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Encyclopedia > University of York

University of York York University (French: Université York), located in Toronto, Ontario, is Canadas third-largest university and has produced several of the countrys top leaders in the fields of law, politics, business, space sciences, and fine arts. ...

Motto In limine sapientiae
On the threshold of wisdom
Established 1963
Type Public
Chancellor Greg Dyke
Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Cantor
Staff 3,082
Students 13,750 [1]
Undergraduates 9,555 [1]
Postgraduates 4,195 [1]
Location Heslington, York, UK
Campus Heslington and King's Manor
Affiliations 1994 Group
EUA
White Rose
WUN
N8 Group
Website http://www.york.ac.uk/

The University of York is a campus university in York, England. Over 30 departments and centres cover a wide range of subjects in the arts, social sciences, science and technology. A proportion of the university's teaching is divided along collegiate lines; some students also live in college accommodation. University of York shield This work is copyrighted. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Gregory Dyke (born 20 May 1947) is a journalist and broadcaster. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Brian Cantor has been the Vice-Chancellor of the University of York since 2002, and is acknowledged as a world authority on materials manufacturing. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Heslington is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south east of the centre of York. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... The White Rose University Consortium is a partnership between three universities in Yorkshire, England - Leeds, Sheffield, and York. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... The N8 Group comprises eight research-intensive universities in the north of England. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A campus university is a British term for a University situated on one site - with student accommodation, teaching and research facilities, and leisure activities all together. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


The landscaped campus, constructed in the mid-1960s, is on the outskirts of the medieval city, north and west of the village of Heslington. This campus is home to York Science Park and the National Science Learning Centre. The university occupies a number of historic buildings in the city centre, and also has permission to build a planned extension to the campus on arable land east of Heslington that was taken out of the green belt for the purpose. The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Heslington is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south east of the centre of York. ... // In 2001, the House of Lords Science & Technology Select Committee Report identified an urgent need for subject specific Continuing Professional Development for Science Teachers. ... In city planning, the Green Belt is a concept for controlling metropolitan growth introduced around London, England by minister of housing Duncan Sandys via a Government Circular. ...

Contents

History

Heslington Hall

One of a series of new British universities, the University of York was opened in 1963, admitting 200 students. At the time the university consisted of three buildings, principally the King's Manor (former residence of Thomas Wentworth, and one-time headquarters of the Council in the North) and Heslington Hall (former residence of Thomas Eynns, Secretary and Keeper of the Seal to the Council in the North). A year later, work began on the Heslington Campus (see below), which today forms the main part of the University. Heslington Hall in York. ... Heslington Hall in York. ... The University of Yorks Central Hall is an example of plate glass architectural design. ... The Kings Manor is a Grade I listed building in York, and is part of the University of York. ... Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford (April 13, 1593 - May 12, 1641) was an English statesman, a major figure in the period leading up to the English Civil War. ... Heslington Hall Heslington Hall is an English manor house located on the campus of the University of York, near the village of Heslington. ...


There were several earlier proposals for the development of a university in York. In 1903 F. J. Munby and others (including the Yorkshire Philosophical Society) proposed a "Victoria University of Yorkshire",[2] whilst the then College of Ripon and York St John also at one time considered purchasing Heslington Hall as part of a proposed new campus. York St John University (formerly known variously as York St John University College, College of Ripon and York St John, York St John College or Ripon and York St John College of the University of Leeds) is located in York, England. ... Heslington Hall Heslington Hall is an English manor house located on the campus of the University of York, near the village of Heslington. ...


Critical assessment

In newspaper league tables, York frequently ranks within the top ten universities in the UK, coming second in The Daily Telegraph university league table in 2001, and in 2003 The Sunday Times named it "University of the Year". In 2007 the Sunday Times ranked York 8th in its overall university league tables, but the Guardian's 2006 ranking and the Times's 2007 ratings both ranked York in 15th place. It is also frequently at the top of subject specific league tables. This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ...


