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Encyclopedia > University of Colorado at Boulder
University of Colorado at Boulder
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Motto: Let Your Light Shine
Established 1876
Type: Public
Endowment: US $590 million (systemwide)[1]
Chancellor: George "Bud" Peterson
President: Hank Brown
Faculty: 2,081
Undergraduates: 24,000+
Postgraduates: 4,000+
Location Boulder, Colorado, United States
Campus: Urban, 786 acres (3.2 km²)
Colors: Silver and Gold[2]           
Nickname: Buffaloes
Mascot: Ralphie (live); Chip (costume)
Website: http://www.colorado.edu

The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. CU has produced a number of astronauts, Nobel laureates, Pulitzer Prize winners and other notable individuals in their fields. It is known as one of the Public Ivies. The January 2004 edition of The Economist ranked CU as the 11th-best public university in the nation and 31st best public university globally for 2003. The U.S. News and World Report currently ranks the university 77th in the nation overall (private institutions included) and 34th best among public universities. In 2004, Carl Wieman was named U.S. Professor of the Year.[4] Seal of the University of Colorado Not GFDL. UC seal assumed to be a trademark of the Regents of the University of Colorado. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... George Hanks (Hank) Brown (1940-) was a Republican politician and Senator from Colorado. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... The City of Boulder ( , Mountain Time Zone) is a home rule municipality located in Boulder County, Colorado, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Silver is the metallic shade of the color gray closest to that of polished silver. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Mike Bohn at the 2005 Spring Practice game. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Ralphie IV on the sidelines at the 2005 Big 12 Conference football championship game Ralphie the buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Colorado (CU) System consists of five campuses: University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Colorado Springs University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Fitzsimons campus of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, scheduled to open in 2007 in Aurora on... The City of Boulder ( , Mountain Time Zone) is a home rule municipality located in Boulder County, Colorado, United States. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Winners of the Nobel prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Wren Building (College of William and Mary) Alumni Hall (Miami U) Sather Gate (UC Berkeley) Central Campus Diag (U of Michigan) Old Well (UNC-Chapel Hill) UT Tower (U of Texas) Williams Hall (U of Vermont) The Rotunda (U of Virginia) Public Ivy is a colloquialism for a state-funded... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Carl Edwin Wieman (born March 26, 1951) is a Nobel-prize winning American physicist at the University of British Columbia who (with Eric Allin Cornell), in 1995, produced the first true Bose-Einstein condensate. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ...

Contents

History

The CU Boulder campus.
The CU Boulder campus.

On March 14, 1876, the Colorado state legislature passed an amendment to the state constitution which provided money for the establishment of the University of Colorado in Boulder, the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, and Colorado Agricultural College in Fort Collins, now known as Colorado State University. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x936, 627 KB) Summary The CU Boulder campus viewed from Enchanted Mesa. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x936, 627 KB) Summary The CU Boulder campus viewed from Enchanted Mesa. ... The Colorado School of Mines is a public research university devoted to engineering and applied science located in the town of Golden, Colorado. ... Downtown Golden, Colorado Golden, Colorado lies at the mouth of Clear Creek at the edge of the foothills of the Front Range. ... Horsetooth Rock, atop Horsetooth Mountain, is often used as a symbol of Fort Collins Fort Collins, situated on the Cache la Poudre River, is the largest city and county seat of Larimer County, Colorado. ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ...


Two cities competed for the site of the original University of Colorado: Boulder and Cañon City. The consolation prize for the losing city would be home of the new Colorado State Prison. Cañon City was at a disadvantage as it was already the home of the Colorado Territorial Prison (There are now six prisons in the Cañon City area). “Canon City” redirects here. ...


In the early days of the University’s construction, Boulder Sheriff David H. Nichols made a midnight horseback ride from Boulder to Denver with $20,000 to give to the state to help with expenses of building the University. For this effort, the University named a dorm after him - Nichols Hall. In the 1980s it came to light that this same Mr. Nichols took part in the infamous Sand Creek Massacre, in which the Colorado Militia massacred a tribe of Native Americans, including many women and children, who were peacefully encamped along Sand Creek. After some debate, the name of the dorm was changed to Cheyenne-Arapaho Hall after two Native American nations indigenous to Colorado. Combatants United States of America Cheyenne, Arapaho Commanders John M. Chivington Black Kettle Strength 800 soldiers 500, mostly elderly, women and children Casualties 15 killed, 50 wounded 150-184 killed The Sand Creek massacre (also known as the Chivington massacre or the Battle of Sand Creek) was an incident in... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... Scabby Bull, Arapaho 1806 Arapaho camp, ca. ...


The cornerstone of the building that would become Old Main was laid September 20, 1875. The doors of the university opened on September 5, 1877. At the time there were few high schools in the state that could adequately prepare students for university work, so in addition to the University, a preparatory school was formed on campus. In the fall of 1877, the student body consisted of 15 students in the college proper and 50 students in the preparatory school. There were 38 men and 27 women, and their ages ranged from 12-23 years. is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...

The University of Colorado at Boulder campus sometime between 1940 and 1953.
The University of Colorado at Boulder campus sometime between 1940 and 1953.

Image File history File links CU-1950s-historical. ... Image File history File links CU-1950s-historical. ...

