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Encyclopedia > Upstairs, Downstairs
Upstairs, Downstairs

Logo for Upstairs, Downstairs
Genre Drama
Created by Jean Marsh
Eileen Atkins
Starring Gordon Jackson
David Langton
Jean Marsh
Angela Baddeley
Christopher Beeny
Jenny Tomasin
Simon Williams
Jacqueline Tong
Pauline Collins
Lesley-Anne Down
Rachel Gurney
Meg Wynn Owen
John Alderton
Nicola Pagett
Hannah Gordon
Country of origin Flag of United Kingdom United Kingdom
No. of episodes 68 (List of episodes)
Production
Producer(s) LWT
Running time 50 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel ITV
Original run 10 October 197121 December 1975
External links
IMDb profile

Upstairs, Downstairs was a BAFTA and Emmy award-winning British drama set in a large townhouse in Edwardian London that depicted the lives of the servants "downstairs" and their masters "upstairs". It ran on ITV for five series from 1971 to 1975. Image File history File links Upstairs_Downstairs. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Dame Eileen June Atkins, DBE (born June 16, 1934 in London, England) is a British writer and an award-winning film and theatre actress. ... This article is about the Scottish actor. ... David Langton (born 16 April 1912, died 25 April 1994) is a British actor. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Madeline Angela Clinton-Baddeley, CBE was an English character actress born on July 4, 1904, in London, England. ... Christopher Beeny (born July 7, 1941) is an English actor. ... Jenny Tomasin is a British actress Tomasin became well known in the early 1970s when she joined the cast of Upstairs Downstairs as scullery maid Ruby. ... Simon Williams (born 16 June 1946 in Windsor Berkshire) is a British actor with many television and film roles. ... Jacqueline Tong (born 21 May 1951) is an English actress who is best known for playing Daisy in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs from 1973 to 1975. ... Pauline Collins (born September 3, 1940) is a British actress working extensively in movies and television. ... Lesley-Anne Down as Jacqueline Payne Marone Lesley-Anne Down (born March 17, 1954 in London) is a British actress. ... Rachel Gurney (March 5, 1920 - November 24, 2001) was a British actress who is best known for playing the snobbish Lady Marjorie Bellamy on the LWT classic Upstairs Downstairs. ... Meg Wynn Owen sometimes formerly credited as Megwyn Owen is a British character actress. ... John Alderton (born November 27, 1940), is a popular British actor. ... Nicola Pagett (born June 15, 1945 in Cairo, Egypt) is a British actress. ... Hannah Gordon (born 9 April 1941 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish-born British actress. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This is a list of all episodes of the British ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV but also as ITV Network or Channel 3) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... The Primetime Emmy Awards are awards presented by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in recognition of excellence in American primetime television programming. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Leinster House, 18th century Dublin townhouse of the Duke of Leinster. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV but also as ITV Network or Channel 3) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990...


Upstairs, Downstairs attempted to portray life in a high-status house set against the events of early 20th century. Great events are featured prominently in the episodes but minor or gradual changes are noted as well. It stands as a document of the social and technological changes that occurred between 1903 and 1930. The lives of the servants are integral to the story.


In one episode Hazel Bellamy notes that although upstairs, they are a family, downstairs they are also a family; Mr. Hudson, the butler, and Mrs. Bridges, the cook, are the mother and father, Rose, the parlor maid, the eldest daughter who lost her man at the front, Edward, the son who has married Daisy who stays with the family while he is at war and Ruby, the youngest child who needs protecting.

