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Encyclopedia > University of Texas at Austin
The University of Texas at Austin

Motto: Disciplina praesidium civitatis (Latin)
Motto in English: Cultivated mind is the guardian genius of democracy[1]
Established: 1883
Type: Flagship state university
Endowment: US$15.6 billion[2]
President: William C. Powers, Jr.
Provost: Steven W. Leslie
Faculty: 2,500[3]
Staff: 14,000
Students: 49,696
Undergraduates: 36,878
Postgraduates: 12,818
Location: Austin, Texas, U.S.
Campus: Urban, 350 acres (1.4 km²)
Former names: University of Texas (1883-1967)[4]
Colors: Burnt orange and white[5]           
Nickname: Texas Longhorns
Mascot: University of Texas Longhorn logo Bevo
Website: www.utexas.edu
University of Texas at Austin Portal

The University of Texas at Austin (often referred to as The University of Texas, UT Austin, UT, or Texas) is a major research university[6] located in Austin, Texas and the flagship[7][8][9] institution of The University of Texas System. The main campus is located less than a mile from the Texas State Capitol in Austin. UT Austin was named one of the original eight "Public Ivy" institutions of higher education; i.e., a public institution that "provides an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price."[10] Founded in 1883, the university has had the fifth largest single-campus enrollment in the nation as of fall 2006 (and had the largest enrollment in the country from 1997–2003), with nearly 50,000 undergraduate and graduate students and 16,500 faculty and staff.[3] It currently holds the largest enrollment of all colleges in the state of Texas.[11] The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities and six are health institutions. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... William C. Powers William Charles Powers Jr. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... For other uses, see Longhorn. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Image File history File links Texas_Longhorn_logo. ... Bevo I (1917). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Hookem_hand. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities and six are health institutions. ... The Capitol Building is brilliantly illuminated at night The Texas State Capitol, located in Austin, Texas, is the fourth building to serve as the seat of Texas government. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... This list of largest United States higher education institutions by enrollment includes only individual four-year campuses, not four-year universities. ...


The university also operates various auxiliary facilities aside from the main campus, most notably the J. J. Pickle Research Campus. Texas is a major center for academic research, annually exceeding $380 million in funding. In addition, the university's athletic programs were recognized by Sports Illustrated, which dubbed UT "America's Best Sports College" in 2002. J.J. Pickle Research Campus The J. J. Pickle Research Campus (PRC) in Austin, Texas, is owned and operated by the University of Texas at Austin. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...

Contents

History

The University's old Main Building in 1903.
The University's old Main Building in 1903.

The first mention of a public university in Texas can be traced to the 1827 constitution for the Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas. Although an article promised to establish public education in the arts and sciences, no action was ever taken by the Mexican government. After Texas obtained its independence from Mexico in 1836, the Congress of Texas adopted the Constitution of the Republic, which included a provision to establish public education in republic, including two universities or colleges. On January 26, 1839, the Congress of Texas agreed to eventually set aside fifty leagues of land towards the effort; in addition, forty acres in the new capital of Austin were reserved and designated "College Hill." The seal of The University of Texas at Austin The history of The University of Texas at Austin began in 1827 as a provision in the Constitutción de Coahuila y Texas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Oldmainbuilding. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Oldmainbuilding. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Coahuila y Tejas (or Coahuila and Texas) was one of the constituent states of the newly established United Mexican States under its 1824 Constitution. ... The 1836 Constitution of the Republic of Texas was written between the fall of the Alamo and Sam Houstons stunning victory at San Jacinto. ... For the latter day independence movement surrounding Texas, see Republic of Texas (group). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see league. ...


In 1846, Texas was annexed into the United States. The state legislature passed the Act of 1858, which set aside $100,000 in United States bonds towards construction. In addition, the legislature designated land, previously reserved for the encouragement of railroad construction, toward the universities' fifty leagues. However, Texas's secession from the Union and the American Civil War prevented further action on these plans. For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The passing of the Morrill Act in 1862 facilitated the creation of Texas A&M University, which was established in 1876 as the Agricultural & Mechanical College of Texas.[12] The Texas Constitution of 1876 mandated that the state establish a university "at an early day," calling for the creation of a "university of the first class," The University of Texas. It revoked the endowment of the railroad lands of the Act of 1858 but appropriated one million acres (4000 km²) in West Texas. In 1883, another two million were granted, with income from the sale of land and grazing rights going to The University of Texas and Texas A&M. Morrill Act redirects here. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The Texas Constitution is the document that describes the structure and function of the government of Texas. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


In 1881, Austin was chosen as the site of the main university, and Galveston was designated the location of the medical department. On the original "College Hill," an official ceremony began construction on what is now referred to as the old Main Building in late 1882. The university opened its doors on September 15, 1883. is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The old Victorian-Gothic Main Building served as the central point of the campus's forty acre site, and was used for nearly all purposes. However, by the 1930s, discussions rose about the need for new library space, and the Main Building was razed in 1934 over the objections of many students and faculty. The modern-day tower and Main Building were constructed in its place. Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ...