Campus

The main CU-Boulder Campus is located about 1-mile (2 km) south of the popular Pearl Street Mall. It is composed of academic and residential buildings as well as research facilities. The East Campus is about a quarter mile from the main campus and is composed mainly of athletic fields and research buildings. Pearl Street Mall is a four block walking mall in downtown Boulder, Colorado. ...


"The Hill" borders Campus to the West and is a central location for shops, restaurants, bars, etc. The Hill is also prime real estate for students, given its central location and proximity to campus. The majority of Greek fraternities and sororities are on the Hill.


Architecture

Old Main
Old Main

Due to its location at the foot of the Flatirons and distinctive Tuscan architecture, CU-Boulder is often called one of the most beautiful campuses in the nation. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 7. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 7. ... The Flatirons on Green Mountain The Flatirons are a rock formation near Boulder, Colorado. ...


In 1917 the university was undergoing a massive expansion. This triggered debate over the architectural style of the campus. The consensus was that the University should be built in a unified style, but which style was the center of the debate. Some wanted to follow the style of Macky Auditorium, which was Neo-Gothic, while others wanted to use the Collegiate Gothic style of many East Coast schools. However, Charles Z. Klauder, the head architect of the firm hired to do the construction, presented then President Norlin with sketches of new buildings in Italian Rural Architecture. This style was developed in the mountains of northern Italy, and Klauder and Norlin felt that it was a harmonious fit with the Boulder foothills. Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


The most obvious characteristics of this style on the Boulder campus are the rough, textured walls and the sloping, multi-leveled roofs with red tile. The sandstone used in the construction of nearly all the buildings on campus was selected from a quarry in Lyons, Colorado. The architecture had a rugged yet classical feel, fitting for a western University. Lyons lies at the intersection of State Highway 7 and U.S. Route 36, on the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains. ...


Klauder’s vision for the campus took nearly twenty years to complete, and laid the foundation for the future design of the campus.


Library

Norlin Library
Norlin Library

Until 1903, the library collection was housed with the rest of the school in Old Main. The growing size of the library required a move, as the weight of the books was causing physical damage to the floor. The cornerstone for the first separate library building was laid in January 1903, and the building was opened in January 1904. When the new Norlin Library opened in 1940, the old library turned over to Theatre department, and was converted into classrooms and a theatre. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 5. ...


Norlin Library was the last building to be designed by Klauder. There are two inscriptions on the western face of the building, overlooking the Norlin Quadrangle. Both were composed by Pres. Norlin. The larger inscription reads “Who knows only his own generation remains always a child” and the smaller inscription on the marble just over the door reads “Enter here the timeless fellowship of the human spirit.” Norlin was one of the first college libraries in the country to have a divisional reading room plan, with books on open shelves where students could freely access them. Norlin Library also completed the Norlin Quadrangle, a central grassy area in the middle of campus which is used as a spot for student gatherings and official events. Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ...

Norlin Library main entrance
Norlin Library main entrance

When it opened, Norlin was the largest university library between the Mississippi and California, and it still ranks among the largest. In 1940, there were 311,000 volumes and 60,000 pamphlets. This jumped to 706,371 volumes by 1950. Currently, Norlin Library and its satellite libraries house approximately 5 million volumes. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 4. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Engineering Center
Engineering Center

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 304 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Colorado at Boulder Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 304 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Colorado at Boulder Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or...

Macky Auditorium

Macky Auditorium
Macky Auditorium

Macky Auditorium is a large building on the University of Colorado campus, which plays host to various talks, plays, and musical performances. Andrew J. Macky was a prominent businessman involved with the town of Boulder in the late 1800’s. Macky served as the President, as well as a stockholder of the First National Bank, an institution founded by another early CU supporter Lewis Cheney. Macky is credited with a number of landmarks throughout Boulder, where he was a carpenter and involved in politics. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 5. ...


The Auditorium opened its doors in 1923, thirteen years after construction started. Macky's adopted daughter, May, sued for a third of Macky's estate, a case which took thirteen years to settle. May was angered that her father left her no money in his will, while leaving $400,000 to CU for the hall’s construction. The university eventually won the case, and the majority of critical construction on the building resumed.


The building has a variety of architectural elements from various buildings around the globe that President Baker, CU’s president at the turn of the century, admired. The design of the auditorium is primarily Neo-Gothic, with the primary materials being sandstone and red tile, like the rest of campus. The result is a unique building, with two large towers and sprawling ivy, that sets itself apart from the rest of the CU campus. Macky was refurbished in 1986, with improved seating, custom carpeting, modern plumbing and an elevator. Currently there is an electronic bell system in the towers of Macky which rings the hours during the day. Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ...


Macky is the home of a two departments both in the College of Music, the Jazz Studies Department and the Choral Department, and it houses an art gallery which is open Wednesdays, and to patrons during performances. A wide range of entertainers perform at Macky each year, from Phillip Glass to Wilco. The hall houses almost all performances by the Boulder Philharmonic, the Artist Series, and the CU Opera. Macky is also the home of many lectures including the famous Conference on World Affairs held at CU each spring.


Macky is also the location of a campus murder. In July of 1966, Elaura Jaquette, a twenty year old student, was lured into the west tower of the building by Joseph Morse, a janitor at Macky. She was raped and brutally murdered in the organ practice room. The murder room is now an office. Campus legend claims her ghost still haunts the building.


