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Encyclopedia > Upper Canada College
Upper Canada College
Palmam qui meruit ferat
Whoever hath deserved it let him bear the palm
Address
200 Lonsdale Road
Toronto, Ontario, M4V 1W6, Canada
Information
Religious affiliation None
Principal Dr. James P. Power
Faculty 74
Funding type Independent
Endowment $43,274,134 CAD[1][2]
Campus Deer Park/Forest Hill (urban), Norval (rural)
Colours Blue and white
Established 1829
Enrollment 1116
Homepage www.ucc.on.ca

Upper Canada College (UCC) is a private elementary and secondary school for boys in downtown Toronto, Canada. Students between Senior Kindergarten and Grade Twelve study under the International Baccalaureate program. Image File history File links UCC_Crest. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that forms part of a postal address in Canada. ... C$ redirects here. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of secondary education in the United States and many other nations. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ...


Founded in 1829, UCC is the oldest independent school in the province of Ontario, the third oldest in the country, and is often described as the most prestigious preparatory school in Canada,[3] having many of Canada's elite, powerful and wealthy as graduates. Modelled on the British public schools, throughout the first part of its history the College both influenced and was influenced by government and maintained a reputation as a Tory bastion from its founding. However, today UCC is fully independent and the student and faculty populations are more diverse in terms of cultural and economic backgrounds. A link to the Royal Family is maintained through Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who is the College's Official Visitor, and a member of the Board of Governors.[4] Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... The point of a bastion on a reconstructed French fort in Illinois. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch and head of state. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ...

Contents

History

Drawing of former UCC campus at King and Simcoe Streets in downtown Toronto
Drawing of former UCC campus at King and Simcoe Streets in downtown Toronto

Canadian Illustrated News, Vol. ... Canadian Illustrated News, Vol. ... Upper Canada College (UCC), located in Toronto, Ontario, has a storied history beginning with its founding in 1829. ...

Beginnings and growth

Founded in 1829 by then-Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, Major-General Sir John Colborne (later Lord Seaton), in the hopes that it would serve as a "feeder school" to the newly established King's College (later the University of Toronto), UCC was modelled on the great public schools of Britain, most notably Eton.[5][4] The school began teaching in the original Royal Grammar School, however, within a year was established on its own campus at the corner of King and Simcoe Streets, to which Colborne brought Cambridge and Oxford educated men from the United Kingdom, attracting them with high salaries.[6] Still, despite ever increasing enrolment, popularity with leading families of the day, both from the local Family Compact and from abroad, and praise from many, including Charles Dickens,[7] UCC was faced with closure on a number of occasions, threatened either by opponents to elitism, withdrawal of funding by the provincial government that once administered it, or by having no building in which to operate.[5] This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... John Colborne, 1st Baron Seaton (February 16, 1778 - April 17, 1863), British field marshal, was born at Lyndhurst, Hants and entered the 2Oth (Lancashire Fusiliers) in 1794, winning thereafter every step in his regimental promotion without purchase. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... King Street is a major east-west commercial thoroughfare in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The Family Compact was the informal name for the wealthy, conservative elite of Upper Canada in the early 19th century. ... Dickens redirects here. ...


The school survived its denigrators, but after the government of Ontario stopped funding it in 1891, thus making UCC a completely independent school, the College was forced to move to its present location in Deer Park, which was then a rural area. The College thrived at this new location, both physically and culturally, as the buildings were expanded and bright instructors attracted. Central to this development was principal William Grant, who appointed a group of teachers described as "eccentric, crotchety, quaint, though widely travelled and highly intelligent,"[8] and who saw the student enrollment and teacher salaries double, bursaries grow, and a pension plan established.[9] UCC expanded to take in lower year students with the construction of a separate primary school building, the Prep, in 1902, allowing for boys to be enrolled from grade three through to graduation. For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Deer Park is a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, centred on the intersection of Yonge Street and St. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... In the United States, Third grade (called Grade 3 in some regions) is a year of primary education. ...


UCC maintained a Cadet Corps from around 1837, becoming the only student corps called to duty in Canadian military history when it assisted in staving off the Fenian Raids in 1866.[5] Through the two World Wars, a number of UCC graduates gave their lives and provided leadership. Historian Jack Granatstein, in his book The Generals, demonstrated that UCC graduates also accounted for more than 30% of Canadian generals during the Second World War; in total, 26 Old Boys achieved brigadier rank or higher in World War II.[10] Fenian Monument - Queens Park, Toronto Canada ca. ... Professor Jack Lawrence Granatstein, OC , Ph. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


After the war

UCC faced a major crisis when, in 1958, it was discovered that the main building was in serious disrepair, due to poor construction during previous renovations, and was in danger of collapse. A massive fundraising campaign was started within the year, and, with the assistance of Prince Philip, all the necessary $3,200,000 was raised from Old Boys and friends of the College; Ted Rogers, Sr.'s contribution paid for the clock tower. Construction of the present building began in early 1959, and it was opened by Governor General Vincent Massey near the end of 1960. The crisis forced the school government to rethink their stance on foresight and planning, leading to a years-long programn of new construction, salary improvements, and funding sources; as of 1958, despite benefactors, UCC had no endowment.[11] Jan. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... Edward S. “Ted” Rogers, Sr. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... Charles Vincent Massey, PC, CH, CC, CD [1] (February 20, 1887 – December 30, 1967) was the eighteenth Governor General of Canada and the first who was born in Canada. ...


In teamwork with principal Rev. Sowby, whom he had helped select, Massey had further influence on the College, bringing about somewhat of a renaissance for the school. A number of distinguished visitors made themselves present, and leading minds were brought on as masters.[12] At this time the curriculum began to shift from a classical education into a liberal arts one; options besides Latin were first offered after 1950.[13] This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Classical education as understood and taught in the Middle Ages of Western culture is roughly based on the ancient Greek concept of Paideia. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...

HRH The Duke of Edinburgh speaks with UCC First Football team members at the College's 150th anniversary celebrations, 1979
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh speaks with UCC First Football team members at the College's 150th anniversary celebrations, 1979

Into the 1960s a decade of rapid change began; UCC, as an establishment institution, was in "cultural shock" over the societal changes that were taking place across the Western world; individual freedoms trumped institutional discipline and moral authority had lost its clout.[14] The cadet corps, seen as outdated and unnecessary, was disbanded in 1976, and the uniform requirements were relaxed, with long hair becoming the norm for boys. However, under principals educated at Oxford (Johnson) and Cambridge (Sadlier), the College pointedly refused to adopt the new provincial educational standards issued in 1967, which it considered lower than the old standards.[15] UCC also moved forward with new educational and athletic facilities across the campus, while opening the campus to the community at the same time.[16] By the 1990s summer camps were set up on the campus for any children who wished to enroll. Image File history File links UCC-duke. ... Image File history File links UCC-duke. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Occident redirects here. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... Summer camp is a supervised program for children and/or teenagers conducted (usually) during the summer months in some countries. ...


The College adopted the International Baccalaureate (IB) program in 1996, which augments the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Following this, grade two was added in 1998, and grade one the next year. Since 2003 UCC has offered places from senior Kindergarten to Grade Twelve.[17] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... In the United States, Second grade (called Grade 2 in some regions) is a year of primary education. ... First grade is a year of education in the United States and other countries immediately following kindergarten. ... For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of secondary education in the United States and many other nations. ...


Early into the new millennium, UCC also followed the trends in environmentalism when the Board of Governors unanimously voted to establish the Green School initiative in 2002, wherein environmental education would become "one of the four hallmarks of a UCC education."[18] Plans to carry this out saw not only upgrades of the school's physical plant to meet environmentally sustainable standards, but also an integration of these new initiatives into the curriculum.[19] The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ... A physical plant or mechanical plant refers to the necessary infrastructure used in support of a given facility. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ...


Controversies

Ethnic and gender issues

Upper Canada College has accepted ethnic minorities since the first black student enrolled in 1831.[20] However, UCC nonetheless attracted accusations of racial bias and sexism. Michael Ignatieff considered the school's ethnic makeup during his time there, between 1959 and 1965, reflective of the culture of Toronto in general; according to him, "basically Tory, Anglican and fantastically patrician."[21] Peter C. Newman, who attended UCC a decade before Ignatieff, and himself Jewish, said anti-semitism was "virtually non-existent."[22] According to school historian Richard Howard, UCC transformed its culture during the 1970s, as it began to offer assistance to the less affluent, and made attempts to attract boys from visible minorities, becoming what he called "a small United Nations" that echoed Toronto's emerging ethnic variety (today, students from over 16 different countries attend UCC),[23][24] though, as recently as 1990, there was references in College Times editorials to anti-semitism and sexism.[25][26] These aspects of College life came to light through James T. Fitzgerald's book Old Boys, in 1994, which published old boys' recollections of the school. The school took the criticisms seriously, hiring one of its critics to help open UCC to the broader community.[27] “Minority” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... Peter Charles Newman (born May 10, 1929 in Vienna, Austria) is a Canadian journalist who emigrated from Czechoslovakia to Canada in 1940 as a Jewish refugee. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ...

