinclair Jr. (September 20, 1878November 25, 1968), was a prolific American author who wrote over 90 books in many genres and was widely considered to be one of the best investigators advocating socialist views and supporting anarchist causes. He achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the 20th century. He gained particular fame for his 1906 novel The Jungle, which dealt with conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry and caused a public uproar that partly contributed to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act in 1906.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Baltimore redirects here. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map showing location of Bound Brook in Somerset County Queens Bridge over Raritan River, Bound Brook, New Jersey Bound Brook is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... This is an article about the United States Food and Drug Act; for the Canadian version see Food and Drugs Act. ... The United States Meat Inspection Act of 1906 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to order meat inspections and condemn any meat product found unfit for human consumption. ...

Contents

Biography

Sinclair was born on September 20, 1878 in Baltimore, Maryland and later, in 1888, moved to New York City. Sinclair married his first wife, Meta Fuller, in 1900. is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


An early success was the Civil War novel Manassas, written in 1903 and published a year later. Originally projected as the opening book of a trilogy, the success of The Jungle caused him to drop his plans, although he did revise Manassas decades later by "moderating some of the exuberance of the earlier version".[citation needed] The Jungle brought to light many major issues in America, such as poverty. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Manassas is an independent city located in the state of Virginia. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


Sinclair created a socialist commune, named Helicon Hall Colony, in 1906 with proceeds from his novel The Jungle. One of those who joined was the novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis, who worked there as a janitor. A Commune is a kind of intentional community where most resources are shared and there is little or no personal property. ... Sinclair Lewis Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 — January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright. ...

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

Sinclair made several bids for office. His first was in 1906. The Socialist Party of America sponsored his candidacy for Congress in New Jersey. He lost with just over 3% of the votes.[1][2] This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ... “NJ” redirects here. ...


The colony burned down in 1907, apparently from arson. After the famed fire of Helicon Hall, he moved to Arden, Delaware, where many Georgist, Socialist, and Communist "Free Thinkers" lived, including Mother Bloor's son Hamilton "Buzz" Ware. Some say that he worked in a tree house behind his home during these years. Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Arden is a village located in New Castle County, Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Henry George Henry George (September 2, 1839 – October 29, 1897) was an American political economist and the most influential proponent of the Single Tax on land. ... Ella Reeve Bloor born Ella Reeve and also known as Mother Bloor (1862–1951) was radical labor organizer, socialist and communist. ...


Around 1911, Sinclair's wife ran off with the poet Harry Kemp (later known as the Dunes Poet of Provincetown, Massachusetts). Within a few years, Sinclair moved to Pasadena, California, where he founded the state's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union in the 1920s. Sinclair went on to run unsuccessfully for Congress twice on the Socialist ticket: in 1920, for the United States House of Representatives, and in 1922, for the Senate.[3] Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the common name for an American organization consisting of two separate entities. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sinclair's 1928 book, Boston, created controversy by proclaiming the innocence of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, anarchists who were accused of a murder/robbery in that city. Sinclair faced what he would later call "the most difficult ethical problem of my life," when he was told in confidence by Sacco and Vanzetti's former attorney, Fred Moore, that they were guilty and how their alibis were supposedly arranged.[4] However, in the letter revealing that discussion with Moore, Sinclair also wrote, "I had heard that Moore was using drugs. I knew that he had parted from the defense committee after the bitterest of quarrels... Moore admitted to me that the men themselves, had never admitted their guilt to him."[citation needed] Although the two men were ultimately executed, this episode has been used by some to claim that Sacco and Vanzetti were guilty and that Sinclair knew that when he wrote his novel. However, this account has been disputed by Sinclair biographer Greg Mitchell.[citation needed] Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sacco (right) and Vanzetti Nicola Sacco (1891 - August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (1888 - August 23, 1927) were two Italian anarchists, who were arrested, tried, and executed in Massachusetts in the 1920s on charges of murder of a shoe factory paymaster named Frederick Parmenter and a security guard named Alesandro... Sacco (right) and Vanzetti Nicola Sacco (1891 - August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (1888 - August 23, 1927) were two Italian anarchists, who were arrested, tried, and executed in Massachusetts in the 1920s on charges of murder of a shoe factory paymaster named Frederick Parmenter and a security guard named Alesandro... Anarchist redirects here. ... Bartolomeo Vanzetti (left) and Nicola Sacco in handcuffs. ...