York has an impressive reputation for research with 18 subjects out of 23 receiving a rating of 5 and three 5* ratings in the last Research Assessment Exercise. York is a founder member of the World Universities Network WUN which supports world-wide collaboration in teaching and research. In 2005 the University was awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for CNAP, the Centre for Novel Agricultural products which explores the potential from the biosphere to reduce the global economy's dependence on fossil reserves and fuel.[3] The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... The Queens Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education is a biennially awarded series of prizes awarded to Universities and Colleges in the further and higher education sectors within the United Kingdom. ...


There are around eight applications for every place and a very low dropout rate of 4% (only Oxbridge, Bristol, and UCL are lower).[4] Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ...


In 2007 York become the only University to have an academic department – Chemistry – win the Athena Swan Gold award for its commitment to the careers of women in science. The Department of Psychology has won a silver Athena Swan award, the first in the country to do so, Biology also has silver, and the University as a whole holds the Athena Swan bronze award.


Colleges

The university is based on eight colleges, which provide accommodation for students and some academic departments. In practice, the colleges fall somewhere between the halls of residence seen in other UK universities and the traditional Oxbridge colleges. By date of construction the colleges are: Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ...

(Derwith, a shared extension of Derwent and Langwith colleges, on the other side of University Road to both of its parents, was built in about 1988) Derwent College, York view from behind Derwent College toward Heslington Hall Derwent College is a college of the University of York, the very first to be opened following the universitys inception. ... The Derwent is a river in Yorkshire in the north of England. ... Langwith College, York Langwith College is a college of the University of York, home to the English and Educational Studies departments and the second college to be opened following the universitys foundation in 1963. ... Alcuin College is a college of the University of York. ... This article is about the scholar Alcuin of York. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Vanbrugh College is a college of the University of York, a UK university. ... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... Goodricke College is a college of the University of York, a British campus university founded in 1963. ... John Goodricke (September 17, 1764 – April 20, 1786) was an amateur astronomer. ... Wentworth College is a college of the University of York. ... Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford (April 13, 1593 - May 12, 1641) was an English statesman, a major figure in the period leading up to the English Civil War. ... James College, York James College is a college at the University of York in the United Kingdom. ... Eric John Francis James, Baron James of Rusholme April 13, 1909 - May 16, 1992 was created Baron James of Rusholme, of Fallowfield in the County Palatine of Lancashire, in 1959. ... Halifax College, York Halifax College is the largest and newest college of the University of York. ... Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, KG, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC (16 April 1881–23 December 1959), known as The Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and as The Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was a British Conservative politician. ...


There are also several off-campus residences, including Constantine House, Walmgate, and Fairfax House. No. ...


List of academic departments

  • Archaeology, located at the King's Manor, incorporates the former Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies.
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Economics and Related Studies, located in Alcuin College.
  • Educational Studies, located in Langwith College.
  • Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies located in the King's Manor
  • Centre for Health Economics
  • Centre for Housing Policy
  • Centre for Women's Studies
  • Electronics
  • English and Related Literature, located in Langwith College.
  • Environment
  • Health Sciences
  • History, located in Vanbrugh College.
  • History of Art, located in Vanbrugh College.
  • Law School, located in Sally Baldwin Buildings D Block
  • Language and Linguistic Science
  • The York Management School
  • Mathematics, located in Goodricke College.
  • The Hull York Medical School, opened in 2003, is shared between the Heslington campus and the University of Hull.
  • Centre for Medieval Studies located in the King's Manor
  • Music, containing one of the earliest electronic music studios built in the United Kingdom. It was also one of the first departments to include the teaching of ethnomusicology in its undergraduate courses, and has its own gamelan orchestra.
  • Philosophy, located in Derwent College.
  • Physics
  • Politics, located in Derwent College.
  • School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy, located in Derwent College.
  • Psychology
  • Social Policy and Social Work, located in the Seebohm Rowntree Building, Alcuin College.
  • Sociology, located in Wentworth College. Staff in the sociology department work actively on various topics, including conversation analysis and sociological theory. The department contains an important Science and Technology Studies Unit, based in the department at Wentworth College.
  • Theatre, Film and Television located in Genesis 6
  • The Centre for Novel Agricultural Products