Further information: Ethnic & gender issues

Upper Canada College (UCC), located in Toronto, Ontario, has a storied history beginning with its founding in 1829. ...

Scandals

In the years following 1998, five Upper Canada College staff were accused of sexual abuse or of possessing child pornography; three were convicted of at least some of the charges against them: Bad Touch redirects here. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ...


The first was Clark Winton Noble, who admitted, while under trial for an assault against a student at Appleby College in 1998, to an earlier advance on a UCC student in 1971. However, he was never tried for the admission as the charges were withdrawn.[28][29] Five years later, eighteen students sued UCC in a very public case, claiming sexual abuse by Doug Brown, who taught at the Prep from 1975 to 1993. He was eventually found guilty in 2004 of nine counts of indecent assault,[30] and was sentenced to three years in jail. That same year, Ashley Chivers, a teaching assistant at UCC from 1996 to 2003, was charged with possession of child pornography, none of which featured UCC students.[31] He was convicted of one count and was given an 18-month conditional sentence.[32] Appleby College is an international private school (grades 7-12) located in Oakville, Ontario, Canada, founded in 1911 by John Guest, a former Headmaster of the Preparatory School at Upper Canada College. ... Bad Touch redirects here. ... Indecent assault is a form of sex crime in many jurisdictions. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ... In grammar, conditional sentences are sentences discussing factual implications or hypothetical situations and their consequences. ...


After himself being charged with sexual abuse of a minor,[33][34] former student Douglas Mackenzie launched various suits against the school in 2004. Upon learning he was one of those accused, former teacher Herbert Sommerfeld surrendered to Toronto police in December, 2005.[35] He was eventually acquitted due to what the judge called "vague and inconsistent" testimony by the plaintiff.[36][37] Lorne Cook, a teacher at UCC between 1978 and 1994, was also named by Douglas and four others in a class action suit. He was found guilty of one count of indecent assault and one of sexual interference. In November, 2006, he was sentenced to house arrest.[38]


In response to the allegations put forward, in 2001 UCC formed a review team to assess school policies, and create new ones, under the direction of Sydney Robins, QC, a former Justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal, and author of Protecting Our Students: A Review to Identify and Prevent Sexual Misconduct in Ontario Schools.[39] Robins tabled his report in May of 2003, with an emphasis on identifying and preventing misconduct before it occurs.[40] In early 2007, the school, in a letter to the entire UCC community, apologized for the sexual and physical abuse that occurred, calling the affairs the most difficult issue the school has faced in its 177-year history.[41] For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... The Ontario Court of Appeal is headquartered in downtown Toronto, in historic Osgoode Hall. ...


Though media attention has subsided, the lawsuits that began for UCC after 2003 continue today in the form of a still unsettled $19 million case against the school by Douglas Mackenzie.[42][43]

Further info: Scandals

Upper Canada College (UCC), located in Toronto, Ontario, has a storied history beginning with its founding in 1829. ...

Campus and facilities

UCC's Upper School on a snowy winter morning
UCC's Upper School on a snowy winter morning

Upper Canada College occupies an open, 17 hectare (43 acre)[44] campus in Deer Park, near the major intersection of Avenue Road and St. Clair Avenue, in the residential neighbourhood of Forest Hill, with 15 buildings on the site. The main building (the Upper School), central on the campus, and with a dominant clock tower, houses the secondary school component of the College, in a quadrangle form. Laidlaw Hall, the principle assembly hall, holding a pipe organ, is attached to the west end of the main building; at the other end is the Memorial Wing, the school's main infirmary; and forming the north end of the main quadrangle is the building containing the two boarding houses, built in 1932.[17] A 17,000 volume library is also part of the Upper School.[45] Satellite to this complex are townhouse-style residences for masters and their families; Grant House, the residence of the College's principal, built in 1917, and a small, two-storey cricket pavilion, innagurated by Governor General Raymond Hnatyshyn. The Preparatory School is at the south-west corner of the campus, near which is a home for the Prep Headmaster, and a small gatehouse. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 144 KB)UCCs main Upper School building on a snowy morning. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 144 KB)UCCs main Upper School building on a snowy morning. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Deer Park is a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, centred on the intersection of Yonge Street and St. ... Avenue Road is a major north-south street in Toronto, Ontario. ... St. ... Forest Hill is an affluent neighbourhood in central Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Clocktower at Geelong Grammar School, Victoria, Australia A clock tower is a tower built with one or more (often four) clock faces. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... MP Ray Hnatyshyn & Gilles Lamontagne Minister of National Defence attend a reception following a parade at #107 Spitfire Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Saskatoon, SK - circa 1980 Ramon John Ray Hnatyshyn, PC, CC, CMM, CD, BA, LL.B, QC, FRHSC (hon) (anglicized pronunciation ) (March 16, 1934 – December 18, 2002...


The athletic facilities include an indoor pool, three gymnasiums, as well as, around the campus, an indoor arena (the Patrick Johnson Arena), a sports activity bubble, tennis courts, a sports court, a running track, and nine regulation sized sports fields. The two major fields of the Upper School are called "Commons" and "Lords", after the British House of Commons and House of Lords. In the summer of 2006, the UCC Oval (the main sports field) and running track were renovated thanks to an anonymous multi-million dollar donation to the school. The field was replaced by a partially synthetic astroturf/grass hybrid, while the track was made entirely of rubber turf. Several meters below the field, geothermal pipes were laid which provide alternative energy heating for both the Upper School and a future sports complex. Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Geothermal heating is a method of heating and cooling a building. ... Alternative energy is energy derived from sources that do not harm the environment or deplete the Earths natural resources. ...


UCC also maintains its own archives with records, including those that outline the history of Upper Canada, the Province of Ontario, and the city of Toronto, dating back to the mid-19th century.[46] Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Aside from UCC's main campus, the College owns the Norval Outdoor School near Georgetown, Ontario. Upper Canada College (UCC) is a private elementary and secondary school for boys in downtown Toronto, Canada. ...


Capital building project

UCC launched a decade-long $90 million capital building campaign. The plans call for two new arena complexes, an Olympic-standard 50-metre swimming pool, a new racquet centre (squash, badminton and tennis), a rowing centre, the expansion of both the Prep and Upper School academic buildings, a new state-of-the-art turf football field, and an expansion of the archives.


In January, 2007, the school announced the arena campaign, dubbed "At Centre Ice." UCC raised $17.5-million for the construction of the new arena complex. The facility will contain one NHL and one Olympic-size ice rink.[47] The complex will be named the Conacher Arena, after Old Boy Brian Conacher and his family, of which eight members attended UCC.[48] NHL redirects here. ... Brian Conacher Brian Conacher (born August 31, 1941, in Toronto, Ontario) was an NHL hockey player and hockey broadcaster, specializing in colour commentary. ...


Tuition, scholarships, and assets

Upper Canada College is Canada's wealthiest independent school[49] having an endowment of more than $40 million (CAD).[50] C$ redirects here. ...


As of 2007, tuition fees range from $24,700 to $27,700 CAD(not including books and uniform) all day-boy students, and $40,500 to $42,000 for boarding.[51] The institution is well-known for its challenging admissions standards, accepting approximately 25% of all applicants.[52] To those, UCC offers over $1.4 million in financial aid to students in Grade Seven and above,[53] providing needs-based assistance.[54] The school plans to increase financial assistance over the next decade, and to help a more diverse range of students attend UCC.[55] Scholarships include the McLeese Family Scholarship - founded in 1992 to assist international students in attending UCC and taking advantage of debating opportunities; Willis McLeese donated $1.8 million towards this scholarship in 2003. C$ redirects here. ... Seventh grade (called Grade 7 in some regions) is a year of education in America and many other nations. ...


The College has a notable collection of artwork, antiques, and war medals. This collection includes Canada's first Victoria Cross, awarded in 1854 to Old Boy Alexander Roberts Dunn, and a Victoria Cross awarded to Hampden Zane Churchill Cockburn. These medals were given to the Canadian War Museum on permanent loan on May 17, 2006.[56] UCC also holds a collection of original paintings from the Group of Seven, though several were auctioned by the College in an effort to pay for the lawsuits it faced in 2004.[57] The school also holds an original Stephen Leacock essay, titled Why Boys Leave Home - A Talk on Camping, donated in 2005, and published for the first time in the Globe and Mail.[58] In UCC's possession is also a chair owned by Sir John A. Macdonald, and another that once belonged to George Airey Kirkpatrick.[59] For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Alexander Roberts Dunn (September 15, 1833_January 25, 1868) was the first Canadian to win the Victoria Cross. ... Photo by John Fotheringham Hampden Zane Churchill Cockburn was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... The Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Group of Seven was a group of Canadian landscape painters in the 1920s, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... The Honourable Sir George Airey Kirkpatrick, PC , KCMG , QC (September 13, 1841 – 13 December 1899) was a politician from Ontario, Canada. ...