University Memorial Center (UMC)

Dalton Trumbo Fountain Court behind the UMC on July 13, 2006
Dalton Trumbo Fountain Court behind the UMC on July 13, 2006
The sign and front of the UMC on April 14, 2007
The sign and front of the UMC on April 14, 2007

In 1947, Colorado Governor Lee Knous issued a proclamation to create a memorial to Colorado's servicemen at the University of Colorado at Boulder. A proposal to house this memorial in a student union building resulted in a remarkable fundraising effort. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 326 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Colorado at Boulder Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 326 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Colorado at Boulder Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 6. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... A proclamation (Lat. ... The memorial at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii commemorates American dead from wars in the Pacific. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ...

North Side of UMC
North Side of UMC

The University Memorial Center opened its doors in October 1953 with President Robert L. Stearns presiding over the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Pundits of the day described the building as "opulent" and "breathtaking," and the UMC quickly became the central landmark of the Boulder campus. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1162 × 778 pixel, file size: 939 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Victor Patel File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1162 × 778 pixel, file size: 939 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Victor Patel File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


A 1964 addition created a new book store, conference facilities, additional dining facilities, and offices to house the rapidly growing student activities and organizations. The expansion was financed through bonds granted by student fees.


The 1960s and '70s put the UMC at the center of student activism as students staged strikes, grape boycotts, love-ins, sit-ins, and walk-outs. The UMC Fountain Court (now the Dalton Trumbo Fountain Court) became a familiar sight to network television news watchers as the famous and notorious promoted their cause at CU-Boulder.


Entertainers as diverse as Ramsey Lewis and the Grateful Dead have performed in the Glenn Miller Ballroom. The UMC Connection, a student entertainment center in the basement, is a more informal gathering place, featuring pool tables and a small bowling alley. It also features Club 156, which hosts concerts from local and up-and-coming bands. Ramsey Emmanuel Lewis, Jr. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ...


In 1986, students passed another bond issue to remodel the food services area. The Alferd Packer Grill was transformed to the current food court concept and students have since enjoyed the addition of other vendors including Subway, Dominos, and Celestial Seasonings Teas and Coffees. Alferd Packer is one of the few people in the US to ever be jailed for cannibalism, having allegedly killed and eaten five of his travelling companions while trapped in the Rocky Mountains during fierce winter weather. ...


Mary Rippon Theatre

The Mary Rippon Theatre is an outdoor theater and the site of many cultural events, notably the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The Mary Rippon Theatre is an outdoor theater at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the site of many cultural events, notably of the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 284 pixelsFull resolution (4912 × 1744 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 284 pixelsFull resolution (4912 × 1744 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Mary Rippon Theatre is an outdoor theater at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the site of many cultural events, notably of the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... The Colorado Shakespeare Festival is an outdoor Shakespeare Festival each summer at the Mary Rippon Theater at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado. ...


The Theatre was named after Professor Mary Rippon, the first female instructor at the University and one of the first female University instructors in the United States. She taught German and French. Professor Rippon was so popular with students that when attempts were made to replace her with a male instructor, the student body revolted en masse, and Rippon kept her job.


Galleries, museums and performing arts facilities

The University of Colorado at Boulder is home to an array of art galleries, museums, and performing arts facilities.


Galleries

Norlin Library features two art galleries, several dedicated art spaces, and art works on display throughout the building.


The CU Art Museum features cutting edge works of modern and contemporary art, as well as historical art works. The Museum's permanent collection includes over 5,000 works of art from numerous time periods and cultures.


The UMC Art Gallery exhibits a variety of visual offerings ranging from student works created on campus to presentations of internationally recognized artists.


Andrew J. Macky Gallery showcases the work of both local and national artists and is housed in the historic Macky Auditorium.


Museums

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History has one of the most extensive natural history collections in the Rocky Mountain and Plains regions, representing the disciplines of Anthropology, Botany, Entomology, Paleontology, and Zoology. With more than four million artifacts and specimens in the areas of Anthropology, Botany, Entomology, Paleontology, and Zoology, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History houses one of the most extensive and respected natural history collections in the Rocky Mountain and Plains regions, making it one of the top...


CU Heritage Center tells the stories of CU-Boulder's past and present and is housed in Old Main, the first building constructed on campus. Seven galleries exhibit art and memorabilia associated with CU faculty and alumni.


Fiske Planetarium and Science Center features a 60 ft (18 m). planetarium dome - the largest between Los Angeles and Chicago - and produces laser shows, live concerts, and an on-going series of public programs. Fiske also offers a hands-on science museum with interactive exhibits and space-themed art.


Performing Arts Facilities

The University of Colorado College of Music presents over 400 performances and educational events bringing together faculty, students, and guest artists each year through the Pendulum New Music Series. They present musical genres including classical, jazz, world music, and new music.


Colorado University Theatre and Dance is home to the Charlotte York Irey Dance Theatre, the University Theatre, and the Loft Theatre. Over a dozen productions are presented each year featuring student and faculty actors, dancers, choreographers, directors, and designers. The University of Colorado at Boulder theatre department. ...


Organization

The University of Colorado is divided into several colleges and schools. While the College of Arts and Sciences is by far the largest, the university also consists of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the schools of Architecture and Planning, Education, Journalism and Mass Communication, Music, Law, and the Leeds School of Business. Most, if not all, of these colleges and schools also incorporate masters and doctorate level degree programs. At the University, there are currently approximately 3400 courses available in over 150 disciplines comprising 85 majors ranging from Accounting to Women's Studies. The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Mass communication is the term used to describe the academic study of various means by which individuals and entities relay information to large segments of the population all at once through mass media. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The Leeds School of Business is a college of the University of Colorado at Boulder. ...


