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Encyclopedia > Upper Canada
Upper Canada
British colony

1791 – 1841

Flag of Upper Canada An anachronous map of British (and prior to the existence of Britain, English) imperial possessions This is a list of the various overseas territories that have been under the political control of the United Kingdom and/or its predecessor states[1]. Collectively, these territories are traditionally referred to as the... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Note: for information about Canadas present-day provinces, see Provinces of Canada. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...


Flag

Map of Upper Canada (orange)
Capital Newark 1792 - 1797
York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841
Language(s) English
Religion Anglican
Government Constitutional monarchy
Sovereign
 - 1791-1820 George III
 - 1837-1841 Victoria
Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors
Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada
 - Upper house Legislative Council
 - Lower house Legislative Assembly
Historical era British Era
 - Constitutional Act of 1791 December 26, 1791
 - Act of Union 1840 Feb 10, 1841
Population
 - 1806 est. 70,718 
 - 1840 est. 432,159 
Currency Canadian pound (fixed to British pound)

Upper Canada was a British province located in what is now the Canadian province of Ontario. Upper Canada officially existed from 1791 to 1841 and covered generally present-day Southern Ontario. Its name reflected its elevation, not its latitude, as it was located upriver from Lower Canada. By latitude, Upper Canada was mainly south of Lower Canada. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1688x1099, 71 KB) Summary Map of w:Upper Canada (orange). ... Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... Niagara-on-the-Lake in the Niagara Region Niagara-on-the-Lake Niagara-on-the-Lake (2001 population 13,839) is a town where the Niagara River meets Lake Ontario in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. ... York was the original name of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Canadian English (CaE) is a variety of English used in Canada. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... // This is a list of the monarchs of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed in the British Isles, namely: The Kingdom of Scotland, from 843 up to 1707; The Kingdom of... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... The flag of the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario This is a list of lieutenant-governors of the Canadian province of Ontario, before and during Confederation in 1867. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... The Legislative Council of Upper Canada was the upper house governing the province of Upper Canada. ... The Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada was the legislature for the province of Upper Canada, which later became the province of Ontario. ... // Main article: Province of Quebec (1763-1791) In North America, Seven Years War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763. ... The Constitutional Act of 1791 was a British law which changed the government of the province of Quebec to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, known as the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Act of Union (3 & 4 Vict. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The pound was the currency in Canada until the colonies decimalized between 1858 and 1871. ... For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Southern Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies south of the French River and Algonquin Park. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ...


The area of present day Southern Ontario first came under European control as part of New France. It passed from French control into British control with the Treaty of Paris (1763). It was incorporated into the Province of Quebec by the Quebec Act of 1774. Upper Canada became a political entity on 26 December 1791 with the passage, in 1790, of the Constitutional Act by the Parliament of Great Britain. The Act divided the Province of Quebec into Upper and Lower Canada. The division was effected so that Loyalist American settlers and British immigrants in Upper Canada could have English laws and institutions, and the French-speaking population of Lower Canada could maintain French civil law and the Catholic religion. Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... The Quebec Act of 1774 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain (citation 14 Geo. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Constitutional Act of 1791 was a British law which changed the government of the province of Quebec to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, known as the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... [[ This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The colony was administered by a lieutenant-governor, legislative council, and legislative assembly. The first lieutenant-governor was John Graves Simcoe. On February 1, 1796 the capital of Upper Canada was moved from Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake) to York (now Toronto), which was judged to be less vulnerable to attack by the Americans. A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... The Legislative Council of Upper Canada was the upper house governing the province of Upper Canada. ... The Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada was the legislature for the province of Upper Canada, which later became the province of Ontario. ... Johnny the guy Simcoe John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the shoreline of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Niagara-on-the-Lake in the Niagara Region Niagara-on-the-Lake Niagara-on-the-Lake (2001 population 13,839) is a town where the Niagara River meets Lake Ontario in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. ... York was the original name of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ...


Local government in Upper Canada was based on districts. In 1788, four districts were created: Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ...

Additional districts were created from the existing districts as the population grew until 1849, when local government mainly based on counties came into effect. At that time, there were 20 districts; legislation to create a new Kent District never completed. Up until 1841, the district officials were appointed by the lieutenant-governor, although usually with local input. A Court of Quarter Sessions was held four times a year in each district to oversee the administration of the district and deal with legal cases. Eastern District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1788. ... The Midland District was a historic district in Upper Canada which existed until 1849. ... The Home District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1792. ... Western District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1788. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ...

Contents

War of 1812 (1812-1815)

During the War of 1812 with the United States. Upper Canada was the chief target of the Americans since it was weakly defended and populated largely by American immigrants. However, division in the United States over the war, a lacklustre American militia, the incompetence of American military commanders, and swift and decisive action by the British commander, Sir Isaac Brock, kept Upper Canada part of British North America. Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other...


