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Encyclopedia > University of Westminster

University of Westminster

Motto Educating for professional life
Established 1838 (as The Royal Polytechnic Institution)
Type Public
Chancellor Lord Swraj Paul
Vice-Chancellor Dr Geoffrey Copland (retires July 2007)
Students 26,080 [1]
Undergraduates 18,730 [1]
Postgraduates 7,355 [1]
Location London, England, UK
Website http://www.wmin.ac.uk/

The University of Westminster is a university in London, England, formed in 1992 as a result of the Further and Higher Education Act, 1992, which allowed the London Polytechnic (Polytechnic of Central London or PCL ) to rename itself as a university. The London Polytechnic itself was formed from the merger of the Holborn College of Law, Languages and Commerce and the Regent Street Polytechnic in 1971. Its antecedents, the Royal Polytechnic Institution date back to 1838, making it one of the oldest post-school educational institutions in Britain. Image File history File links WMN_logo. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Swraj Paul, Baron Paul (born 1931) is an Indian-born, British-based business magnate and philanthropist. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... The Further and Higher Education Acts 1992 made changes in the funding and administration of further education and higher education within the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Overview

Marylebone campus
Marylebone campus

The University of Westminster's headquarters is situated on Regent Street in the West End of London. It has evolved over 160 years from the first institution in the UK to provide post-school education for working people to a multi-faceted modern university. There are plans to celebrate 170 years by publishing a new History of the University in 2008. There are more than 23,800 students from 132 countries studying at the University of Westminster on a variety of programmes. These range from undergraduate and postgraduate courses to tailored professional programmes and short courses. Many Westminster students study part-time; courses are available both during the day and in the evening. University of Westminster, Marylebone campus. ... University of Westminster, Marylebone campus. ... The Quadrant at the bottom of Regent Street. ... The interior of Covent Garden Market in the West End The West End of London is an area of central London, containing many of the citys major tourist attractions, businesses, and administrative headquarters. ...


The University of Westminster ranked 55th out of 122 university-level institutions in the United Kingdom in 2005, according to the Guardian newspaper.[2] The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


The University of Westminster Students' Union:[6] provides a wide range of activities for its members. It is based at the Marylebone campus, next to Baker Street tube station, where 'Inter:Mission', a new social venue, costing £750,000 was launched in 2006. [3] The Union also has another bar and a night club, Area 51, located on the University's Harrow Campus. Marylebone (sometimes written St. ... 94 Baker Street, formerly the Apple Boutique. ... Alternative meanings: Harrow, London, a place in the London Borough of Harrow; Harrow School, a famous public school in the United Kingdom; The Harrow, a fantasy and horror magazine. ...


The Union was founded in 1966 as The Polytechnic Students' Union. Its first three Presidents were Owen Spencer-Thomas 1966-1967, [4] Roger Beavil 1967-1968 and Alan Smith 1968-1969. [5]. Owen Spencer-Thomas was born on 3 March 1940 in Braughing, Hertfordshire, England. ...


The University of Westminster is home to the Diplomatic Academy of London, which operates postgraduate degrees on international politics and diplomacy in both its campuses in London and Paris, France. The Seal of the Diplomatic Academy of London. ... Diplomat redirects here. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


History

The University has had four different names during its long history:

  • The Royal Polytechnic Institution (1838-1881)
  • Regent Street Polytechnic (1881-1970)
  • The Polytechnic of Central London - known as PCL (1970-1992)
  • The University of Westminster (1992 to present)

1838-1881 Royal Polytechnic Institution

The first polytechnic - The Polytechnic Institution- opened to the public at 309 Regent Street on 6th August 1838, under the chairmanship of the distinguished scientist and aeronatical engineer Sir George Cayley. Its aim was to demonstrate new technologies and inventions to the public. The Polytechnic played a significant role in the popularisation of science & engineering, and it became a major tourist attraction in Victorian London.


1839

The Polytechnic was the first institution in London to demonstrate the new invention of photography, and in 1841 the first photographic studio in Europe opened on the roof of the building.


1841

The name changed to The Royal Polytechnic Institution when Prince Albert - the husband of Queen Victoria - became Patron.


1848

A new theatre was added to the building, which became world famous for its spectacular magic lantern shows.


1850s-1870s

The Director of the Polytechnic, Professor John Pepper, was internationally known as a showman and popular science lecturer; he invented the popular theatrical illusion known as Pepper's ghost.


