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Encyclopedia > Upper Sorbian
Upper Sorbian
Hornjoserbsce
Spoken in: Germany 
Region: Saxony
Total speakers: 55,000
Language family: Indo-European
 Slavic
  West Slavic
   Sorbian
    Upper Sorbian 
Writing system: Latin (Sorbian variant
Official status
Official language of: regional language in Germany (Brandenburg and Saxony)
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: none
ISO 639-2: wen
ISO 639-3: hsb

Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbšćina) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. A West Slavic language, it strongly resembles Czech. The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... Current distribution of Human Language Families A language family is a group of related languages said to have descended from a common proto-language. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... This article or section should be merged with List of West Slavic languages The West Slavic languages is a subdivision of the Slavic language group (q. ... The Sorbian languages are classified under the West Slavic branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Writing systems of the world today. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Sorbian alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet but uses diacritics such as the acute accent and the caron. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... ISO 639-1 is the first part of the ISO 639 international-standard language-code family. ... ISO 639-2 is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. ... ISO 639-3 is in process of development as an international standard for language codes. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of the sounds of human speech. ... Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech Lužice) is a historical region between the Bóbr and Kwisa rivers and the Elbe river in the eastern German states of Saxony and Brandenburg, south-western Poland (Lower Silesian Voivodeship) and the northern... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... This article or section should be merged with List of West Slavic languages The West Slavic languages is a subdivision of the Slavic language group (q. ...

A bilingual sign, the lower part is in Upper Sorbian language
A bilingual sign, the lower part is in Upper Sorbian language

Contents

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (992x744, 241 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sorbian languages Saxony ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (992x744, 241 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sorbian languages Saxony ...

History

The history of the Upper Sorbian language in Germany began with the Slavic migrations during the 6th Century AD. Since the 12th Century, there was a massive influx of rural Germanic settlers from Flanders, Saxony, Thuringia and Franconia. The preceding devastation of the country by martial actions, began the slow decrease of the Upper Sorbian language. Besides, in the Saxony region, the Sorbian language was legally subordinated to the German language. Language prohibitions were later added: In 1293, the Sorbian language was forbidden in Berne castle before the courts, in 1327 that language was forbidden in Zwickau and Leipzig, and from 1424 in Meissen. Further there was the condition in many guilds of the cities of the area to accept only members of German-language origin. Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Flanders (Dutch: ) is a geographical region that occupies the northern half of Belgium. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Franconia (German: Franken) is a historic region in modern Germany, which today forms three administrative regions of the German federal state of Bavaria: Lower Franconia (Unterfranken), Middle Franconia (Mittelfranken), and Upper Franconia (Oberfranken). ... Events May 20 - King Sancho IV of Castile creates the Study of General Schools of Alcala The Minoresses (Franciscan nuns) are first introduced into England Births Deaths Categories: 1293 ... For other uses, see Berne (disambiguation). ... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... Zwickau is a city of Germany, in the Bundesland Saxony (Sachsen), situated in a valley at the foot of the Erzgebirge, on the left bank of the Zwickauer Mulde, 130 km (82 miles) southwest of Dresden, south of Leipzig and south west of Chemnitz. ...   [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state of Saxony in Germany with a population of over 504,000. ... August 17 - Battle of Verneuil - An English force under John, Duke of Bedford defeats a larger French army under the Duke of Alençon, John Stewart, and Earl Archibald of Douglas. ... Old town of Meißen. ...


The central areas of the Milzener and Lusitzer, in the area of the today's Lausitz, was relatively little affected by the new German language settlements and from legal restrictions. The language had therefore flourished there. By the 17th Century, the number of Upper Sorbian speakers there grew to over 300,000. The oldest evidence of the Upper Sorbian written language is the „Burger Eydt Wendisch” monument, and was discovered in the city of Bautzen since the year 1532. The Milceni or Milzeni (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ) were a West Slavic tribe in Upper Lusatia. ... Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech and Serbian Lužice), sometimes called Sorbia comprises a region in the southern parts of Brandenburg and eastern parts of Saxony, Germany. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Bautzen (pronounced , listen, until 1868: Budissin; Upper Sorbian: BudyÅ¡in; Lower Sorbian: BudyÅ¡yn; , listen; Polish: Budziszyn; Czech: Budyšín) is a city in eastern Saxony, Germany, and capital of the eponymous district. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ...


The Upper Sorbian language in Germany

Altogether there is estimated to be 60,000 speakers of Upper Sorbian, of which approximately 40,000 live in Saxony and approx. 20,000 live in Brandenburg of Germany. Thus the Upper Sorbian language is still - after the Danish language and before Frisian language — the second largest minority language of Germany. Since the nationality affiliations in Germany are not officially seized and the confession to the Upper Sorbian nationality is free, these figures are only estimations. The number of the active speakers may be substantially smaller. Some scholars predict that the Upper Sorbian language is threatening to becoming extinct. Computer forecasts predict that in 20-30 years time, there will only be 7,000 Lower Sorbian and 13,000 Upper Sorbian speakers left in the world (They also believe that the Lower Sorbian language may have become extinct by that time). In the opinion of language experts, by the end of the 21st century the Upper Sorbian will not have become extinct yet. Nevertheless at present, no further future reliable forecasts can be made. The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... Danish (dansk) is one of the North Germanic languages (also called Scandinavian languages), a sub-group of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Frisian is a Germanic group of closely related languages, spoken by about half a million members of Frisian ethnic groups living on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany. ...


See also

The Sorbian alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet but uses diacritics such as the acute accent and the caron. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbšćina) is a Slavic minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ...

External links

Wikipedia
Upper Sorbian edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Ethnologue on Upper Sorbian
Slavic languages and dialects
East Slavic Belarusian | Old East Slavic† | Old Novgorod dialect† | Russian | Rusyn (Carpathians) | Ruthenian† | Ukrainian
West Slavic Czech | Kashubian | Knaanic† | Lower Sorbian | Pannonian Rusyn | Polabian† | Polish | Pomeranian† | Slovak | Slovincian† | Upper Sorbian
South Slavic Banat Bulgarian | Bulgarian | Church Slavic | Macedonian | Old Church Slavonic† | Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Bunjevac, Croatian, Montenegrin, Serbian, Šokac) | Slavic (Greece) | Slovenian
Other Proto-Slavic† | Russenorsk† | Slavoserbian† | Slovio
Extinct

  Results from FactBites:
 
Projekat Rastko - Luzica / Project Rastko - Lusatia (4240 words)
Sorbian is spoken in Upper and Lower Lusatia in the German Länder of Saxony and Brandenburg.
Until the 10th century, Sorbian was spoken between the Bober and Queiß in the east and the Saale in the west, the Erz and Lusatian mountains in the south and roughly as far as Frankfurt on the Oder, Köpenick and Jüteborg.
In the A schools, Sorbian is the main language of instruction, and in the B schools of the area it is an optional language.
Upper and Lower Sorbian language, alphabet and pronunciation (528 words)
Sorbian, or Wendisch, is a member of the West Slavic subgroup of Indo-European languges spoken by about 55,000 people in Upper and Lower Lusatia in the German Länder of Saxony and Brandenburg.
In the mid-19th century, written Upper Sorbian based on the dialect spoken around Bautzen was introduced as the compulsory standard in the Sorbian-speaking area in Upper Lusatia, while written Lower Sorbian based on the Cottbus dialect was introduced as the standard written form in Lower Lusatia.
Sorbian is taught as a subject in a number of secondary schools and used as a medium of instruction for some subjects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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