Detroit was captured by the British on August 6, 1812. The Michigan Territory was held under British control until it was abandoned in 1813. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting...


Major battles (or attacks) fought on territory in Upper Canada included;

Many other battles were fought in American territory bordering Upper Canada, including the Northwest Territory (most in modern day Michigan), upstate New York and naval battles in the Great Lakes. Combatants Britain United States Commanders Isaac Brock † Roger Sheaffe Stephen Van Rensselaer Strength 1,300 regulars, militia, and natives 6,000 regulars and militia Casualties 14 dead 77 wounded 100 dead 300 wounded 925 captured The Battle of Queenston Heights was a British victory of the War of 1812 which... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... York was the original name of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Fort George is a historic military structure at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, that was the scene of several battles during the War of 1812. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders John Vincent John Chandler William Winder Strength 700 regulars and militia 3,400 Casualties 22 dead 134 wounded 55 dead or wounded 113 captured The Battle of Stoney Creek was a battle fought on June 6, 1813, during the War of 1812 near Stoney Creek... June 5 is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders James FitzGibbon Charles G. Boerstler Strength 50 regulars 400 natives 575 regulars Casualties 25 killed and wounded 80 dead or wounded 462 captured The Battle of Beaver Dams was a small battle on June 24, 1813, during the War of 1812. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Jesse Elliot Strength 2 ships 2 brigs 1 schooner 1 sloop 3 brigs 5 schooners 1 sloop Casualties 41 dead 93 wounded prisoners 306 surrendered Entire squadron captured 27 dead 96 wounded One brig heavily damaged The Battle... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders William Mulcaster Joseph Morrison James Wilkinson John P. Boyd Strength 800 regulars and militia 8,000 regulars and militia (2500 present) Casualties 22 dead 148 wounded 102 dead 237 wounded 150 missing The Battle of Cryslers Farm was a battle of the War of... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Battle of Chippewa (sometimes spelled Chippawa) was a decisive victory for American militia units which allowed for the invasion of Canada along the Niagara River. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Battle of Lundys Lane was a battle of the War of 1812 on July 25, 1814, fought in present-day Niagara Falls, Ontario. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


The Treaty of Ghent (ratified in 1815) ended the war and restored the status quo ante bellum between the combatants. Signing of the Treaty of Ghent. ...


Dissidents and 1837 Rebellion

After 1800 there emerged a dissident faction that questioned the direction and handling of the colony by the Tories, including both colonial and imperial officials. The leaders were Robert Thorpe, Joseph Willcocks, Robert Gourlay, and especially, William Lyon Mackenzie. They challenged the establishment about taxes, land policy, the privileges of the Anglican Church and the Family Compact, appropriations, and freedom of the press. They claimed that all citizens and not just the enfranchised were entitled to a voice, but they did not form a political party; there were no parties. In 1831 the Tories expelled MacKenzie from the Assembly, and the conflict escalated. Their brief armed rebellion in 1837 failed. Officials blamed American influence, "In this country unfortunately the settlement of American citizens has been too much permitted and encouraged, and thus in the bosom of this community there exists a treacherous foe ... in many parts of the Province the teachers are Americans.... These men are utterly ignorant of everything English and could not if they tried instruct their pupils in any of the duties which the connection of the Province with England casts upon them." [Rea] The oligarchic Family Compact was defended by Tories who explained, "The Radicals, Revolutionists or Destructives was composed of all the American settlers and speculators in land, some of the more simple and ignorant of the older class of farmers, and the rabble of adventurers who poured in every year from the United States or from Britain, to evade the laws of their respective countries." [Rea] Lord Durham's support for "responsible government" undercut the Tories and gradually led the public to reject what it viewed as poor administration, unfair land and education policies, and inadequate attention to urgent transportation needs. Finally there emerged responsible government under Robert Baldwin and Louis LaFontaine by the late 1840s. The Republic of Canadas flag - the two stars represent Upper and Lower Canada. ... Robert Thorpe (c. ... Joseph Willcocks (1773 – September 4, 1814) was a publisher, soldier and political figure in Upper Canada. ... Robert Fleming Gourlay (March 24, 1778 – August 1, 1863) was a writer, reformer and agriculturalist. ... William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 – August 28, 1861) was a Scottish-Canadian journalist, politician, and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion. ... The Republic of Canadas flag - the two stars represent Upper and Lower Canada. ... The Family Compact was the informal name for the wealthy, conservative elite of Upper Canada in the early 19th century. ... Robert Baldwin (12 May 1804 – 9 December 1858), Canadian statesman, was born at York (now Toronto). ... Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine. ...