Constitutional restrictions against funding building construction hampered expansion. However, the funds generated by oil discovered on university-owned grounds in 1923 were put towards its general endowment fund. This extra revenue allowed the university to pay down its debt, and pass bond in 1931 and 1947, funding the necessary expansion after the enrollment spike following World War II. The university built 19 permanent structures between 1950 and 1965, when it was given the right of eminent domain. With this power, the university purchased additional properties surrounding the original forty acres. Petro redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Eminent domain (United States), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate property, or rights in property, without the owner...


Campus

The Lyndon B. Johnson Library and Museum located on the UT Austin campus.
The Lyndon B. Johnson Library and Museum located on the UT Austin campus.

UT property totals 850 acres (3.4 km²), comprised of the 350 acres (1.4 km²) for the main campus and other land for the J.J. Pickle Research Campus in north Austin and the other properties throughout Texas. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Lyndon B. Johnson library in Austin, Texas. ... The J.J. Pickle Research Campus (PRC) in Austin, Texas, is owned and operated by the University of Texas at Austin. ...

The UT Tower (built in 1931) stands 307 ft. (94 m) tall.
The UT Tower (built in 1931) stands 307 ft. (94 m) tall.[13]

One of the university's most visible features is the Beaux-Arts Main Building, including a 307-foot (94 m) tower designed by Paul Philippe Cret.[14] Completed in 1937, the Main Building is located in the middle of campus. The tower usually appears illuminated in white light in the evening but is lit orange for various special occasions, including athletic victories and academic accomplishments; it is conversely darkened for solemn occasions.[15] At the top of the tower is a carillon of 56 bells, the largest in Texas. Songs are played on weekdays by resident carillonneur Tom Anderson, in addition to the usual pealing of Westminster Quarters every quarter hour between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.[citation needed] The tower went through a few periods of being closed to the public (due to the 1966 Whitman Massacre[16] and multiple suicide jumps); however, in 1998, after the installation of security and safety measures, the observation deck reopened to the public indefinitely for weekend tours.[17] Download high resolution version (741x903, 87 KB)Personal photo of the UT Tower File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (741x903, 87 KB)Personal photo of the UT Tower File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ... Paul Philippe Cret (October 24, 1876, Lyon, France – September 8, 1945, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was a French-American architect and industrial designer. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to strike the hour. ...


The university is home to 7 museums and 17 libraries, which hold over eight million volumes.[18] The holdings of the university's Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center include one of only 21 remaining complete copies of the Gutenberg Bible and the first permanent photograph, View from the Window at Le Gras, taken by Nicéphore Niépce.[19] The newest museum, the Blanton Museum of Art, opened in April 2006 and hosts approximately 17,000 works from Europe, the United States, and Latin America. The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center is an archive at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and other cultural artifacts from the United States, Great Britain, and France. ... A copy of the Gutenberg Bible owned by the U.S. Library of Congress The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible or the Mazarin Bible) is a printed version of the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible that was printed by Johannes Gutenberg, in Mainz, Germany in... Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1795. ... Personification of Astrology by Giovanni Francesco Barbieri in the Blanton Museum The Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art, established in 1963 as the University Art Museum, is the art museum and research institution of The University of Texas at Austin. ...


UT has an extensive underground tunnel system that links many of the buildings.[20][unreliable source?] The tunnel system, purportedly used for communications and utility service, is closed to the public and is guarded by silent alarms. The university also operates a 1.1 megawatt nuclear reactor at the J.J. Pickle Research Campus, which has gone critical twice in its history: once at Taylor Hall in 1963 and again in 1992. [21] [21][22] A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... Burglar (or intrusion), fire and safety alarms are found in electronic form today. ... Core of CROCUS, a small nuclear reactor used for research at the EPFL in Switzerland. ...


