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Encyclopedia > Upper Paleolithic
Epoch:
Middle Paleolithic - Millennia:
10th millennium BC



Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... // For other uses, see time scale. ... The Middle Paleolithic (or Middle Palaeolithic) is the second subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... See 1 E11 s for more remote dates. ...

This time period is part of the
Pleistocene epoch.
Pleistocene
Paleolithic
Lower Paleolithic
Middle Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
Châtelperronian culture
Aurignacian culture
Gravettian culture
Solutrean culture
Magdalenian culture
Holocene
Mesolithic or Epipaleolithic
Neolithic

The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. Very broadly it dates to between 40,000 and 10,000 years ago, roughly coinciding with the appearance of "high" culture (see below) and before the advent of agriculture. It has also been called the Reindeer Age. The late stone age and the upper paleolithic refer to the same periods. For historical reasons the late stone age usually refers to the period in Africa, whereas the upper paleolithic is generally used when referring to the period in Europe. The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... The Lower Paleolithic (or Lower Palaeolithic) is the earliest subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age. ... The Middle Paleolithic (or Middle Palaeolithic) is the second subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Châtelperronian was the earliest industry of the Upper Palaeolithic in central and south western France. ... Aurignacian is the name of a culture of the Upper Palaeolithic present in Europe and south west Asia. ... The Gravettian was an industry of the European Upper Palaeolithic. ... The Solutrean industry was an advanced flint tool making style of the Upper Palaeolithic. ... The Magdalenian, also spelt Magdalénien, refers to one of the later culture of the Upper Palaeolithic in western Europe. ... The Holocene epoch is a geological period that extends from the present day back to about 10,000 radiocarbon years, approximately 11,430 ± 130 calendar years BP (between 9560 and 9300 BC). ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age[1]) was a period in the development of human technology between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age. ... The Epipalaeolithic (or Epi-Palaeolithic, Epipaleolithic, or Epi-Paleolithic) was a period in the development of human technology that immediately precedes the neolithic period, as an alternative to mesolithic. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Obsidian projectile point The Stone Age is a period of history that encompasses the first widespread use of technology in human evolution and the spread of humanity from the savannas of East Africa to the rest of the world. ...


Subscript textItalic text==Overview==

See also: Single origin hypothesis

Modern humans (i.e. Homo sapiens sapiens), are believed to have emerged around 130,000 years ago. Though these humans were modern in anatomy their lifestyle changed very little from their predecessors such as Homo erectus and the Neanderthals. They used the same crude stone tools. Archaeologist Richard G. Klein, who has worked extensively on ancient stone tools, describes the stone tool kit of archaic hominids as impossible to categorize. It was as if when the Neanderthals went to make a stone tool they weren't really concerned about its final form. He argues that almost everywhere, whether Asia or Africa or Europe, before 50,000 years ago all the stone tools are very much alike and unsophisticated. However after 50,000 years ago there is sharp increase in the diversity of artifacts. For the first time bone artifacts, and the first art appear in the fossil record in Africa. The first evidence of human fishing is also noted from artifact in places like Blombos cave in South Africa. After 50,000 years ago, firstly in Africa, it was found that he could easily sort the human artifacts into many different categories, such as projectile points, engraving tools, knife blades, and drilling and piercing tools. These new stone tool types have been described as being distinctly differentiated from each other as if each tool had a specific name. 3000 to 4000 years later this technology would then spread to Europe resulting in a population explosion of modern humans and also the extinction the Neanderthals. The invaders commonly referred to as the Cro-Magnons left many sophisticated stone tools, cave art and Venus figurines[1][2][3].This shift from Middle to Upper Paleolithic is called the Upper Paleolithic Revolution. The Neanderthals continued to use Mousterian stone tool technology. In paleoanthropology, the single-origin hypothesis (or Out-of-Africa model) is one of two accounts of the origin of anatomically modern humans, Homo sapiens. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Binomial name (Dubois, 1892) Synonyms † Sinanthropus pekinensis † Javanthropus soloensis † Meganthropus paleojavanicus Homo erectus (Latin: upright man) is an extinct species of the genus Homo. ... For other uses, see Neanderthal (disambiguation). ... Richard G. Klein is a Professor of Anthropological Sciences at Stanford University. ... Blombos cave is a cave in a limestone cliff on the Southern Cape coast in South Africa. ... The Cro-Magnons (IPA: or anglicised IPA: ) form the earliest known European examples of Homo sapiens, from ca. ... Cave, or rock, paintings are paintings painted on cave or rock walls and ceilings, usually dating to pre_historic times. ... For other uses, see Neanderthal (disambiguation). ... Mousterian is a name given by archaeologists to a style of predominantly flint tools (or industry) associated primarily with Homo neanderthalensis and dating to the Middle Paleolithic, the middle part of the Old Stone Age. ... Ancient stone tools A stone tool is, in the most general sense, any tool made of stone. ...