Land settlement

Land had been settled since the French regime, notably along the Detroit River and the Saint Lawrence River. However, impetus to land settlement came with the influx of Loyalist refugees and military personnel in 1784 after the American Revolution. As a result, prior to the creation of Upper Canada in 1791 as a separate colony, much land had been ceded by the First Nations to the Crown in accordance with the Royal Proclamation of 1763. This land was surveyed by the government of the Province of Quebec, particularly in eastern Ontario along the Saint Lawrence River, as the Western Townships, while the Eastern Townships were in Lower Canada. Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... TheSaint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... A portion of eastern North America; the 1763 Proclamation line is the border between the red and the pink areas. ... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... TheSaint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Eastern Townships (in French les Cantons de lest) is a region in south central Quebec, lying between the Saint Lawrence River and the US border. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ...


Rudimentary municipal administration began with the creation of districts, notably Western (including present day Brantford), Eastern, Gore (including present day Hamilton) and Home (including present day Toronto). Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Established May 31, 1877 Government  - City Mayor Mike Hancock  - Governing Body Brantford City Council  - MP Lloyd St. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - Representatives 5 MPs and 5 MPPs Area [2]  - City 1,138. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ...


The Act Against Slavery passed in Upper Canada on July 9, 1793. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Act Against Slavery, Upper Canada, 1793 The Act Against Slavery was an Act passed by Upper Canada on 1793-07-09 to prohibit slavery. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Organized settlement tracts were laid out with portions set aside for the clergy reserves, one exception was the Talbot Settlement on the north shore of Lake Erie which was set up in 1804. Clergy reserves were tracts of land in Upper Canada and Lower Canada reserved for the support of Protestant clergy by the Constitutional Act of 1791 which established the two provinces. ... Colonel Thomas Talbot (July 19, 1771 – February 5, 1853) was born at Malahide Castle in Ireland. ...


These land tracts expanded in reach well beyond the St. Lawrence-Lake Ontario-Lake Erie shores after the war of 1812. In 1828, Britain appointed Upper Canada's first Chief Agent of Emigration, A.C. Buchanan. His title reflected the centrality of Britain's perspective on migration in the colonies at the time, especially since most new arrivals in Upper Canada were from the British Isles. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


British regiment soldiers who were veterans of the war were offered free land, some remained despite the harsh winters. Unlike the period prior to the war, immigration was now directed at Europe and more specifically to the British Isles, not from the US, which was the largest source of immigration before the war. Very cheap or even free land was offered with advertizements to entice immigrants to settle there, even those in financially meager circumstances. Passage could be obtained across the Atlantic on returning empty lumber ships for little fare. During the early 1830s, the population increased more than 10% of its total each year. In the 1820s many German speaking Mennonite immigrants came to the Grand River region of Upper Canada from Pennsylvania, they were joined as well by many German speaking Amish immigrants. This region was sometimes called "Little Pennsylvania", however this term is no longer used today. Many of their descendants continue to speak a form of German called Pennsylvania German. The British Isles in relation to mainland Europe The British Isles (French: , Irish: [1] or Oileáin Iarthair Eorpa,[2] Manx: Ellanyn Goaldagh, Scottish Gaelic: , Welsh: ), are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptist denominations named after and influenced by the teachings and tradition of Menno Simons (1496-1561). ... The Amish (Amisch or Amische) (IPA: ) are an Anabaptist Christian denomination in the United States and Canada (Ontario and Manitoba) known for their plain dress and avoidance of modern conveniences such as cars and electricity. ... Pennsylvania German, or more commonly Pennsylvania Dutch, (Deitsch, Pennsylvania Deutsch, Pennsilfaanisch-Deitsch, Pennsilfaani-Deitsch, Pennsilweni-Deitsch, Pennsilfaanisch), is a West Central German variety spoken by 150,000 to 250,000 people in North America. ...


It is estimated that thousands of escaped slaves entered Upper Canada from the US, using the Underground Railroad. This does not cite any references or sources. ...


Upper Canada ceased to be a political entity with the Act of Union (1840), when, by an act of the British Parliament, it was merged with Lower Canada to form the Province of United Canada. This was principally in response to the Upper and Lower Canada rebellions of 1837 and 1837-38, respectively. At Confederation in 1867, the Province of Canada was re-divided along the former boundary as the provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The Act of Union passed in July 1840 and proclaimed February 10, 1841, abolished the legislatures of Lower Canada and Upper Canada and established a new political entity the Province of Canada to replace them. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595...


The name 'Upper Canada' lives on in a few fossilized forms, most notably the Law Society of Upper Canada, Upper Canada Lumber, Upper Canada College, Upper Canada Mall (in Newmarket, Ontario), and the Upper Canada Brewing Company. The Law Society of Upper Canada (LSUC) is responsible for the self-regulation of lawyers in the province of Ontario. ... Upper Canada College (abbreviated to UCC) is a private elementary and secondary school for boys, founded in 1829. ... Upper Canada Mall is a shopping centre in Newmarket, Ontario owned by Ivanhoe Cambridge. ... Map showing Newmarkets location in York Region Newmarket is a town located approximately 45 km north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Upper Canada Brewing Company refers to the company in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. ...