Government, faculty, and staff

Upper Canada College is administered by a Board of Governors as a public trust, with the current Chair of the Board being Michael MacMillan, Executive Chairman of Alliance Atlantis.[60] A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ... Michael I.M. MacMillan is the current executive Chairman of Alliance Atlantis. ... Alliance Atlantis Alliance Atlantis is a Toronto-based media company. ...


The school's Principal is Dr. James Power, with the Preparatory School and Upper School headed by Donald Kawasoe and Steven Griffin respectively. The Upper School is in turn divided into the Middle Years Division, directed by Derek Poon, and a Senior Years Division, directed by Scott Cowie. There are 72 faculty members in total, 64 of which teach at the Upper School. Within the Upper School faculty there are 52 men and 12 women, 26 of which have advanced university degrees. 10 faculty members reside on the campus.[61]


Student body

UCC is a non-denominational school with 1,000 day students and 110 boarders, who all study the International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma programme during Grades Eleven and Twelve.[62] From Senior Kindergarten to Grade Seven (known as Remove) students attend the Preparatory School (the Prep). Following this, a boy may move on to the Upper School, which consists of Grades Eight to Twelve. The Upper School years are known as follows: A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... Seventh grade (called Grade 7 in some regions) is a year of education in America and many other nations. ...

400 boys are enrolled at the Prep,[63] while the remainder are at the Upper School; boarding is only available to students in Grade Eight and above, though it was announced in October, 2007, that boarding would eventually be phased out in favour of increased financial aid.[64] However, in November 2007, the school announced that the decision to close boarding may be reversed, due to widespread protest from Old Boys. The current student-to-teacher ratio is 18:1 in the lower grades and 19:1 in the upper grades.[53] Eighth grade is a year of primary education in the United States and Canada (in Canada its often referred to as Grade 8). ... Ninth grade (called Grade 9 or Year 9 in some regions, also known as freshman year in the U.S.) is the ninth school year after kindergarten. ... Tenth grade (called Grade 10 in some regions and in Canada, also known as sophomore year in the U.S.) is a year of education in the United States and many other nations. ... Eleventh grade (called Grade 11 in some regions, also known as junior year in the U.S.) is a year of education in the United States and many other nations. ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of secondary education in the United States and many other nations. ...


Like several other Commonwealth schools, UCC divides its students into ten houses, though only in the Upper School (Prep students are divided into Forms). The house system was first adopted in 1923. There were only four houses until the late 1930s; there are now ten houses in all. Two of these, Seaton's and Wedd's, are boarding houses while the remaining eight (Bremner's, Howard's, Jackson's, Martland's, McHugh's, Mowbray's, Orr's, and Scadding's) are for day students. The houses compete in an annual intramural competition for the Prefects' Cup. Each House is also paired up with a "sister house" from Bishop Strachan School,[citation needed] and the boarders also take part in weekend events and trips with boarders from neighbouring girls' schools.[65] The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... A form is a grade, class or grouping of students in a UK school. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Upper Canada College, an all male preparatory school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, like several other Commonwealth schools, divides its students into ten houses, each led by a Senior House Adviser and a student-elected Head of House. ... The Bishop Strachan School (BSS), (IPA: ) named after Anglican Bishop John Strachan, is the oldest and one of the most prestigious day and boarding schools for girls in Canada. ...

The school's student government, known as the Board of Stewards comprises 17 elected members of the Leaving Class. The Board represents the students at many events such as Association Day and Hockey Night, and relays their wishes during times of change or concern to the upper administration. Upper Canada College, an all male preparatory school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, like several other Commonwealth schools, divides its students into ten houses, each led by a Senior House Adviser and a student-elected Head of House. ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... The UCC Board of Stewards, 1933-34, wearing the distinctive Stewards jacket. ...

The UCC Board of Stewards, 1933-34, wearing the distinctive Stewards jacket. ...

Curriculum

Upper Canada College educates boys from Senior Kindergarten through to Grade Twelve, in two separate buildings on the main campus. High School students complete the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of secondary education in the United States and many other nations. ...


International Baccalaureate

In 1996, UCC adopted the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, administered by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) in Cardiff, Wales. Today the entire curriculum is guided by the IB program, beginning with the IB Primary Years Program (PYP) from Senior Kindergarten to Form Six, which attempts to foster attributes characteristic of a "globally minded" student who inquires, thinks, communicates, and is knowledgeable and principled; an emphasis is placed on the development of positive attitudes towards people, the environment and learning. French, language, mathematics, science, outdoor education, physical education, the arts, and more are covered.[66] Form Six and Remove (Grade 7) are bridging years between the PYP and the Upper School, though the same courses are taught. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) is an international profit educational foundation, founded in 1968 in Geneva, Switzerland. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Outdoor education (also known as adventure education) usually refers to organized learning that takes place in the outdoors. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


Once boys move to the Upper School in Year One (Grade Eight), they begin university preparation through a liberal arts program. The courseload includes mathematics, geography, science, English, dramatic, visual and musical arts, as well as computer science. All students must study at least one language in addition to English before graduation.[67] Eighth grade is a year of primary education in the United States and Canada (in Canada its often referred to as Grade 8). ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ...


Students earn the IB diploma on top of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma; the additional diploma aids students in Canadian University acceptances.[68] UCC boys average a point total of 36 in the final examinations, and 2 bonus points.[69] The majority of boys take Mathematical Methods; as well, UCC pioneered and wrote the syllabus of the IB's newest, and still developing course, World Cultures. As an IB World School, UCC is in charge of internally administering both CAS, Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay.[67] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Extended Essay (EE) is one of the requirements of the IB Diploma Programme. ...


Extracurricular activities

The arts

UCC runs a variety of extracurricular theatre programs, ranging in scope and scale, with at least one large scale and one small scale production each year. Productions have included The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, The Alchemist, several variations of Hamlet, as well as musicals such as The Boy Friend and West Side Story. Smaller, student written and run plays are also produced, some of which feature provocative material, including references to drugs and sex, the on-stage smoking of cigarettes by minors, and UCC's first ever publicly performed homosexual kiss. The school awards the Robertson Davies Award for outstanding achievement on-stage. The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus is a play by Christopher Marlowe, based on the Faust story (Faustus is Latin for Faust), in which a man sells his soul to the devil for power and knowledge. ... David Garrick as Abel Drugger in Jonsons The Alchemist by Johann Zoffany. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... The Boy Friend (sometimes mis-spelled The Boyfriend) is a musical by Sandy Wilson. ... This article is about the musical. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ...


UCC also supports a music programme, with education taking place both within classrooms as well as through numerous bands and music groups which practice extra-curricularly; including a wind ensemble, concert band, stage band, string ensemble, jazz ensemble, and singers. These groups, as well as individual students, have won various prizes, including gold at MusicFest Canada, and numerous levels of award from the Kiwanis Music Festival.[70][71] UCC hosts the fundraising Youth 4 Youth concert, which also features bands and performers from underprivileged areas of Toronto. A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ...


College ensembles have toured various parts of the world, including Hungary, Hong Kong, and Guangzhou, China. Guangzhou is the capital and the sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Athletics

UCC maintains teams for the following sports:

UCC teams compete in the CISAA and OFSAA, and regularly place high in the standings at national and international competitions, such as the Head of the Charles Regatta where UCC placed third overall, just behind Princeton University.[72] UCC is currently building a new twinpad hockey arena. The arena will have some environmentally friendly facilities such as using the heat produced by making the ice to heat the bubble. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Cross-country skiing (aka XC skiing) is an adventure and fitness activity as well as a competitive winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily in Europe and Canada. ... The downhill is an alpine skiing discipline. ... Diagram of a Canadian football field. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Inline hockey is a variation of roller hockey very similar to ice hockey, from which it is derived. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Soccer redirects here. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Swimmer redirects here. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... CISAA stands for the Conference of Independent Schools of Ontario Athletic Association. ... OFSAA stands for the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations, an Ontario, Canada organization of student-athletes, teacher-coaches, teachers, principals, and sport administrators. ... Kennedy School womens team outside the Weld Boathouse preparing to row the Head of the Charles in 1996, though that year the race was cancelled due to bad weather. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


School events

Every year the school plans and runs several on or off-site events, some of which are open only to students in certain years, while others to the entire student population, alumni, and their respective friends and family. These events are intended to serve a variety of purposes – promoting school spirit, for enjoyment, fund raising or philanthropic causes. Many of these events are organized by the Upper Canada College Association, with the help of parent and student volunteers. Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... Philanthropy involves the donation or granting of money to various worthy charitable causes. ... Upper Canada College (UCC) is a private elementary and secondary school for boys in downtown Toronto, Canada. ...

