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Encyclopedia > University of Wisconsin
The University of Wisconsin–Madison

Motto: Numen Lumen
The divine within the universe, however manifested, is my light or God, our light.
Established 1848
Type: Public
State University
Endowment: US $1.425 billion [1]
Chancellor: John D. Wiley
Faculty: 2,053
Students: 41,466
Undergraduates: 28,462
Postgraduates: 13,004
Location Madison, WI, USA
Campus: Urban
933 acres (3.77 km²)
Sports: Wisconsin Badgers
Colors: Cardinal & White            
Mascot: Bucky Badger
Website: wisc.edu

The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Founded in 1848, it is the largest university in the state with a total enrollment of over 41,000 students, of whom approximately 29,000 are undergraduates.[1] University of Wisconsin may refer to: The University of Wisconsin System, the public state university system of Wisconsin, and its components: Research Universities granting doctorates: University of Wisconsin-Madison, the largest and oldest university in this system, which is abbreviated UW and known as the flagship campus of the system... Small Seal of the University of Wisconsin-Madison This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A state university system in the United States is a group of universities supported by an individual state or a similar entity such as the District of Columbia. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... John D. Wiley is the current chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Uw_madison_logo. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ...


A public, land-grant institution, UW-Madison offers a wide spectrum of liberal arts studies, professional programs, and student activities. The school is frequently called a "public Ivy," and in 2007 US News and World Report ranked UW as the eighth best public university in the United States.[2] It has also been ranked as the 16th best university in 2006 in terms of volume scientific publications according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities.[2] UW-Madison ranked second in a list of top national research universities for the 2006 fiscal year, generating more than $900 million in research, according to statistics by the National Science Foundation. Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...


From 1848 to 1956, the university was part of the higher education system in Wisconsin that included the current Madison campus, ten freshman-sophomore centers and the state-wide extensions.[3] Between 1956–1971, it was part of the then University of Wisconsin. It became a part of the University of Wisconsin System in 1971. Welcome sign for UW-Fond du Lac The University of Wisconsin Colleges is a member of the University of Wisconsin System composed of 13 local campuses and an online program. ... The University of Wisconsin-Extension, UW-Extension, is the outreach arm of the University of Wisconsin System. ... The University of Wisconsin was an organization of higher education in the state of Wisconsin that existed from 1956 until 1971. ... The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ...


Wisconsin's NCAA Division I athletic teams are called the Badgers. They compete in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except ice hockey, where they participate in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Wisconsin's football team won the Rose Bowl in 1994, 1999, and 2000. Its men's basketball team won the NCAA National Championship in 1941, and made it to the Final Four in 2000. Both the men's and women's hockey teams won the national championship in 2006. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... Head coach Bret Bielema 2nd year, 20–4 Home stadium Camp Randall Stadium Capacity 80,321 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Barry Alvarez Website UWBadgers. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The Wisconsin Badgers mens basketball team is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. ... // Final four redirects here. ... // Final four redirects here. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ...

History

The university had its official beginnings when Wisconsin was incorporated as a state in 1848. Article X, Section B of the Wisconsin Constitution provided for "the establishment of a state university, at or near the seat of state government..." On July 26, 1848, Nelson Dewey, Wisconsin's first governor, signed the act that formally created the University of Wisconsin. The board of regents held their initial meeting in the library room of the Capitol on October 7, and provided John W. Sterling a $500 per-annum salary to become the university's first professor (mathematics). The first class of 17 students met at Madison Female Academy on February 5, 1849. Regents continued to discuss the construction of the university and soon a campus site was selected. It was an area of 50 acres (200,000 m²) "bounded north by Fourth lake, east by a street to be opened at right angles with King (later State) street, south by Mineral Point Road (University Avenue), and west by a carriage-way from said road to the lake." Building plans called for a "main edifice fronting towards the Capitol, three stories high, surmounted by an observatory for astronomical observations." This building, University Hall, now known as Bascom Hall, was finally completed in 1859. A fire later destroyed the building's dome, which was never replaced. North Hall, constructed in 1851, was actually the campus' first building. Finally, in 1854, Levi Booth and Charles T. Wakeley became the first graduates of the university. Academics continued to improve at Wisconsin, and in 1892 the university awarded its first Ph.D. to future university president Charles R. Van Hise. This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of Wisconsin Wikisource has original text related to this article: Rejected Constitution of the State of Wisconsin The Wisconsin Constitution is the governing document of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nelson Dewey (December 13, 1813 - July 21, 1889) was a member of the Democratic Party, and the First Governor of Wisconsin from 1848 - 1852. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A Board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ... The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the state Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USD redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... Madison Female Academy was a school for girls which flourished in the 19th century in Madison, Wisconsin and is now mainly famous as the site of the first classes held by the University of Wisconsin. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... Bascom Hall, at the top of Bascom Hill Bascom Hill is the main quad that forms the symbolic core of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Charles Richard Van Hise (May 29, 1857 – November 19, 1918) was an academic and president of the University of Madison from 1903 to 1918. ...


The Wisconsin Idea

Students, faculty and staff are motivated by a tradition known as the Wisconsin Idea, first started by UW President Charles Van Hise in 1904, when he declared that he would "never be content until the beneficent influence of the university [is] available to every home in the state."[4] The Wisconsin Idea holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that the research conducted at UW should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment, and agriculture for all citizens of the state. The Wisconsin Idea permeates the university’s work and helps forge close working relationships among university faculty and students, and the state’s industries and government.[5] Together with Wisconsin's populist history, the Wisconsin Idea has evolved to this day to describe "The Wisconsin Experience:" that the work of the faculty, staff, and students aims to solve real-world problems, and that these solutions benefit from working together across disciplines and demographics. A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment... Charles Richard Van Hise, University of Wisconsin president, 1903-1918 Charles Van Hise has the distinctions of receiving the first PhD degree granted by the University of Wisconsin (1892, geology), being the first UW alumnus to head the university, and being the longest serving leader of the university. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Student activism

Sign near Sterling Hall
Bascom Hill, 1968, with crosses placed by students protesting the Vietnam War, and sign reading, "BASCOM MEMORIAL CEMETERY, CLASS OF 1968"
"Sifting and winnowing" plaque on Bascom Hall