The earliest remains of organized settlements in the form of campsites, some with storage pits, are encountered in this period. These were often located in narrow valley bottoms, possibly in order to make hunting passing herds of animals easier. Some sites may have been occupied year round though more generally they seem to have been used seasonally with peoples moving between them to exploit different food sources at different times of the year. Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, United States, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... Campsites are often situated in or near forests. ... Look up pit, pits, pitted, pitting in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ... A hunt is an activity during which humans or animals chase some prey, such as wild or specially bred animals (traditionally targeted species are known as game), in order to catch or kill them, either for food, sale, or as a form of sport. ... A herd of Wildebeest A gaggle of Canada geese For other uses, see Herd (disambiguation). ... This article is about divisions of a year. ... Food is any substance, usually composed primarily of carbohydrates, fats, water and/or proteins, that can be eaten or drunk by an animal for nutrition and/or pleasure. ...

Upper Paleolithic people used caves and tents like this one (reconstruction) for dwelling
Upper Paleolithic people used caves and tents like this one (reconstruction) for dwelling

Technological advances included significant developments in flint tool manufacturing with industries based on fine blades rather than simpler and shorter flakes. Burins and racloirs attest to the working of bone, antler and hides. Advanced darts and harpoons also appear in this period, along with the fish hook, the oil lamp, rope, and the eyed needle. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1027x1506, 1134 KB) en: Reconstruction of Upper Paleolithic tent from non-tawing leathers. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1027x1506, 1134 KB) en: Reconstruction of Upper Paleolithic tent from non-tawing leathers. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Flint tools were made by stone age peoples worldwide. ... In archaeology, a prismatic blade is a long, narrow, specialized lithic flake with parallel margins. ... In archaeology, a lithic flake is a thin, sharp fragment of stone that results from the process of lithic reduction. ... In lithic reduction, a burin is a special type of lithic flake with a chisel-like edge which prehistoric humans may have used for engraving or for carving wood or bone. ... A racloir is a name given by archaeologists to a certain type of flint tool made by prehistoric peoples. ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... For the Poet Laureate of Milwaukee, see Antler (Poet). ... Look up hide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Darts are missile weapons, designed to fly such that a sharp, often weighted point will strike first. ... For other uses, see Harpoon (disambiguation) Harpoon gun redirects here. ...


Artistic work also blossomed with Venus figurines, cave painting, petroglyphs and exotic raw materials found far from their sources suggest emergent trading links. More complex social groupings emerged, supported by more varied and reliable food sources and specialised tool types. This probably contributed to increasing group identification or ethnicity. These group identities produced distinctive symbols and rituals which are an important part of modern human behaviour. The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ... External links Venus figures from the Stone Age Images of women in ancient art http://perso. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Petroglyphs on Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument, southern Utah, USA Petroglyphs are images created by removing part of a rock surfaces by incising, pecking, carving, and abrading. ... material is the substance or matter from which something is or can be made, or also items needed for doing or creating something. ... Young people interacting within an ethnically diverse society. ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task, or provides an ability that is not naturally available to the user of a tool. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ...