Contents

Background

Upstairs, Downstairs was originally an idea by two actress friends, Jean Marsh and Eileen Atkins, for a comedy called Behind the Green Baize Door.[1] It was to focus on two housemaids, played by Marsh and Atkins, in a large country house in the Victorian era. They soon added a family upstairs, as Marsh recognised "Servants have to serve somebody".[2] In summer 1969, they took this idea to Sagitta Productions, which was run by John Hawkesworth and John Whitney.[1] They soon removed the comedy element, changed the setting to a large townhouse in Edwardian London and the title became Below Stairs. It was first offered to Granada Television in Manchester, but they declined as they already had a period drama, called A Family at War, about to start.[1] However, Stella Richman, the Controller of Programmes at London Weekend Television, saw potential and in April 1970 the first series was commissioned.[1] Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Dame Eileen June Atkins, DBE (born June 16, 1934 in London, England) is a British writer and an award-winning film and theatre actress. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... John Hawkesworth (7 December 1920–30 September 2003) was a television and film producer and writer best known for his work on the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Manchester shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Greater Manchester Admin HQ Manchester City Centre Founded 13th Century City Status 1853 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Manchester City Council Area  - Borough & City 115. ... A Family At War was a British television drama made by Granada Television for ITV. The series was transmitted between 1970 and 1972 and examined the lives of the working-class Ashton family of the city of Liverpool and their experiences during the Second World War. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Characters were then developed, but when Alfred Shaughnessy, an old friend of John Hawkesworth, was called in as script editor, he changed much of the detail to make the characters more realistic. Honor Blackman was originally short listed for the role of Lady Marjorie and George Cole to play Hudson.[2] Eileen Atkins, who was to play the other maid opposite Jean Marsh, was playing Queen Victoria in a stage show at the time, so Pauline Collins took the role, and Gordon Jackson was offered the role of Hudson after it was decided that Londoner George Cole would not be suitable to play a Scotsman.[1] The programme took many names, including Two Little Maids in Town, The Servants' Hall and That House in Eaton Square. It was called 165 Eaton Place until just before the production of the first episode when it was changed to Upstairs, Downstairs following a suggestion from John Hawkesworth.[1] Alfred James Shaughnessy (19 May 1916–2 November 2005), sometimes known as Freddy Shaughnessy, was an English scripwriter and producer best known for being the script editor of Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Honor Blackman (born in London on 12 December 1927) is an English actress. ... Lady Marjorie Bellamy was a fictional character on the ITV drama Upstairs Downstairs. ... George Cole as Arthur Daley in Minder (book cover) George Cole (born April 22, 1925 in Tooting, London, England) is a British actor. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Pauline Collins (born September 3, 1940) is a British actress working extensively in movies and television. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Despite having a champion in Stella Richman the show suffered from internal politics at the station, most notably from the sales department who could not see the attraction of a period drama, and spent nearly a year on the shelf awaiting a transmission date.[1] Eventually the network had a space in its schedule at the unfashionable time of Sunday nights at 10.15pm and called upon LWT to fill it. They chose Upstairs, Downstairs and with no promotion of the show there was little expectation of success. However audiences steadily grew and the series became a hit.[1]


Cast

This article is about the Scottish actor. ... David Langton (born 16 April 1912, died 25 April 1994) is a British actor. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Madeline Angela Clinton-Baddeley, CBE was an English character actress born on July 4, 1904, in London, England. ... Simon Williams (born 16 June 1946 in Windsor Berkshire) is a British actor with many television and film roles. ... Christopher Beeny (born July 7, 1941) is an English actor. ... Joan Benham (17 May 1918–13 June 1981) was an English actress best known for her portrayal of Lady Prudence Fairfax in the ITV drama series Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Actor b. ... Rachel Gurney (March 5, 1920 - November 24, 2001) was a British actress who is best known for playing the snobbish Lady Marjorie Bellamy on the LWT classic Upstairs Downstairs. ... Patsy Smart (born 1918-died 1996) is a British actress who is possibly best known for her performance as Maud Roberts in the 1970s television drama Upstairs Downstairs. ... George Innes is a British actor, born 8 March 1938, who played minor and guest roles on British film and television from his film debut in Billy Liar in 1963 until 1971, when he played footman Alfred Harris in the period drama, Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Nicola Pagett (born June 15, 1945 in Cairo, Egypt) is a British actress. ... Ian Ogilvy as Simon Templar pictured on a reprint of an early Saint novel published to coincide with the TV series. ... Pauline Collins (born September 3, 1940) is a British actress working extensively in movies and television. ... Brian Osborne (born 1940) is an English actor who is best known for his roles in Upstairs, Downstairs and The Sandbaggers. ... Evin Crowley (born 5 December 1945) is a Northern Ireland actress. ... Jenny Tomasin is a British actress Tomasin became well known in the early 1970s when she joined the cast of Upstairs Downstairs as scullery maid Ruby. ... John Alderton (born November 27, 1940), is a popular British actor. ... Jacqueline Tong (born 21 May 1951) is an English actress who is best known for playing Daisy in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs from 1973 to 1975. ... Lesley-Anne Down as Jacqueline Payne Marone Lesley-Anne Down (born March 17, 1954 in London) is a British actress. ... Meg Wynn Owen sometimes formerly credited as Megwyn Owen is a British character actress. ... Hannah Gordon (born 9 April 1941 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish-born British actress. ... Alan Leonard Hunt (7 February 1943 – 13 March 2007) was an English actor, known as Gareth Hunt, who is best remembered for playing the footman Frederick Norton in Upstairs, Downstairs and Mike Gambit in The New Avengers. ... Karen Dotrice (born 10 September 1955) is an actress known primarily for her role as a child in Walt Disneys feature film adaptation of the Mary Poppins book series. ...