The campus is also home to the National Science Learning Centre. Opened in March 2006 by Tony Blair, the Prime Minister, it serves as the hub for a £51 million national network of Centres dedicated to revitalising science teaching in schools. It is operated by the White Rose University Consortium (which comprises the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York) together with Sheffield Hallam University. The Hull York Medical School (HYMS) is a medical school in the United Kingdom which took its first intake of students in 2003. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Ethnomusicology (from the Greek ethnos = nation and mousike = music), formerly comparative musicology, is the study of music in its cultural context, cultural musicology. ... Gamelan - Indonesian Embassy in Canberra A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesian origin typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings, and vocalists may also be included. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... Conversation analysis (commonly abbreviated as CA) is the study of talk in interaction. ... Science and technology studies (STS) is the study of how social, political, and cultural values affect scientific research and technological innovation, and how these in turn affect society, politics, and culture. ... // In 2001, the House of Lords Science & Technology Select Committee Report identified an urgent need for subject specific Continuing Professional Development for Science Teachers. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The White Rose University Consortium is a partnership between three universities in Yorkshire, England - Leeds, Sheffield, and York. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) is a university in Sheffield, England. ...


Heslington campus

Central Hall
Central Hall

In 1964, work began on the campus facilities in the grounds of Heslington Hall. The marshy land was drained, forming the narrow, winding lake which dominates the campus, and extensively landscaped. The original buildings were designed by architect Andrew Derbyshire, and assembled using the CLASP system of prefabricated construction. Scattered around the lake, the buildings are connected by numerous covered walkways and bridges. Most of the university's arts departments inhabit the colleges, while many of the science departments have their own buildings. The Central Hall at the University of York. ... The Central Hall at the University of York. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


A major landmark building is Central Hall, a daringly-designed half-octagonal concert hall whose appearance is frequently likened to that of a spaceship. As well as University convocations and examinations, it is used as a venue for theatrical and musical performances, and has played host to George Melly, Jimi Hendrix, Soft Machine, Pink Floyd, and Paul McCartney. Performances by big-name acts have been rarer at the university following a 1985 Boomtown Rats concert, during which the cover of the Central Hall orchestra pit was damaged.[5][6] A ban on pop performances, and in particular dancing, in Central Hall was imposed by the University, although it has occasionally been waived. Central Hall is still used for classical concerts. Public concerts are regularly held in the music department's Sir Jack Lyons Concert Hall, the Rymer Auditorium and in some of the colleges. George Melly (born: 17 August 1926 in Liverpool, England) is a British jazz and blues singer. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... The Boomtown Rats The Boomtown Rats (1975-1985) were a punk rock/new wave group headed by Bob Geldof, who was later known for organizing charity rock concerts such as Band Aid (intended to help famine victims in Ethiopia), Live Aid, Live 8, and Hands Across America (intended to help... An orchestra pit is the usually lowered area (hence pit) in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers. ... Isidore Jack Lyons (born 1916) is a retired British financier and philanthropist. ...


The campus lake has attracted a large population of wild and semi-wild waterfowl. These include Greylag, Canada, Barnacle and Snow geese, cootes, moorhens and large numbers of ducks, including mallards, Tufted Duck, and Pochards. There is also a growing population of Black Swans and a few Great Crested Grebes. The southern end of the lake has been established as a bird sanctuary. Fishing is permitted in season, on purchase of a licence. Falcated Duck at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands centre, Gloucestershire, England Wildfowl or waterfowl, also waterbirds, is the collective term for the approximately 147 species of swans, geese and ducks, classified in the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies Western Greylag Goose Eastern Greylag Goose Domesticated goose The Greylag Goose, Anser anser, is a bird with a wide range in the Old World. ... Binomial name Branta leucopsis (Bechstein, 1803) The Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis) belongs to the genus Branta of black geese, which contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. ... Binomial name Anser caerulescens (Linnaeus, 1758) The Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) is a North American species of goose. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Oxyurinae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. ... Binomial name Aythya fuligula (Linnaeus, 1758) The Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) is a medium-sized diving duck with a population close to one million birds. ... Binomial name Aythya ferina (Linnaeus, 1758) The Pochard (Aythya ferina) is a medium-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Cygnus atratus Latham, 1790 Subspecies Black Swan New Zealand Swan (extinct) Synonyms Anas atrata Latham, 1790 Chenopis atratus The Black Swan, Cygnus atratus is a large non-migratory waterbird which breeds mainly in the southeast and southwest of Australia. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Great Crested Grebe, Podiceps cristatus is a member of the grebe family of water birds. ...