The university continues to expand its facilities on campus. In February 2006, the Board of Regents voted to update and expand the football stadium, and in March 2006 the student body passed a referendum to build a new Student Activities Center next to Gregory Gym on the east side of campus, pending final approval by the Board of Regents. According to The Daily Texan, the project is estimated to cost $51 million and is set to open between fall 2010 and fall 2012. Funding will primarily come from students, raising tuition by a maximum of $65 per semester.[23]


The university operates a public radio station, KUT, which provides local FM broadcasts as well as live streaming audio over the Internet. The university uses Capital Metro to provide bus transportation for students around the campus and throughout Austin. Kūt (كوت; also known as Kut-Al-Imara and Kut El Amara) is a city in eastern Iraq, on the left bank of the Tigris River, about 100 miles south east of Baghdad, at 32. ... FM broadcasting is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation (FM) to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or Capital Metro, provides public transportation to the city of Austin, Texas, primarily by bus. ...


Academic profile

Rankings

The McCombs School of Business is consistently ranked one of the top business schools in the country.
The McCombs School of Business is consistently ranked one of the top business schools in the country.

UT Austin consistently receives high rankings for several of its programs and overall. The 2008 U.S. News and World Report ranks Texas #44 in the nation and #12 among public universities,[24] while a 2007 The Washington Monthly report ranked UT Austin #19 in the nation.[25] Additionally, UT Austin was ranked as the #6 Top American Research University for 2007,[26] and a 2005 USA Today report ranked the university as "the number one source of new Fortune 1000 CEOs". In international rankings, Texas was ranked #4 in a Zhejiang University (China) 2005 report on the innovativeness of universities worldwide,[27] and #15 worldwide in a 2004 Times Higher Education Supplement (England) report.[28][29] Seven UT Austin doctoral programs ranked in the top 10 in the nation for 2008, with 22 departments also in the top 25.[30] Image File history File links UTAustin_business. ... Image File history File links UTAustin_business. ... McCombs School of Business. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ... Zhejiang University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...


One of the most renowned schools at the university is the McCombs School of Business, which comprises 2008 national rankings of the #1 undergraduate and graduate accounting programs,[31] the #4 management research productivity,[32] the #10 undergraduate business program,[33] and the #18 (full-time) MBA program.[34] A 2005 Bloomberg survey also ranked the school #5 among all business schools and #1 among public business schools for the largest number of alumni who are S&P 500 CEOs.[35] McCombs School of Business. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Bloomberg L.P. is the largest financial news and data company in the world, controlling 33% of market share. ... The S&P 500 is an index containing the stocks of 500 Large-Cap corporations, most of which are American. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ...


While UT Austin does not have a medical school, it houses medical programs associated with other campuses and allied health professional programs, which has contributed to the College of Pharmacy's #2 2008 national ranking by U.S. News and World Report.[36][37] Other programs highly ranked by U.S. News and World Report include the #10 College of Education,[38][39] the #11 Cockrell School of Engineering,[40] and the #16 School of Law.[41] Additionally, the university's library system—its main campus library the Perry-Castañeda Library—ranks #6 among academic libraries in the nation.[42] Robert Lee Moore Hall, Engineering Science Building, and Ernest Cockrell Jr. ... The Perry-Castañeda Library (PCL) is the main central library of The University of Texas library system in Austin, Texas. ...

Proctor's Mustangs (1948) overlooking the Engineering Sciences buildings.
Proctor's Mustangs (1948) overlooking the Engineering Sciences buildings.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 541 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 541 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Colleges and Schools

View of downtown Austin from Main Mall south of the Main Building.
View of downtown Austin from Main Mall south of the Main Building.

The university contains sixteen colleges and academic units, each listed with its founding date:[43] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1203x960, 470 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1203x960, 470 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ...