The reasons for these changes in human behaviour have been attributed to the changes in climate during the period which encompasses a number of global temperature drops, meaning a worsening of the already bitter climate of the last ice age. These may have reduced the supply of usable timber and forced people to look at other materials while flint becomes brittle at low temperatures and may not have functioned as a tool. For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... This article or section should be merged with Wisconsinan glaciation The Wisconsin (in North America), Weichsel (in Scandinavia), Devensian (in the British Isles) or Würm glaciation (in the Alps) is the most recent period of the Ice Age, and ended some 10,000 Before Present (BP). ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction or wood...


It has also been argued that the appearance of (complex or abstract) language made these behavioural changes possible. The complexity of the new human capabilities hints that humans were less capable of planning or foresight before 40,000 years and that speech changed that [1]. This suggestion has no wide acceptance, since human phylogenetic separation dates to the Middle Paleolithic (see Proto-language). Still, it must be remembered that while the latter view is better supported by phylogenetic inference, the material evidence is hard to explain thus. A phylogeny (or phylogenesis) is the origin and evolution of a set of organisms, usually of a species. ... The Middle Paleolithic (or Middle Palaeolithic) is the second subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Proto-language may refer to either: a language that is the common ancestor of a set of related languages (a language family), or a system of communication during a stage in glottogony that may not yet be properly called a language. ... Inference is the act or process of deriving a conclusion based solely on what one already knows. ...

Contents

Events

Map of findings of Upper Paleolihic art in Europe
  • c. 50000 BC: start of the Mousterian Pluvial in North Africa
  • 35000 BC: Zar, Yataghyeri, Damjili and Taghlar caves in Azerbaijan
  • 30000 BC: Gobustan Culture starts in Azerbaijan
  • c. 30000 BC: end of the Mousterian Pluvial in North Africa
  • c. 30000 BC–26000 BC: Lion-Human, from Hohlenstein-Stadel, Germany created. It is now in Ulmer Museum, Ulm, Germany.
  • c. 23000 BC: Venus of Petřkovice (Petřkovická venuše in Czech) from Petřkovice in Ostrava, Czech Republic, was made. It is now in Archeological Institute, Brno.
  • c. 22000 BC: Neanderthals become extinct in Europe.
  • c. 22000 BC: Last Glacial Maximum: Venus of Bassempouy, Grotte du Pape, Brassempouy, Landes, France, was made. It is now at Musee des Antiquites Nationales, St.-Germain-en-Laye.
  • c. 22000 BC–21000 BC: Venus of Willendorf, Austria, was made. It is now at Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna.
  • c. 18000 BC-15000 BC: Last Ice Age.
  • c. 16500 BC: Paintings in Cosquer cave, Cap Margiou, France were made.
  • c. 16000 BC: Spotted Horses, Pech Merle cave, Dordogne, France are painted. Discovered in December 1994.
  • c. 16000 BC–9000 BC: Ibex-headed spear thrower, from Le Mas d'Azil, Ariege, France, is made. It is now at Musee de la Prehistoire, Le Mas d'Azil.
  • c. 16000 BC–10000 BC: Mammoth-bone village in Mezhirich, Ukraine is inhabited.
  • c. 15000 BC: Spotted human hands, Pech Merle cave, Dordogne, France are painted. Discovered in December 1994.
  • c. 15000 BC–13000 BC: Hall of Bulls, Lascaux caves, is painted. Discovered in 1940. Closed to the public in 1963.
  • c. 15000 BC–13000 BC: Bird-Headed man with bison and Rhinoceros, Lascaux caves, is painted.
  • c. 15000 BC–13000 BC: Lamp with ibex design, from La Mouthe cave, Dordogne, France, is made. It is now at Musee des Antiquites Nationales, St.-Germain-en-Laye.
  • c. 14000 BC-10000 BC: Pregnant woman and deer (?), from Laugerie-Basse, France was made. It is now at Musee des Antiquites Nationales, St.-Germain-en-Laye.
  • c. 13000 BC: Bison, Le Tuc d'Audoubert, Ariege, France.
  • c. 12000 BC: Paleo-Indians searched for big game in what is now the Hovenweep National Monument.
  • c. 12000 BC: Bison, on the ceiling of a cave at Altamira, Spain, is painted. Discovered in 1879. Accepted as authentic in 1902.
  • c. 12000 BC: Domestication of Reindeer and Dogs. [4]
  • 11500 BC–10000 BC: Wooden buildings in South America (Chile), first pottery vessels (Japan), bow and arrow appeared.
  • 11000 BC: Beginning of the Holocene extinction event.
  • 11000 BC: First evidence of human settlement in Argentina.
  • 11000 BC: The Arlington Springs Man dies on the island of Santa Rosa, off the coast of California.
  • 11000 BC: Human remains deposited in caves which are now located off the coast of Yucatan [2]