When the capital was first moved to Toronto from Newark (present-day Niagara-on-the-Lake) in 1796, the Parliament Buildings of Upper Canada were located at the corner of Parliament and Front Streets, in buildings that were burned by United States forces in the War of 1812, rebuilt, then burned again by accident. The site was eventually abandoned for another, to the west. In 2001, some remnants of the original Parliament building were found. Today, there is an ongoing fight by preservationists and historians who propose the government develop and interpret the historic site. Currently the government leases most of the site. Categories: Canada geography stubs | Ontario communities | Coastal towns of Canada ... An Ontario historical plaque marking the site of Upper Canadas first Parliament Buildings. ...


Population

Population of Upper Canada, 1806—1840
Year Census estimate
1806 70,718
1811 76,000
1814 95,000
1824 150,066
1825 157,923
1826 166,379
1827 177,174
1828 186,488
1829 197,815
1830 213,156
1831 236,702
1832 263,554
1833 295,863
1834 321,145
1835 347,359
1836 374,099
1837 397,489
1838 399,422
1839 409,048
1840 432,159

(see Province of Canada for population after 1840)
Source: Statistics Canada website Censuses of Canada 1665 to 1871. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Numismatic History

See Coins of Upper Canada. Upper Canada had a short history as a coin-issuing entity. ...


References

  • Moving Here, Staying Here: The Canadian Immigrant Experience at Library and Archives Canada

Bibliography

  • Armstrong, Frederick H Handbook of Upper Canadian Chronology Dundurn Press, 1985. ISBN 0-919670-92-X
  • John Clarke. Land Power and Economics on the Frontier of Upper Canada McGill-Queen's University Press (2001) 747pp. (ISBN 0-7735-2062-7)
  • Craig, Gerald M Upper Canada: the formative years 1784-1841 McClelland and Stewart, 1963, the standard history online edition
  • Dieterman, Frank Government on fire: the history and archaeology of Upper Canada's first Parliament Buildings Eastendbooks, 2001.
  • Dunham, Eileen Political unrest in Upper Canada 1815-1836 McClelland and Stewart, 1963.
  • Errington, Jane The lion, the eagle, and Upper Canada: a developing colonial ideology McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987.
  • Edward Grabb, James Curtis, Douglas Baer; "Defining Moments and Recurring Myths: Comparing Canadians and Americans after the American Revolution" The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, Vol. 37, 2000
  • Johnston, James Keith. Historical essays on Upper Canada McClelland and Stewart, 1975.
  • William Kilbourn; The Firebrand: William Lyon Mackenzie and the Rebellion in Upper Canada (1956) online edition
  • Lewis, Frank and Urquhart, M.C. Growth and standard of living in a pioneer economy: Upper Canada 1826-1851 Kingston, Ont. : Institute for Economic Research, Queen's University, 1997.
  • McCalla, Douglas Planting the province: the economic history of Upper Canada 1784-1870 University of Toronto Press, 1993.
  • McNairn, Jeffrey L The capacity to judge: public opinion and deliberative democracy in Upper Canada 1791-1854 University of Toronto Press, 2000.
  • J. Edgar Rea. "Rebellion in Upper Canada, 1837" Manitoba Historical Society Transactions Series 3, Number 22, 1965-66 online, historiography
  • Carol Wilton. Popular Politics and Political Culture in Upper Canada, 1800-1850. McGill-Queen's University Press, (2000). 311pp
  • Winearls, Joan Mapping Upper Canada 1780-1867: an annotated bibliography of manuscript and printed maps. University of Toronto Press, 1991.erdvrv

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Upper Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1458 words)
Upper Canada became a political entity on 26 December 1791 with the passage, in 1790, of the Constitutional Act by the Parliament of Great Britain.
Upper Canada ceased to be a political entity with the Act of Union (1840), when, by an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, it was merged with Lower Canada to form the Province of United Canada.
At Confederation in 1867, the Province of Canada was re-divided along the former boundary as the provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
Upper Canada Rebellion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (850 words)
The Upper Canada Rebellion was, along with the Lower Canada Rebellion in Lower Canada, a rebellion against the British colonial government in 1837 and 1838.
In Upper Canada, one of the most controversial issues in the early 19th century was the allocation of land.
After the War of 1812 the government of Upper Canada was run by the wealthy owners of most of this reserve land, known as the Family CompactLand had also been set aside for the "Protestant Clergy," but the Family Compact interpreted this to mean only the Anglican Church, rather than other Protestant groups or Catholics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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