Plot

Lady Marjorie Talbot-Carey, the lovely and wilful daughter of the Earl and Countess of Southwold married Richard Bellamy MP, the upright younger son of a country parson, despite her parents' objections. Mr. Richard and Lady Marjorie Bellamy set up housekeeping at 165 Eaton Place, one of several London properties owned by Lord Southwold. A parson is a member of the Protestant clergy. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Richard was a politician and several plots centred around his political ambitions and conflicts arising from his desire to follow his conscience and his allegiance to his father-in-law's political party, the Conservatives. Richard and Lady Marjorie Bellamy had two children, James and Elizabeth, who were in their late teens and early twenties when the series starts in 1903. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ...


1903-1910

The first and second series are set from 1903 until 1910, during the reign of Edward VII. Stories depicted the lives of the Bellamy's "upstairs" and the servants "downstairs". The Bellamy family comprised Richard, the politician, and his wife Lady Marjorie, and their two children, James and the rebellious Elizabeth, whom Rose calls "Miss Lizzy". The original staff was composed of Mr. Angus Hudson, the pompous and authoritarian butler, Mrs. Kate Bridges, the cook, Emily, the kitchen maid, Alfred, the footman, Rose, the head house parlourmaid, Sarah, the under house parlourmaid, and Pearce, the coachman. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ...


In 1908, Elizabeth married a young poet Lawrence Kirbridge, but he found sexual intercourse disgusting and their marriage was unconsummated. Elizabeth had an affair with her husband's publisher and became pregnant, later giving birth to a daughter, Lucy. She moved to America in 1910 after her divorce from Kirbridge. She was later said to have married a man named Dana. James and Sarah, the Under House Parlourmaid, had an affair, resulting in Sarah's pregnancy and James's banishment to India. Sarah was sent to live at the Southwold estate, but came back after she went into labour, while the King was upstairs at a dinner party, only to give birth to a stillborn boy. Later, Sarah and Thomas Watkins, the valet of Lawrence Kirbridge, fell in love, though he never married her, and they were spun off to their own short-lived series "Thomas & Sarah". Emily, the scullery maid, killed herself over a lover who was forbidden from seeing her and was replaced by Ruby, a hardworking young woman with minor mental disabilities who constantly irritated Mrs. Bridges. In 1905, Alfred ran away with Baron Klaus von Rimmer, a guest of the family, after they had been caught in a compromising position. He was replaced by Edward Barnes, who went on to marry housemaid Daisy Peel. It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy with the emergence of a newborn infant from its mothers uterus. ... The expected result of pregnancy is the birth of a living child. ... Thomas & Sarah was the only spin-off from the popular LWT drama series Upstairs, Downstairs. ... In great houses, scullery maids were the lowest-ranking of the female servants and is assistant to a kitchen maid. ...


1912-1914

Lady Marjorie (and her brother Hugo Talbot-Carey, Earl of Southwold and his wife), died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic, her last known words being uttered to her maid – "Keep this for me, Roberts" – as she hands over her jewelery case. The episode in which Miss Roberts returns alive features a brilliant farewell (to the series) performance by Patsy Smart, as Maud Roberts. She refuses to let anyone touch the jewelery box, because she's keeping it for Lady Marjorie. Richard's secretary, Hazel Forrest, wins the hearts of all when she very gently persuades Miss Roberts to open the box. That means accepting Lady Marjorie is gone and she breaks down into sobs, as she cries, "I tried to save her! I tried to make them [the life boat] go back!" RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on 14 April 1912 and dramatic sinking on 15 April 1912. ...


Richard had recently hired Hazel to type the biography of his father-in-law which he was writing. Soon after, she and James fell in love and eventually married. Hazel became "mistress" of the household, and they were happy for a time but started to grow apart; this estrangement was worsened by a miscarriage.