In the years 1966 through 1970, UW was shaken by a series of student protests, and by the use of force by authorities in response. The first major demonstrations protested the presence on campus of recruiters for the Dow Chemical Company, which supplied the napalm used in the Vietnam War. Authorities used force to quell the disturbance. The struggle was documented in the PBS documentary Two Days in October, as well as the book, They Marched Into Sunlight. Among the students injured in the protest was future Madison mayor Paul Soglin. Site of Sterling Hall bombing, University of Wisconsin Copyright ©2002 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... Site of Sterling Hall bombing, University of Wisconsin Copyright ©2002 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... Bascom Hall and Bascom Hill, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1968, show student protest (sign says BASCOM MEMORIAL CEMETARY CLASS OF 1968). Photographed 1968 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... Bascom Hall and Bascom Hill, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1968, show student protest (sign says BASCOM MEMORIAL CEMETARY CLASS OF 1968). Photographed 1968 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... University of Wisconsin Sifting and Winnowing plaque Located on Bascom Hall, University of WIsconsin Photographed July, 2002 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... University of Wisconsin Sifting and Winnowing plaque Located on Bascom Hall, University of WIsconsin Photographed July, 2002 by Daniel P. B. Smith. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... Recruitment refers to the process of finding possible candidates for a job or function, usually undertaken by recruiters. ... The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) is a multinational corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan, USA. In terms of market capitalization, it is the second-largest chemical company in the world, smaller than only DuPont. ... A simulated Napalm explosion during MCAS Air Show in 2003. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Paul Soglin (born April 22, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois) is a politician and activist based in Madison, Wisconsin. ...


Another target of protest was the Army Mathematics Research Center (AMRC), clearly identified and centrally located on campus in the Sterling Hall physics building. Director J. Barkley Rosser, an eminent logician, publicly minimized any practical role and implied that AMRC pursued only pure mathematics. But the student newspaper, The Daily Cardinal, obtained quarterly reports that AMRC submitted to the Army. The Cardinal published a series of investigative articles making a convincing case that AMRC was pursuing research that was directly pursuant to specific US Department of Defense requests, and relevant to counterinsurgency operations in Vietnam. AMRC became a magnet for demonstrations, in which protesters chanted "U.S. out of Vietnam! Smash Army Math!" John Barkley Rosser Sr. ... Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... The Daily Cardinal is the fifth oldest student newspaper in the United States, located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ...


On August 24, 1970, near 3:40 AM, a van filled with ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixture was detonated next to Sterling Hall. Despite the late hour, a post-doc was in the lab; that man, physics researcher Robert Fassnacht, was killed in the explosion. The physics department was hit worse than the intended target, the AMRC. Karleton Armstrong, Dwight Armstrong, and David Fine were responsible for the blast. Leo Burt was a suspect but was never apprehended or tried. is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A postdoctoral (colloquially, post-doc) appointment is a usually temporary academic job held by a person who has completed his or her doctoral studies. ... Robert Fassnacht was a Physics teacher who on August 24 1970 was killed by a bomb on the University of Madison campus near Sterling Hall as a protest event for the Veitnam War. ... Once home to the physics department at UW-Madison, it also housed the Army Mathematics Research Center which made it the target of student protests. ... Leo Frederick Burt (born April 18, 1948) was an anti-Vietnam war bomber who was alleged involved in the Sterling Hall bombing in 1970. ...


Timeline of notable events

Other notable historical moments in Wisconsin's first century include:

  • On April 4, 1892, the campus's first student-run newspaper began publishing The Daily Cardinal.
  • In 1894, the state Board of Regents rejected an effort to purge Professor Richard T. Ely for supporting striking printers, issuing the famous "sifting and winnowing" manifesto in defense of academic freedom, later described as "part of Wisconsin's Magna Carta". [3]
  • 1898 saw UW music instructor Henry Dyke Sleeper write Varsity, the university’s traditional alma mater song.
  • In 1904-1905, the UW Graduate School was established. The "Wisconsin Idea" becomes a living doctrine. Voiced by President Charles Van Hise, the idea sought to make "the beneficent influence of the University available to every home in the State."
  • The Wisconsin Union was founded in 1907, fourth among U.S. universities after Pennsylvania's Houston Hall (1896), Dartmouth's College Club (1901), and Harvard's Union (1901).
  • William Purdy and Paul Beck wrote On, Wisconsin in 1909, which became the fight song for UW athletic teams.
  • The Single-grain experiment ran from 1907 to 1911 run by Stephen Moulton Babcock and Edwin B. Hart. This experiment would pave the way for modern nutrition as a science.
  • In 1925, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation was chartered to control patenting and patent income on UW inventions.
  • The UW Arboretum dedicated itself to restoring lost landscapes, such as prairies, in 1934.
  • 1966 through 1970, UW-Madison was shaken by a series of student protests, and by the use of force by authorities in response. The first major demonstrations protested the presence on campus of recruiters for the Dow Chemical Company, which supplied the napalm used in the Vietnam War.
  • 1969 The Badger Herald was founded, debuting as a conservative voice on campus. Born to cover and combat the turmoil of the Vietnam protests, the Herald maintains its maverick spirit, though to some extent it has shed the “conservative” reputation. The University of Wisconsin is to this day the only major American university with two daily student newspapers.
  • 1970 In one of the first major acts of modern domestic terrorism, a bomb was set to explode outside the Sterling Hall physics building, killing post-doctoral researcher Robert Fassnacht (see Sterling Hall bombing)
  • 1988 The Onion was founded by two UW juniors, Tim Keck and Christopher Johnson; they would sell it to colleagues the next year.
  • December 10, 1993, the popular computer game, Doom, was uploaded to the University's servers. The initial popularity of the game caused the servers to crash, due to the number of simultaneous downloads.

is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Daily Cardinal is the fifth oldest student newspaper in the United States, located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Theodore Ely, Ph. ... Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Wisconsin Union is a membership organization at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... On, Wisconsin! is the official state song of Wisconsin as well as the fight song of the University of Wisconsin-Madison athletic teams. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The single-grain experiment was an experiment that carried out at the University of Wisconsin from May 1907 to 1911 that would lead to the development of modern nutrition. ... Stephen Moulton Babcock (1843–1931) was a U.S. agricultural chemist. ... Edwin B. Hart (1874-1953) was an American biochemist. ... The Nutrition Facts table indicates the amounts of nutrients which experts recommend you limit or consume in adequate amounts. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... WARF company logo The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is the nonprofit technology transfer office of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum (1260 acres) is an arboretum operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and located at 1207 Seminole Highway, Madison, Wisconsin. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) is a multinational corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan, USA. In terms of market capitalization, it is the second-largest chemical company in the world, smaller than only DuPont. ... A simulated Napalm explosion during MCAS Air Show in 2003. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Badger Herald is one of the nations first and most successful independent daily student newspapers. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Fassnacht was a Physics teacher who on August 24 1970 was killed by a bomb on the University of Madison campus near Sterling Hall as a protest event for the Veitnam War. ... The Sterling Hall Bombing was a crime on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus on August 24, 1970 committed as a protest against the Universitys research connections with US military during the Vietnam War. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ...