UT Austin offers more than 100 undergraduate and 170 graduate degrees. In the 2003-2004 academic year, the university awarded a total of 13,065 degrees: 68.6% bachelor's degrees, 21.7% master's degrees, 5.2% doctoral degrees, and 4.5% other professional degrees.[44] UT Austin also offers numerous undergraduate honors programs, such as Dean's Scholars,[45] Turing Scholars, Business Honors,[46] Plan II,[47] and Liberal Arts Honors.[48] The University of Texas School of Architecture is a college within The University of Texas at Austin and has its major facilities located on the main campus in Austin, Texas. ... McCombs School of Business. ... The College of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has more than 7,100 students enrolled in nine undergraduate degrees and seventeen graduate programs. ... The College of Fine Arts is one of 14 academic units at The University of Texas at Austin. ... The Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin unites one of the largest and most respected academic departments of geological sciences with two world-renowned research units, the Institute for Geophysics and the Bureau of Economic Geology. ... The University of Texas School of Law is an ABA-certified American law school located on The University of Texas at Austin campus. ... The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs (or LBJ School of Public Affairs) is a public policy school and a graduate college of The University of Texas at Austin founded in 1970 to prepare graduate students for leadership positions in government and the private and nonprofit sectors, organize research... External links The University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... Aquatint of a Doctor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ...


Admission

As a state public university, UT Austin is subject to Texas House Bill 588 (aka HB 588, the top ten percent law, or the percent plan), which guarantees graduating Texas high school seniors in the top 10% of their class admission to any public Texas university. For others who go through the traditional application process, selectivity at UT Austin is deemed "more selective" according to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.[49] In fall 2006, a total of 27,315 applications were received and 13,305 were admitted. In fall 2007, 27,232 applications and 13,781 students were admitted.[50] Texas House Bill 588 is a Texas law passed in 1997. ...


Faculty and research

The 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at The McDonald Observatory is the third largest telescope in the world.
The 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at The McDonald Observatory is the third largest telescope in the world.

In Fall 2007, UT Austin employed 2,300 full-time faculty members, 51% who were tenured. The student-to-faculty ratio is 19.23.[51] The university's faculty includes winners of the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Medal of Science, the National Medal of Technology, and numerous other awards. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 777 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory October 28, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 777 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory October 28, 2006. ... Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory October 28, 2006. ... McDonald Observatorys 2. ... Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a way to measure a workers productivity and/or involvement in a project. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The National Medal of Technology is an honor granted by the President of the United States to inventors and innovators that have made significant contributions to the development of new and important technology. ...


The university exceeds $446 million in annual research funding[52] and has earned more than 400 patents since its founding. (Licensing deals generate more than $5 million annually for the university.)[53]


Endowment

The university receives income from an endowment known as the Permanent University Fund (PUF), with $11.6 billion (fourth-largest in the United States) in assets as of November 2005,[54] of which 30 percent is dedicated to the university.[55] Proceeds from lands appropriated in 1839 and 1876, as well as oil monies, comprise the majority of this fund. At one time, the PUF was the chief source of income for Texas's two university systems, The University of Texas System and the Texas A&M University System; today, however, its revenues account for less than 10 percent of the universities' annual budgets. This has challenged the universities to increase sponsored research and private donations. Privately funded endowments contribute over $2 billion to the University's total endowment value. The Permanent University Fund (PUF) is one of the ways the state of Texas funds its universities. ... The Permanent University Fund (PUF) is one of the ways the state of Texas funds its universities. ... The following are lists of American institutions of higher education by endowment. ... The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest and most complex systems of higher education in the United States. ...


Student life

The university enrolls 37,377 undergraduate, 11,533 graduate and 1,467 law students. The student population includes students from all 50 states and more than 100 foreign countries, most notably, South Korea, followed by India, the People's Republic of China, Mexico and the Republic of China, are represented.[56] The average SAT score for entering Fall 2004 freshmen was a 1230 out of 1600. For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... “Freshman” redirects here. ...


Housing

The campus is currently home to fourteen residence halls, the last of which opened for residence in Spring 2007. On-campus housing can hold more than 7,100 students.[57] Jester Center is the largest residence hall with its capacity of 2,945.[58] Academic enrollment exceeds the capacity of on-campus housing; as a result, most students must live in private residence halls, housing cooperatives, apartments, or with Greek organizations and other off-campus residences. The Division of Housing and Food Service, which already has the largest market share of 7,000 of the estimated 27,000 beds in the campus area, plans to expand to 9,000 beds in the near future.[59] Jester Center or Jester Dormitory is a residence hall at The University of Texas at Austin, built in 1969. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Student organizations

The university recognizes more than 1,000 student organizations.[60] In addition, it supports three official student governance organizations that represent student interests to faculty, administrators, and the Texas Legislature. Student Government, established in 1902, is the oldest governance organization and represents student interests in general.[61] The Senate of College Councils represents students in academic affairs and coordinates the college councils,[62] and the Graduate Student Assembly represents graduate student interests.[63] The Texas Union Student Events Center serves as the hub for student activities on campus.[64]