1914-1918

James served in World War I, was seriously injured in a trench battle and was brought home to recover. He was nursed by his step-cousin Georgina, who was orphaned and came to live with the Bellamys at Christmas 1913, when she was 18. Georgina was the daughter of Lady Marjorie's brother Hugo's wife, and her first husband. Hazel had a brief affair with an airman who, like her, rose from the ranks of the middle-classes. He was killed while James is at home on leave. Rose met an Australian man named Gregory Wilmot and after overcoming several hurdles, finally agreed to marry him on his return from the war. Unfortunately he was killed, Rose was heartbroken but Gregory left her £1200 in his will. Edward suffered from shell shock and went into hospital. He spoke to Richard, who comforted him as if he was his own son. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The military term combat stress reaction (CSR) comprises the range of adverse behaviours in reaction to the stress of combat and combat related activities. ...


In 1918, just as the War ended, Hazel dies, aged 32, in the infamous worldwide influenza pandemic. Richard later married a young widow named Mrs. Virginia Hamilton, who had three children, the eldest killed when he was 17 in the spring of 1918. Her other children, Alice, was 10 and her youngest son, William, was 6 when Richard proposed to Virginia Hamilton in late October/November 1918. He was elevated to the House of Lords as Viscount Bellamy of Haversham in the New Year's Honours List of 1917. Chart of deaths in major cities The 1918 flu pandemic, commonly referred to as the Spanish flu, was a category 5 influenza pandemic between 1918 and 1920 caused by an unusually severe and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


1918-1930

Along the way, from 1903 through 1930, there are various and sundry adventures had by all, as many or more by the folk downstairs as upstairs. Georgina and her friends rebelled against the depression and hard times of the war in the roaring 20s but her frivolity and merriment were brought to a quick end firstly, by the suicide of a friend who protested he loved her and threatened that, if she wouldn't marry him, he would kill himself — which he did, in the schoolroom at 165 Eaton Place, while a roaring 20s party raged below. Secondly, Georgina accidentally killed a working class man early one morning. He was on his way to work while she had borrowed Richard's car without asking and was going to a further party. Her friends deserted her at the inquest, except the very rich, but very stupid Lady Dolly and the seeming dull and boring stick-in-the mud Lord Stockbridge, heir to a dukedom, who was a witness in her defence despite his family being against it. He was in love with her and she very quickly fell in love with him. James never settles. When the war ended, he stood for Parliament but was not elected. The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


As Lord Stockbridge's parents sent him on a trip around the world to make sure his love for Georgina was true, James returned, in October 1929, from America — where he has visited Elizabeth and become rich through speculation on Wall Street. Rose allowed James to invest the money Gregory left her when he died in the war in stocks and shares. Then the market crashed and he lost everything, plus he had "borrowed a fair bit" that he now couldn't repay. James had disgraced his family and taken advantage of a member of staff who trusted him. He became depressed and ashamed, and went to a hotel in Maidenhead to commit suicide. Statistics Population: 58,848 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU889811 Administration District: Windsor and Maidenhead Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Berkshire Historic county: Berkshire Services Police force: Thames Valley Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town: MAIDENHEAD... Rather than surrender to US soldiers, the Mayor (Bürgermeister) of Leipzig Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ...


The final episode, in 1930, finds things looking up at Eaton Place as Georgina was married to Lord Stockbridge on 12 June 1930. Mr. Hudson and Mrs. Bridges also finally married, and Mr. and Mrs. Hudson took the uneducated but surprisingly shrewd kitchen maid, Ruby Finch, off to the seaside with them, to run a guest house called "Seaview" (however, you can only see the cliffs from the top bedroom window, over the other houses). When asked about this, Ruby says "They'll not last long and I'll get the guest house". Lord Bellamy has delivered his retirement speech to the House of Lords. He and Lady Bellamy, Virginia, retired to a small villa, keeping Rose Buck in their employ. Young Edward and his wife, Daisy, were elevated to the posts of butler and Head House Parlourmaid in the country household of Marquess and new Marchioness of Stockbridge. is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The last scene showed Rose taking a final walk through all of the rooms and memories at 165 Eaton Place, which is up for sale, and likely to be redeveloped into flats. She heard the voices of Lady Marjorie, of Mr Hudson and of many incidents she had witnessed over the years but when she heard the voice of Gregory, she quickly realised that it was time to move on and left through the front door.