Academics

The University of Wisconsin–Madison, the flagship campus of the University of Wisconsin System, is divided into twenty associated colleges and schools. In addition to traditional undergraduate and graduate divisions in business, engineering, education, agriculture, and letters and sciences, the university also maintains professional schools in law, medicine, veterinary medicine, environmental studies, public affairs, journalism, library science and pharmacy. The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Environmental studies is the systematic study of human interaction with their environment. ... Public affairs is a catch-all term that includes public policy as well as public administration, both of which are closely related to and draw upon the fields of political science as well as economics. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ...


The largest university college, the College of Letters and Science, enrolls approximately half of the undergraduate student body and is made up of thirty-nine departments and five professional schools[6] that instruct students and carry out research in a wide variety of fields such as biology, astronomy, history, geography, linguistics, and economics. For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ...


Rankings

Wisconsin has been one of the leading public universities in the United States since the beginning of the Twentieth Century and ranks as one of the great research universities of the world.[7] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ...


According to the National Research Council there are over 70 programs at UW ranked in the top 10 nationally. In the Academic Ranking of World Universities, published by the Institute of Higher Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University,[8] the University of Wisconsin-Madison is ranked 16th best university in the world. In the Gourman report on undergraduate programs, the University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked the third-best public university, after the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Michigan. Additionally, it was ranked the seventh-best university in the United States for overall strength of the undergraduate programs. In a 2004 study by Bloomberg Market News, researchers found that UW-Madison tied Harvard for producing the most CEOs at Standard & Poor’s 500 companies.[9] UW-Madison is second only to Harvard in the number of alumni receiving doctorates, and leads the nation by numbers of alumni in the Peace Corps.[10] The University is one of 60 elected members of the Association of American Universities. The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ...


In U.S. News & World Report's ranking of national universities in 2007, Wisconsin ranked 38th.[11] Among U.S. universities, UW-Madison is frequently listed as one of the "public Ivies"—publicly-funded universities providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League.[12] In addition to being a top-ranked school in education, geography, history, journalism, and sociology, the university was recently ranked the second-best college at which to earn an education degree, and the overall seventh-best public university in the United States. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Wren Building (College of William and Mary) Alumni Hall (Miami U) Sather Gate (UC Berkeley) Central Campus Diag (U of Michigan) Old Well (UNC-Chapel Hill) UT Tower (U of Texas) Williams Hall (U of Vermont) The Rotunda (U of Virginia) Public Ivy is a colloquialism for a state-funded... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous...


Washington Monthly's 2006 college rankings placed Wisconsin eleventh, based not only on academic measures, but also student research, public service and social mobility.[13]


Research

Since its founding as a land-grant university, Wisconsin has been at the forefront of research. In 2007-2008, the school allocated $832 million towards research on campus. This meant UW-Madison ranked as the 2nd largest research university in the country behind Johns Hopkins University, and ahead of other rival universities in research such as, University of California Los Angeles, and the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.[14] Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... UM also has campuses in Dearborn and Flint. ...


The University is considered a major academic center for embryonic stem cell research. UW professor James Thomson was the first scientist to isolate human embryonic stem cells. This has brought significant attention and respect for the University's research programs from around the world. The University continues to be a leader in stem cell research, helped in part by the funding of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation and promotion of WiCell.[15] Human embryonic stem cell colony. ... James Jamie Alexander Thomson (born in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American developmental biologist who also serves as a professor of anatomy in the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and as the chief pathologist at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. ... This article is about the profession. ... This article is about the concept. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... WARF company logo The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is the nonprofit technology transfer office of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... WiCell is the nonprofit subsidiary of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation created in 1998 to license and promote research in human embryonic stem cells. ...


The University is also well know for its graduate mechanical engineering programs. It is highly ranked in the area of nuclear engineering. Its center for research on internal combustion engines, known as the Engine Research Center, is known for its leadership role in research in the field of combustion technologies in automotive applications. The Engine Research Center is a major research and educational institution investigating the fundamentals and applications of internal combustion engines with a unique combination of modeling and experimental capabilities. [16] Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... Nuclear engineering is the practical application of the breakdown of atomic nuclei and/or other sub-atomic physics, based on the principles of nuclear physics. ... An internal combustion engine is an engine that is powered by the expansion of hot combustion products of fuel directly acting within an engine. ...


Letters & Science Honors Program

The L&S Honors Program serves over 1,700 students in the College of Letters and Science (the UW's liberal arts college) with an enriched undergraduate curriculum. Students in the program pursue the Honors in the Liberal Arts, Honors in the Major, or Comprehensive Honors Degrees. The program was begun in response to a petition by students in 1958 seeking more challenging work for outstanding students. A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... For a curriculum vitae, see Résumé. In formal education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university. ... Look up Petition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In addition to its curriculum, the program offers professional advising services; grants, scholarships, and awards, particularly for introductory and Honors Senior Thesis research; and numerous academic, social, and service opportunities through the Honors Student Organization. Grants are funds given to tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or local governments by foundations, corporations, governments, small business and individuals. ... Note: The term scholarship can mean either the methods employed by scholars (see scholarly method) or an award of access to an institution and/or money for an individual for the purposes of furthering their education. ... An award is something given to a person or group of people to recognize excellence in a certain field. ...


The Honors Program also supports several student organizations, such as the University of Wisconsin-Madison Forensics Team. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Forensics Team (also known as the UW-Madison Speech Team) is a student-run, nationally competitive individual events (speech) team located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...


Campus

Bascom Hill
Bascom Hill

The university is located in Madison, slightly more than one mile from the state capitol, and is situated partially on an isthmus between two lakes, Lake Mendota and Lake Monona. The main campus comprises 933 acres (3.77 km²) of land, while the entire campus, including research stations, is over 10,600 acres (42.9 km²) in area. The campus includes many buildings designed or supervised by architects J.T.W. Jennings and Arthur Peabody. The main hub of campus life is the Memorial Union. The campus has its own police force, food service, hospital, recreation facilities, power facilities, and an on-campus dairy. The campus also owns the UW Arboretum, which is home to many plants and wildlife. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the state Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. ... For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ... Lake Mendota is the northernmost and largest of the four lakes near Madison, Wisconsin. ... Lake Monona is a lake surrounded on three sides by the city of Madison, Wisconsin and on the south side by the city of Monona, Wisconsin. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... J.T.W. Jennings (Brooklyn, New York 1856 to ?) was the Milwaukee Roads architect from 1885 to 1893, and was part-time supervising architect for the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin from 1899-1906. ... Arthur Peabody (1858, Eau Claire, Wisconsin- September 6, 1942, Madison, Wisconsin) was campus architect for the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin from 1905-1915. ... Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, is located on the shore of Lake Mendota on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... “Fun” redirects here. ... The University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum (1260 acres) is an arboretum operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and located at 1207 Seminole Highway, Madison, Wisconsin. ...