The Heslington campus has both indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including an all weather pitch and County standard cricket pitch. A large, tent-like structure allows for indoor sport, gymnastics and dance.

A view of the J. B. Morrell Library, the University's main academic library, north-west from near Langwith College at the Heslington campus

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 131 pixelsFull resolution (9659 × 1577 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 131 pixelsFull resolution (9659 × 1577 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

King's Manor

Main article: King's Manor

Located in the centre of the city of York, around three miles from the main Heslington campus, The King's Manor is home to the Archaeology, Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies departments and is regularly used by other similar departments such as History. It has a public restaurant and is used for art displays. The Kings Manor is a Grade I listed building in York, and is part of the University of York. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John...


Student activities

The university has an unusually high number of active student societies. University Radio York (URY), the student radio station, is the oldest independent radio station in the United Kingdom, and winner of the Student Radio Awards Best Station Award 2006. Nouse, the oldest student newspaper on Campus, was established in 1964 and was 2005 NUS/Mirror Student paper of the year; its rival newspaper, Vision, was named Guardian Student Newspaper of the Year for three consecutive years between 2002 and 2004 - the only time this has occurred in the 27-year history of the prestigious awards. It also won Best Small Budget Publication at the 2006 NUS/Mirror National Student Media Awards. There also exists student television station YSTV, England's first student TV station (celebrated 40 years in 2007) and one-time holder of the world record for longest continuous television broadcast under a single director. A student society or student organization is an organization, operated by students at a university, whose membership normally consists only of students. ... URY redirects here; for other meanings, see URY (disambiguation). ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... Nouse is a student newspaper at the University of York, the primary competitor to and rival of Vision. ... Vision (also known as yorkVision and formerly York Student Vision) is one of two student newspapers at the University of York. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ... York Student Television (YSTV) is the University of Yorks very own student television station. ...


The University of York Music Society is one of the largest societies on campus with over 400 members. The Music Society, in collaboration with DramaSoc (below), elect and put on an annual musical in Central Hall with the Central Hall Musical Society (CHMS) - normally attracting over 1,800 students over a three night production. 2005 proved to be a fantastic year for CHMS with three sold out nights of 'Fame - The Musical' and gaining Royal recognition by HRH Prince William and HRH the Duke of York - the first York society to gain such an accolade. The Music Society also was the first student run society in the UK to offer monetary aid to those wishing to further their musical abilities by offering students Music Society Bursaries.


The University of York DramaSoc is one of the university's largest societies, and stages a play every week of term in the Drama Barn, as well as organising other projects such as open drama nights, and the annual 24 hour musical. Another of the University's dramatic societies is the Gilbert and Sullivan Society who put on a fully staged production every spring. In addition, they also put on a non-Gilbert and Sullivan show every summer, and give concerts and performances in the York area. Pantsoc put on a student pantomime every January. W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ...


In recent years a new and vibrant urban music and performance society, FUSION, has gained popularity. This society was created to promote the ever growing urban music scene and to raise thousands of pounds for charity. A year's worth of fund-raising activities culminate in an annual show of physical and aesthetic creativity. Local and national shops provide the fashion, as do many student designers, while the university's Dance, Capoeira, sports, African-Caribbean and Pole Exercise societies among many others come together to create the ultimate fusion.


The York Union Society is the University of York's active and successful debating union, which competes in intervarsity tournaments against other universities, as well as teaching debating and speaking skills. The York union has also brought several important speakers to campus to argue their case on a range of issues. York Union is the debating society of the University of York. ...


Formerly known as The Cinematography Society, University of York Filmmaking Society is a student run film-making group. Since 1999 its members have made two features and many shorts, some of which have gone on to national film festivals. Commercial films are shown most nights of term weeks too.