Characters

This is a list of characters from the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs, that aired from 1970 to 1975. ...

Episodes

Upstairs, Downstairs ran for five series from 10 December 1971 to 21 December 1975. The first four series consisted of thirteen episodes each, while the final series consisted of sixteen episodes. Due to an industrial dispute over extra payments for using newly-introduced colour equipment in which broadcasting unions refused to allow their members to use colour cameras, the first six episodes of the first series were shot in black-and-white, and when colour production resumed, the first episode was remade in colour. Two endings were made, which could be shown depending on whether or not the black and white episodes were broadcast by the channel. The original black-and-white first episode is believed to have been wiped. This is a list of all episodes of the British ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


The opening credits of each episode featured a cartoon from the magazine Punch, and the lettering was drawn by the graphic designer Terry Griffiths. The theme tune was composed by Alexander Ferris and entitled The Edwardians. It won an Ivor Novello Award.[2] Part of this tune would be made into the song What Are We Going To Do With Uncle Arthur?, sung by Sarah, with lyrics written by Alfred Shaughnessy. Pauline Collins released this as a single in 1973. A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations with varied meanings that evolved from its original meaning. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... The Ivor Novello Awards, named after the Cardiff born entertainer Ivor Novello, are awards awarded for songwriting and composing. ... Sarah Moffat (born Clémence Moffat in July 1882), also known as Sarah Delice and Clémence Dumas, was a fictional character in the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs and its spin-off Thomas & Sarah. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ...


Many writers wrote episodes throughout the five series, including Alfred Shaughnessy, John Hawkesworth, Fay Weldon, Terence Brady & Charlotte Bingham, John Harrison, Julian Bond, Raymond Bowers, Jeremy Paul, Rosemary Anne Sisson, Anthony Skene and Elizabeth Jane Howard. Alfred James Shaughnessy (19 May 1916–2 November 2005), sometimes known as Freddy Shaughnessy, was an English scripwriter and producer best known for being the script editor of Upstairs, Downstairs. ... John Hawkesworth (7 December 1920–30 September 2003) was a television and film producer and writer best known for his work on the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Fay Weldon (born September 22, 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright and essayist whose work has been associated with the cause of feminism. ... Charlotte Bingham (born 1942) is a British novelist. ... Elizabeth Jane Howard is an English novelist. ...


Production

Each episode of Upstairs, Downstairs was made in a fortnightly production schedule. The first week and a half would be spent rehearsing, with two days of recording in the studio.[1] Location footage was usually filmed beforehand. The exterior shots of 165, Eaton Place was filmed at 65, Eaton Place with the "1" painted on.[1] Upstairs, Downstairs was one of the first major colour productions to be made by LWT.[1]


Awards

Upstairs, Downstairs was nominated and won many national and international awards. It was nominated for the BAFTA Television award for Best Drama Series in 1972, 1973, 1975 and 1976, winning in 1972 and 1974. Pauline Collins was also nominated as Best Actress in 1973 for her role as Sarah, and in 1975 Gordon Jackson was nominated as Best Actor for playing Mr Hudson.[3] The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... Sarah Moffat (born Clémence Moffat in July 1882), also known as Sarah Delice and Clémence Dumas, was a fictional character in the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs and its spin-off Thomas & Sarah. ...


In the United States, Upstairs, Downstairs was honoured in the both the Emmy Awards and the Golden Globes. In 1974, 1975 and 1977 it won the award for Outstanding Drama Series at the Emmys. In 1975, Jean Marsh won the award for Best Actress - Drama Series, while Bill Bain won the award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series. The following year, it won the Outstanding Limited Series category and Gordon Jackson won as Outstanding Supporting Actor, while Angela Baddeley was nominated as Outstanding Supporting Actress - Drama Series. In 1977, Jacqueline Tong was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actress - Drama. In the Golden Globes, Upstairs, Downstairs won the Best TV Show - Drama in 1975 and it was nominated for this in 1978. Jean Marsh was nominated in 1976 and 1977 as Best TV Actress - Drama.[4] The Primetime Emmy Awards are awards presented by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in recognition of excellence in American primetime television programming. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Primetime Emmy Award for best drama has changed names many times in its history. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winners: 1974: Michael Learned - The Waltons 1975: Jean Marsh - Upstairs, Downstairs 1976: Michael Learned - The Waltons 1977: Lindsay Wagner - The Bionic Woman 1978: Sada Thompson - Family 1979: Mariette Hartley - The Incredible Hulk 1980... Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series is a Primetime Emmy Award given out during the primetime Emmys telecast. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winners: 1974: Joanna Miles - The Glass Menagerie 1975-78 No Award Given 1979: Kristy McNichol - Family 1980: Nancy Marchand - Lou Grant 1981: Nancy Marchand - Lou Grant 1982: Nancy Marchand - Lou Grant 1983: Doris... Documentary series and mini-series are also eligible for this award, as shown by the consecutive awards to Rich Man, Poor Man, Roots, and 60 Minutes. ...