The campus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison was featured in the 1986 movie Back to School (starring Rodney Dangerfield),[17] although in the movie the school is called "Great Lakes University." Portions of the campus (Bascom Hill, the Union Terrace) are also featured in a few scenes of the 2006 movie The Last Kiss, starring Zach Braff, which was set in Madison but filmed primarily in Canada.[18] Back-to-school, in clothing retailing, is a product season and is characterized by a display of items appropriate to a school wardrobe. ... Rodney Dangerfield (November 22, 1921 – October 5, 2004), born Jacob Cohen, was an American comedian and actor, best known for the catchphrase I dont get no respect and his monologues on that theme. ... The Last Kiss is a 2006 film which is based on the 2001 Italian film Lultimo bacio, directed by Gabriele Muccino. ... Zachary Israel Braff (born April 6, 1975) is an American television and film actor, director, screenwriter, and producer. ...

Bascom Hall atop Bascom Hill at the heart of the campus.
Bascom Hall atop Bascom Hill at the heart of the campus.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 1904 KB) Summary A picture outside of Bascom Hill. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 1904 KB) Summary A picture outside of Bascom Hill. ...

Bascom Hall

As one of the most recognizable buildings on campus, Bascom Hall,[19] at the top of Bascom Hill, is one of the icons of the UW campus and is often considered the "heart of the campus." Built in 1857, the structure has been added to several times over the years although a decorative dome atop the structure was destroyed by fire. The building currently houses the office of the university's chancellor and vice chancellors. Bascom Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing building within the Bascom Hill Historic District.[20] Bascom Hall, at the top of Bascom Hill Bascom Hill is the main quad that forms the symbolic core of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

A view of Music Hall and the mall pedestrian bridge.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 817 KB) Summary Author - MadMaxMarchHare Music Hall on a crisp Fall day at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Licensing This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 817 KB) Summary Author - MadMaxMarchHare Music Hall on a crisp Fall day at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Licensing This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ...

Music Hall

This Victorian Gothic building, built in 1878, was initially named Assembly Hall and was designed to house an 800-seat auditorium, a library, and a clock tower. Dedicated on March 2, 1880, the building originally held conventions, dances, and commencement ceremonies, along with its primary purpose of a library. After the library moved to different buildings on campus, a portion of the hall was assigned to the School of Music in 1900. Shortly after renovations in the early 1900s, the building was officially named Music Hall in 1910, where it still remains an important music venue and home to the university opera.[21] This building also is home to the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, with part of the building being used as office space and classrooms. An auditorium is the area within a theatre, concert hall or other performance space where the audience is located in order to hear and watch the performance. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Clocktower at Geelong Grammar School, Victoria, Australia A clock tower is a tower built with one or more (often four) clock faces. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Metro Toronto Convention Centre, late 2004. ... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ...


The Wisconsin Union

The Memorial Union
The Memorial Union

The University of Wisconsin-Madison, unlike many schools, is home to two student unions. The first, Memorial Union, was built in 1928. The Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, has gained a reputation as both one of the most beautiful and rowdy student unions or student centers on a university campus. Memorial Union is located on the shore of Lake Mendota, and it is a popular spot for socializing among students, as well as the public, while gazing at the lake and the sailboats that are often present. The union is known for the "Rathskeller," a German pub that directly connects to the lake terrace. Political debates and backgammon games are common among students over a beer on the terrace. The Rathskeller serves "Rathskeller Ale", a beer brewed expressly for the Terrace. Memorial Union is home to many arts outlets, including several art galleries, a movie theater, and the Wisconsin Union Theater, and the Craftshop, one of the first in the nation. The Memorial Union is also home to the only solely student run and owned business on campus, ASM StudentPrint. Students and Madison community members alike congregate at the Memorial Union, which honors American war veterans, for the films and concerts each week. An advisory referendum (advising the Chancellor, but lacking official power) to renovate and expand Memorial Union has been approved by the student body, and the university is currently in the planning phase for the expansion.[22] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 885 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Wisconsin-Madison Memorial Union (Wisconsin) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 885 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Wisconsin-Madison Memorial Union (Wisconsin) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, is located on the shore of Lake Mendota on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... Lake Mendota is the northernmost and largest of the four lakes near Madison, Wisconsin. ... Backgammon is a board game for two players in which pieces are moved according to the roll of dice. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Memorial Union, also known as the Union or the Terrace, is located on the shore of Lake Mendota on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Renovation is the process of restoring or improving a structure. ...


Union South, the second campus union, is at the south end of campus. It was built in the 1960s, to alleviate the pressure for space on Memorial Union, on an ever-growing campus. Union South has mainly served students, faculty, staff, and other users of the UW-Madison's many science related buildings, but has also become a home for many activities including weekly dances by student groups, weekly music and film series, and several bowling leagues. Plans to knock down and build a new "green" Union South have been approved by the student body and are currently in the planning phase.[23] A bowler releases the ball. ...


The Wisconsin Union also provides a home for the Wisconsin Union Directorate Student Programming Board (WUD). Since the opening of Memorial Union, students have actively participated in programming on campus. WUD provides programs nearly every day of the year, for both students and community members. The Wisconsin Union is a membership organization at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...

This 9.8 megawatt coal power plant is located two blocks south of the busiest part of the Madison campus.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 516 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is the coal-burning Charter Street Heating Plant in Madison, Wisconsin on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 516 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is the coal-burning Charter Street Heating Plant in Madison, Wisconsin on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ...

Charter Street Power Plant

Located 2 blocks south of the busiest part of campus is the University's coal-burning heating plant. The 9.8 MW power plant opened in the mid 1950's, and produces a little over 50 million kilowatt hours of electricity every year.[24] On May 3, 2007, the Sierra Club filed a lawsuit accusing the university of violating the Federal Clean Air Act.[25] The plant does not use modern pollution controls such as scrubbers, catalytic reduction, or carbon injection.[26] In 2006-2007, the editorial boards of local papers began calling for the elimination or phasing-out of the coal power plant.[27] The watt-hour (symbol W·h) is a unit of energy. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ...