As of Fall 2005, the top 10 declared majors were:

  1. Psychology
  2. Integrative Physiology
  3. English
  4. Political Science
  5. Journalism and Mass Communication
  6. Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
  7. Finance
  8. Marketing
  9. Economics
  10. Art and Art History -- Studio Arts

The most popular major for new students is the "open option" or undeclared major.


University of Colorado School of Law is by far the smallest and most selective of the colleges. The Wolf Law Building, the new home of the Law School, was dedicated on September 8, 2006, by United States Supreme Court justice Stephen Breyer. The University of Colorado School of Law is one of the professional graduate schools within the University of Colorado System. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ...


The Leeds School of Business has an enrollment of 3,300 students including undergraduates, master's candidates, and Ph.D. candidates. The Ph.D. entrepreneurship program ranks first in the nation. The undergraduate program ranks 39th in the country and the undergraduate entrepreneurship program ranks 14th in the nation. The MBA program ranks 26th among all public universities. The faculty are ranked 38th in the nation according to the Academy of Management Journal. The Leeds School of Business is a college of the University of Colorado at Boulder. ...


Center for Advanced Engineering and Technology Education

The Center for Advanced Engineering and Technology Education (CAETE) is a partnership between the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the Division of Continuing Education and Professional Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. As the distance learning and professional studies arm of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, CAETE provides courses from the College to working professionals via the Internet and CD-ROM. Students can take courses for professional development or toward earning a master's degree or graduate certificate (in some disciplines) in aerospace engineering, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, engineering management, and telecommunications. Founded in 1983, CAETE currently receives over 1,000 enrollments a year from over 250 job sites in Colorado, across the nation, and abroad. Distance Learning is learning carried out apart from the usual classroom setting; in an asynchronous setting. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Electrical and Computer Engineering is a major at many institutes of higher education. ... Engineering management is a field that bridges the gap between engineering and management. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


Academic freedom

Article 5.D of the Laws of the Regents defines "academic freedom" as the "freedom to inquire, discover, publish and teach truth as the faculty member sees it, subject to no control or authority save the control and authority of the rational methods by which truth is established."[5] It requires that all members of the University's faculty have complete freedom to study, learn, research, and communicate the results of these pursuits to others. It also protects University students with freedom of study and discussion. However, both the faculty and the students must comply with certain standards. Those standards for faculty members are listed in 5.D.2.[5]


Honor code

CU-Boulder has an honor code that all students must adhere to in their academic pursuits. A copy of the code, engraved on a metal plate, is posted in every classroom on campus. The Honor Code is a result of a student initiative, it took effect in 2000 after the student body voted in favor of the code. [3] Students are expected to uphold the ideals of ethics and honor in all of their academic pursuits. If students do not, they are held accountable through the student-run honor code system. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ...


The code states: On my honor, as a University of Colorado at Boulder student, I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this work.


Honors Program

Undergraduates who seek an academic challenge may participate in CU's Honors Program. Currently consisting of the top ten percent of incoming freshmen and all undergraduates with a 3.3 GPA or greater (on a 4.0 scale), the Honors Program has been recognizing high achieving students since the 1920's. The program offers over 40 honors classes each semester. These classes are taught by tenured professors and are limited to class sizes of 15. Honors students also have the opportunity to graduate with honors, high honors, and highest honors, by writing and defending a thesis during their senior year. The program extends into the dorms through the Kittredge Honors Program, which offers a living-learning community of high achieving students.


Nobel Laureates

In 2005, John Hall was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics along with fellow researchers Roy J. Glauber, from Harvard University, and Theodor W. Hansch, from Munich, Germany. Dr. Hall's efforts developed laser-based precision spectroscopy, which includes the optical frequency comb technique. He is currently a professor of physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Harvard redirects here. ...


Eric Cornell and Carl Wieman are both distinguished professors of physics at CU Boulder. In 2001, they won the Nobel Prize in Physics for their creation of the world's first Bose-Einstein condensate that they created in 1995.


In 1989, Thomas Robert Cech was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery that RNA in living cells is not only a molecule of heredity, but can also function as a biocatalyst. Cech is currently employed in the Molecular Cellular Developmental Biology Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder.


Noted alumni

The University of Colorado at Boulder ranks fourth among U.S. universities in number of astronauts produced, not including military academies. The seal of the University of Colorado at Boulder The following is a list of encyclopedic people associated with the University of Colorado at Boulder. ...


Ward LeRoy Churchill

Ward LeRoy Churchill was a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. While a professor, Ward Churchill wrote an essay in September 2001 titled Some People Push Back: On the Justice of Roosting Chickens about the September 11, 2001 attacks, in which he argued that American foreign policies provoked the attacks. He described the "technocratic corps at the very heart of America's global financial empire" working in the World Trade Center as "little Eichmanns," a phrase coined by anarcho-primitivist John Zerzan.[6][7] Ward LeRoy Churchill (born October 2, 1947) is an American writer and political activist. ... Ethnic studies is an academic discipline dedicated to the study of ethnic minorities. ... Ward LeRoy Churchill (born October 2, 1947) is an American writer and political activist. ... Book cover On the Justice of Roosting Chickens: reflections on the consequences of U.S. imperial arrogance and criminality (ISBN 1902593790) is a book written by controversial scholar Ward Churchill published in 2003. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... Little Eichmanns is a phrase coined by anarcho-primitivist John Zerzan. ... Theory Issues Culture By region Lists Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Anarcho-primitivism is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. ... John Zerzan (born 1943) is an American anarchist and primitivist philosopher and author. ...