Free membership of a 'hacking' society is available to all students of the Computer Science departmental, named "HackSoc", founded in 2004 as a way of providing students with access to a group of machines purchased by the department and put in an isolated environment known as the Playpen. Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ...


Despite lacking a central students' union social facility, York students enjoy a varied nightlife, particularly in the College bars on the Heslington campus. The city has numerous nightclubs and pubs, with Hull Road in particular developing into a student area, also due to the students of York St John University which is also in York. Studentification is a neologism, coined to describe the effects that a large student population can have on an area. ... York St John University (formerly known variously as York St John University College, College of Ripon and York St John, York St John College or Ripon and York St John College of the University of Leeds) is located in York, England. ...


Every summer term the students take part in the Roses Tournament, a sports competition against Lancaster University. The venue of the event alternates each year between York and Lancaster. In Spring 2005, a similar White Rose Varsity Tournament was held, between University of York and York St John College (now York St John University). The Roses 2006 logo The Roses Tournament is an annual sports competition between Lancaster University and the University of York in England. ... Lancaster University (officially the University of Lancaster) is a collegiate campus university in Lancaster, England. ... Taking its name from the 15th Century Wars of the Roses where York were represented by the white rose the White Rose Varsity Tournament is a sports competition between the two York-based universities in the UK; University of York and York St John College. ...


Each College has its own JCRC or students' association which provide a variety of services, including College events, student welfare, volunteering, charity work, recycling, College merchandise, College sports and representation to the College and University. They also organise the Freshers' Fortnight activities in their College. The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... A Students Association is a grouping of students through a common cause or identity typically found at universities and colleges. ...


The university student government organisation is called York University Students' Union (YUSU), the membership of which is currently the entire student population. Posts in YUSU are elected by the students yearly. A students union, student government, student leadership, student council, or students association is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ... This article is on the University of York Students Union in England. ...


The university also hosts a detachment of Leeds University Officers' Training Corps (UOTC).


Future expansion

Over the next decade, the University plans to increase student numbers by around 5,000, and to introduce a number of new subjects. The Departments of Law and of Theatre, Film and Television studies are already recruiting students. Pharmacy and Dentistry are planned. These intentions are based upon calculations of expansion of University numbers nationally and a re-targeting of the University's assets. For most of its history, the core strengths of the University were regarded as the technology departments - Physics, Computer Science and Electronics - and the traditional liberal arts - History and English. Successes in cancer research lead to a re-structuring of the Chemistry and Biology departments to bring them closer together, the founding of a Health Sciences department, the establishment of courses in Nursing and Midwifery, and the creation of the Hull York Medical School or HYMS. This entry into medical and health care training has led to a change in the University's priorities. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... A Dentist and Dental Assistant perform surgery on a patient. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... The Hull York Medical School (HYMS) is a medical school in the United Kingdom which took its first intake of students in 2003. ...


On the arts side, the University is building upon its reputation for fostering interdisciplinary studies. The Centre for Medieval Studies has been regarded as at the forefront of combining history, art history, archaeology, literary studies, architectural studies and drama to give a more rounded view of historical events and culture. This model has been successfully replicated with the establishment of the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies. The opening of the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies was in 2007, admitting the first postgraduate students in 2008. At the same time, the Department of English and Related Literature intends to expand upon its literary studies by placing more emphasis on creative writing and performance linked to the new Department for Theatre, Film and Television. The Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies is an independent research institute at the University of Toronto, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


For a number of years, the University's expansion plans have been limited by planning restrictions on the Heslington West campus. The City of York planning conditions stipulate that only 20% of the land may be built upon, to retain its character.