In June 2007 it was reported that runoff from the coal pile behind the Charter St. Plant may be draining into the stormwater system and that the pollutants could contain arsenic and other heavy metals.[28]


Libraries

Wisconsin State Historical Library
Wisconsin State Historical Library

Wisconsin has the 10th largest research library collection in North America, according to a survey by the Association of Research Libraries in 2004-05.[29] Memorial Library, the largest library in Wisconsin, along with more than 40 other professional and special-purpose libraries, serve the campus.[30] In 2004, the campus library collections included more than 7.3 million volumes representing human inquiry through all of history. In addition, there are more than 55,000 serial titles, 6.2 million microfilm items, and hundreds of thousands of government documents, maps, musical scores, audiovisual materials and other items housed in libraries across campus. Nearly 1 million volumes are circulated to library users every year.[31] Memorial Library serves as the principal research facility on campus for the humanities and social sciences. It houses the largest single library collection in the state of Wisconsin—-more than 3.5 million volumes. This library also houses an extensive periodical collection, a large selection of domestic and foreign newspapers, Special Collections,[32] the University Archives,[33] a music library,[34] a letterpress printing museum,[35] and the UW Digital Collections Center.[36] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 972 KB) *Description: Fotos from Madison, WI taken in Dec 04. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 972 KB) *Description: Fotos from Madison, WI taken in Dec 04. ...


Undergraduates can also find many of the resources they need at the College Library.[37] Specialized collections include a college catalog collection, women's and minority studies materials, art slides, music and literature tapes and recreational reading paperbacks. College Library also hosts an extensive Media Center with over 200 computer workstations available for student use. The Kurt F. Wendt Library[38] serves the College of Engineering[39] and the Departments of Computer Sciences,[40] Statistics,[41] and Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences.[42] Designated a Patent and Trademark Depository Library, Wendt Library maintains all U.S. utility, design, and plant patents in various formats, and provides reference tools and searching assistance for both the general public and the UW-Madison community. Additionally, Wendt Library houses books, journals, standards, and over 1.5 million technical reports in print and microfiche.


The online catalog for UW-Madison Libraries is MadCat.[43] MadCat includes bibliographic records for books, periodicals, audiovisual materials, maps, music scores, microforms, and computer databases currently owned by over 30 campus libraries. It also contains records for most of the items which are still on order. It also includes an increasing number of important World Wide Web resources either licensed for UW use or openly available on the World Wide Web. WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...


Museums

The Geology Museum features rocks, minerals, and fossils from around the world. Highlights include a blacklight room, a walk-through cave, and a fragment of the Barringer meteorite. Some noteworthy fossils include the first dinosaur skeleton assembled in Wisconsin (an Edmontosaurus), a shark (Squalicorax) and a floating colony of sea lilies (Uintacrinus), both from the Cretaceous chalk of Kansas, and the Boaz Mastodon, a found on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin in 1897.[44] The UW-Madison Geology Museum has the second highest attendance of any museum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, exceeded only by the Chazen Museum of Art. ... For meteorite-created craters in general, see Impact crater. ... Species (type) Marsh, 1892 Sternberg, 1926 Synonyms Anatosaurus Lull & Wright, 1942 Edmontosaurus (ed-MON-toh-sawr-us) meaning Edmonton lizard (after where it was found, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and Greek sauros meaning lizard) was a hadrosaurid dinosaur genus from the Maastrichtian, the last stage of the Cretaceous Period, 71... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... Species See text Squalicorax (crow shark) is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. ... Orders Articulata Cladida (extinct) Flexibilia (extinct) Camerada (extinct) Disparida (extinct) Crinoids, also known as sea lilies or feather-stars, are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the prehistoric elephant-like animal. ...


The campus art museum, formerly the Elvehjem Museum of Art, was renamed the Chazen Museum of Art in 2005, in recognition of a $20 million donation to fund an expansion.[45] The Chazen Museum of Art is a large museum of art located at the University of Wisconsin, in Madison, Wisconsin. ...


Athletics

Main article: Wisconsin Badgers

The school's mascot is Buckingham U. Badger, who is commonly referred to as "Bucky Badger". The University of Wisconsin sports teams participate in the NCAA's Division I-A. With the exception of men's and women's hockey and rowing (Wisconsin Crew), University of Wisconsin athletic programs compete in the Big Ten Conference. Both hockey programs compete in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association, while the traditionally highly ranked men's and women's Crew programs compete in the Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges. In 2006, both the men's and women's hockey teams won the national title, making Wisconsin only the second school to win national championships in both the Men's and Women's division of a sport in the same year (Connecticut Huskies Basketball 2004). The school's fight song is On, Wisconsin!. The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... The Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges is a sports conference of fifteen college crew teams. ... The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut. ... A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... On, Wisconsin! is the fight song of the Wisconsin Badgers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...


2005-06 marked the first time in school history that four Badgers teams brought home national championships in the same academic year. In the fall, the men's cross country team won its fourth national championship, after finishing second the previous three years. The winter season was highlighted by the men's and women's ice hockey teams both bringing home national titles. The year was capped off in the spring with the women's lightweight crew team winning its third straight Intercollegiate Rowing Association national crown. The Intercollegiate Rowing Association runs the IRA Championship Regatta, which is considered to be the United States collegiate national championship of rowing. ...


Football

One of the most popular sports at Wisconsin is college football. Playing at the 80,000-plus capacity Camp Randall Stadium, the Badgers have always drawn large crowds and a loyal following. After every game, win or lose, the University of Wisconsin Marching Band plays popular songs during the famed Fifth Quarter. The 2005-06 season was the last for the beloved Badgers' head coach Barry Alvarez. He is now a full-time athletic director; Bret Bielema took over as head coach. The Badgers won three Rose Bowl Championships under Alvarez in 1994, 1999, and 2000. In the 2006 season, Bielema led the Badgers to an eleven-win regular season and to 12 overall wins, both firsts in school history. The Badgers' final win of the season was against SEC runner-up Arkansas at the Capital One Bowl. Head coach Bret Bielema 2nd year, 20–4 Home stadium Camp Randall Stadium Capacity 80,321 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Barry Alvarez Website UWBadgers. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... Camp Randall Stadium was built in 1917 and is the current home of the Wisconsin Badgers football team. ... The University of Wisconsin Marching Band is the marching band for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The University of Wisconsin Marching Band is the marching band for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Barry Alvarez Barry Alvarez (born December 30, 1946, Langeloth, Pennsylvania) is a retired college football head coach and current Director of Athletics at the University of Wisconsin. ... Bret Bielema (b. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ...


Men's basketball

After decades of mediocrity (notwithstanding a 1941 national championship), the men's basketball team has enjoyed success in recent years. They are now a perennial attendee of the NCAA Tournament, reaching the Final Four in 2000. Bo Ryan, a four-time division III national championship coach at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, has coached the team since 2001 after the retirement of venerable Dick Bennett. The Badgers play at the Kohl Center, where the students are known as the Grateful Red. In the 2006-2007 basketball season, the Badgers attained their highest AP ranking (#1) (Feb. 19-25) in school history, as well as garnering 35 first-place votes.[46] The Wisconsin Badgers mens basketball team is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. ... The Wisconsin Badgers mens basketball team is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... William Bo Ryan (born December 20, 1947 in Chester, Pennsylvania, United States) is the current head coach of the University of Wisconsin-Madison mens basketball team. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The Grateful Red is the student section of the University of Wisconsin-Madisons NCAA mens basketball team. ...