In response to 2005 publicity from the mass media and in weblogs, Churchill was both widely condemned and widely defended. Some defenders who did not agree with Churchill's analysis and/or with his inflammatory phrasing nonetheless felt that the attacks on Churchill represented efforts at intimidation against academic discourse and suppression of political dissent.[8] This later became known as the Ward Churchill 9/11 essay controversy. Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... This article is about a type of web application. ... Churchill book cover Historian and ethnic studies professor Ward Churchill wrote an essay in September 2001 titled Some People Push Back: On the Justice of Roosting Chickens about the September 11, 2001 attacks, in which he argued that American foreign policies provoked the attacks. ...


Following an investigation of Churchill's past research, Churchill was fired by the University on July 24, 2007 for research misconduct not related to the controversial essay, including plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification.[9][10] Regent Cindy Carlisle was the lone vote against dismissal, arguing that the University should "follow the recommendation made by the majority of those on the P&T dismissal panel, namely that Churchill should be demoted and suspended for one year without pay."[8] Margaret LeCompte, chair of the University's chapter of the American Association of University Professors, commented that the act of dismissing Churchill would have a "profoundly chilling effect on teaching, learning and research" at the University and that it is not "a safe place for academic freedom."[8] The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization of professors and other academics in the United States. ...


Notable accomplishments at CU

  • First to create a new form of matter, the Bose-Einstein condensate, just a few hundred billionths of a degree above absolute zero. [11]
  • First to observe a "fermionic condensate" formed from pairs of atoms in a gas.[12]
  • Developed the "FluChip" to aid physicians in diagnosing respiratory illness and differentiating between three types of influenza and other viruses that cause similar symptoms.[13]
  • First Place in the 2002 and 2005 National Solar Decathlons. (An international competition in which students and faculty from the Engineering and Architecture programs collaborated to design, construct, transport and live in a sustainable residence. These are the only two competitions until the next one in 2007.)[14]
  • is the number one university recipient of NASA funding

A Bose–Einstein condensate is a phase of matter formed by bosons cooled to temperatures very near to absolute zero (0 kelvins or -273. ...

Events

The Colorado Shakespeare Festival is a summer festival of Shakespeare held at the outdoor Mary Rippon Theater on the University of Colorado campus. The Colorado Shakespeare Festival is an outdoor Shakespeare Festival each summer at the Mary Rippon Theater at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado. ...


The Conference on World Affairs is an annual one-week conference featuring dozens of discussion panels on a variety of contemporary issues. The Conference on World Affairs takes place yearly in Boulder, Colorado, and was founded in 1948, originally as a forum on international affairs (according to their site). ...


Campus Organizations

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

The Buff Bus

The Buff Bus is a student shuttle that runs between off-campus housing and the main campus. The buses serve students with two routes through campus. The route from The Williams Village Dormitories and Bear Creek Apartments runs all day and brings passengers to campus from the remote dormitories and the apartment complex. The College Inn route runs for two hours in the morning and again in the evening and circulates through campus to and from that dormitory. The Buff Bus can also be chartered for special events and trips.


The Buff Bus runs from 7:00 am to midnight on weekdays, until 2:55 am on Fridays, and until 3:00 am on Saturday. It is a primary mode of transportation by many students living in off-campus housing. Many Buff Bus drivers are students, with a few exceptions.


The fleet includes buses manufactured by NovaBus, Gillig, Neoplan, Thomas Built Buses, Navistar International Corporation, Blue Bird Corporation, and ElDorado National. Some of the buses in the fleet are powered by biodiesel manufactured from fryer grease. The idea started as a class project for CU Environmental Engineering student Andrew Azman and four other students after hearing a talk from biodiesel pioneer, Joshua Tickell.[15] The conversion of the Buff Buses to biodiesel was supported by a student referendum. Used fryer grease from the dining halls around campus is now processed into fuel for the Buff Busses, leading some to comment that the bus exhaust smells like french fries.[15] A Nova LFS operated by Grand River Transit. ... Gillig Corporation, formerly Gillig Bros. ... An articulated Neoplan bus arrives at the Silver Spring Metro station in Silver Spring, Maryland on February 9, 2005. ... Thomas Built Buses, Inc. ... Navistar International Corporation NYSE: NAV is the parent company of International Truck and Engine Corporation, a leading producer of mid-range diesel engines, medium trucks, heavy trucks, severe service vehicles, and parts and service sold under the International® brand. ... The Blue Bird Corporation is a large manufacturer of buses. ... ElDorado National is a bus manufacturer owned by Thor Industries. ... This article is about transesterified plant and animal oils. ... Joshua Tickell is the author of From the Fryer to the Fuel Tank ISBN 0970722702 Published by Greenteach. ...


Hiking Club

Founded in May 1919, the Hiking Club is the longest running student organization at the University of Colorado at Boulder. [16] It is a non-profit, student-run organization for university students and affiliates interested in hiking and outdoors activities, with hundreds of active members on campus.