Greek life

A student giving the Hook 'em Horns hand gesture at a Longhorn football game.
A student giving the Hook 'em Horns hand gesture at a Longhorn football game.
See also: List of fraternities and sororities at University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas at Austin is home to an active Greek community. The first UT Greek chapters opened in 1883; the same year as the university.[65] Over 11 percent of undergraduate students make up the nearly 4,500 members. With more then 50 national fraternity and sorority chapters, the university's Greek community is one of the largest in the nation. These chapters are under the authority of one of UT Austin's five Greek council communities, Interfraternity Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, Texas Asian Pan-Hellenic Council, United Greek Council and University Panhellenic Council.[66] Other registered student organizations also name themselves with Greek letters and are called affiliates. They are not a part of one of the five councils but have all of the same privileges and responsibilities of any other organization.[65] According to the Office of the Dean of Students' mission statement, Greek Life promotes the principles of cultural appreciation, scholarship, leadership, and service.[67] While there are no fraternity and sorority houses located on-campus, the majority are located west of The Drag in the neighborhood called West Campus. Image File history File links A fan displays the hook em horns sign at a University of Texas football game. ... Image File history File links A fan displays the hook em horns sign at a University of Texas football game. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mano cornuto. ... For other uses, see Longhorn. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Chapters old and new logos, respectively Chapters is a Big Box bookstore chain throughout Canada. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... Not to be confused with National Panhellenic Conference. ... Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... A portion of Guadalupe Street that runs along the western edge of the University of Texas campus is known as The Drag. ...


School spirit

The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... UT Students and Football players singing The Eyes of Texas after a win versus Nebraska For the long-running Texas travel program of the same name, see The Eyes of Texas (TV Series). ... Texas Fight is the official fight song of the University of Texas at Austin and was written by Colonel Walter S. Hunnicutt in collaboration with James E. King, then director of the Marlin High School Band. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mano cornuto. ... The Longhorn Band on the field at a football game vs Baylor in 2006 The Showband of the Southwest performs at Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in 2007 The University of Texas Longhorn Band, also known as the Showband of the Southwest or LHB, is the marching band of... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Longhorn. ... Bevo I (1917). ...

Student media

Main article: Texas Student Media
  • Study Breaks Magazine, a college-age entertainment and drink special magazine.
  • The Daily Texan, the most award-winning daily college newspaper in the United States[70]
  • Texas Travesty, the college humor publication with the largest circulation in the United States.[citation needed]
  • K09VR, the only FCC-licensed student-managed television station in the country.[citation needed]
  • The Cactus Yearbook, the school's yearbook.
  • KVRX, a student-run college radio station.
  • The Vector [4], a monthly publication within the Cockrell School of Engineering.

Other student-run publications include: Texas Student Media (officially named Texas Student Publications) is an auxiliary enterprise of The University of Texas at Austin and the largest student media operation in the United States. ... The Daily Texan is the student newspaper of The University of Texas at Austin. ... Texas Travesty logo The Texas Travesty is the largest student-produced humor publication in the United States. ... K09VR channel 9, known on-air as TSTV (or Texas Student Television, formerly KVR-TV) is the student-run television station of The University of Texas at Austin, operated by Texas Student Media. ... FCC redirects here. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ... KVRX 91. ...

Athletics

Main article: Texas Longhorns
The Tower in orange after the Longhorns won the 2005 National Championship in football at the Rose Bowl. Littlefield Fountain is in the foreground.
The Tower in orange after the Longhorns won the 2005 National Championship in football at the Rose Bowl. Littlefield Fountain is in the foreground.

The University of Texas offers a wide variety of varsity and intramural sports programs. Due to the breadth of sports offered and the quality of the programs, Texas was selected as "America's Best Sports College" in a 2002 analysis performed by Sports Illustrated.[71] Texas was also listed as the number one Collegiate Licensing Company client for the second consecutive year in regards to the amount of annual trademark royalties received from the sales of its fan merchandise. However this ranking is based only on clients of the Collegiate Licensing Company which does not handle licensing for approximately three dozen large schools such as Ohio State, Southern California, UCLA, Michigan State, and Texas A&M.[72][73] For other uses, see Longhorn. ... Image File history File links UT-Tower-in-Orange. ... Image File history File links UT-Tower-in-Orange. ... The Main Building Tower in the foreground. ... The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of the 2005 National Championship football team. ... Littlefield Fountain, by Pompeo Coppini, in front of The University of Texas tower, which is lit in celebration of the 2005 Texas Longhorn Football Team. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Varsity sports