Ice hockey

Men's hockey game played at the Kohl Center
Men's hockey game played at the Kohl Center

First approved as a men varsity sport in 1922 by the UW athletic council, Badger Ice Hockey has been highly competitive over the years. The sport was dropped after the 1934-35 season before becoming a varsity sport for the 1963-64 season. That first team was coached by John Riley until Bob Johnson, nicknamed 'Badger Bob' by the fans, took over the reins in 1966. The men's team played in the Dane County Coliseum for many years until they moved to the Kohl Center (capacity 15,237) in the fall of 1998. The first game played at the Kohl Center for Ice Hockey was the Hall of Fame game against the University of Notre Dame. During the 2005-06 season, the team set an NCAA attendance record averaging 13,511, surpassing the record they had set in 1998-99. The tradition gained another dimension with the addition of a women's team that began play during the 1999-2000 season. The women's team coached by Mark Johnson, son of the legendary Badger Bob and member of the men's 1977 title team, won their first national championship on March 26, 2006. On April 8, 2006 the men's team coached by Mike Eaves, Johnson's teammate on that same '77 title team, won their sixth national championship. The 6 National Championships rank 4th in NCAA Ice Hockey History. The men's team had previously won NCAA titles in 1973, 1977, 1981, 1983 and 1990. It marked the first time that both the men's and women's titles were won by the same school in the same year for Division I NCAA hockey. The women's team repeated as national champions in 2007 with a 4-1 victory over the University of Minnesota-Duluth on March 18 at Herb Brooks Arena in Lake Placid, NY. Both teams play in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association, the men's team becoming members in the 1969-70 season and the women's since their inception. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1152 × 768 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1152 × 768 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Robert Badger Bob Johnson (March 4, 1931-November 26, 1991) was an American-born college and professional ice hockey coach. ... Alliant Energy Center is a 8,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... gvhbjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbkkkkkkkkkkkkkkbnnnnnnnnnnntyguhjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkjbhnmj,,n,mrtfkfjotigkfffffff fxkfdkdf fdkmfdkfmkldf dfkfdidfMedia:Example. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Minnesota Duluth The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) regional university part of the University of Minnesota System located in Duluth, Minnesota. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Herb Brooks Arena is a 7,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Lake Placid, New York. ... Lake Placid is a village located in Essex County, New York. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ...


Rivalries

The Wisconsin Badgers are very competitive in the Big Ten Conference. Their most notable rivalry is the annual college football game between the Wisconsin Badgers and the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers for Paul Bunyan's Axe, the longest-running rivalry in NCAA athletics. The two universities also compete in the Border Battle, a year-long athletic competition in which each team's win is worth a certain number of points for their university. The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Golden Gophers are the college sports team for the University of Minnesota. ... Paul Bunyans Axe, named after the mythical giant lumberjack Paul Bunyan, is awarded to the winner of each college football game between Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The long standing rivalry between the University of Iowa and Wisconsin was finally recognized beginning in 2004. The winner of the annual football game between the schools is awarded the Heartland Trophy. Wisconsin also has a major non-conference basketball rivalry with Marquette University, located in Milwaukee. That rivalry is also driven by the public-private divide between the two leading schools in the same state. In more recent years, an intense rivalry has developed between Wisconsin and Ohio State University. The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900-acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... The Heartland Trophy is a brass bull that is presented to the winner of the Iowa-Wisconsin football game. ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


Wisconsin has also developed a "border battle" with Illinois. It is not an official rivalry but the games always get rowdy. The reason for this mini-rivalry may be because of the rivalries that other Wisconsin teams have with other Illinois teams, such as the Bears-Packers rivalry. The Fighting Illini (also known as The Illini) are the intercollegiate athletic teams of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Bears-Packers rivalry is a sports rivalry between two of the NFLs most storied and successful franchises, the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers. ...


Mascot

The signature mascot is an anthropomorphized badger named Bucky who dons a sweater affixed with the UW-Madison athletic logo (currently the red "Motion W"). Beginning in 1890, the university's first Bucky Badger was a live, temperamental and unruly badger who was quickly retired. Although the nickname of the Wisconsin teams remained the "Badgers," it was not until Art Evans drew the early caricature version of Bucky in 1940 that today's recognizable image of Bucky was adopted. In 1949, a contest was held to name the mascot, but no consensus was reached after only a few entries were received. In reaction, the contest committee chose the name Buckingham U. Badger, or "Bucky," for short. 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ...


The team's nickname originates not from the state animal (also the badger), but from the state nickname. In the 1820s, many lead miners and their families lived in the mines in which they worked until adequate above-ground shelters were built and thus were compared to badgers.[47] A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ...


Student Life

A view of the Wisconsin State Capitol from atop Bascom Hill. Mosse Humanities building is on the right while the Wisconsin State Historical Society (fore) and Memorial Library (rear) on the left.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (909x608, 180 KB) Summary Author - madmaxmarchhare . ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (909x608, 180 KB) Summary Author - madmaxmarchhare . ... The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the state Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. ... Bascom Hall, at the top of Bascom Hill Bascom Hill is the main quad that forms the symbolic core of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. ...

Media

Student newspapers

UW-Madison is the only American university to have two competing daily student newspapers: The Daily Cardinal, founded in 1892 and The Badger Herald, founded in 1969. Both papers are financially and editorially independent from the University. In addition, students also produce the liberal biweekly Madison Observer, founded in 2003, and the conservative weekly Mendota Beacon, founded in 2005. The Onion was founded in 1988 by two UW-Madison juniors, and was published in Madison for many years before moving to New York City in 2001. A student newspaper is a newspaper run by university or high or middle school students that covers local and in particular school/university news. ... The Daily Cardinal is the fifth oldest student newspaper in the United States, located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Badger Herald is one of the nations first and most successful independent daily student newspapers. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... The Mendota Beacon is a free, privately funded newspaper published every other week in Madison, Wisconsin which ran its first issue on February 12, 2005, Republican president Abraham Lincolns birthday. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Campus radio