The club organizes member-led trips every weekend, and travels throughout the Rocky Mountain Region during breaks to wilderness areas in New Mexico, Wyoming, and Utah.[citation needed] Depending on the outing, a variety of activities are featured such as climbing, mountain biking, hot-springing, and backpacking. Examples of frequent trip destinations include the nearby Indian Peaks Wilderness, ascents of Colorado's fourteeners, and day-hikes among the picturesque Flatirons. Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lake Isabelle below Navajo, Apache and Shoshoni Peaks The Indian Peaks Wilderness is a wilderness area in north central Colorado managed by the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forest. ... In mountaineering, a fourteener is a mountain that exceeds 14,000 feet (4,267. ... The Flatirons on Green Mountain The Flatirons are a rock formation near Boulder, Colorado. ...


The club motto, "half mile more," dates back to the 1940's of the club's tradition-rich history.[citation needed] The summit of Green Mountain, overlooking Boulder and the CU campus, is where a plaque placed by club members in 1925 marks the names and elevations of every visible summit in the Rocky Mountain Front Range from Longs Peak to Pikes Peak.[citation needed] A slide show[17] of the club's activities is shown on campus during semi-annual new member meetings and the alumni association meets annually. The Front Range is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States The Front Range is a mountain range in the United States on the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains, and on the western edge of the Great Plains. ... Longs Peak (or Longs Peak, see below) is one of the 54 fourteeners in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. ... This article is about the mountain in Colorado. ...


Radio 1190

Main article: KVCU

KVCU AM-1190, popularly known as Radio 1190, is a college radio station affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder. Staff of the station are compensated with funds provided by the University of Colorado Student Union while operating funds are raised during biannual on-air pledge drives. It is also run by volunteers from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. KVCU AM-1190, popularly known as Radio 1190 is a college radio station affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder. ... College radio (also known as university radio, campus radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college or university. ...


Boulder Freeride

Boulder Freeride is the ski and snowboard club at the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was started in 1933,[citation needed] and has thrived[citation needed] on the CU campus as a student run, nonprofit organization. It was designed to promote skiing and snowboarding at the University of Colorado, Boulder campus.[citation needed] Boulder Freeride is the largest student group on campus, as well as the largest collegiate ski and snowboard club in the nation.[citation needed] It has over 3,000 members, making it larger than the University of Colorado’s Greek system.[citation needed] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ... A snowboard with strap-in bindings A snowboard is a board ridden in snowboarding to descend a snow-covered slope. ... While the terms fraternity and sorority may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, including the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, International, and the Shriners, in the United States and Canada fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students - organizations...


Boulder Freeride is active year-round.[citation needed] Fall activities include a camping trip, BBQs, popular ski and snowboard movie premieres, and one of the year’s biggest events, Welcome Freeriders.[citation needed] This event is the club’s annual back to school gathering held on campus attended by CU students, and includes popular ski and snowboard vendors and magazines, as well as representative from the Colorado mountain resorts.[citation needed]


Boulder Freeride organizes a number of ski trips each year. Past trips have included a Thanksgiving trip to Steamboat Springs, CO, an annual trip to Aspen, CO to see the X Games, spring break trips to Innsbruck, Austria, Whistler, BC and Chamonix, France, and summer surf trips to South America.[citation needed] Steamboat Springs is a city located in Routt County, Colorado. ... Aspen, Colorado is now a Colorado ski resort and cultural center, named because of the abundance of aspen trees in the area. ... For the computer game series named X, see X (computer game series). ... Innsbruck City Center Innsbruck and Nordkette from south Innsbruck (population 120,000) is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the Tyrol province. ... Whistler is a resort community in the province of British Columbia, Canada. ... Panorama of Chamonix valley Chamonix-Mont-Blanc or, more commonly, Chamonix is a town and commune in eastern France, in the Haute-Savoie département, at the foot of Mont Blanc. ...


Program Council

Established in 1953,[citation needed] Program Council is a student run group that coordinates the concerts and movies that are played on campus throughout the year.[citation needed] Program Council mainly focuses on organizing concerts around campus. Over the years, this group has brought such acts as The Rolling Stones, Dave Matthews Band, Pearl Jam, REM, The Ramones, and many more to the University of Colorado.[citation needed] Concerts vary in size ranging from large scale concerts, to smaller local acts, some of which are free to attend.[citation needed] Besides concerts, Program Council also hosts a film series throughout the year which allows students to see soon-to-be-released movies as well as cult classics for free in one of the large lecture halls on campus.[citation needed] Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... This article is about the rock group. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ...


For more information, go to: About Program Council


For a list of events go to: www.programcouncil.com


The Herd

The Herd is one of the largest student alumni groups in the nation, with over 6,000 members.[citation needed] It was created to bring students together and get them involved in school activities.[citation needed] The Herd's main goal is increasing school spirit.[citation needed] Therefore, the Herd is an active participant in encouraging students to come to many of the school activities such as sports games and club meetings. The Herd also sponsors free bus rides to the ski slopes, discounts around Boulder, and pre-game parties.[citation needed] Twenty-five student leaders run the group; the group is open to currently enrolled students and all Herd activities are optional. For more information, visit www.cuherd.com [citation needed]


Residential Academic Programs (RAPs)