In 1934, Sinclair made his most successful run for office, this time as a Democrat. Sinclair's platform for the California gubernatorial race of 1934, known as EPIC (End Poverty in California), galvanized the support of the Democratic Party, and Sinclair gained its nomination. Conservatives in California were themselves galvanized by this, as they saw it as an attempted communist takeover of their state. They used massive political propaganda portraying Sinclair as a Communist, even as he was being portrayed by American and Soviet communists as a capitalist. Robert A. Heinlein, the science fiction author, was deeply involved in Sinclair's campaign, a point which Heinlein tried to obscure from later biographies, as Heinlein tried to keep his personal politics separate from his public image as an author.[citation needed] Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Short for End Poverty in California, EPIC was an effort for then well-known muckraking writer and former Socialist Upton Sinclair to implement Socialist reforms through Californias Democratic Party during the Great Depression by recruiting supporters into the party and then securing that partys nomination for Governor of... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Soviet redirects here. ... In economics, a capitalist is someone who owns capital, presumably within the economic system of capitalism. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ...


Sinclair was defeated by Frank F. Merriam in the election, and largely abandoned EPIC and politics to return to writing. However, the race of 1934 would become known as the first race to use modern campaign techniques like motion pictures. Frank Finley Merriam (December 22, 1865 – April 25, 1955) was Governor of California from June 2, 1934 until January 2, 1939. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as...


Of his gubernatorial bids, Sinclair remarked in 1951: "The American People will take Socialism, but they won't take the label. I certainly proved it in the case of EPIC. Running on the Socialist ticket I got 60,000 votes, and running on the slogan to 'End Poverty in California' I got 879,000. I think we simply have to recognize the fact that our enemies have succeeded in spreading the Big Lie. There is no use attacking it by a front attack, it is much better to out-flank them."[5] Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sinclair's grave in Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, DC
Sinclair's grave in Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, DC

Aside from his political and social writings, Sinclair took an interest in psychic phenomena and experimented with telepathy, writing a book titled "Mental Radio", published in 1930. According to Sinclair, a 34-pound table was once levitated eight feet over his head by a young psychic in a seance.[6][7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adams Memorial Rock Creek Cemetery (also Rock Creek Church Cemetery) is located at Webster Street and Rock Creek Church Road, NW, in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The Cemetery falls under the governance of the St. ... Psychic (sÄ«kÄ­k); from the Greek psychikos - of the soul, mental - and referring in part to the human mind or psyche (ex. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Mental Radio: Does it work, and how? (1930) was written by the American author Upton Sinclair. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A séance (SAY-ahnce) is, on its most basic level, an attempt to communicate with the dead. ...


After Sinclair's first wife left, he married Mary Craig Kimbrough (1883 - 1961), a woman who was later tested for psychic abilities. After her death, Sinclair married a third time, to Mary Elizabeth Willis (1882 - 1967). Late in life, he moved from California to Buckeye, Arizona, and then to Bound Brook, New Jersey. Sinclair died in 1968, and is buried in Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, DC, next to his third wife, who died a year before him. Mental Radio: Does it work, and how? (1930) was written by the American author Upton Sinclair. ... Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Government  - Mayor Bobby Bryant Area  - City  145. ... Map showing location of Bound Brook in Somerset County Queens Bridge over Raritan River, Bound Brook, New Jersey Bound Brook is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... Adams Memorial Rock Creek Cemetery (also Rock Creek Church Cemetery) is located at Webster Street and Rock Creek Church Road, NW, in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The Cemetery falls under the governance of the St. ...


The Upton Sinclair House in Monrovia, California, is now a National Historic Landmark. The papers, photographs, and first editions of most of his books are found at the Lilly Library at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.[8] The Upton Sinclair House was, from 1942 until 1966, the principal residence of American novelist Upton Sinclair, and the place in which he wrote his later works. ... Monrovia is a city located in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ...


Political and social activism

Sinclair believed that the main point of The Jungle was lost on the public, overshadowed by his descriptions of the unhealthy conditions in packing plants. The public health concerns dealt with in The Jungle were not as significant to Sinclair as the human tragedy lived by his main character and other workers in the plants. His main goal for the book was to demonstrate the inhumane conditions of the wage earner under capitalism, not to inspire public health reforms in how the packing was done. Indeed, Sinclair lamented the effect of his book and the public uproar that resulted: "I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach." Still, the fame and fortune he gained from publishing The Jungle enabled him to write books on almost every issue of social injustice in the Twentieth Century. [2]


Sinclair is well-known for his principle: "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it." This quotation by Sinclair has appeared in many political books, essays, articles, and other forms of media.[citation needed]


The Lanny Budd series

Between 1940 and 1953, Sinclair wrote the World's End series of 11 novels about Lanny Budd, the "red" son of an American arms manufacturer who was a socialite, an art expert and an acquaintance of Hermann Göring and Adolf Hitler. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hermann Wilhelm Göring ( ) (also Goering in English) (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was a German politician and military leader, a leading member of the Nazi Party, second in command of the Third Reich, and commander of the Luftwaffe. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


They cover in sequence much of the political history of the Western world (particularly Europe and America), in the first half of the twentieth century. Almost totally forgotten today, they were all bestsellers upon publication and were published in 21 countries. The third book in the series, Dragon's Teeth, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1943. A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. ... The novel Dragons Teeth, written in 1942 by Upton Sinclair, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Long out of print, the World's End or Lanny Budd series, have recently been re-issued by Simon Publications. For technical reasons, each original volume is issued in two parts, forming a 22-volume set. The series was originally published by Viking Press in New York and T. Werner Laurie in London. Viking Press was founded on March 1, 1925, in New York City, by Harold K. Guinzburg and George S. Oppenheim. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ...