  • Association Day is analogous to UCC's homecoming. Held since 1979, "A-Day," as it is informally known, constitutes the school's largest annual event, taking place over the last weekend of September, and culminating on the Saturday with a large festival, including competitive matches for all fall sports teams. Association Day is also used as a fundraiser for charities. Following the daytime events is the Association Dinner, attended by Old Boys, and honouring those celebrating their five year incremental (i.e. 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, etc.) class reunions.[73]
  • The Founder's Dinner commemorates the school's founding, and has been held for more than a century, typically taking place on the third weekend in January, to coincide closely with Lieutenant Governor Colborne's birthday. The formal dinner is held on the Thursday night before a four day weekend, given to the students to commemorate the occasion. The dinner itself consists of addresses, a keynote speech given by UCC alumnae, and presentation of awards.[73]
  • UCC Gala is black tie fundraiser, held every 3 or 4 years in May traditionally in UCC's Lett Gym, however in 2007 it was moved off-campus to reduce disruption at the school during year end exams. It was established for both family and friends of current or former students, and is the school's pre-eminent source of donations, raising over $1 million at each event.[74] It is held in conjunction with a silent auction of donated goods and services.
  • The Battalion Ball is a yearly dance held off-campus, at venues like the Royal York Hotel or Arcadian Court. The event began in 1887, when it was called the "At Home," and was a UCC community-wide event, similar to a modern homecoming. The revival of the UCC Rifle Corps in 1891 resulted in students attending the At Home, in their cadet uniforms, and by 1897 a dance was held that evening, known as the Rifle Corps Dance. The event was titled the Battalion Ball in 1931, just before the UCC Cadet Battalion. By 1971, the colloquial nickname "The Batt" was devised, and in 1975 the dance was held off the UCC campus for the first time in its history, at the King Edward Hotel. After 1976, when the Cadet Corps was disbanded, school uniforms replaced the military attire, rock bands played, and the Batt became more of an end-of-the-school-year prom. Today attire is traditionally tuxedo for boys, and evening gown or cocktail dress for girls, and music is provided by DJs. This event is open for students in grades 11 and 12.[75]
  • The Stewards' Dance is UCC's fall semi-formal, and is typically fashioned around costume party themes such as "Great Couples in History." The dance takes place in late October, and is administrated by the Board of Stewards for all students in grades 11 and above.
  • Hockey Night has been held by College since 1933 as an evening where the First Hockey team would play a feature game against one of UCC's rival schools in competition for the Foster Hewitt Victory Trophy.[17] The game was held at Maple Leaf Gardens, thanks to the generosity of the arena's builder, Conn Smythe, and it's (as well as the then Toronto Maple Leafs) owner, Harold Ballard, both themselves Old Boys. After the closing of the Gardens in 2000, the event was moved to the Air Canada Centre and then the Ricoh Coliseum. Over the decades other games were added to the roster, including a game involving the school's Junior Varsity team, the final game of the house hockey tournament, and a game between Havergal College and Bishop Strachan School. By the early 1990s, pleasure skating, and Prep School games had been added to the evening's schedule.
  • The Terry Fox Run is one of Upper Canada College's most successful events. The school is an official site for the run, acting as the starting, ending point, and event part of the course, which ventures throughout Toronto's Belt-Line. UCC's Terry Fox Run is also the largest site, and has also raised the most money in the world since 2000.[76]

For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... // “School reunion” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Birthday (disambiguation). ... The Royal York surrounded by Toronto’s modern towers. ... The Arcadian Court is an Art Deco restaurant and banquet hall on the the 8th floor of the Canadian department store The Bays downtown Toronto, Ontario store, whose wrought iron railings, arched windows and huge chandeliers made it one of Torontos most exclusive dining spots for many years. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The King Edward Hotel King Edward Hotel in Toronto is part of the Meridien chain of hotels. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Prom Queen redirects here. ... Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. President Ronald Reagan wearing black tie with wives in Quebec, Canada, March 18, 1985. ... An evening gown is a ladys dress worn to a formal affair. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Halloween costumes A costume party (chiefly in the U.S. and Canada) or a fancy dress party (chiefly in Britain and Australia), mainly in contemporary Western culture, is a type of party where guests dress up in a costume. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Foster William Hewitt, O.C. (November 21, 1902 – April 21, 1985) was a Canadian radio pioneer. ... Exterior signage as of 2006, with letters missing Maple Leaf Gardens was an indoor arena in Toronto, on the northwest corner of Carlton Street and Church Street. ... Constantine Falkland Kerry Smythe (b. ... For other uses, see Toronto Maple Leafs (disambiguation). ... Harold Ballard (July 30, 1903-April 11, 1990) was the controversial long-time owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs and Maple Leaf Gardens. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... North Entrance Atrium. ... Ricoh Coliseum is an ice hockey arena at Exhibition Place in Toronto. ... Havergal College (shortform Havergal or HC) is a leading independent boarding and day school for girls in Toronto, Ontario, Canada at the intersection of Lawrence Avenue and Avenue Road (). It is located down the street from Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute. ... The Bishop Strachan School (BSS), (IPA: ) named after Anglican Bishop John Strachan, is the oldest and one of the most prestigious day and boarding schools for girls in Canada. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Camp Julien, Afghanistan - Major-General Andrew Leslie leads Canadian troops through one of the many 2-km laps of the camp perimeter that make up the first Terry Fox Run ever held in Kabul. ...

School programs

  • The World Affairs Conference is Canada's oldest student run conference, and one of North America's most successful. It is held annually, attended by over 750 international students from 20 schools;[77] providing a forum for students to hear opinions of leaders in the global community and discuss current and pressing world issues amongst themselves. Past speakers have included Ralph Nader, Stephen Lewis, Michael Ignatieff, Susan Faludi, Gwynne Dyer, and Thomas Homer-Dixon,[77] all of whom have spoken on a variety of topics including Human Rights, Gender Issues, Justice, Globalization, and Health Ethics.
  • The Wernham West Centre for Learning is the most comprehensive and endowed secondary school learning facility in Canada[citation needed]. Created in 2002 with a $6.9 million donation by the Wernham family to fund the establishment of a department pertaining to the refinement of academic skills and assisting the students with learning disabilities, its primary focus is to facilitate improved learning skills and abilities, as well as accommodate for students with particular learning disabilities.[78] During the late 1990s, many requests for such a centre were made[citation needed].
The logo of UCC's Green School program.
  • The Ontario Model Parliament (OMP) is a simulation of a provincial parliament. Upper Canada College and St. Clements School students make up a majority of the Executive Committee that organizes and runs the Model Parliament. It is composed of two events: an Elections-Day at UCC followed by a three-day Simulation takes place in the Chamber at Queen's Park. The first OMP event took place in 1986. Past Elections Day speakers have included Art Eggleton, John Tory, John Aimers, Bob Rae, and Rex Murphy.
  • The UCC Green School is an environmental organization composed of student, teachers and faculty from all over the school. Through this program UCC has planted and maintained an organic garden, reduced landfill waste by twenty percent, and water consumption by twenty-six percent.[79] The Green School has won many awards for its work, especially in the domain of water, including the 2006 "Green Toronto Award" from the City of Toronto and an Environmental Stewardship Award from the National Audubon Society.[80]

North American redirects here. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... This article is about the Canadian politician and broadcaster. ... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... Susan C. Faludi (born April 18, 1959 ) ) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of two well-known books and won a Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Journalism in 1991, for a report on the leveraged buy-out of Safeway Stores, Inc. ... Gwynne Dyer, Ph. ... Thomas Homer-Dixon is the Director of the Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Toronto, and Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Ontario Model Parliament (OMP) was formed in 1986, as the brainchild of Dr. Paul Bennett, a former history master at Upper Canada College (UCC) in Toronto, Ontario. ... Aerial view of Queens Park in winter, facing north. ... Arthur (Art) C. Eggleton, PC (born September 29, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) is a former Canadian Cabinet minister and Mayor of Toronto, and is currently a Senator representing Ontario. ... John Howard Tory, LL.B, BA, MPP (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman, political activist and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario (Ontario PC Party). ... John Lathrop Aimers (born in Dublin, Ireland in 1951) is co-founder and the current Dominion Chairman of the Monarchist League of Canada. ... Hon. ... Rex Murphy (born March, 1947, Carbonear, Newfoundland) is a noted Canadian commentator. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Organic horticulture. ... Look up landfill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Headquarter of National Audubon Society in New York. ...

School media

The College maintains and administers its own publishing company, the UCC Press. The Press, which produces all school publishings, also once printed professional texts, novels and histories, such as those by Robert Lowell. Today, the UCC Press still prints the majority of school related publishings (newspaper, alumni magazines, financial reports etc), save the College Times. UCC still provides a very extensive quantity of publications, most of which are written, directed and printed by students. Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was a highly regarded mid-twentieth-century American poet. ...