Name Location Focus
Baker RAP Baker Hall Natural Sciences
Business RAP (B³) Kittridge West Business
Chancellor's Leadership Program William's Village Leadership
Farrand RAP Farrand Hall Humanities and Cultural Studies
Hallett RAP Hallett Hall Diversity
Kittridge Honors Program (KHP) Buckingham Hall Honors
Libby RAP Libby Hall The Arts
Engineering RAP Quadrangle Community Engineering
Sewall RAP Sewall Hall Distinct Geography and Culture of the West
Smith Hall International Program (SHIP) Smith Hall Global Interdependance and International Understanding

One option for students (mainly freshman and sophomores) living on campus is to join a residential academic program. The RAPs allow students to take one or two classes with other students from their dorm. The dorm normally houses these classes. The programs also include educational activities that only members of the RAP can attend. There are a total of 10 RAPs on campus with over 1,800 students involved.[citation needed] Each program requires an additional annual fee.[citation needed] Some programs are mandatory for the residents of a particular dorm, while others are optional.[citation needed]



Residence Hall Association


Sports, clubs, and traditions

Folsom Field
Folsom Field
Main article: Colorado Buffaloes

Sports teams at the school are called Buffaloes. The varsity athletic teams participates in the NCAA’s Division I (FBS for football) as a member of the North Division of the Big 12 Conference. The school's live mascot is an American Bison named Ralphie. The official school colors are silver and gold, as opposed to the common belief of black and gold. Silver and gold were chosen to represent the state's mineral wealth, but the colors did not look good together on the uniforms, so black was substituted.[18] There are three official fight songs: "Glory Colorado," "Go Colorado," and "Fight CU." Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 144 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 184 pixels, file size: 123 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 144 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 184 pixels, file size: 123 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Mike Bohn at the 2005 Spring Practice game. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Ralphie IV on the sidelines at the 2005 Big 12 Conference football championship game Ralphie the buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. ...


In 1934, the University teams were officially nicknamed the "Buffaloes." Previous nicknames used by the press included the “Silver Helmets” and “Frontiersmen.” The final game of 1934, against the University of Denver, saw the first running of a buffalo in a Colorado football game. A buffalo calf was rented from a local ranch and ran along the sidelines. The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ...

The logo of CU athletics
The logo of CU athletics

CU's varsity teams have won national championships in skiing, men’s cross country, women’s cross country, and football. Conference championships have also been won in several sports. Several club sports, such as cycling and triathlon, have won national championships in addition to the varsity teams. Image File history File links University-of-Colorado-Boulder-sports-logo. ... Image File history File links University-of-Colorado-Boulder-sports-logo. ... The NCAA Skiing Championships are held annually to crown the National Collegiate Athletic Association mens and womens team skiing champions. ... NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... NCAA team Champions for Womens Cross Country Division One 1981 Virginia 1982 Virginia 1983 Oregon 1984 Wisconsin 1985 Wisconsin 1986 Texas 1987 Oregon 1988 Kentucky 1989 Villanova 1990 Villanova 1991 Villanova 1992 Villanova 1993 Villanova 1994 Villanova 1995 Providence 1996 Stanford 1997 Brigham Young 1998 Villanova 1999 Brigham Young... The Bear Bryant Trophy, the AP national championship trophy Division I-A football is the only NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion. ...


In football, CU enjoys major rivalries with the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Colorado State Rams in the "Rocky Mountain Showdown." The game is sometimes played at the neutral site Invesco Field at Mile High. Since the 1990s, Colorado and Nebraska have finished their respective seasons in a nationally televised confrontation on the Friday following Thanksgiving. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is a state-supported institution of higher learning located in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Often referred to as simply Nebraska or UNL, it is the flagship and largest campus of the University of Nebraska system. ... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... The Rocky Mountain Showdown is an annual American football college rivalry between the University of Colorado Buffaloes and the Colorado State University Rams. ... INVESCO Field at Mile High is a stadium in Denver, Colorado. ... For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ...


The CU ski team has won 16 National Championships at the Division I level. The sport is not sponsored by the Big 12 Conference, however. Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ...


CU also includes a spirit program. The spirit program consists of three teams: two Cheerleading squads, and the CU Express Dance Team. The Cheerleading Program consists of a competitive co-ed squad as well as a competitive all-girl squad. Both the Cheerleading squad and the Express Dance Team compete at NCA/NDA College Nationals. In 2007, the Cheerleading squad finished sixth at NCA Nationals in Daytona Beach, Florida. All squads support the home games of football, Women’s Basketball, Men’s Basketball and Women's Volleyball teams, along with other athletic and social events. Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Head coach Dan Hawkins 2nd year, 8–16 Home stadium Folsom Field Capacity 53,750 - Grass Conference Big 12 - North First year 1890 Athletic director Mike Bohn Website CUBuffs. ...


The costumed mascot Chip is also a part of the CU Spirit Program. Chip is a costumed buffalo that represents the University of Colorado at numerous athletic and social events.


CU also maintains one of the largest Club Sports departments in the U.S. It supports over 30 club teams with leading clubs such as crew, cycling, ultimate Frisbee, swimming/diving, men's lacrosse, softball, ice hockey, and Rugby union. For other uses, see Crew (disambiguation). ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... Ultimate Frisbee is a competitive non-contact team sport played with a Frisbee or similar flying disc most commonly weighing 175 g. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Boulder offers a variety of political student organizations which cover the full spectrum of politics. Among them are Amnesty International, which focuses on human rights worldwide, as well as the College Democrats and the College Republicans. The University of Colorado also offers many clubs promoting diversity and human rights, such as the Gay Straight Alliance. Students can also choose from a plethora of clubs and organizations centered on ethnicities and countries, as well as different religious groups.