The University of Wisconsin–Madison Campus Radio Station is WSUM 91.7 FM.[48] Historically, UW has been home to a collection of student run radio stations, a number of which stopped broadcasting after run-ins with the FCC. The current radio station, WSUM, started out in 1997 in a webcast only format because of the prolonged battle to get a FCC license and construct a tower. This lasted for five years until February 22, 2002, when the station finally started broadcasting over FM airwaves at 91.7 from its tower in Montrose, Wisconsin. The radio station currently has around 150 volunteer DJ's and 8 paid managers. All UW-Madison students as well as a limited number of community members are eligible to participate in running the station. They are trained over the course of a semester, after which they are required to produce an "air check tape" and submit a show proposal form. Though not all volunteers are guaranteed a show, the majority receive one. Unlike many other college radio stations, WSUM remains entirely free format, which means that the on-air personnel have the ability to showcases a large variety of music and talk programming at their discretion with very little limitations. There are very few radio stations that give their on-air personnel this freedom. Despite being one of the newest and most eclectic student radio stations in Wisconsin, WSUM has garnered many awards from the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association for their news and unique public service announcements. WSUM 91. ... A radio station is a site configured for broadcasting sound. ... WSUM 91. ... A webcast is a live media file distributed over the Internet using streaming media technology. ... The abbreviation FCC can refer to: Face-centered cubic (usually fcc), a crystallographic structure Federal Communications Commission, a US government organization Farm Credit Corporation/Farm Credit Canada, a Canadian government organization Families with Children from China, an adoption support organization Florida Christian College, a college in central Florida Fresno City... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... Montrose is a town located in Dane County, Wisconsin. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... College radio (also known as university radio, campus radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college or university. ... WSUM 91. ... A public service announcement or PSA is a non-commercial advertisement—typically on U.S. or Canadian radio or television, broadcast for the public good. ...


Moped use

Mopeds parked in designated moped parking spaces.
Mopeds parked in designated moped parking spaces.

Due to their high mile per gallon rates and the spread-out layout of the campus, mopeds are a popular form of transportation among students. Madison has one of the highest number of registered mopeds per capita in the nation.[49] On campus, since 2006, mopeds riders are required to purchase parking permits[50] and are required to park in designated moped parking areas or risk a ticket.[51] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... A moped is a motorized two-wheeled vehicle subject to local speed regulations. ...


"Party school" image

Wisconsin has recently held the distinction of being rated the nation's number one "party school", according to the 2005 Princeton Review's annual survey and the number one "party school" according to the May 2006 issue of Playboy magazine.[52] In the 2006 Princeton Review's survey, Wisconsin dropped to fourth place, but was ranked first for the most beer. UW has long held a reputation for academics, political activism, and drinking; the last of these is easily understood when considering the state's traditionally high level of alcohol consumption in general.[53] A party school is a term used to refer to colleges, universities, or any institution of higher learning in which there exists a culture of ribaldry and licentiousness amongst the student population[1]. The term is not used mututally exclusively with a school that has a strong academic program (that... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... A party school is a term used to refer to colleges, universities, or any institution of higher learning in which there exists a culture of ribaldry and licentiousness amongst the student population[1]. The term is not used mututally exclusively with a school that has a strong academic program (that... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


The festive mentality is most notably displayed with the annual Mifflin Street Block Party (which started in the 1960s as a counterculture event, is today a spring semester finals week kickoff) and the State Street Halloween Party. Both of these events are commonly attended by tens of thousands of partiers, including many who come from out-of-state to attend. Following a (non-political) riot that developed at the 1996 Mifflin Street Block Party, it was forcibly canceled by the city; since then, the city has permitted resumption of a Mifflin Street event. The Mifflin Street Block Party is an annual celebration held on Mifflin Street in Madison, Wisconsin in late April. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... This article is about the holiday. ...


State Street Halloween Party

The State Street Halloween Party, FreakFest, an outdoors gathering of several thousand costumed college students and others on the weekend before Halloween, has been a source of recent controversy. Located in downtown Madison, Wisconsin, United States, near the Wisconsin State Capitol, State Street hosts a variety of shops, bars, and restaurants and is known for its small town appeal and street musicians and jugglers and other types of busking, making it a common tourist attraction. ... This article is about the holiday. ...


In 2004, 450 partiers were arrested after bonfires were started on the street and several businesses were vandalized during the celebration. Fewer than a quarter of the arrestees were Wisconsin residents and fewer than 5% were UW-Madison students. Property damage occurred; in the case of one business (Tomboy Girl), the insurance costs were significant enough to force them to move to another location. Because of this event, the Division of University Housing became very strict on controlling the number of guests allowed in the residence halls, including limiting the number of guests students could have in university housing. As of 2007, absolutely no one besides University Housing residents were allowed into any of the University Housing dorms on Halloween weekend. This also included family members. For the AC/DC box set, see Bonfire (album). ... Vandalism is the conspicuous defacement or destruction of a structure, a symbol or anything else that goes against the will of the owner/governing body. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ...

State Street on Halloween

At the peak of the 2005 party, an estimated 100,000 revelers were crammed onto the street at one time. Although very little property damage and no reported injuries occurred during the party, 447 people were arrested between Friday and Saturday nights, primarily for alcohol-related violations. Police decided to end the larger scale Saturday night party around 2 a.m. Finally, unable to coerce the 1,000 remaining partiers to clear the street, police ended the event with the use of riot gear and pepper spray for the fourth consecutive year. According to Mayor Dave Cieslewicz, the huge police presence at the party ultimately cost the city an estimated $750,000. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 961 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 961 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Party (disambiguation). ... French mobile gendarmes doing riot control. ... Pepper spray (also known as OC spray (from Oleoresin Capsicum), OC gas, capsicum spray, or oleoresin capsicum) is a lachrymatory agent (a chemical compound that irritates the eyes to cause tears, pain, and even temporary blindness) that is used in riot control, crowd control and personal self-defense, including defense... David J. Cieslewicz (IPA: tʃɛs. ...


The 2006 party was viewed largely as a success by city and university officials, citing decreased attendance due to an admission fee to the State Street corridor. While the event was a success from both an attendance and a security standpoint, many students boycotted the event in protest of the newly imposed regulations.


Notable people

Main article: List of University of Wisconsin-Madison people

// Herbert Spencer Gasser, B.S. 1910, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1944 John Bardeen, B.S. 1928 and M.S. 1929, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1956 and 1972 Edward Lawrie Tatum, B.A. 1931, M.S. 1932, Ph. ...

UW-Madison Alumni

Living alumni: 372,100 Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...