In the academic year 2003/04, draft plans were finalised for a new part of the campus, called Heslington East. The proposal is for a 70 hectare extension to the campus designed to mirror the existing Heslington campus, to be built on land situated between Grimston Bar park and ride car park and Heslington village. This land is currently used for arable farming. Designs have yet to be finalised for the site and for the new buildings, but the current proposal includes landscaping the area, constructing an artificial lake and planting light woodland. Several departments are being considered for new, purpose-built facilities on the extension, including Computer Science and Law, and the University's Chancellor Greg Dyke has funded a professorship in the new Department of Theatre, Film and Television. Heslington East will be connected to the existing site by a network of pathways and light transport links. The University hopes to begin construction in 2008, with the first buildings coming into use the following year. A lengthy consultation and planning exercise took place, with a public inquiry into the proposals being held[7] in 2006. The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government gave the go-ahead in May 2007.[8] a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... In geography, arable land is a form of agricultural land use, meaning land that can be (and is) used for growing crops. ... A reservoir (French: réservoir) is an artificial lake created by flooding land behind a dam. ... Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Gregory Dyke (born 20 May 1947) is a journalist and broadcaster. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... In the politics and government of Commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom, a public inquiry is an official review of events or actions ordered by the government. ... The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, formerly Minister of State for Communities and Local Government, is a Cabinet position currently within the UKs Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, formerly headed by John Prescott. ...