The university's men's and women's athletics teams are nicknamed the Longhorns. A charter member of the Southwest Conference until its dissolution in 1996, Texas now competes in the Big 12 Conference (South Division) of the NCAA's Division I-FBS. Texas has won 47 total national championships,[74] 39 of which are NCAA national championships.[75] The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located mostly in the central United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


The University of Texas has traditionally been considered a college football powerhouse.[76][77][78] At the start of the 2007 season, the Longhorns were ranked third in the all-time list of both total wins and winning percentage.[79] The team experienced its greatest success under coach Darrell Royal, winning three national championships in 1963, 1969, 1970, and winning a fourth title under head coach Mack Brown in 2005 after the 41-38 victory over previously undefeated Southern California in the 2006 Rose Bowl. This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is head coach of the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ...


In recent years, the men's basketball team has gained prominence, advancing to the NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen in 2002, the Final Four in 2003, the Sweet Sixteen in 2004, and the Elite Eight in 2006 and 2008. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... The playoff term Elite Eight has been popularized to refer to the final eight teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ...


The university's baseball team is considered one of the best in the nation with more trips to the College World Series than any other school, with wins in 1949, 1950, 1970, 1983, 2002 and 2005. College baseball is baseball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ...


Additionally, the university's highly successful men's and women's swimming and diving teams lay claim to sixteen NCAA Division I titles.[citation needed] In particular, the men's team is under the leadership of Eddie Reese, who served as the head men's coach at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, and the 2004 Games in Athens.

2006 football Lone Star Showdown.
2006 football Lone Star Showdown.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 2943 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Texas A&M University Lone Star Showdown 2006 Texas Longhorn football team Texas A&M Aggies Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 2943 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Texas A&M University Lone Star Showdown 2006 Texas Longhorn football team Texas A&M Aggies Metadata This... Lone Star Showdown logo The State Farm Lone Star Showdown is the official moniker (trademarked in 1996)[1] for all varsity mens and womens athletics competitions between Texas A&M University and the University of Texas at Austin. ...

Rivalries

One of the university's notable rivals in many sports is Texas A&M University.[80] The two schools have acknowledged the importance of this rivalry by creating the State Farm Lone Star Showdown series, which encompasses all sports where both schools field a varsity team. The football game played between the two schools is the third longest-running rivalry in the nation and is the longest-running rivalry for both schools. The game used to be played on Thanksgiving day but in recent years has been played on the day following Thanksgiving. Both schools traditionally hold a rally each year before the football game — Texas hosts the Hex Rally, and students at Texas A&M host the Aggie Bonfire (although it is no longer an officially sanctioned Texas A&M event because of the deaths of 12 students in 1999). Texas A&M Aggies is the name given to the sports teams of Texas A&M University. ... State farm can refer to: Sovkhoz, a type of collective farm in the Soviet Union State Farm Insurance, an insurance company in the United States This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Lone Star Showdown logo The State Farm Lone Star Showdown is the official moniker (trademarked in 1996)[1] for all varsity mens and womens athletics competitions between Texas A&M University and the University of Texas at Austin. ... For the Canadian holiday, see Thanksgiving (Canada). ... Hex Rally (sometimes Texas Hex) is a pep rally at The University of Texas at Austin that occurs in the week prior to the annual football game between the Texas Longhorns and their main rivals, the Texas A&M Aggies. ... The 1993 Aggie Bonfire; the relative size of the wedding cake-style structure can be seen in comparison to the people standing at its base. ...


Some fans and observers, however, argue that the Longhorns' biggest rival in football is the University of Oklahoma.[81] The football game between Texas and Oklahoma is known as the Red River Shootout and is held annually in Dallas, Texas, at the Cotton Bowl. In recent years, this rivalry has been particularly spirited, in part due to the fact that at least one school had been ranked in the top five nationally at the time of the game (from 2000-05). University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Logo for the 2006 meeting between Oklahoma and Texas. ... For other uses, see Dallas (disambiguation). ... For the Cotton Bowl game, see Cotton Bowl (game). ...


Other schools, such as Arkansas and Texas Tech, also consider Texas among their rivals.[82][83][84] Texas Tech University is a nationally recognized doctoral/research university located in Lubbock, Texas, established in 1923 originally as Texas Technological College. ...