Robertson Davies, editor of the College Times while a student at UCC.
Robertson Davies, editor of the College Times while a student at UCC.
  • College Times, UCC's yearbook, is the oldest school publication in existence, having been printed without fail since September, 1857.[5] Past editors include Robertson Davies, and Stephen Leacock.
  • Old Times is the school's alumni magazine, which reports on the lives of Old Boys, and highlights recent and upcoming events.
  • The Blazer is the college humour newspaper, though published under the strict censorship[citation needed] of the UCC administration.
  • The Blue Page is the "opinionated voice of UCC". It is a one-page weekly publication of letters to the editor, expressing the opinions of the UCC community regarding any relevant issue.
  • Convergence, founded in 2000, is the school's weekly student newspaper, which reports solely on school issues. Since its inception, Convergence has emerged as one of the leading student-run publications in Canada, receiving awards from the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail - most notably the award for "Best Student-Run High School Newspaper", which it has won several times. It has also received numerous donations from the National Post.
  • The Green Report was a student-run monthly publication that focused on the environmental issues of the world and the school, taking its roots in the UCC Green School. Founded in 2005 by UCC student John Henderson, the Green Report was printed on 100% recycled post-consumer paper. Due to lack of both popularity and contribution, publication of the Green Report ceased as of the 2007-2008 academic year.
  • The College Broadcasting Channel ("CBC") is a closed-circuit television network that is currently being planned by the UCC administration and a group of students. The network will air multimedia created by UCC students, as well as promotional material created for the College. It may also serve as a replacement for one of UCC's weekly assemblies as it will display announcements and notices.

Robertson Davies, Canadian author Photo by Harry Palmer, September 22, 1984 Copyright: Library and Archives Canada: PA-182426 Retreived from http://www. ... Robertson Davies, Canadian author Photo by Harry Palmer, September 22, 1984 Copyright: Library and Archives Canada: PA-182426 Retreived from http://www. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ...

Community service

Though it is not a mandatory requirement, UCC offers a Service program that directs students to engage in voluntary community service.[81] UCC runs its own united program with Habitat for Humanity: twice a year, the school administers a fund raiser with which one full housing unit can be built in the downtown Toronto area. As well, over 50 students annually commit over 60 hours to the building of this unit[citation needed]. Official Habitat for Humanity logo Habitat for Humanity is an international, Christian, non-governmental, non-profit organization devoted to building quality, low-cost, affordable housing. ...


Horizons is a year-long, UCC run program with which local underprivileged children are tutored twice a week by current UCC student volunteers, and has recently been expanded to include athletic games and training. UCC graduates studying at McGill University launched a spin-off program in Quebec, between the Collège Jean-Eudes and inner-city Montreal schools. In 2003 the program was honoured by the Toronto District School Board, and the program in Quebec won first prize at the Gala Forces Avenir. In 2006 the programme was awarded the Urban Leadership Award by the Canadian Urban Institute, which itself is dedicated to the enhancement of urban life.[82] McGill University is a public co-educational research university located in Montréal, Québec, Canada. ... Toronto District School Board, also known as TDSB, is the English-language public school board for Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Each year UCC also organises trips for 15 to 20 its Upper School students to various third world countries where they take part in community building services such as constructing schools, wells and homes, or aiding in conservation work. These trips usually take place during the March break. Students have ventured to places like Venezuela, El Salvador, Kenya, and China.[83][84] For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ... Village pump redirects here, for information on Wikipedia project-related discussions, see Wikipedia:Village pump. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Norval

Upper Canada College owns and maintains an outdoor educational facility, Canada's oldest "outdoor school,"[citation needed] located in Norval, Ontario. Though the College only uses a select few, the Norval property is over 450 acres (181 hectares) in area, through which much of the area's Credit River flows.[44] This article is about the unit of measurement. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... The Credit River is a river in southern Ontario which flows from headwaters above the Niagara Escarpment to empty into Lake Ontario at Port Credit, Ontario, now part of Mississauga. ...


By the early 20th century, the city of Toronto was already growing quickly around the College's Deer Park campus, causing the trustees to begin an exploration into the possibility of once again moving the school. The present Norval property, north of the city, was purchased in 1913, and plans for a new college building were even drawn up by a Toronto architectural firm. However, due to the First World War and the depression, plans to move the school were abandoned in the 1930s.[5] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Still, the property remained in the hands of the school, and it was developed into an outdoor education centre for UCC students and community. Beginning in 1913, an annual picnic was held at Norval, this first being catered by the King Edward Hotel. As it was originally land cleared for agricultural uses, much of the site was open field. However, since the 1940s over 700,000 seedlings were planted by staff and students.[85] The first bunk-house was built in the 1930s, and in 1964, an arboretum was planted, while a modern bunk-house, designed by Blake Millar (Class of 1954), and which won him a Massey Medal for excellence in architecture in 1967,[17] was constructed.[5] Stephen House not only contains residential spaces for students and staff, but also a classroom/laboratory. There is also an older structure that was the original bunk-house, and a bungalow-style residence for the property caretaker. In 2003, several log cabins were built for writing retreats. The King Edward Hotel King Edward Hotel in Toronto is part of the Meridien chain of hotels. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Sunflower seedlings, just three days after germination In a botanical sense, germination is the process of emergence of growth from a resting stage. ... This article is about a type of botanical garden. ... The Governor Generals Awards are named in honour of Canadas Governor General, and are presented in a number of fields. ...


Norval's main focus of management is toward improved diversity of forest cover and the related protection of wildlife and the Credit River watershed,[86] aiding the school's primary function of providing outdoor learning programs to students;[66] other Ontario schools use the property and its facilities during the weeks when UCC students are not in residence. Throughout the school year, entire classes, houses, or portions of certain grades will have a several day stay at Norval, where they will learn about a range of topics including environmental systems, sustainability, archeology, plant types, river study, and survival, in addition to participating in trust building exercises, meditation, and athletic games. Some of the programs are held in conjunction with Outward Bound Canada.[87] This article is about the natural environment. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... For other senses of this word, see Meditation (disambiguation). ... Outward Bound (OB) is an international, non-profit, independent educational organization with approximately 40 schools around the world and 100,000 participants per year. ...


Into the 2000s, the school came under criticism for keeping the entirety of the increasingly taxed Norval property, while so little of it was actually used; this argument is gained increased credence in light of the consistent yearly tuition hikes, and mounting legal costs. Despite the fact that the school repeatedly stated that it had no intention of selling the property, citing not only rapidly increasing land value, but also an intention to hold it in order to prevent industrial development of the property, which contains a variety of wildlife, including spotted deer and hares, UCC sold a small portion of the land in 2007 to help cover legal costs.[88] Binomial name Axis axis (Erxleben, 1777) The chital (also spelled cheetal) or spotted deer is a large spotted deer which commonly inhabits wooded regions of Sri Lanka and most of India. ... Genera Lepus Caprolagus Pronolagus Hares and Jackrabbits belong to family Leporidae, and mostly in genus Lepus. ...


Norval hosts an "Open House" each season with the spring "Maple Madness" focusing on the site's traditional maple syrup manufacturing.[89] Bottled maple syrup produced in Quebec. ...


Affiliations

UCC is a member of the Conference of Independent Schools of Ontario (CIS), the Canadian Association of Independent Schools (CAIS), the Secondary School Admission Test (SAT) Board, The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) and an associate member of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS), the International Boys' School Coalition (IBSC), the Toronto Boys' School Coalition (TBSC), and the Principal is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) in the UK. The Headmasters and Headmistresses Conference (HMC) is an association of the headmasters or headmistressess of 242 leading day and boarding independent boys and coeducational schools in the United Kingdom, Crown dependencies and the Republic of Ireland. ...


The school also remains one of the "Little Big Four." This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Though Bishop Strachan School (BSS) is located only two blocks from UCC, BSS is not UCC's sister school, as is sometimes thought. Instead, BSS's historical brother school is Trinity College School in Port Hope; both share Anglican High Church origins. UCC students work on joint projects with students of other nearby girls' schools, including St. Clement's School, Havergal College, Bishop Strachan School, and Branksome Hall. Lower Canada College, a co-educational private school in Montreal, Quebec, is not affiliated with UCC. The Bishop Strachan School (BSS), (IPA: ) named after Anglican Bishop John Strachan, is the oldest and one of the most prestigious day and boarding schools for girls in Canada. ... For other institutions named Trinity School, see Trinity School. ... Port Hope is a municipality in Ontario, Canada, about 100 km east of Toronto and about 150 km west of Kingston filled with crack addicts. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... St. ... Havergal College (shortform Havergal or HC) is a leading independent boarding and day school for girls in Toronto, Ontario, Canada at the intersection of Lawrence Avenue and Avenue Road (). It is located down the street from Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute. ... The Bishop Strachan School (BSS), (IPA: ) named after Anglican Bishop John Strachan, is the oldest and one of the most prestigious day and boarding schools for girls in Canada. ... Branksome Hall is a Toronto private girls school for day and boarding students from kindergarten to graduating year. ... Lower Canada College (LCC) of Montreal is an elementary and secondary level private school. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Alumni

The College states that almost 100% of graduates go on to post-secondary schooling, though some will take a sabbatical.[90] Though the career paths of the College's alumni are varied, UCC has a reputation for educating many of Canada's powerful, elite and wealthy. As is common in single-sex male schools, UCC's alumni are known as "Old Boys". A sabbatical year is a prolonged hiatus, typically one year, in the career of an otherwise successful individual taken in order to fulfill some dream, e. ...


