FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Uppsala Cathedral
The Cathedral of Uppsala.
The Cathedral of Uppsala.
Cathedral from the inside.
Cathedral from the inside.

The Cathedral of Uppsala (Swedish: Uppsala domkyrka), is the largest church building in Scandinavia, being 118.7 m high, and with a length of 118.7 m. The construction of the cathedral began in 1287 after the archbishopric was moved from Gamla Uppsala. It would take more than a century to complete the construction. It was inaugurated 1435 under archbishop Olaus Laurentii, but was actually still not completely finished. It was dedicated to the saints Saint Lawrence, a most cherished saint in all of Sweden at that time, Saint Eric, the patron of Sweden (though never canonised by the pope), and Saint Olaf the patron of Norway. It was completed within the following decades. The Cathedral was severely damaged in the great fire of 1702, whereafter its Renaissance appearance of 1619 was altered. For instance its tall, Dutch Renaissance spires were replaced with small, dome-like, towers in Baroque style under the architect Carl Hårleman (1700-1753). The second restoration came in 1885-1893 under the architect Helgo Zettervall (1831-1907), who wanted to give the cathedral a French Gothic revival appearance. The original, medieval style was Baltic International Gothic, which employed relatively robust brick walls. The small Baroque towers were replaced by tall (French-inspired) spires, including a third, smaller tower on the transept crossing in the same style. Zettervall also severely altered large portions of the medieval outer brick walls as to give it a slimmer appearance, which meant the white-washed "blind windows", similar to the ones found on parts of the nearby Holy Trinity Church (Helga trefaldighets kyrka) were removed. The (interior) ceiling and walls of the cathedral were decorated in neo-Gothic style, although some depictions, such as one of Martin Luther, did not attempt to reconstruct the cathedral's medieval heritage. Large portions of cement additions by Zettervall to the exterior structure of the cathedral were removed some decades later. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 614 KB) I took this picture in 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 614 KB) I took this picture in 2004. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... Gamla Uppsala is an area rich in archaeological remains seen from the grave field whose larger mounds (left part) are close to the royal mounds. ... For other uses, see number 1435. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Olaus Laurentii (d. ... Saint Lawrence (225 – 258) (Latin Laurentius, laurelled) was one of the seven deacons of Rome who were martyred under the persecution of Roman Emperor Valerian in 258. ... The third seal of the City of Stockholm, depicting the crowned head of Eric the Saint, attested for the first time in 1376. ... Olav II Haraldsson ( 995 – 1030), king from 1015–1028, called during his lifetime the Fat and afterwards known as Saint Olaf, was born in the year in which Olaf Tryggvesson came to Norway. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... Detail of the Consistory House, Uppsala. ... Helgo Zettervall, 1901 Helgo Zettervall, older spelling Zetterwall, (November 21, 1831 – 1907) was a Swedish architect and professor of the Royal Swedish Academy of Arts. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... International Gothic is a subset of Gothic art developed in Burgundy, Bohemia and northern Italy in the late 1300s and early 1400s. ...


In the Middle Ages, when all houses in Uppsala except the churches consisted of one- or two-storeyed houses made of wood or sometimes bricks, the cathedral must have seemed even more enormous than today. Interestingly, the church was not the main place of worship of the citizens until the Reformation. The church was reserved for official services (by the cathedral's canons). The main churches, or parishes, in Uppsala were Holy Trinity church, or "Bondekyrkan" ("Farmer's Church") as it was often called, Saint Peter's church (St. Per), Our Lady's church (Vår Fru) and a Franciscan monastery. The last three existed on the east side of Fyrisån, which was, and is, the central business district, but were successivelly torn down during the Reformation. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Uppsala (older spelling Upsala) is a city in central Sweden, located about 70 km north of Stockholm. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


The Cathedral was also the coronation church for many of Swedens kings and queens. It housed coronations from the middle ages, up until the end of the 17th century. Thereafter, up until 1872, Stockholm's Cathedral (Storkyrkan) was the official coronation church. (Monarchs in Sweden have not been crowned since the days of Oscar II.) The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Oscar II (Oscar Fredrik) (January 21, 1829 – December 8, 1907) was King of Sweden and Norway from 1872 until his death. ...


A number of Swedish kings and prolific personalities lie buried inside, among others:

  • Gustav Vasa, 16th century, mighty King of Sweden. He is buried with his three wifes, although only two are depicted on the grave monument. He was interred in what was once the chapel of the Virgin Mary. The only indication of this in our day are the painted yellow stars against a blue background on the vaulted ceiling of the chapel, which are symbols of Saint Mary in Catholic tradition.
  • John III of Sweden and his wife Catherine Jagiellon.
  • Carolus Linnaeus, 18th century, world renowned botanist.
  • Olof Rudbeck, famous Swedish polymath and one of the discoverers of the lymphatic system (He also wrote Atlantica, a book in which he attempted to demonstrate that all peoples of the world originated in Sweden, and that Uppsala was the lost Atlantis).
  • Emanuel Swedenborg, 18th century, scientist and mystic. He was not originally interred here, but his earthly remains were transported to Uppsala from England in 1908.
  • Nathan Söderblom, 19th-20th century, notable archbishop.
  • Eric the Saint, 12th century. King and national saint.
  • Laurentius Petri Sweden's first Lutheran archbishop.
  • In modern times some relics of Saint Bridgette (Heliga Birgitta) are placed in the chapel of Saint Erik and the parents of Saint Bridgette.

Gustav Vasa, originally Gustav Eriksson Vasa (May 12, 1496–September 29, 1560) was King of Sweden from 1523 until his death. ... John III (Johan III) (December 23, 1537 – November 17, 1592) was King of Sweden from 1568 until his death. ... Catherine Jagiellon. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Olaus Rudbeckius, senior or (1630-1702), Swedish scientist and writer, professor of medicine at Uppsala University and for several periods rector magnificus (headmaster) of the same university. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Lars Olof Jonathan Söderblom, better known as Nathan Söderblom (January 15, 1866 - July 12, 1931), was a Swedish clergyman, and later Archbishop of the Church of Sweden and laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... Categories: Stub | Assassinated people | Saints | Swedish monarchs ... Laurentius Petri Nericus (Örebro 1499 – October 27, 1573), originally Lars Persson, was a Swedish clergyman and the first Evangelical Lutheran Archbishop of Sweden. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...

Dag Hammarskjöld Memorial

In the cathedral there is also a small memorial to Dag Hammarskjöld, former UN Secretary-General. On a stone it says: Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ...


Icke jag utan gud i mig Dag Hammarskjöld 1905 - 1961


"Not I, but God in me."


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Uppsala Cathedral

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Bishop Lennart Koskinen with some young people. ... The Patriarchal cross The Archbishops Palace in Uppsala, designed in the 18th century by the architect Carl HÃ¥rleman, but built on older foundations. ... The Temple at Uppsala was a temple in Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), near modern Uppsala, Sweden, that was created to worship the Norse gods of ancient times. ...

External links

  • Photos of Cathedral of Uppsala
  • Tourist guide
  • Official Uppland tourist page
  • Cathedral's website

Coordinates: 59°51′29″N, 17°37′58″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m