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Mousterian Pluvial was an extended wet and rainy period in the climate history of North Africa. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Lion-human sculpture from the Upper Paleolithic period was found in 1939 in Stadel im Hohlenstein near Asselfingen, Alb-Donau-Kreis. ... For other uses, see Ulm (disambiguation). ... Czech Republic Moravian-Silesian Ostrava 23  - Moravská Ostrava a Přívoz  - Hošťálkovice  - Hrabová  - Ostrava-Jih  - Krásné Pole  - Lhotka  - Mariánské Hory a Hulváky  - Martinov  - Michálkovice  - Nová BÄ›lá  - Nová Ves  - PetÅ™kovice  - Plesná  - Polanka nad Odrou  - Poruba  - Proskovice  - Pustkovec  - Radvanice a Bartovice  - Stará BÄ›lá  - Slezsk... Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region South Moravia Founded 1146 Area  - city 230. ... Temperature proxies for the last 40,000 years The Last Glacial Maximum refers to the time of maximum extent of the ice sheets during the last glaciation, approximately 21 thousand years ago. ... The Venus of Brassempouy can hardly be included with the other Venus figurines because she is so unlike them. ... Landes (Occitan: Lanas) is a département in southern France. ... Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a city west of Paris, in the Yvelines d partement (of which it is a sous-pr fecture), in the Ile-de-France r gion, in France. ... Venus of Willendorf Venus of Willendorf, also known as the Woman of Willendorf, is an 11. ... Naturhistorisches Museum at Maria-Theresien-Platz, Vienna Naturhistorisches Museum Wien The Naturhistorisches Museum (Museum of Natural History) is a large museum located in Vienna, Austria. ... “Wien” redirects here. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... A painted bison from the Cosquer cave The Cosquer cave is located in the Calanque de Morgiou near Marseille, France, not very far from Cap Morgiou. ... Pech Merle, a hillside opening in the Lot département of Midi-Pyrénées region in France, about 35 minutes drive east of Cahors, is the site of one of the prehistoric cave painting remaining in France, which is open to the general public. ... Dordogne (Occitan: Dordonha) is a department in central France named after the Dordogne River. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Ari ge is a d partement in southwestern France named after the Ari ge River. ... This article is about the genus Mammuthus. ... Mezhyrich (Ukrainian: , also referred to as Mezhirich) is a village (selo) in central Ukraine. ... Pech Merle, a hillside opening in the Lot département of Midi-Pyrénées region in France, about 35 minutes drive east of Cahors, is the site of one of the prehistoric cave painting remaining in France, which is open to the general public. ... Dordogne (Occitan: Dordonha) is a department in central France named after the Dordogne River. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Painting of bison attacking a man, from the cave at Lascaux, c. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Painting of bison attacking a man, from the cave at Lascaux, c. ... Dordogne (Occitan: Dordonha) is a department in central France named after the Dordogne River. ... Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a city west of Paris, in the Yvelines d partement (of which it is a sous-pr fecture), in the Ile-de-France r gion, in France. ... (Redirected from 10000 BC) (Pleistocene, Paleolithic – 10th millennium BC – 9th millennium BC – other millennia) Beginning of the Mesolithic, or Epipaleolithic time period, which is the first part of the Holocene epoch. ... Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a city west of Paris, in the Yvelines d partement (of which it is a sous-pr fecture), in the Ile-de-France r gion, in France. ... Ari ge is a d partement in southwestern France named after the Ari ge River. ... Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... Hovenweep National Monument straddles the Colorado-Utah border west of Cortez, Colorado. ... Altamira could mean any of the following: Altamira, a cave in Spain famous for its cave paintings. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Dogs and sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated. ... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus (Linnaeus, 1758) Reindeer map The reindeer, known as caribou when wild in North America, is an Arctic and Subarctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... This article is about the domestic dog. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Look up container in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This image depicts a typical bow, as made by the Huns, lying against a tree. ... Traditional target arrow and replica medieval arrow. ... The Dodo, a bird of Mauritius, became extinct during the mid-late 17th century after humans destroyed the forests where the birds made their homes and introduced animals that ate their eggs. ... Arlington Man is the name given a set of human remains. ...