UCC Association

The Upper Canada College Old Boys' Association was established in 1891, on the day of the closure of the College's Russell Square campus. The name was changed to the Upper Canada College Association in 1969,[17] when the association expanded its mandate to include parents, faculty, staff and friends of the College.


The Association's purpose is to "preserve and perpetuate the associations and traditions of the College." Managed by an eight person Board of Directors, elected annually by members at the Annual Meeting, the Board meets six times annually to discuss matters facing the College and plan Association events. Four of the 17 members of the College's Board of Governors come from the Association board, including the President of the Association, and serve on the larger body for a three-year period. The Association has an office at the College, and is run by Old Boy Paul Winnell.[73]


The UCC Association Speakers Series and the Common Ties Mentorship Program, established to link successful young Old Boys with students preparing to take on a career in a similar field, are also run by the UCC Association.[91] The group also organizes Old Boy reunions all over the world, through the branches that it operates in fifteen locations outside Toronto, n Canada, the United States, UK, China and Hungary. The local branch president organizes events for all members of the Association, which are held either annually or bi-annually in the relevant location. Branch Presidents also act as the Association's representative in each location, helping members re-locating in the area make contact with other Association members and helping find "lost" Association members. In the summer of 2006, UCC created a social network hosted on the school's homepage.


Noted alumni

The school has produced five Lieutenant Governors, three Premiers and one chief justice. At least sixteen graduates have been appointed to the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, twenty-four have been named Rhodes Scholars,[92] nine are Olympic medallists, and at least five have received the Order of the British Empire. No less than thirty nine have received the Order of Canada since the award's inception in 1967.[90] In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... In Canada, a Premier is the head of government of a province. ... The Right Hon. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... An Olympic medalist is the winner of a medal in one of the Olympic games. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ...

Examples include: The following is a list of prominent Upper Canada College alumni; many notable Canadian men are graduates of the school. ...

Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour, PC, OC, KCSG (born 25 August 1944, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a former financier, newspaper magnate, and biographer. ... “Tycoon” redirects here. ... Sun-Times Media Group (until recently Hollinger International) NYSE: SVN is the holding company of a Chicago based newspaper group. ... Look up ultimate, penultimate, antepenultimate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... General The Honourable Henry Duncan Graham (Harry) Crerar Henry Duncan Graham (Harry) Crerar, PC, CH, CB, DSO, KStJ, CD (April 28, 1888 - April 1, 1965) was a Canadian general and the countrys leading field commander in World War II. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, he died at Ottawa, Ontario. ... Canadian Forces Flag The Canadian Armed Forces (Fr. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... The Governor Generals Awards are named in honour of Canadas Governor General, and are presented in a number of fields. ... The Manticore is the second novel in Robertson Davies Deptford Trilogy. ... Eaton (disambiguation). ... Eatons was once Canadas largest department store retailer. ... Interior of the Toronto Eaton Centre, looking south. ... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The initial seat distribution of the 39th Canadian Parliament Stephen Harper is the Prime Minister of the 39th Parliament. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Ernest Armstrong McCulloch is a Canadian cellular biologist, best known for demonstrating–with James Till–the existence of stem cells. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... Edward Samuel Ted Rogers, Jr. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) Formerly named SkyDome (1989-2005) Exhibition Stadium (1977-1989) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1992 â€¢ 1993 AL... Rogers Centre, formerly known as SkyDome,[2] is a multi-purpose stadium in Toronto, Ontario, situated next to the CN Tower near the shores of Lake Ontario. ... David Kenneth Roy Thomson, 3rd Baron Thomson of Fleet (born 12 June 1957) is a Canadian businessman. ... The Thomson Corporation (NYSE: TOC TSX: TOC) is one of the worlds largest information companies, focused on providing integrated information solutions to business and professional customers. ... Kenneth Roy Thomson, 2nd Baron Thomson of Fleet (1 September 1923 – 12 June 2006) was a Canadian businessman and art collector who, at the time of his death, was the ninth richest person in the world, according to Forbes. ... David Thomson can refer to a number of people: David Thomson, Australian politician David Thomson, film critic David K.R. Thomson, Canadian businessman This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Willard Gordon Galen Weston, OC, OOnt, (born October 29, 1940) is a Canadian businessman and descendant of George Weston of the George Weston Bakeries Limited. ...

Noted faculty

Many leading intellectuals and notable personalities have taught at UCC. They include:

William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ... The Royal Society of Canada, (French: La Soci̩t̩ royale du Canada) The Canadian Academy of the Sciences and Humanities, is the senior national body of distinguished Canadian scientists and scholars. ... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. External link The Royal Society of Literature Categories: Literature stubs | Literature of the United Kingdom ... David Gilmour (born 1949 in London, Ontario) is a Canadian novelist and television journalist. ... Rev. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... The Royal Society of Canada, (French: La Soci̩t̩ royale du Canada) The Canadian Academy of the Sciences and Humanities, is the senior national body of distinguished Canadian scientists and scholars. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Chiang Kai-sheks L̩gion dhonneur. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Imperial Federation was a mid-19th Century proposal to create a federated union in place of the existing British Empire. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Henry Scadding (July 29, 1813 Р6 May 1901) was a Canadian author and clergyman. ... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ... The Canadian Opera Company (COC), located in Toronto, Ontario, is the largest opera company in Canada and the sixth largest in North America. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

Ontario Heritage

The Ontario Heritage Trust, a non-profit agency of the Ontario Ministry of Culture, recently erected three plaques outlining UCC's presence and history in Toronto. One is on the north-east corner of 20 Duncan Street (the only existing building from the College's original campus), the second at the south-east corner of 212 King Street West, and one at the main entrance of the current campus at 200 Lonsdale Road. The Ontario Heritage Trust is a non-profit agency of the Ontario Ministry of Culture in Ontario, Canada responsible for preserving and promoting examples of the province’s historic and cultural heritage. ... The Ministry of Culture in the Canadian province of Ontario is responsible for services including libraries, museums, and culture and heritage programs. ... A commemorative plaque, or simply plaque, is a plate of metal attached to a wall or other vertical surface and bearing text in memory of an important figure or event. ...