Upton Beall Sinclair (September 20, 1878 - November 25, 1968) was a prolific (90 books) American author who wrote in many genres, often advocating Socialist views, and achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Worlds End is the first novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Between Two Worlds is the second novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The novel Dragons Teeth, written in 1942 by Upton Sinclair, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wide Is the Gate is the fourth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Presidential Agent is the fifth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dragon Harvest is the sixth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A World to Win is the seventh novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential Mission is the eighth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... One Clear Call is the ninth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... O Shepherd, Speak! is the tenth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Return of Lanny Budd is the eleventh and final novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sinclair in culture

In Sinclair Lewis' novel, It Can't Happen Here, Upton Sinclair is depicted as an eccentric and a supporter of fascism out of opportunistic motives, who is rewarded for his support of an American fascist government by being made ambassador to Great Britain. Sinclair Lewis Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 — January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright. ... Poster for a stage adaptation of It Cant Happen Here, ca. ... In popular usage, eccentricity refers to unusual or odd behavior on the part of a person, as opposed to being normal. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the needs of the state, and seeks to forge a type of national unity, usually based on, but not limited to, ethnic, cultural, or racial attributes. ...


Sinclair is extensively featured in Harry Turtledove's American Empire trilogy, in which the American Socialist Party succeeds to become a major force in US politics. He wins the 1920 and 1924 presidential elections and becomes the first Socialist President of the United States, his inauguration attended by crowds of jubilant militants waving Red Flags. However, the actual policies which Turtledove attributes to him, once in power, are not particularly radical.[citation needed] Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ... The American Empire series is a trilogy of alternate history novels by Harry Turtledove. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Historically, and most generally, the red flag is an international symbol for the blood of angry workers. ...


Sinclair is featured as one of the main characters in Chris Bachelder's satirical fictional book, U.S.!: a Novel. Sinclair is the frequently assassinated and resurrected personification of the contemporary failings of the American-left and portrayed as a Quixotic reformer attempting to stir an apathetic American public to implement Socialism in America. Chris Bachelder is an American writer, e-book pioneer and frequent contributor to the publications McSweeneys Quarterly Concern and The Believer. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ...


Films

Upton Sinclair was the writer or producer of several films, including his involvement, in 1930-32, with Sergei Eisenstein, for Que Viva Mexico!, which turned into a debacle.[citation needed] Charlie Chaplin got him involved in the project.[3] Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн, Latvian: Sergejs Eizenšteins) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ...


His 1937 novel, The Gnomobile, was the basis of a 1967 Disney musical motion picture, The Gnome-Mobile. [4]. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Gnome-Mobile is a 1967 Disney musical film. ...


His 1927 novel Oil! was the basis of There Will Be Blood (2007), starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano. It was screenwritten, produced, and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. [5] Oil! is a novel by Upton Sinclair published in 1927. ... There Will Be Blood is a film adaptation of Upton Sinclairs novel Oil!. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano, and is screenwritten, produced and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957), is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is an American actor. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ...