Cultures

Reindeer Age articles
Reindeer Age articles
Reindeer Age (Aurignacian) Engravings & Carvings
Reindeer Age (Aurignacian) Engravings & Carvings

The Upper Paleolithic in the Franco-Cantabric region: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 465 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1547 pixel, file size: 47 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 465 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1547 pixel, file size: 47 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1192 × 1584 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1192 × 1584 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

  • The Châtelperronian culture was located around central and south western France, and northern Spain. It appears to be derived from the earlier Mousterian culture, and represents the period of overlap between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens. This culture lasted from approximately 33000 BC to 27000 BC.
  • The Aurignacian culture was located in Europe and south west Asia, and flourished between 32000 BC and 21000 BC. It may have been contemporary with the Périgordian (a contested grouping of the earlier Châtelperronian and later Gravettian cultures).
  • The Gravettian culture was located around France, though evidence of Gravettian products have been found across central Europe and Russia. Gravettian sites date between 26000 BC to 20000 BC.
  • The Solutrean culture was located in eastern France, Spain, and England. Solutrean artifacts have been dated to around 19000 BC before mysteriously disappearing around 15000 BC.
  • The Magdalenian culture left evidence from Portugal to Poland during the period from 16000 BC to 8000 BC.

From the Synoptic table of the principal old world prehistoric cultures: Châtelperronian was the earliest industry of the Upper Palaeolithic in central and south western France. ... Mousterian is a name given by archaeologists to a style of predominantly flint tools (or industry) associated primarily with Homo neanderthalensis and dating to the Middle Paleolithic, the middle part of the Old Stone Age. ... Binomial name Homo neanderthalensis King, 1864 The Neanderthal or Neandertal was a species of genus Homo (Homo neanderthalensis) that inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia from about 230,000 to 29,000 years ago (in the Middle Palaeolithic, early Stone Age). ... Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ... Aurignacian is the name of a culture of the Upper Palaeolithic present in Europe and south west Asia. ... Périgordian is a term for several distinct but related Upper Palaeolithic cultures which are thought by some archaeologists to represent a contiguous tradition. ... The Gravettian was an industry of the European Upper Palaeolithic. ... The Solutrean industry was an advanced flint tool making style of the Upper Palaeolithic. ... The Magdalenian, also spelt Magdalénien, refers to one of the later culture of the Upper Palaeolithic in western Europe. ... The table gives a rough picture of the relationships between the various principal cultures of Prehistory outside the Americas, Antarctica, Australia and Oceania. ...