Alfred Shaughnessy, the script editor and frequent writer, was nominated for an Emmy twice, for the episodes Miss Forrest and Another Year. Another frequent writer was the producer, John Hawkesworth, who was nominated for Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series for the episode The Bolter. Fay Weldon won a Writers' Guild award for Best British TV Series Script of 1971 for the first episode On Trial. Alfred James Shaughnessy (19 May 1916–2 November 2005), sometimes known as Freddy Shaughnessy, was an English scripwriter and producer best known for being the script editor of Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Another Year was the ninth episode of the fourth series of the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... John Hawkesworth (7 December 1920–30 September 2003) was a television and film producer and writer best known for his work on the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Fay Weldon (born September 22, 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright and essayist whose work has been associated with the cause of feminism. ...


Spin-offs

Following the final episode of Upstairs, Downstairs many ideas for spin-offs were thought of. These included having the new Lord and Lady Stockbridge buying back 165, Eaton Place and an American company wanted to make a programme based around Hudson and Rose emigrating to the United States. Another idea, called You Live or You Die, was to have Frederick Norton seeking his fortune in the US. A further idea would have followed Hudson, Mrs Bridges and Ruby running their seaside boarding house, and this probably would have been made had it not been for the death of Angela Baddeley on 22 February 1976. The only spin-off to make it screen was Thomas & Sarah, which broadcast in 1979, and this followed the adventures of Thomas and Sarah after they left Eaton Place. A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... This is a list of characters from the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs, that aired from 1970 to 1975. ... This is a list of characters from the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs, that aired from 1970 to 1975. ... Madeline Angela Clinton-Baddeley, CBE was an English character actress born on July 4, 1904, in London, England. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas & Sarah was the only spin-off from the popular LWT drama series Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Thomas Watkins Thomas Watkins was a fictional character in the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs and its spin-off Thomas & Sarah. ... Sarah Moffat (born Clémence Moffat in July 1882), also known as Sarah Delice and Clémence Dumas, was a fictional character in the ITV drama Upstairs, Downstairs and its spin-off Thomas & Sarah. ...


Novelisations

Each series of Upstairs, Downstairs was accompanied by a novelisation, with additional detail in each, but also with some episodes missing. All books were published by Sphere Books. The novelisation of the first series, "Upstairs, Downstairs or the secrets of an Edwardian household", was written by John Hawkesworth and published in 1972. Hawkesworth also wrote the series two novelisation, "In My Lady's Chamber" and this was published in 1973. The following year, Mollie Hardwick's novelisation of the third series, "The Years Of Change", was published and she also wrote the 1975 "The War to End Wars", the fourth series novelisation. The fifth series, which was longer than the others, was novelised in two books, both by Michael Hardwick and published in 1975. They were called "On With The Dance" and "Endings And Beginnings". Sphere Books, a British paperback-publisher from 1961 to 1990. ... Paul C. Doherty is a British writer, with a doctorate in history from Oxford, who writes historical mysteries and novels under the pennames Anna Apostolou, Michael Clynes, Ann Dukthas, C. L. Grace, Paul Harding, and Mollie Hardwick. ...


As well as these novelisations, five books were seperatley published, again by Sphere Books, with each being the biography of a main character before the series started. "Rose's Story" was written by Terence Brady & Charlotte Bingham and published in 1972. The following year, Mollie Hardwick's "Sarah's Story" and Michael Hardwick's "Mr Hudson's Diaries" were both published. "Mr Bellamy's Story", by Michael Hardwick, was published in 1974 and "Mrs Bridge's Story" by Mollie Hardwick was published in 1975. Also in 1975, "The Upstairs, Downstairs Omnibus", featuring all five slightly edited stories, was published.