Works

  • Courtmartialed - 1898
  • Saved By the Enemy - 1898
  • The Fighting Squadron - 1898
  • A Prisoner of Morro - 1898
  • A Soldier Monk - 1898
  • A Gauntlet of Fire - 1899
  • Holding the Fort (story) - 1899
  • A Soldier's Pledge - 1899
  • Wolves of the Navy - 1899
  • Springtime and Harvest - 1901
  • The Journal of Arthur Stirling - 1903
  • Off For West Point - 1903
  • From Port to Port - 1903
  • On Guard - 1903
  • A Strange Cruise - 1903
  • The West Point Rivals - 1903
  • A West Point Treasure - 1903
  • A Cadet's Honor - 1903
  • Cliff, the Naval Cadet - 1903
  • The Cruise of the Training Ship - 1903
  • Prince Hagan - 1903
  • Manassas - 1904
  • A Captain of Industry - 1906
  • The Jungle - 1906
  • The Millennium (four-act drama) - 1907
  • The Overman - 1907
  • The Industrial Republic - 1907
  • The Metropolis - 1908
  • The Money Changers - 1908
  • Samuel The Seeker - 1909
  • Good Health and How We Won It - 1909
  • The Machine (novel) - 1911
  • King Coal - 1917
  • The Profits of Religion - 1917
  • Jimmie Higgins - 1919
  • The Brass Check - 1919
  • 100% - The Story of a Patriot - 1920
  • THE SPY - 1920
  • They Call Me Carpenter - 1922
  • The Goose-step A Study of American Education - 1923
  • The Millennium (novel form) - 1924
  • The Goslings - 1924
  • Mammonart - 1925
  • Money Writes! - 1927
  • Oil! - 1927
  • Boston - 1928
  • Mental Radio - 1930
  • Roman Holiday - 1931
  • The Wet Parade - 1931
  • American Outpost - 1932
  • Upton Sinclair presents William Fox - 1933
  • The Epic Plan for California - 1934
  • I, Candidate For Governor: And How I Got Licked. - 1935
  • Co-op: a Novel of Living Together - 1936
  • No Pasaran!: a Novel of the Battle of Madrid - 1937
  • The Gnomobile- 1937
  • The Flivver King - 1937
  • Little Steel- 1938
  • Our Lady - 1938
  • Letters to a Millionaire - 1939
  • World's End - 1940
  • Between Two Worlds - 1941
  • Dragon's Teeth - 1942
  • Wide Is the Gate - 1943
  • The Presidential Agent - 1944
  • Dragon Harvest - 1945
  • A World to Win - 1946
  • A Presidential Mission - 1947
  • One Clear Call - 1948
  • O Shepherd, Speak! - 1949
  • Schenk Stefan! - 1951
  • The Return of Lanny Budd - 1953
  • The Cup of Fury - 1956
  • What Didymus Did - UK 1954 / It Happened to Didymus - US 1958
  • The Autobiography of Upton Sinclair - 1962 written with the help of Maeve Elizabeth Flynn III

Upton Sinclairs writing of Springtime and Harvest, later renamed King Midas, was shortly of the breakup and divorce of his wife. ... Le Bossu (alternative English title: On Guard) is a French historical action romance film directed by Philippe de Broca, released in 1997. ... Manassas is an independent city located in the state of Virginia. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... King Coal is a book by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1917, that exposes the dirty working conditions in the coal mining industry in the western United States during the 1910s. ... The Profits of Religion: An Essay in Economic Interpretation is a nonfiction book, first published in 1917, by the American novelist and muckraking journalist Upton Sinclair. ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article is about the book. ... Mammonart. ... Oil! is a novel by Upton Sinclair published in 1927. ... Boston is a novel by Upton Sinclair that was written in criticism of the Sacco and Vanzetti trials. ... Mental Radio: Does it work, and how? (1930) was written by the American author Upton Sinclair. ... Roman Holiday is a 1931 novel by Upton Sinclair. ... The Flivver King A Story of Ford-America is a novel by Upton Sinclair, published in 1937. ... Between Two Worlds is the second novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... The novel Dragons Teeth, written in 1942 by Upton Sinclair, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943. ... Wide Is the Gate is the fourth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... The Presidential Agent is the fifth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Dragon Harvest is the sixth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... A World to Win is the seventh novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... Presidential Mission is the eighth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... One Clear Call is the ninth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... O Shepherd, Speak! is the tenth novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ... The Return of Lanny Budd is the eleventh and final novel in Upton Sinclairs Lanny Budd series. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Upton Sinclair
Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Upton Sinclair
Persondata
NAME Sinclair, Upton Beall, Jr.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Sinclair, Upton
SHORT DESCRIPTION American novelist, writer, journalist, political activist
DATE OF BIRTH 20 September 1878
PLACE OF BIRTH Baltimore, Maryland
DATE OF DEATH 25 November 1968
PLACE OF DEATH Bound Brook, New Jersey

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Social Security Online History Pages (509 words)
Upton Sinclair was a famous novelist and social crusader from California, who pioneered the kind of journalism known as "muckraking." His best-known novel was "The Jungle" which was an expose of the appalling and unsanitary conditions in the meat-packing industry.
Sinclair's candidacy also set off a bitter political battle both within the Democratic party and with many groups who were opposed to various aspects of the EPIC plan.
Sinclair was denounced as a "Red" and "crackpot" and the Democratic establishment sought to derail his candidacy.
Upton Sinclair (3072 words)
Sinclair was now a well-known national figure and decided to accept the offer of the Socialist Party to become its candidate for Congress in New Jersey.
Sinclair rejoined the Socialist Party and in 1926 was its candidate to become governor of California.
I assure them that they were, except that Upton Sinclair individualized and expressed them better than they could have done, and arranged their experiences, which as they actually occurred were as unintelligible as pied type, in significant and intelligible order.
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