1881

The Royal Polytechnic closed in 1881. In 1881 the Regent Street Polytechnic was founded. The Polytechnic was subsequently to have a significant influence on English higher education and perhaps an even greater one on sport.[7] Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


The University's founder was Quintin Hogg who is described on a memorial plaque in the rebuilt flagship building (1911) as an "Education and Christian Benefactor", who "expanded his work by founding the Polytechnic in 1881-2". In Portland Place, is his statue, a memorial to both him and to those staff and students who died during the First World War. The imagery of Hogg's statue conveys the values and priorities of his Polytechnic, because he is depicted giving equal value to book learning and sporting activity. In essence, it reflects the ethos of muscular Christianity, a popular strain in Victorian culture. In the Fyvie Hall in the main building, a plaque explains that the reconstruction in 1911 was a memorial to the late Edward VII and it refers to the commitment of the Polytechnic to the "physical and moral development of youthful subjects". Memorial To Quintin Hogg Portland Place London This article is about Quintin Hogg the philanthropist. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Muscular Christianity is the view of the Victorian-era English writers Charles Kingsley and Thomas Hughes (though the name was bestowed by others). ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ...


Smoke Radio

Smoke Radio
Broadcast area Flag of United Kingdom UK
First air date 2004
Frequency Live Stream Quicktime
Format Contemporary
Owner UWSU
Website www.smokeradio.co.uk

Smoke Radio is the student radio station of the University of Westminster. It was brought about in late 2004. After the intake of new students in September 2005 the station took to running a 24 hour playout system and running live programmes during the week. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... FreQuency is a music video game developed by Harmonix and published by SCEI. It was released in November 2001. ... A radio format or programming format describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML...


By 2006 Smoke Radio had established itself as a leading UK Student station, winning awards at the Student Radio Awards. These included the Gold Award for 'Best Journalistic Programming' and two Bronze Awards for 'Best Marketing and Station Sound' and 'Best Station 2006'. During 2006/2007 the station was run by three ‘editors’ whose job it was to look after the day to day running of the station. Ricky Marshall was editor for Programming & Music, whilst Ross Tilley was editor for News & Online Content, and Ross Goodlass was editor for Marketing & Events. The Student Radio Awards is a UK awards scheme celebrating talent within the UK student radio industry. ...


As of June 2007, Smoke Radio's management was handed over to a new committee consisting of seven second year students handling five positions on the station. Christopher Chilvers was appointed Head of Music; Stewart Paske, Head of Web; Steven McIntosh, Head of News; Philip Harris, Heads of Marketing and Events; and Phil Landers and Sam Impey, Heads of Programming.


Smoke Radio is the sister media of The Smoke (Newspaper) and Smoke Screen (TV).


The Smoke

The Smoke is the newspaper of the University of Westminster. It was originally brought about in 1992 as a magazine. In 2006 The Smoke was switched to a newspaper, initially being published fortnightly during term time. The Newspaper currently features News, Comment, Politics, Media Business, Film, Music, Arts and Culture, Fashion, Sports, Science and Technology, Listings and Comic Strips.


Degrees offered

The University offers a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees via its departments:

  • School of Architecture and the Built Environment
  • School of Biosciences
  • School of Law
  • School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages
  • School of Media, Arts and Design
  • School of Integrated Health
  • School of Informatics (formerly the Cavendish School of Computer Science)
  • Harrow Business School
  • Harrow School of Computer Science
  • Westminster Business School

Fashion design

Graduate fashion collection from 2006

A number of notable fashion designers have attended The University of Westminster. These include both Vivienne Westwood and Christopher Bailey, who have each been awarded British Fashion Designer of the Year in the past. Vivienne Westwood in 1990, 1991 and 2006, and Christopher Bailey in 2005. Image File history File links Westminster_fashion. ... Image File history File links Westminster_fashion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christopher Bailey is an English lecturer at Brighton Polytechnic and occasional screenwriter for television. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christopher Bailey is Design Director of the largest British luxury goods brand, Burberry. ...


Other notable alumni include Katie Hillier, accessories designer for Marc Jacobs; Stuart Vevers, the Creative Director of Mulberry; and Carrie Munden the Creative Director of Cassetteplaya. Marc Jacobs (born April 9, 1963 in New York City) is an American fashion designer. ... Mulberry is a British fashion company producing luxury products. ...


Additionally, a number of Fashion Designers have also been awarded honorary doctorates from The University of Westminster. These include Christopher Bailey 2006, Jeff Banks in 1992, and Zandra Rhodes in 1999. Christopher Bailey is Design Director of the largest British luxury goods brand, Burberry. ... Jeff Banks (born March 17, 1943 in Ebbw Vale, Wales) is a renowned British Designer of both Mens and Womens Clothing, Jewellery, and Home Furnishings. ... Zandra Lindsey Rhodes (born 19 September 1940 in Chatham, Kent) is an English clothes designer, most prominent in the 1970s, known for her unusual clothes in loud colours. ...