Influence

The BBC series The Duchess of Duke Street is widely seen as the BBC's answer to Upstairs, Downstairs, not least because some of the same producers and writers worked on it, and it also has a theme tune by Faris. The 1990 BBC sitcom You Rang, M'Lord? also featured a similar situation. In the early 1990s, Marsh and Atkins created another successful period drama, The House of Eliott, for the BBC. In 1975 an American version, entitled Beacon Hill, debuted but due to low ratings it was soon cancelled, running for just thirteen episodes. Tom Wolfe called the series a plutography, i.e. a "graphic depiction of the lives of the rich."[5] The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The Duchess Of Duke Street is a British television drama series transmitted by the BBC. The programme lasted for two series, shown between 1976 and 1977. ... You Rang MLord? was a British television series written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft, broadcast between 1990 and 1993 on the BBC (although there had earlier been a pilot episode in 1988). ... The House Of Eliott is a British TV series about two sisters who start off their tailoring business. ... Thomas Kennerly Wolfe (born March 2, 1931 in Richmond, Virginia), known as Tom Wolfe, is a best-selling American author and journalist. ... Plutography is a word coined by Tom Wolfe to categorize books and other media that describe the lives of rich and famous people, often uncritically. ...


DVD releases

Region One

Upstairs, Downstairs was first released to Region One DVD in December 2001 by A&E Home Entertainment. During 2002, A&E released the remaining series. Thomas and Sarah was released on DVD in 2004 also by A&E. Thomas & Sarah was a short-lived British drama series and the only spin-off from the popular BAFTA-Award winning series Upstairs, Downstairs. ...


Region Two

Upstairs, Downstairs was originally released on DVD by VCI in Region 2 (UK). The colour episodes of the first series were released in 2001 followed by the other series finishing in 2003. In 2004, the black-and-white episodes and the first episode with the original ending were released. Thomas & Sarah was released in matching packaging in 2004. In 2005, VCI stopped making these DVDs. There were no extras on any of the DVDs. Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ...


Network Video released the entire programme series by series from 2005 to 2006. The episodes were digitally remastered and the black-and-white episodes were put in chronological order in the first series. Some episodes also featured audio commentaries, the LWT logo, commercial bumpers and the original preceding countdowns. In addition, each series was accompanied by a special one hour documentary relating to that series featuring new and archive interviews. The fifth series release also featured the 1975 documentary Russell Harty goes... Upstairs, Downstairs. In 2006, a boxset featuring all the DVDs was released. Remaster (and its derivations, frequently found in the phrases digitally remastered or digital remastering) is a word and concept ushered into the mass consciousness via the digital age, although it had existed before then. ... On a DVD (or laserdisc), an audio commentary is a bonus track consisting of a lecture or comments by one or more speakers, who talk about the movie as it progresses. ... A brief (usually ten to fifteen seconds) transition announcement in broadcasting, placed between a pause in the program and its commercial break (and also the other way around). ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ...


DVDs of earlier series have also been released in Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, Italy and Germany.


Region Four

Universal DVD has released all five series to region four DVD in Australia and New Zealand. but the company has stopped making new discs and they are slowly disappearing.


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Inside UpDown - The Story of Upstairs, Downstairs", Kaleidoscope Publishing, 2005. 
  2. ^ a b c Phillips, Steve. "www.updown.org.uk", Steve Phillips, 1997-2006. 
  3. ^ "BBC Guide", BBC, 2005. 
  4. ^ "BBC Guide", BBC, 2005. 
  5. ^ Wolfe, Tom (1986-06-15), "Snob's Progress", New York Times

The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Thomas Kennerly Wolfe (born March 2, 1931 in Richmond, Virginia), known as Tom Wolfe, is a best-selling American author and journalist. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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Upstairs, Downstairs (1139 words)
Upstairs, Downstairs was one of the first series of its type to be produced on videotape rather than film (though certain scenes, mainly exteriors and location shots, were shot on film).
Upstairs, Downstairs was first shown on British television in 1971 and continued through four series of 13 episodes each (two Edwardian series, a later pre-war series, and a World War I series) and a fifth series of 16 episodes (post-war) making a total of 68 episodes produced and broadcast.
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