Addressable alumni: 343,319 (92%)


International alumni 14,550 (4%)


Alumni in Wisconsin: 132,949 (39%)


U.S. cities by alumni populations:

 Madison: 49,315 (14%) Chicago: 22,447 (7%) Milwaukee: 19,038 (6%) Twin Cities: 16,143 (5%) New York: 11,159 (3%) San Francisco: 9,579 (3%) Washington, D.C.: 7,779 (2%) Los Angeles: 5,423 (2%) TOTAL: 140,883(41%) 

17 Nobel Prizes and 24 Pulitzer Prizes have been awarded to UW-Madison alumni or faculty.


See also

For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Camp Randall Stadium was built in 1917 and is the current home of the Wisconsin Badgers football team. ... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Kohl Center opened in 1998 in Madison, Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Arena (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Undergraduate Projects Laboratory (UPL) is a computer laboratory in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. ... The University of Wisconsin was an organization of higher education in the state of Wisconsin that existed from 1956 until 1971. ... The University of Wisconsin Law School is the professional school for the study of law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum (1260 acres) is an arboretum operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and located at 1207 Seminole Highway, Madison, Wisconsin. ... The University of Wisconsin Marching Band is the marching band for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The University of Wisconsin Forensics Team (also known as the UW-Madison Speech Team) is a student-run, nationally competative forensics team located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ... The UW-Madison Geology Museum has the second highest attendance of any museum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, exceeded only by the Chazen Museum of Art. ... 2007 UW Hybrid Vehicle Team // The Hybrid Vehicle Team consists mainly of undergraduate students from the University of Wisconsin who work together to build a hybrid electric vehicle. ... The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... WARF company logo The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is the nonprofit technology transfer office of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... The Weinert Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is home to the entrepreneurship specialization in the School of Business. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Head coach Bret Bielema 2nd year, 20–4 Home stadium Camp Randall Stadium Capacity 80,321 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Barry Alvarez Website UWBadgers. ... The Wisconsin Badgers mens basketball team is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. ... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment...

References

  1. ^ Community, Students, and Degrees. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  2. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. US News and World Report. Retrieved on January 20, 2007.
  3. ^ History and Organization of the University of Wisconsin System. Retrieved on Feb, 18, 2007.
  4. ^ University of Wisconsin–Madison: The Wisconsin Idea. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  5. ^ Dictionary of Wisconsin History: Wisconsin Idea. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  6. ^ Letters & Science, University of Wisconsin–Madison. UW-Madison. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  7. ^ Top American Research Universities. The Center. Retrieved on April 11, 2007.
  8. ^ Top 500 World Universities (1-100). Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  9. ^ Wisconsin Ties Harvard for most CEOs. UW-Madison School of Business. Retrieved on January 22, 2007.
  10. ^ Harvard and Wisconsin tie for most CEOs. Bloomberg.com. Retrieved on January 22, 2007.
  11. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. US News and World Report. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  12. ^ Comparing Black Enrollments at the Public Ivies. The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. Retrieved on January 22, 2007.
  13. ^ The Washington Monthly College Rankings. Washington Monthly. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  14. ^ Top American Research Universities. The Center. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  15. ^ Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Retrieved on January 20, 2007.
  16. ^ Engine Research Center. COE, UW-Madison. Retrieved on November 20, 2007.
  17. ^ Trivia for Back to School. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  18. ^ The Last Kiss movie review. A.V. Club. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  19. ^ Bascom Hall Home Page. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  20. ^ National Register of Historic Places. National Register of Historic Places. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  21. ^ Music Hall. Mills Music Library. Retrieved on January 20, 2007.
  22. ^ Students Hope to Add Union Referendum to Ballot. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  23. ^ Union Referendum Plans. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  24. ^ Guey-Lee, Louise. Net Generation and Fuel Consumption at Power Plants Consuming Coal and Biomass by State and Plant Name, 2001. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  25. ^ Ivey, Mike. "Coal Burning Heat", The Capital Times, 2007-05-04, pp. D8. Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
  26. ^ Air Permits. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  27. ^ Daily Cardinal Editorial Board. "UW must live up to clean image", Daily Cardinal, 2006-12-10. Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
    Badger Herald Editorial Board. "Stuck in soot", Badger Herald, 2006-11-29. Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
    Capital Times Editorial Board. "Charter St. Plant Must Go", The Capital Times, 2007-05-08. Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
  28. ^ Badger Herald Editorial Board. "Coal runoff may drain into lake", The Capital Times, 2007-06-30. Retrieved on 2007-07-02. 
  29. ^ ARL Statistics. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  30. ^ UW-Madison Libraries. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  31. ^ Memorial Library. UW-Madison general library system. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  32. ^ Special Collections. UW-Madison Memorial Library. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  33. ^ University Archives. UW-Madison Libraries. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  34. ^ Mills Music Library. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  35. ^ Silver Buckle Press. UW-Madison General Library System. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  36. ^ UW Digital Collections. University of Wisconsin. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  37. ^ College Library. UW-Madison general library system. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  38. ^ Wendt Library. UW-Madison General Library System. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  39. ^ College of Engineering. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  40. ^ UW-Madison Computer Sciences. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  41. ^ Department of Statistics. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  42. ^ Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  43. ^ Madcat library search. UW-Madison General Library System. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  44. ^ UW Geology Museum. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  45. ^ Chazen Museum of Art. UW-Madison. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  46. ^ Men's Basketball Rankings 2006-07 Week 11. ESPN.com. Retrieved on January 20, 2007.
  47. ^ Badger Notables: Badger Nickname. UWBadgers.com - The Official Web Site of Badger Athletics. Retrieved on 2006-10-22.
  48. ^ WSUM. WSUM.org. Retrieved on January 20, 2007.
  49. ^ Safety experts: Exercise caution on mopeds this winter. Retrieved on 2007-09-18.
  50. ^ "Shifting gears", Badger Herald, 2005-10-12. Retrieved on 2007-09-18. 
  51. ^ Campus Moped Rules & Parking Map. UW-Madison Transportation Services. Retrieved on 2004-09-18.
  52. ^ Playboy's Top Ten Party Schools. Fanblogs.com. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  53. ^ Do Wisconsites account for 75% of U.S. brandy consumption?. straightdope.com. Retrieved on April 6, 2007.

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  • University of Wisconsin-Madison is at coordinates 43°04′30″N 89°25′02″W / 43.075000, -89.417222Coordinates: 43°04′30″N 89°25′02″W / 43.075000, -89.417222

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Wisconsin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3882 words)
In the years 1966 through 1970, the University of Wisconsin was shaken by a series of student protests, and by the use of force by authorities in response.
Wisconsin has been one of the leading public universities in the United States since the beginning of the 20th century and ranks as one of the great research universities of the world.
Among U.S. universities, the University of Wisconsin is frequently listed as one of the "public Ivies"—publicly-funded universities providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League.
University of Wisconsin - definition of University of Wisconsin in Encyclopedia (114 words)
The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin.
The UW System was founded in 1971 with the merger of the University of Wisconsin, which included the Madison, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Parkside campuses, the Centers and the Extension, and the Wisconsin State Universities, which included the other nine campuses.
The University of Wisconsin (or simply UW) alone is commonly used to refer to the Madison campus, especially with regard to sports.
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16th August 2010
I had a dream to make my own commerce, however I didn't earn enough amount of money to do this. Thank God my colleague said to utilize the personal loans . Hence I used the college loan and made real my desire.

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