The graduates from the BA Fashion Design course stage a runway shows every June during Graduate Fashion Week in London. Fashion design is the applied art dedicated to the design of clothing and lifestyle accessories created within the cultural and social influences of a specific time. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In June 2006 The Daily Telegraph wrote “Central St Martins, the London fashion college that produced Britain's brightest design talents of the last decade, lost its place on the cutting edge at Graduate Fashion Week last night. It was usurped dramatically by Westminster University in a show that featured the work of only 17 students, compared with CSM's roll-call of 40 BA graduates. This article concerns the British newspaper. ...


"This is what British fashion is really about, said Christopher Bailey, Westminster graduate and now creative director of Burberry.” It was rebellious, rude and individual. Most fashion colleges are too afraid to shock.” [6] Christopher Bailey is Design Director of the largest British luxury goods brand, Burberry. ... A ladies Burberry handbag in the companys trademarked check pattern Burberry is a British luxury fashion house, manufacturing clothing and other apparel. ...


The BA Fashion Design course also has its own website at westminsterfashion


Campuses and halls

This University is divided into four campuses; three of these are in central London and the fourth is in Harrow. The nearest Tube station to the Harrow Campus is Northwick Park, on the Metropolitan Line, which takes 18 minutes from Baker Street. The campus includes a Business School, Computer School and Media School. Each campus contains a set of architecturally distinctive buildings and has its own library, IT and catering facilities. Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... Harrow is the principal town in the London Borough of Harrow. ... Look up Tube in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Northwick Park is a London Underground station on the Metropolitan Line. ... London Transport Portal The Metropolitan Line is part of the London Underground, coloured maroon on the Tube map. ... Baker Street tube station is a station on the London Underground located on Baker Street. ...


The English language section has 14 classes and 200 students who come from every part of the world (Japan, China, France etc.). There is also a Learning Advice Centre in the library.


There are several Halls of Residence dispersed throughout London, including Furnival House in Highgate and Alexander Fleming situated near Old Street, one based at the Marylebone campus and as of September 2005 there are two based at the Harrow campus.


They have also campus in Paris, France. That offers Master of Arts in Diplomatic Studies program. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ...


The University established Westminster International University in Tashkent in 2002 at the invitation of and with the co-operation of the government of Uzbekistan. Westminster International University in Tashkent (WIUT) is a university in Tashkent in Uzbekistan, founded in 2002. ...


Sporting achievements

This twin commitment to education and sport is further exemplified by a double set of honours boards which show that, from 1898 until the establishment of what was to become the University of Westminster, it awarded an annual trophy for the best educational achievement, and for the best sports performance. The latter award was the Studd Trophy. Over the years, the awards have been given to sportsmen from various disciplines, such as swimming, boxing and cycling, but the majority of awards have been given to athletes. Six names stand out: Willie Applegarth (1912/13), Olympic medallist and the greatest of the pre-First World War sprinters; Albert Hill (1919/20), Olympic gold medallist and the greatest middle-distance runner of his time; Harry Edward (1922), Olympic sprint bronze medallist; McDonald Bailey (1950), the greatest sprinter of the immediate post-Second World War years; Colin Campbell (1968 and 1970), a great quarter miler; and Alan Pascoe (1971/72/73/74/75), one of the greatest hurdlers of all time. Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Studd Challenge Trophy was presented annually from 1898 for the best performance by a Polytechnic athlete during the previous year. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left, throwing a left uppercut) versus Rafael Ortiz Boxing, also referred to as pugilism is a combat sport in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series of one to three-minute intervals called rounds. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... Look up Athlete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... William Reuben Willie Applegarth (May 11, 1890 - December 12, 1958) was a British athlete, winner of gold medal in 4x100 m relay at the 1912 Summer Olympics. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Sprints are races where the runner tries to go as fast as humanly possible. ... For the First World War soldier, winner of the Victoria Cross, see Albert Hill VC. Albert George Hill ( March 24, 1889 – January 8, 1969) was a British athlete, winner of two Olympic gold medals at the 1920 Summer Olympics. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Harry Edward was a runner from Great Britain who won the bronze medal in both the 100m and 200m sprint race at the 1920 Summer Olympics. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... There have been several notable people named Colin Campbell: For the Scottish soldier, see Colin Campbell, 1st Baron Clyde For the Governor of Nova Scotia, see Colin Campbell (politician) For the Scottish Vice-Chancellor of the University of Nottingham, see Colin Campbell (academic) For the oil industry analyst, see Colin... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Alan Pascoe was a British athlete who gained success in hurdles. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