Notable alumni

Professor Haleh Afshar is a lecturer in Politics and Womens Studies at the University of York and Visiting Professor of Islamic Law at the Faculte Internationale de Droit Compare. ... Daron Acemoglu (Turkish: Daron Acemoğlu), born on September 3, 1967 in Istanbul, Turkey is an Turkish-American economist. ... The biennial John Bates Clark Medal is awarded by the American Economic Association to that American economist under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. Named after the American Neoclassical economist John Bates Clark (1847-1938), it is considered... Dr Kerry Andrew (5 April 1978–) is an accomplished musical composer, performer, writer and educator, based in London. ... Juice are a British a cappella voice trio, specialising in vocals with an experimental edge. ... Rollo Armstrong (born in London) is a part of the music producers/remixers team Rollo and Sister Bliss and older brother to Dido, whom he helped to write and produce the multi-million selling albums No Angel and Life For Rent. ... Rhodes University is a university in South Africa. ... Anthony Louis Banks, Baron Stratford (8 April 1943 – 8 January 2006), usually known as Tony Banks, was a British politician and Labour Party MP and member of the House of Lords. ... Hugh Bayley (born January 9, 1952 in Oxford) is a British politician. ... Beresford at the Red Rose club, London, 1990 Steve Beresford (born 1950) is a British musician. ... Professor Alan Burns (currently beardless) Professor Alan Burns is currently the head of the University of York Computer Science Department. ... Tanya Byron MSc PsychD is a British psychologist who became a celebrity in 2004/5 as the resident expert on parenting shows Little Angels and the House of Tiny Tearaways (these programmes are amongst several that have kickstarted the currently popular genre of parenting programmes in the UK). ... Alex Callinicos Alex Callinicos (born 1950 in South Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)) is a Marxist intellectual (a contradiction in terms) and a member of the Central Committee of the Socialist Workers Party. ... James Callis. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ... Aníbal António Cavaco Silva (pron. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... Jung Chang (Traditional Chinese: 張戎, Simplified Chinese: 张戎, Wade-Giles: Chang Jung, Pinyin: Zhāng Róng; born March 25, 1952) is a Chinese-born British writer, best known for her family autobiography Wild Swans, selling over 10 million copies worldwide, but banned in mainland China. ... Dave Cheeseman is a prolific British underground session musician, currently most well known for his work with Sack Trick and Pillow Talk. ... Myrna May Combellack,[1] academic researcher and writer of the Institute of Cornish Studies (in the Charles Thomas era), translator of Beunans Meriasek[2] and author of several works of fiction. ... Richard Coyle is a British actor. ... Michael Dobbs (born 1948) was a British politician and is author of books and TV, mainly political fiction. ... Jonathan Dollimore (b. ... Denise ODonoghue (born April 13, 1955 in Wembley) is cofounder, with Jimmy Mulville, of the independent British TV production company Hat Trick Productions. ... Helen Dunmore (born December 12, 1952) is a British poet, novelist and childrens writer. ... Gregory Dyke (born 20 May 1947) is a journalist and broadcaster. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Paul Alexander Cyril Goodman (born 17 November 1959, London) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... THe name Linda Grant may refer to one of the following people: Linda Grant (journalist) Linda Grant (mystery writer) This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Christine Hamilton (born November 10, 1949) is an English television personality and author, and the wife of former MP Neil Hamilton. ... Fabian Uziell-Hamilton known as Fabian Hamilton (born 12 April 1955, London) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Harriet Ruth Harman QC, MP (born July 30, 1950, London) is a British Solicitor and Labour politician. ... Dr. Adam John Hart-Davis (born July 4, 1943) is a British author, photographer, and broadcaster, well-known in the UK for presenting the television series Local Heroes and What the Romans Did for Us, the latter spawning several spin-off series involving the Victorians, the Tudors, and the Stuarts. ... Peter Hitchens Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Patrick Holford is a controversial British nutritionist, author, and the founder and director of the Institute of Optimum Nutrition in London. ... Anthony Horowitz (born 5 April 1955) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Oona Tamsyn King (born October 22, 1967, in Sheffield) is a British politician. ... Panayiotis Kokoras, Rethymno, Crete 2004 Panayiotis Kokoras (born 1974) is a Greek composer, musician and teacher in music. ... Mark F Laity (born 1953, Truro, Cornwall) is a NATO spokesman and former BBC correspondent. ... Carol Leader (b. ... Play School was a long-running British series. ... Victor Lewis-Smith is a British satirist, producer, critic and prankster. ... Tim Liardet (born in London) is a poet and critic. ... Peter Lord (born 1953) is co-founder of Aardman Animations, a British animation firm best known for claymation films including those involving the characters Wallace and Gromit, and the 2000 film Chicken Run. ... Gordon McPherson was born in Dundee in 1965. ... Dominic Muldowney (born 1952 in Southampton) is a British composer. ... Gregory Thomas Mulholland (born 31 August 1970) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and is Member of Parliament for Leeds North West. ... Margaret Patricia Munn (born 24 August 1959, Sheffield), is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Albert Owen (born 10 August 1959) is a Welsh politician, and member of Parliament for Ynys Mon for the Labour Party. ... Alvin Pang (Chinese: 冯启明; born 1972, Singapore) was named 2005 Young Artist of the Year (Literature) by the National Arts Council Singapore. ... Lance Parkin is a British author, best known for writing fiction and reference books for television series, in particular Doctor Who (and spin-offs including the Virgin New Adventures and Faction Paradox) and Emmerdale. ... Peter Robinson (born 1953) is a British poet born in Salford, Lancashire. ... Justina Robson is a science fiction author from Leeds, England. ... Verity Sharp is a Radio Three presenter and co-presenter of the Late Junction programme. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is the most popular station in the UK. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in Western House, adjacent to Broadcasting House in central London. ... Jonathan Stroud Jonathan Anthony Stroud (27 October 1970, Bedford, England) is an author of fantasy books, mainly for children and youths. ... Graham Colin Swift (born May 4, 1949) is a well-known British author. ... Jamie Turner (born August 12, 1962) is a former Australian rules footballer who played in the Australian Football League. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... Simon Webb is a composer, musical director, conductor, arranger and performer. ... Trevor Wishart (b Leeds, 11 Oct 1946) is an English composer based in York and is widely acknowledged for his contributions in the domain of composing with digital audio media, both fixed and interactive. ... John Witherow is the editor of the Sunday Times newspaper. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... William Anthony Worthington (born 11 October 1941) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Colville Norbert Young (born 1932) is the Governor-General of Belize, and also patron of the Scout Association of Belize. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ The history of the Society. The Yorkshire Philosophical Society. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  3. ^ The Queen's Anniversary Prizes for Higher and Further Education, Prizewinners 2005. The Royal Anniversary Trust. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  4. ^ The Sunday Times University Guide 2005, University of York. The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  5. ^ Boomtown Rats play Central Hall. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  6. ^ The 1980s. University of York Communications Office. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  7. ^ University of York Heslington East planning application. City of York Council. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  8. ^ York can build new £500m campus. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-05-30.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • yusu.org University of York Students' Union
  • University of York website
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  • URY University Radio York

Coordinates: 53.9456° N 1.0579° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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