External links

Footnotes

  1. ^ Registered Charity Information Return - Total assets for Fiscal Period End 2006-06-30
  2. ^ The Upper Canada College Foundation at Canada Revenue Agency
  3. ^ Cheney, Peter; Globe and Mail:UCC's watershed moment; September 11, 2004
    Conrad Black of Crossharbour
    Valpy, Michael; Globe and Mail: Being Michael Ignatieff; August 28, 2006
    CBC News: Verdict expected Friday in UCC case; October 8, 2004
    Cheney, Peter; Globe and Mail: Judge gives green light to UCC sexual abuse suit; December 31, 2003
    CBC News: Former UCC teacher denies sexual abuse; October 5, 2004
    Toronto Star: Ex-UCC Teacher Sorry (Moved as of February 12, 2007
    PlayFloorball: Upper Canada College starts Floorball program
    Michael Ignatieff website: Maclean's Profiles Michael; November 16, 2006
    Bonokoski, Mark; Toronto Sun: Another former teacher from prestigious Upper Canada College goes on trial on school-related sex assault charges tomorrow; September 10, 2006
  4. ^ a b Upper Canada College: History
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Howard, Richard; Upper Canada College, 1829-1979: Colborne's Legacy; Macmillan Company of Canada, 1979
  6. ^ Howard, Pg. 13
  7. ^ Dickens, Charles; American Notes. Cited in The College Times, Summer 1910, pg. 30.
  8. ^ Howard, Pg. 204
  9. ^ Howard, Pg. 209
  10. ^ Killbourn, Pg. 168
  11. ^ Howard, Pg. 248
  12. ^ Killbourn, William; Toronto Remembered; Stoddart Publishing, Toronto; 1984
  13. ^ Howard, Pg. 245
  14. ^ Howard, Pg. 249
  15. ^ Howard, Pg. 261
  16. ^ Howard, Pg. 263
  17. ^ a b c d e Upper Canada College: Then & Now
  18. ^ Current Times: Governors Agree: UCC to be a Green School; September 2002; Pg. 2
  19. ^ Current Times: Executive Director of Green School sought; December 2002; Pg. 5
  20. ^ Borrows, John; "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" The Diversification of Canadian Law Schools
  21. ^ James T. Fitzgerald website: Fitzgerald, James; Old Boys: The Powerful Legacy of Upper Canada College; exerpts
  22. ^ Peter C. Newman; Howard, Pg. 239
  23. ^ Howard, pg. 264
  24. ^ Upper Canada College: History
  25. ^ Sherman, Motek; College Times: Editorial; 1990
  26. ^ Tessaro, Greg; College Times: The School On The Hill; 1990; Pg. 154-155
  27. ^ James T. Fitzgerald website: Ted Schmidt - Full Review
  28. ^ James T. Fitzgerald website: Cheney, Peter; Globe and Mail: What would you say if I seduced you?; August 25, 2001
  29. ^ Appleby, Timothy and Cheney, Peter; Globe and Mail: Sexual predator at private schools pardoned; October 19, 2006
  30. ^ CBC News: Ontario private school teacher found guilty of abusing boys; October 8, 2004
  31. ^ Cheney, Peter; Globe and Mail: Child porn charges laid against teaching assistant; June 11, 2003
  32. ^ Bradley, Kim; Toronto Sun: UCC aide sentenced; October 15, 2004
  33. ^ Bonokoski, Mark; Toronto Sun: Another former teacher from prestigious Upper Canada College goes on trial on school-related sex assault charges tomorrow; September 10, 2006
  34. ^ Bonokoski, Mark; Toronto Sun: The worst case; December 2, 2005
  35. ^ Appleby, Timothy; Globe and Mail: Retired UCC teacher guilty in sex case; October 13, 2006
  36. ^ CBC News: Retired UCC instructor acquitted of sexual abuse charges; December 6, 2005
  37. ^ Moore, Oliver; Globe and Mail: Teacher acquitted in UCC sex case; December 6, 2005
  38. ^ Pazzano, Sam; Toronto Sun: No jail for teacher in sex assault; November 23, 2006
  39. ^ Current Times: Robins Review Update; April 2002; Pg. 2
  40. ^ Current Times: Independent Review of Harassment and Abuse Procedures Complete; May 2003; Pg. 2
  41. ^ Black, Debra; Toronto Star: UCC sends apology for abuse; February 2, 2007
  42. ^ Bonokoski, Mark; Toronto Sun: Another former teacher from prestigious Upper Canada College goes on trial on school-related sex assault charges tomorrow; September 10, 2006
  43. ^ Bonokoski, Mark; Toronto Sun: The worst case; December 2, 2005
  44. ^ a b Upper Canada College: More about us
  45. ^ Upper Canada College: Academic programs
  46. ^ Upper Canada College: Archives
  47. ^ Old Ties: At Centre Ice': UCC launches new arena campaign; January, 2007
  48. ^ Old Times: The Conacher Family; Winter/Spring 2007; Pg. 11
  49. ^ Centre for Social Justice: Consider the Cost: Privatizing Education Public Money for Private Schools
  50. ^ Current Times: The Endowment; December 2005, p. 7
  51. ^ Upper Canada College: Admissions
  52. ^ Upper Canada College: Admission FAQs
  53. ^ a b Upper Canada College: UCC at a glance
  54. ^ Upper Canada College: Financial Aid
  55. ^ Current Times: Principal Power sets priorities at community meeting; December 2005; Pg. 9
  56. ^ Aster, Andrea; Old Times, Heroes' Welcome; Summer/Fall 2006; pg. 7
  57. ^ CTV News: UCC selling assets to fund assault settlement; March 10, 2005
  58. ^ Leacock, Stephen; Globe and Mail: Stephen Leacock's hidden treasure; July 1, 2005
  59. ^ Spence, Marion; Old Times: Remember When: Seats of Honour; Winter/Spring 2007; Pg. 18
  60. ^ UCC press release; November 29, 2006
  61. ^ Thomson Peterson's School Overview: Upper Canada College
  62. ^ Upper Canada College: International Baccalaureate
  63. ^ Upper Canada College: Preparatory School
  64. ^ Salina, Evas; The Globe and Mail: Where the boys aren't; October 22, 2007
  65. ^ Upper Canada College: The House System
  66. ^ a b Upper Canada College: Preparatory School Curriculum
  67. ^ a b Upper Canada College: Upper School Course Descriptions
  68. ^ Upper Canada College: Upper School International Baccalaureate
  69. ^ Current Times: Double Cohort Graduates shine in IB results; September 2002; Pg. 2
  70. ^ Current Times: Jazz Ensemble captures double gold
  71. ^ Current Times: Prep Band wins gold; July 2002; Pg. 1
  72. ^ Old Times: UCC rowers and Old Boys finish third at world class regatta; Winter/Spring 2007; Pg. 17
  73. ^ a b c Upper Canada College: Old Boys Alumni FAQs
  74. ^ Current Times: Gala chairs announced; December 2005; Pg. 3
  75. ^ Jerjian, Edward; Old Times, Remember When...; Summer/Fall 2006; pg. 9
  76. ^ Aster, Andrea; Current Times: UCC goes the distance for Terry; December, 2005
  77. ^ a b UCC News: Students think globally at World Affairs Conference; February 13, 2007
  78. ^ Current Times: Richard Wernham and Julia West Centre for Learning Opens its Doors; January 2002; Pg. 2
  79. ^ Green School Annual Report; 2006; Pg. 2
  80. ^ Power, Jim; Old Times: Message from the Principal: How'd we measure up?; Winter/Spring 2007; Pg. 21
  81. ^ Upper Canada College: Boarding academics
  82. ^ Current Times: In Brief; June, 2006
  83. ^ UCC News: Students go on ‘famine’ and visit China, Kenya'; February 5, 2007
  84. ^ UCC News: Students build homes in earthquake zone; March, 2006
  85. ^ Current Times: Forest Management at Norval; May 2003; Pg. 1
  86. ^ Upper Canada College: Norval Outdoor School
  87. ^ Upper Canada College: Norval Outdoor School
  88. ^ Pringle, Andy; Old Times: Message from the Chair: What's the bottom line?; Winter/Spring 2007; Pg. 20
  89. ^ Upper Canada College: Norval Open Houses
  90. ^ a b Upper Canada College: Academic programs
  91. ^ Upper Canada College: Common Ties Mentorship Program
  92. ^ The Canadian Encyclopedia: Upper Canada College
  93. ^ Killbourn, Pg. 169
  94. ^ Killbourn, Pg. 173
  95. ^ Sir George Parkin's Biography
  96. ^ Queen's University: Queen's Economics Department: Sir Edward Peacock
  97. ^ ZoomInfo.com: Bruce Littlejohn
Example of a cheque from the Canada Revenue Agency The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers: tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories; international trade legislation; and various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system. ... Peter Charles Newman (born May 10, 1929 in Vienna, Austria) is a Canadian journalist who emigrated from Czechoslovakia to Canada in 1940 as a Jewish refugee. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The Old City of Toronto refers to the City of Toronto, Canada, and its boundaries from 1834 to 1998. ... The Abelard School is a small private school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, named after the 11th century scholar and philosopher Peter Abélard, and its teaching philosophy is highly based on a Socratic approach. ... The Bishop Strachan School (BSS), (IPA: ) named after Anglican Bishop John Strachan, is the oldest and one of the most prestigious day and boarding schools for girls in Canada. ... Bloor Collegiate Institute is a public secondary school located in the Bloordale Village neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada . ... Branksome Hall is a Toronto private girls school for day and boarding students from kindergarten to graduating year. ... Central Commerce Collegiate (also known as Central Commerce or CCC for short) is a public, semestered secondary school located in the Trinity-Spadina area of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Central Tech Central Technical School is a vocational school in Toronto, Canada. ... The college building Le Collège français is a French-language high school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... College of Toronto is a private English-language elementary and high school located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Danforth Collegiate and Technical Institute is a secondary school in east Toronto, situated to the east of the citys Greek neighbourhood and between the Greenwood and Donlands subway stations. ... De La Salle College Oaklands is an independent co-educational Catholic school in Toronto, Ontario. ... The Dragon Academy is a small co-ed private school in the historic Annex district of downtown Toronto. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Forest Hill Colligiate Institute (FHCI) is a semestered public high school of about 1,000 students and 80 teachers located in Toronto, Ontario. ... Greenwood College School is a co-educational day school located on the south-east corner of Davisville Road and Mount Pleasant Road in Toronto. ... Harbord Collegiate Institute (also known as Harbord and H.C.I. for short) is a public secondary school located in downtown Toronto. ... 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North Toronto Collegiate Institute (NTCI) is a non-semestered public high school of about 1,000 students located in Toronto, Ontario. ... Northern Secondary School is a public high school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Oakwood Collegiate Institute (known to students as OCI) is a public high school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Riverdale CI as seen from Jones Aveune Riverdale Collegiate Institute is a high school located at 1094 Gerrard Street East Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Royal St. ... St. ... Saint Johns School of Ontario (SJSO) was the third of three private Anglican boys boarding school in Toronto founded on conservative Anglican ideas and the notion that children were not challenged by present day society. ... St. ... One of the campus buildings of St. ... School Logo Scarlett Heights Entrepreneurial Academy (SHEA) is a unique secondary school within the Toronto District School Board whose curriculum is broadened through a Student Leadership Development Program (Scarlett Future Leaders). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... TheStudentSchool[1] is an alternative high school in the Toronto District School Board. ... Thornton Hall (also known as Thornton) was a Canadian private school that operated from 1949 to 1997. ... Tiferes Bais Yaakov high school is a private Orthodox Jewish high school in Toronto, Ontario. ... Olegasole 00:57, 7 March 2007 (UTC)Toronto Montessori Schools (of formy know as TMS) is a private school in the GTA region of Toronto, Canada. ... UTS on Bloor Street (the entrance is undergoing construction work by film crews in preparation for filming for Take the Lead, starring Antonio Banderas) The University of Toronto Schools (UTS) (founded in 1910) is an independent secondary school in downtown Toronto, Canada. ... Ursula Franklin Academy (UFA) is a high school located in the High Park area of Toronto, Canada. ... Western Technical-Commercial School (WTCS) is a high school in the Bloor-West Village of Toronto, Canada. ... The York School (TYS) is an independent coeducational JK to grade 12 school. ... North York forms the central part of the northern half of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Bathurst Heights Secondary School was a public high school located in the North York district of Toronto, and serving the area of Lawrence Avenue West and Allen Road (a. ... Yeshivat Or Chaim boys school ישיבת אור חיים and Ulpanat Orot girls school אולפנת אורות are two high schools sharing the same philosophy. ... Brebeuf College School is a Catholic boys school founded by the Jesuits (Society of Jesus) in 1963 and located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... C.W. Jefferys Collegiate Institute is a public secondary school in the Keele-Finch area of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Cardinal Carter Academy for the Arts is a Catholic arts high school located in Toronto, Canada. ... It has been suggested that this school-related article be merged to the appropriate school district or locality article. ... Don Mills Collegiate Institute (DMCI) is the high school in the community of Don Mills in Toronto. ... Earl Haig Secondary School serves a diverse population of about 2,200 students in Willowdale, Toronto, Ontario, Canada and is recognized for its academic focus, enthusiasm for learning, lively school spirit, and commitment to the arts. ... École secondaire Étienne-Brûlé is a French first language high school located in North York, Ontario, Canada. ... Georges Vanier Secondary School is a public high school located in Toronto, Ontario. ... For schools of a similar name, see Loreto College. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... is an all-girls school located in Toronto, Ontario. ... Senator OConnor College School is a Roman Catholic high school located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Anne & Max Tanenbaum Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (Hebrew: האקדמיה העברית עש טננבאום), or Tanenbaum CHAT, is a secondary Jewish day school which is located on two campuses in the Greater Toronto Area in Canada. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Victoria Park C.I. is a collegiate institute located south of Ellesmere Road and west of Victoria Park Ave. ... William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute is a public high school located in Toronto, Ontario. ... York Mills Collegiate Institute is a suburban Toronto high school located in North York along York Mills Road between Leslie Street and Bayview Avenue. ... The Yorkland School is a Christian School located in North York, ON, Canada. ... Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1 January 1850 (township)   1 January 1967 (borough) Incorporated Amalgamation June 1983 (city) 1 January 1998 Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs John Cannis, Jim Karygiannis, Derek Lee, John McKay, Dan McTeague, Tom Wappel  - MPPs Bas Balkissoon, Lorenzo Berardinetti... Agincourt Collegiate Institute (ACI) is a secondary school (or high school) located in Agincourt, Toronto, Ontario. ... Albert Campbell Collegiate Institute (ACCI) is a Toronto public high school located in north Scarborough. ... Blessed Mother Teresa Catholic Secondary School (BMTCSS or BMT) is a Catholic secondary school in Scarborough, a muncipality of Toronto, Ontario. ... Cardinal Newman Catholic High School was founded in 1973 when the St. ... Cedarbrae Collegiate Institute is a semestered public high school in Toronto, primarily serving immersion and extended French students. ... David and Mary Thomson Collegiate Institute is an English-language high school located in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. ... This article refers to a high school in Scarborough, Ontario. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... LAmoreaux Collegiate Institute is a public highschool in Toronto, located in north-west Scarborough. ... Bold text Lester B. Pearson C.I (LBP) is a public high school in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada; which teaches grades 9 through 12. ... Mary Ward Catholic Secondary School (abbreviated Mary Ward C.S.S. or simply Mary Ward) is a Roman Catholic secondary school of the Toronto Catholic District School Board in Scarborough, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... Midland Avenue Collegiate Institute was a public high school in Scarborough, Ontario. ... Neil McNeil High School is an all-boys Roman Catholic secondary school of the Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School is an all girls Roman Catholic secondary school of the Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Pope John Paul II Catholic Secondary School is a publicly funded high school administered by the Toronto Catholic District School Board in Scarborough, which is the eastern part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... R.H. King Academy is a secondary school (or high school) located in Toronto, Ontario at Scarborough. ... SATEC@W.A. Porter C.I. is a secondary school located in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. ... Sir John A. Macdonald Collegiate Institute is a secondary school located in Scarborough Ontario. ... Sir Oliver Mowat Collegiate Institute is a public highschool located in Toronto, located in south-east Scarborough. ... Sir Wilfrid Laurier Collegiate Institute is a public high school in Toronto, located in southern Scarborough. ... West Hill Collegiate Institute (West Hill) is a public, non-semestered high school in Toronto, located in eastern Scarborough. ... Wexford Collegiate Institute Website Wexford Collegiate Institute, soon to be renamed Wexford Collegiate School for the Arts, is a public secondary school located in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. ... Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute is a public high school in Toronto, specifically located in Scarborough. ... Woburn Collegiate Institute is a secondary school on Ellesmere Road in the Scarborough district of Toronto. ... Country Province Established 1 January 1850 (township)   1 January 1967 (borough) Incorporated Amalgamation June 1983 (city) 1 January 1998 Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs Roy Cullen, Michael Ignatieff, Borys Wrzesnewskyj  - MPPs Shafiq Qaadri, Donna Cansfield, Laurel Broten Area  - Total 123. ... Bishop Allen Academy is a mid sized high school located in Torontos west end overseen by the Toronto Catholic District School Board. ... Etobicoke Collegiate Institute (ECI) is a large high school located in Torontos west end overseen by the Toronto District School Board. ... The Etobicoke School of the Arts is a specialized public arts-academic high school located in Etobicoke area of Toronto, Canada. ... Keiller MacKay Collegiate Institute (KMCI) was a medium-sized high school located in Torontos west end close to the intersection of Islington Avenue and Highway 401 (Ontario). ... Lakeshore Collegiate Institute (formerly New Toronto Secondary School and often abbreviated to LCI) is a high school that serves the Village of Long Branch, New Toronto and Mimico, working class neighbourhoods in Torontos west end. ... Martingrove Collegiate Institute (MCI) is a non-semestered public secondary school located in the intersection of Eglinton Avenue and Martin Grove Road in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Michael Power/St. ... North Albion Collegiate Institute is a high school in Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada. ... Richview Collegiate Institute is a secondary school in Etobicoke, a suburb in the west end of Toronto, Ontario. ... School Logo Scarlett Heights Entrepreneurial Academy (SHEA) is a unique secondary school within the Toronto District School Board whose curriculum is broadened through a Student Leadership Development Program (Scarlett Future Leaders). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Thistletown Collegiate Institute is a high school in northwest Toronto. ... Vincent Massey Collegiate Institute was a high school located at 105 Eringate Drive in Etobicoke, Ontario from 1961-1985. ... West Humber Collegiate Institute is a high school located in Rexdale, at the corner of Martingrove Road and John Garland Blvd (just south of Finch Avenue West). ... Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1967 Amalgamation 1998 with Toronto Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs Jack Layton, Maria Minna  - MPPs Michael Prue, Peter Tabuns Area  - Borough 21. ... , East York Collegiate Institute is a school of 1700 pupils in central-east Toronto at the corner of Coxwell and Cosburn Avenues. ... Leaside High School is a school of 1000 pupils in central-east Toronto at the corner of Eglinton and Bayview Avenues. ... Marc Garneau Collegiate Institute is a high school in Flemingdon Park, Toronto, Ontario, under the TDSB. The schools multicultural environment combined with its large size enables it to have a varying student body along with varying student activities. ... York is a very diverse and vibrant community in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Runnymede Collegiate Institute is a high school located on Jane Street in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... St. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... // York Memorial Collegiate Institute is a high school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Upper Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1480 words)
Upper Canada became a political entity on 26 December 1791 with the passage, in 1790, of the Constitutional Act by the Parliament of Great Britain.
Upper Canada ceased to be a political entity with the Act of Union (1840), when, by an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, it was merged with Lower Canada to form the Province of United Canada.
At Confederation in 1867, the Province of Canada was re-divided along the former boundary as the provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
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