This roll of honour explains why, of the many sports clubs that arose from the Regent's Street Polytechnic, the Polytechnic Harriers were the most remembered and celebrated. The Polytechnic Harriers became associated with the Chiswick track, but their name confirmed that they were connected to this important educational and sporting institution. However, the Polytechnic Marathon [8], founded after the London Olympic Marathon of 1908, has ceased. Indeed, even the Polytechnic Harriers have been subsumed into another club. Although the club, as Kingston and Polytechnic A.C., still compete, at their Kingston home, for their Kinnaird and Sward Trophies every April against the famous Achilles Club and others. Nevertheless, the achievements of this unique establishment, especially in athletics, still stand the test of comparison with modern activities and clubs. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ...


The other two sports with which the Polytechnic has a strong association are cycling and water polo. Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, handball and wrestling. ...


List of notable lecturers and alumni

Notable lecturers

Cherie Blair (born 23 September 1954 in Bury, Lancashire, England), known professionally as Cherie Booth QC, is an English barrister. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Chantal Mouffe (born 1943) is a Belgian political theorist. ... John Keane could be one of several notable people: John Keane was one of Irelands most outstanding hurlers. ... David Greene (born June 22, 1982) is a National Football League quarterback with the Seattle Seahawks. ... Archigram was an avant-garde architectural group formed in the 1960s and based at the Architectural Association, London that was futurist, anti-heroic and pro-consumerist, drawing inspiration from technology in order to create a new reality that was solely expressed through hypothetical projects. ...

Notable alumni

Alexander Fleming Sir Alexander Fleming (August 6, 1881 - March 11, 1955) is famous as the discoverer of the antibiotic substance lysozyme and for isolating the antibiotic substance penicillin from the fungus Penicillium notatum. ... Ilich Ramírez Sánchez (born October 12, 1949) is a Venezuelan-born self-proclaimed leftist revolutionary and mercenary. ... Christopher Bailey is Design Director of the largest British luxury goods brand, Burberry. ... A ladies Burberry handbag in the companys trademarked check pattern Burberry is a British luxury fashion house, manufacturing clothing and other apparel. ... Arnis Balcus (born 1978) is a photography and video artist. ... Luke Busby (born 16th April 1981) is an English music producer-songwriter best known for being part of UK electronic pop band Temposhark. ... Sir Anthony Caro, OM, CBE, (born 8 March 1924 in New Malden, Surrey) is an English, abstract sculptor whose work is characterised by assemblies of metal using found industrial objects. ... Caroline Ann Cox, Baroness Cox (born as Caroline Ann Love, 6 July 1937) is a Cross-Bench peer who is a founder and leading member of Christian Solidarity Worldwide, and is the current president of its Board of Trustees. ... Wilfred Cass CBE (born 1924) co-founded the Cass Sculpture Foundation. ... Rob Diament (born 26 October 1980) is an English singer-songwriter best known as the lead singer of UK electronic pop band Temposhark, a joint collaboration with producer Luke Busby. ... For the trance musician, see John Fleming (music) This article is being considered for deletion for the 2nd time in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Trisha Goddard (born 23 December 1957) is an English television presenter well known for morning talk show Trisha which is aired on Channel Five. ... Stephen Hesford (born 27 May 1957, Altrincham) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Jackson (born 1958) is a British television executive. ... Asif Kapadia (born 1972) is a British filmmaker of Indian origin. ... Dale Mills is a human rights activist and journalist based in Sydney, Australia. ... We dont have an article called Trevor Miller Start this article Search for Trevor Miller in. ... Jake Nava is a music video director. ... The Spire of Dublin from Henry Street, Dublin. ... Jon Ronson Jon Ronson (born 10 May 1967) is a Cardiff born Jewish journalist, author, documentary filmmaker and radio presenter. ... Jehst (born William G. Shields, 25 Dec 1979) is a British rapper. ... Owen Spencer-Thomas was born on 3 March 1940 in Braughing, Hertfordshire, England. ... Mousir Syed is an Indian actor and director, born in London. ... Manish Sahi was born in London and educated in boarding schools in the Himalayas and grammar schools in England. ... Sam Dodwell was born in London as Samuel William Charles Dodwell in 1909. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... George Roger Waters (born September 6, 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, guitarist, bassist, songwriter, and composer. ... Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London, England) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3] Biography, Owen Spencer-Thomas Accessed 2007-05/09
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ Saint Martins finds itself out of fashion By Hilary Alexander, Fashion Director. [5] (2006-07-06). Retrieved on 2007-01-03.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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