  • central and east Europe:
    • 30000 BC, Szeletian culture
    • 20000 BC, Pavlovian, Aurignacian cultures
    • 10000 BC, Epigravettian culture
    • 9000 BC, Gravettian culture
  • north and west Africa, and Sahara:
    • 30000 BC, Aterian culture
    • 10000 BC, Ibero-maurusian, Sebilian cultures
    • 8000 BC, Capsian culture
  • central, south, and east Africa:
    • 50000 BC, Fauresmithian culture
    • 30000 BC, Stillbayan culture
    • 10000 BC, Lupembian culture
    • 9000 BC, Magosian culture
    • 7000 BC, Wiltonian culture
    • 3000 BC, beginning of hunter-gatherer art in south Africa
  • west Asia (including Middle East):
    • 50000 BC, Jabroudian culture
    • 40000 BC, Amoudian culture
    • 30000 BC, Emirian culture
    • 20000 BC, Aurignacian culture
    • 10000 BC, Kebarian, Athlitian cultures
    • 9000 BC, Natufian culture
  • south and central Asia:
    • 50000 BC, Soanian culture
    • 30000 BC, Angara culture
    • 9000 BC, Khandivili culture
  • east and southeast Asia:
    • 80000 BC, Ordos culture
    • 50000 BC, Ngandong culture
    • 30000 BC, Sen-Doki culture
    • 10000 BC, pre-Jōmon ceramic culture
    • 8000 BC, Hoabinhian culture
    • 7000 BC, Jōmon culture

Ivan Pavlov Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (September 14, 1849 - February 27, 1936) was a Russian physiologist who first described the phenomenon now known as conditioning in experiments with dogs. ... The Gravettian was an industry of the European Upper Palaeolithic. ... The Aterian industry is a name given by archaeologists to a type of stone tool manufacturing dating to the middle Palaeolithic in the region around the Atlas Mountains and the north west Sahara. ... The Capsian culture (named after the town of Gafsa) was a Mesolithic culture of the Maghreb, which lasted from about 10000 BC to 6000 BC. It was concentrated mainly in modern Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, with some sites attested in Cyrenaica (Libya). ... The Magosian is the name given by archaeologists to an industry found in southern and eastern Africa. ... Aurignacian is the name of a culture of the Upper Palaeolithic present in Europe and south west Asia. ... The Natufian culture existed in the Mediterranean region of the Levant. ... Angara (Ангара́) is a river, 1840 km (1150 m. ... Ordos can refer to: the Ordos Desert in Inner Mongolia House Ordos, a fictional organisation appearing in Dune spin-offs This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Trinomial name †Homo erectus soloensis Oppenoorth, 1932 Homo erectus soloensis (formerly classified as Homo sapiens soloensis) is generally regarded as a subspecies of the extinct hominin, Homo erectus. ... Enter of Roman Catholicism (16th century) Tây SÆ¡n Dynasty (1778–1802) Nguyá»…n Dynasty (1802–1945) Union of Indochina (1887–1940) World War I (1914–1918) and World War II (1939–1945) Participated in WWI (1916–1917) Axis invasion in WWII (1940) Việt Minh Front Empire of... Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period ) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BC to 300 BC. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BC glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ...

See also

An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Hovenweep National Monument straddles the Colorado-Utah border west of Cortez, Colorado. ... Behavioral modernity is a term used in anthropology and archeology to refer to an important milestone in the evolution of humans. ...

References

  1. ^ Biological origins of modern human behavior part3
  2. ^ Biological origins of modern human behavior part 1
  3. ^ Modern' Behavior Began 40,000 Years Ago In Africa
  4. ^ Lloyd, J & Mitchinson, J: "The Book of General Ignorance". Faber & Faber, 2006.

John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ... John Mitchinson is the head of research for the British television panel game QI, and co-author of The Book of General Ignorance with QIs creator John Lloyd. ... QI: The Book of General Ignorance (UK cover) The Book of General Ignorance is a series of books based on the final round in the intellectual British panel game QI, written by John Lloyd and John Mitchinson. ...

External links

  • The Upper Paleolithic Revolution
  • Online community of people who strive to emulate the diet and fitness of Paleolithic humans

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The Early Upper Paleolithic beyond Western Europe (591 words)
The appearance of novel Upper Paleolithic technologies, new patterns of land use, expanded social networks, and the emergence of complex forms of symbolic communication point to a behavioral revolution beginning sometime around 45,000 years ago.
In the absence of fossil association, the behavioral transition was thought to reflect the biological replacement of archaic hominid populations by intrusive modern humans.
Emergence of the Levantine Upper Paleolithic: Evidence from the Wadi al-Hasa
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