Facilities

Major sporting facilities and their main use include:

In addition, the university has numerous practice, training, and intramural facilities. Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, located in Austin, Texas, is home to the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... The Frank C. Erwin, Jr. ... UFCU Disch-Falk Field is the baseball field of the University of Texas at Austin. ... Mike A. Myers Stadium is the home of The University of Texas Longhorn track and field and soccer teams and also home to the USATF Elite Running Circuit Austin Track Club. ... The Red and Charline McCombs Field is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Softball team. ... Gregory Gymnasium is the current home of the University of Texas Longhorn Womens Volleyball team, and former home of the Longhorn Basketball and Swimming teams. ... The Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center is an aquatic facility at the University of Texas at Austin. ...


Notable people

The university has a base of more than 450,000 living alumni[85] and has produced leaders of science, art, media, business, law, engineering, and public policy, as well as athletics. A few household-name alumni include the following: The list of University of Texas at Austin people includes notable alumni, non-graduates, faculty and staff, chief executives, and affiliates of the University of Texas at Austin. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Michael_Dell,_square_crop. ... Michael Saul Dell (born February 23, 1965, in Houston, Texas) is an American businessman and the founder and CEO of Dell, Inc. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3196x4804, 1945 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lady Bird Johnson Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Claudia Alta Lady Bird Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007)[1] was First Lady of the United States from 1963 to 1969, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mrsbush-20060206. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Vince_Young. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953) is an American politician, and was the 43rd Governor of Florida. ...

See also

Texas Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links This image, including all photography and graphics used in it, was taken and created by myself, Shem Daimwood. ... Big Bertha is the worlds largest drum. ... The new scoreboard as seen from the North end zone, approximately 150 yards away at the opposite end of the field Godzillatron is the nickname given to the scoreboard at the University of Texas at Austins Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium. ... The Texas Cowboys firing Smokey at the 2003 Texas Football Spring Jamboree. ... The Worlds Largest Texas Flag refers to any of the Texas flags used by the Alpha Rho chapter of Alpha Phi Omega at The University of Texas at Austin in displays at football pre-game shows, at pep rallies, or for other purposes. ... Texas House Bill 588 is a Texas law passed in 1997. ... The Texas 4000 for Cancer or Texas 4000 is the longest annual charity bicycle ride in the world. ... The complete list of University of Texas at Austin presidents officially includes 28 individuals in the history of the University. ... The Institute of Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) was created at the University of Texas at Austin to provide the infrastructure and intellectual leadership for strong interdisciplinary programs in computational engineering and sciences. ... The Institute for Advanced Studies at Austin is a private scientific think tank in Austin, Texas. ... ARCNET (also CamelCased as ARCnet, an acronym from Attached Resource Computer NETwork) is a local area network (LAN) protocol, similar in purpose to Ethernet or Token Ring. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ...

References

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  2. ^ For the 2007 fiscal year, which for most universities ended 30 June 2007, Sources: National Association of College and University Business Officers; TIAA-CREF. Endowment listed represents U. of Texas system.
  3. ^ a b Enrollment & Essentials. The University of Texas at Austin Office of Public Affairs (2006-07-27). Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
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  5. ^ a b The University of Texas Style Guidelines - signed by UT president Larry Faulkner. Accessed 27 February 2006.
  6. ^ The Top American Research Universities - 2007. Retrieved on 2008-05-06.
  7. ^ "Texas flagship universities celebrate milestone of Giant Magellan Telescope partnership", University of Texas, 2005-07-21. Retrieved on 2006-09-28. 
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  9. ^ Austin, Liz. "Flagship university of Texas seeks to boost diversity", 2005-10-03. Retrieved on 2006-09-28. 
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For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Faulkner presenting at the May 10, 2004 Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board meeting. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Texan is the student newspaper of the University of Texas at Austin. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Zhejiang University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Hangchow) is a sub-provincial city located in the Yangtze River Delta in the Peoples Republic of China, and the capital of Zhejiang province. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Harris Interactive is a company. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Texan is the student newspaper of The University of Texas at Austin. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The University of Texas
  • University of Texas Athletics
  • Texas Exes — The University of Texas Alumni Association
  • University of Texas at Austin is at coordinates 30°17′05″N 97°44′12″W / 30.2846, -97.7367 (University of Texas at Austin)Coordinates: 30°17′05″N 97°44′12″W / 30.2846, -97.7367 (University of Texas at Austin)

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