See also

The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) is a research institute that is sponsored jointly by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) and the University of Colorado at Boulder. ... The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) is a research organization at the University of Colorado at Boulder. ... JILA, formerly known as the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, is one of the leading physical science research institutes in the United States. ... The National Science Digital Library (NSDL) intends to become the comprehensive source for science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. ... The National Snow and Ice Data Center, or NSIDC, is a United States information and referral center in support of polar and cryospheric research. ... The Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) was established at the University of Colorado at Boulder in the College of Engineering and Applied Science during the fall of 1985. ... The seal of the University of Colorado at Boulder The following is a list of encyclopedic people associated with the University of Colorado at Boulder. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ "2006 NACUBO Endowment Study". National Association of College and University Business Officers.
  2. ^ <http://www.cubuffs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=600&KEY=&ATCLID=28035 FAQ - CUBuffs.com -- Official Athletics Web Site of the University of Colorado
  3. ^ ^  University of Colorado Graphic Standards Manual (PDF)
  4. ^ http://www.colorado.edu/news/poy/wieman/
  5. ^ a b Laws of the Regents [1]
  6. ^ Ward Churchill, "Some People Push Back": On the Justice of Roosting Chickens, Kersplebedeb blog, February 10, 2005
  7. ^ Ward Churchill Statement, Daily Camera, February 1, 2005
  8. ^ a b c Regents dismiss Ward Churchill [2]
  9. ^ Wesson, Marianne; Clinton, Robert & Limón, José et al. (2006), Report of the Investigative Committee of the Standing Committee on Research Misconduct at the University of Colorado at Boulder concerning Allegations of Academic Misconduct against Professor Ward Churchill, University of Colorado at Boulder, <http://www.colorado.edu/news/reports/churchill/download/WardChurchillReport.pdf>
  10. ^ Ward Churchill The Research Misconduct Inquiry. colorado.edu. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  11. ^ Observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Atomic Vapor (html) (07/14/1995).
  12. ^ NIST/University of Colorado Scientists Create New Form of Matter: A Fermionic Condensate (HTML) (English). Office of News Services (2004-01-28). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  13. ^ New CU-Boulder Technology Expected To Help Rapidly Identify Avian Flu Strains (HTML) (English). Office of News Services (2006-11-13). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  14. ^ HGTV To Film Segment On CU Solar Decathlon Home (HTML) (English). Office of News Services (2006-07-07). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  15. ^ a b Fueling the Future (HTML) (English). CUBioDiesel.org (2004). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  16. ^ http://www.colorado.edu/StudentGroups/uchc/pictures/historical_photos/history_thumbs.html
  17. ^ http://www.colorado.edu/StudentGroups/uchc/slideShows.htm
  18. ^ FAQ - University of Colorado. Retrieved on 2006-08-02.
  • Davis, William E. (1965). Glory Colorado! A history of the University of Colorado, 1858-1963. Boulder, CO: Prutt Press, Inc.. LD1178 .D35. 

Coordinates: 40°0′24″N, 105°16′2″W Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Adams State College is a small state-supported liberal arts college in Alamosa, Colorado, USA, in Colorados San Luis Valley. ... Arapahoe Community College is located in Littleton, Colorado. ... Colorado Christian University (CCU) is an interdenominational evangelical Christian liberal arts university. ... The Colorado College is a private four-year, co-educational liberal arts college located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... The Colorado School of Mines is a public research university devoted to engineering and applied science located in the town of Golden, Colorado. ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... Colorado State University - Pueblo is a public institution of higher learning located in Pueblo, Colorado in the United States. ... Fort Lewis College is a small state-supported liberal arts college located in Durango, Colorado. ... Heritage College (also Heritage Institute in FL & VA) was established in Denver, Colorado in 1986. ... Iliff School of Theology is a graduate theological school of the United Methodist Church located in Denver, Colorado. ... Mesa State College is a public, co-educational, liberal-arts college centered in Grand Junction, Colorado. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Naropa University is a private, liberal arts university in Boulder, Colorado, which was founded in 1974 by Chögyam Trungpa. ... Nazarene Bible College is one of the ten Nazarene institutions of higher education in the United States. ... Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... Red Rocks Community College is a community college located in Lakewood, Colorado and Arvada, Colorado. ... The Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design (RMCAD) is in Lakewood, a suburb of Denver, Colorado, USA. The college was founded in 1963 by Philip J. Steele, an artist and teacher. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... The University of Colorado (CU) System consists of five campuses: University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Colorado Springs University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Fitzsimons campus of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, scheduled to open in 2007 in Aurora on... It has been suggested that Beth-El College of Nursing & Health Sciences be merged into this article or section. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ... University of Northern Colorado (Northern Colorado) is a baccalaureate (arts, sciences, humanities, business, human sciences, and education), graduate (primarily in the field of education), and research university located in Greeley, Colorado, USA. It has a 2006 enrollment of 13,775 students. ... Western State College of Colorado is a four-year public liberal arts college located in Gunnison, Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Boulder's elevation is 5,430 feet (1,655 meters) and is 35 miles (50 km) northwest of Denver.
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Boulder may also be part of the basis for the town of South Park in the animated show South Park, the creators of which (Trey Parker and Matt Stone) attended the University of Colorado at Boulder, which also makes appearances in South Park.
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